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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 26, 1910, Image 3

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SUGAR SECRETS
BARED AT LOCAL
FEDERAL INQUIRY
Men Prominent in the Trade on
Pacific Coast Called by the
Government
Evidence of Pact With Railroads
to Kill- Competition Is Re=
ported Object
1 al ***** magnates barod the so
-rots of ,1,,-ir business again y.^r
.'llTnoim under the searching
t|urn> s>O f James R. Knapp, special
;.r..socutor. * C :it west by Attorney Gen
eral "Wickersham to investigate sugar
companies here The inquisition will
>"" cominuod for several days. A long
i'*t of businessmen <on<erned in the
nnd importation of sugar have
Wsen subpena.Hl. and the inquiry gives
every promise of being an exhaustive
Though what transpires before the
fo.jora.l grand jurors is kept :i pro
found secret, it has boon said on good
authority that the primary purpose of
Ihc investigation is to ascertain
whether or not the leading sugar com
panies ncrc are In a comoinatlou that
is in effect H trust, restraining trade
;t!i<3 acting with the American sugar re
iiinng: company, the great sugar trust,
in arbitrarily fixing price*.
To ascertain whether or not this is
true Knapp was detached from drtty
with the New York office of the at
torney gen^raJ, and made special prose
cutor under P'ederal District Attorney
Robert T. Devlin.
WiuL BK RECALLED
Robert P. Rithet, president of Welch
£.- Co., and George M. Rolpli, manager
of the California and Hawaiian sugar
icfining company, which is one of the
Welch & Co. concerns, were called be
fore the grand jury and quizzed by
Special Prosecutor Knapp yesterday
afternoon. Both are subject to re
call, and will be further questioned
3ater.
A. A. Brown of A. A. Brown & Co. and
Wallace JL Alexander, vice president of
Alexander & Baldwin. Ltd., were also
<alled as witnesses, but time nas not
found to examine them, and they will
STo on the grill today.
"I have been sent out here to investi
gate th<s sugar companies," was all that
Special Prosecutor Knapp would say
vosterday regarding his mission to San
J'rancisco. and what was going on in
the grand jury room.
"That was done under orders from
Attorney General Wickersham, was It
not?" he was asked.
"Naturally, I am always under the
.ittorney general's orders," Knapp said.
"I was made a special assistant to
Mr. Devlin here,"
OTIICRS ARK MTMSIOXED
William Matson, president of the Mat-
Ron navigation company, was examined
before the hearing Friday, at the open
ing day of the inquisition, and A. B.
Spreckels of the Western sugar refin
ery was subpenaed, but not called upon
to testify.
United States District Attorney Dev
'iii returned from Sacramento, where he
i-.jjs been on business for a. few days,
last night and he will work with Knapp
;:i the Inquiry. When the hearing goes
on this afternoon, indeed, it is said
that Devlin will occupy a seat beside
Kiiapp in the jury room.
' As sugar imported from Hawaii and
tlio Philippines is not dutiable the in
vostigatioii can not take the same trend
as that concluded recently in New
York, when underweighing by the
sugar trust mulcted the government
of almost $2,000,000. It has been as
serted that such frauds could not have
been practiced here, and that there is
no reason for the sugar companies here
attempting any ,«uch practice with the
iHa.ti\e]y small amount of sugar
1-rought from Central and South Amer
ica.
That Knapp will look for a freight
tate pact between the railroads and the
sugar interests, which would enable a
combination of the greatest growers to
undersell their smaller competitors in
the middle west, has been stated also.
Witnesses both from the larger and
smaller companies will be called.
MAINTAIN SILENCE
IN DUCKING EPISODE
Lake Lajjunita Incident to Be
Investigated
[Special Diipcich to The Call]
STANFORD UNIVERSITY. April 25.
Tli<? Question as to whether or not any
action will !»<» taken by the committee
on student affairs against the studrnts
who threw Erie M. Leaf into Lake La
grunits*. last Friday night because of
articles that appeared in the Sequoia,
which were supposed to have caused
ihe suspension of D. P. jCrawford and
H. L. Ilorton. has not yet been an
swered. A stoical silence is main
tained by Prof. A. B. Clark, chairman of
the committee, in regard to the matter,
although it is known that he has been
investigating the circumstances of the
occurrence for the last two days.
Leaf was closeted with Professor
• Mark this afternoon, but refused to
divulge the names of any of his as
sailants.
The committee docs not meet regu
larly until Wednesday afternoon, but
from the statement of Professor Clark
it is probable that a special meeting of
the committee will be called to investi
gate this matter. ; .?/.}'\u25a0\u25a0'
MODERN EDIFICE MAY
REPLACE OLD MISSION
President Gleason of Santa
Clara Makes 1 Announcement
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SANTA CLARA, 'ApriI 25. — Rev. Rich
ard \u25a0 A. Gleason, S. J., president of
Santa Clara college, arrived home yes
terday after a two weeks' trip to Idaho,
where he went to attend the golden
jubilee of Bishop Gloreaux of Boise
Cjty. Rev. Father Gleason was bene
fited by the brief journey.
According to a statement made by
President Gleason soon after his ar
rival, a concrete building, modeled In
the mission style, may replace the ruins
of the Santa Clara mission, now be
ing torn down.
The adobe walls, which would have
stood for many years under ordinary
circumstances, were so badly damaged
by the lire of last December that they
had to be razed.
ODD FELLOWS' PlCNlC— Redwood City, April
20 — The Odd Fellows and Rebrkabs of Jhe
fortr-fonrth district, which comprifs . lbe
towns of South San Francisco. UurHD^a-nf.
Nan Maten. Bedwood City, r«lo Alto «nd
Mountain Vl*w, will hold their annual picnic
at Congress Bpring« tomorrow. Special trains
V will coorry tlw members tn th* outinß. which
«r|i! oon^ist ollrack and field cveuts, Fpcecnes.
music «nd dancing. '.'-'.. - -..;
SUICIDE FOLLOWS QUAEREL-^S«. I^uif,
< ]jr jl 23.— Philip S. Kinjrsland. l! 2 yeans c!d.
until recent'/ |<rr-sident «>f a pus «ncinr o.mh
j»Hur and • inMnbor of od«* nf tbo oity'a wi*t
prorotmnt families. ' cominJliw! suicide this
aftTn<H>n »fter • quarrel ivilb a Eon.
Many Are Summoned
By Special Prosecutor
-\u2666- . . ; ; £ +.
At the top James R. Knapp, special government prosecutor; at the bottom George M. Rolph, one of the sugar
magnates he has called to testify.
4 ~ : : ... \u25ba
MYSTERIOUS FORCE
STARTS MUSIC BOX
Strange Happening After Musi
cal Instrument Had Been
Mute Half a Century
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
PARIS, Ky., April 25: — More than 50
years ago Dr. Edward' O wings", leading
physician and wealthy, citizen of this
city, purchased an expensive imported
Italian music box and installed it in
his mansion. He was very fond of
music, and as the day of grand opera
and concerts in. the south had not ar
rived, this was his only chance to hear
the works of the great composers.
One Sunday shortly after the pur
chase-of the instrument, Doctor Owings
wound it up and adjusted it . to play
his favorite air, rested his head on a
table in the room and fell asleep, and
.when found an hour later was dead.
The muf=ic box was left just as
it was found by Kdward and Thomas
Owings, the dead physician's sons, 1 and
has never been used or removed from
the table where it was placed by their
father in the half century that has
elapsed since his death.
About 10 o'clock last Sunday morn
ing members of Kdward Owings' fam
ily heard music coming from the room
.where the music box was kept, and
when they entered the room they were
mystified beyond expression to find the
old instrument playing the air that it
had. played last as the breath left the
body of Doctor Owings.
A minute examination of the mech
anism of the machine failed to offer
any solution of--- the strange occur
rence.
LIFE IMPRISONMENT
FOR MURDER OF CHILD
Willard E. Thomas Sentenced
by Judge Seawell
[Special Dispatch to the Call]
SANTA ROSA, April 25— Willard E.
Thomas, who was • convicted last \u25a0 week
of murder in the first degree with pen
alty fixed by the Jury at life imprison
ment for the murder of the infant child
of his wife. May Chio Thomas, was
sentenced this morning by Judge Sea
well. Thomas had to be supported by
deputy sheriffs when ordered to stand
and be sentenced. Mrs. Thomas will go
to trial in the morning on the charge
of having murdered the babe. They
were indicted Jointly, but were granted
separate trials. .;/,'.' *
CONCORD EVANSTON
\u25a0with Ax»->'otch with Baaonbolt \u25a0\u25a0-\u0084'\u25a0
THE NEW
Arrow
COLLARS
FOR SUMMER. High enough for
looks— low enough for comfort and
plenty of room for the tie to slide in.
V,':'- !: . UC.MCh,2forStC. .:X'--? (\u25a0. '\u25a0
Cteetr. Vt*i>ody A C 0.'... \u25a0-:-. --.t Arrow Cnflyate.
THE SAX ,XX ANOISCO CALL;:. 'TUESDAY;^ APRIL . 20,. 1910:
WINS HIS FIGHT
FOR CONFIRMATION
Robert T. Devlin's Reappoint
ment to Office is Approved
by the Senate
WASHINGTON.- April 25.— -Robert T.
Devlin, United States .attorney, for, the
northern district of California, was
confirmed today, for an additional term.
The fight against him continued for
nearly two years- and .attracted much
attention. Devlin was , opposed '. by Dr.
E. B. Perrin, one of the defendants in
the Perrin-Benson land' fraud cases in
California. Perrin , was convicted,' but
the case was reversed 'by the. supreme
court and during the administration of
President Roosevelt a special attorney
from the department of justice investi
gated the "case- and recommended the
indictments against Perrin be dis
missed. Perrin fought against Devlin's
reappointment and, after the appoint
ment had been made, against confirma
tion. v . : . . , \u25a0 \u25a0 - - : \u25a0
The senate judiciary - committee.- on
the strength _of the showing made by
Perrin, voted to reject the nomination.
Afterward the case was reopened and
Devlin proved to the ; satisfaction of
the committee- that the report of -the
department of Justice official on ; the
Perrin case. had never reached. him. •
ROMANTIC EXPERIENCE
OF AN AGED COUPLE
SOUTH ..BKND, Ind.,'' April 25.—Mar
ried in their teens, divorced .27 . years
ago, each taking another 'mate a short
time afterward, only; to come back to
each • other and be married again in
this city, is the experience of Henry
Ranstcad, a retired farmer. SI years
old, and Mrs. Jane Frame,,7 7, of Terre
Coupee, Ind. They were married yes
terday by Justice Wright.'
:•/'../\u2666 5 . \u25a0 Golden Oak if you prefer. "'<
Room size, 9x12 fleets Velvet Rugs $17.50
281 Geary Street, Near Powell
; • .Vv ; : Exclusive Agents for the World-Famous "Craftsman** Furniture H V
COMET VISIBLE AT
3:50 IN MORNING
Can Be Seen Without Aid of
Glass, Says Astronomer on
Mount Wilson
Public Warned Against Mistak=
ing Venus, Morning Star,
for the Wanderer
PASjVDIiXA. April 2. r ,._ Malley's \
comet is now plainly visible from tljc !
summit of Mount Wilpoiu Professor;
Ad am .s, who has charge of making the!
observations, said today that the spec- i
truni showed the head of the comet to i
bo surrounded' by cyanogen gas, which i
is a. combination of carbon and nitro- \u25a0
gen. The tail is composed of hydro
carbon gas, a mixture of carbon and
hydrogen. In some parts, one gas will
prevail,, while in others the other is
predominant.
. ... pjxteiisiyo preparations are being
made on Mount Wilson for observing
the electrification of the earth's atuios
phero May 18, when thu comet will
[cross the sun and -the earth pass
through the great tail of the wanderer.
It is believed that the electrification of
the earth's .atmosphere will be dis
turbed then, but how much or in what
way is not known.
The evening of May 17 and also the
evening of May VJ, according to the
Mount Wilson scientists, there proba
bly ' will be . a wonderful display of
shooting stars. This will occur just
before the comet crosses the sun and
just after.
Professor Adams said today lhat the
aerial maverick, became visible at S:so
o'clock in the morning and passed out
9 — ; \u25a0— _ «.
of. sight at about 4:30. When first seen
it is just above the 'horizon and it
moves up into the sky rapidly until the
brightness of the rising sun prevents
further observations.
The .comet is only one-tenth the
brightness of the planet Venus, the
morning star. Thousands of persons
are gazing at Venus each morning, mis
taking it for- the. wanderer, which is
barely visible' to the "naked eye. The
comet stands several' degrees to the
north of Venus.
JOHN LA FARGE MAKES
READY FOR THE END
Greatest of American Artists
Lies at Death's Door
NEW YORK.- April: 25.— -Little hope
was held out today for the recovery of
John la FargeV • the greatest living
American artist, who is critically ill
at his residence in Fifth avenue.
. So weak from the infirmities of age
that. his thin hand had to be guided by
another, the artist yesterday signed his
will and made final preparations for
the end. J
A fortnight ago the physicians sum
moned his son, who is a Jesuit priest
attached to the Vatican in Rome, and
the latter is now at his father's bedside.
La Farge is, to a considerable extent, a
martyr to his work. For more than a
year, he has been confined to his home
almost continuously and has been' able'
to visit only.rarely Ills studio in' West
Tenth street. The artist is 77 years
old. . . .0 ;.
BOY JOINS FAMILY
OF JIMMY HOPPER
Son Born to Wife of the Writer
in Paris
[Special Dispatch to The Call] . .
' NEW -YORK, April 25. — Will Irwin
has received, a letter from .Paris stat
ing that a .boy has been, born to Mrs.
Janies Hopper, wife of the former Cali
fornia, writer. Hopper now has; two
girls and a boy. . .He has been in
France, the country jof his birth, for
six months, and as he 'writes \u25a0 French
almost; as well, as he does English,
has 'contributed ' to the Paris periodi
cals as well as.tosome magazines in
New York.'
BULLS TRIUMPH ON
COTTON EXCHANGE
Exciting Day Follows Continued
Report of Ruin of New
v Crop in South
Preparations Rushed for Enor=
mous Delivery of Old
Product in May
NK W.YORK. April- 251— Not since the
big break of January last has the New
York cotton exchange seen so .much ac
tivity and*. excitement as today.
It i was a time of triumph for the
bulls, whose already strengthened posi
tion as regards the old crop was sensa
tionally stimulated by reports of disas
trous weather in the south. This led to
rumors that the bull campaign was to
be carried on throughout the end of
the Current senson and possibly into
early new., crop deliveries, us It/Was in
tlie season 1002-03, when, after Sully's
successful. deal in May contracts, Brown
&. Hayne, .who are prominently men
tioned in connection with the' present
bull' movement, Carried the bull cam
paign through into -July, August and
September.
Jt is -argued that even, if the south
iinds enougli seed to replant the entire
area reported damaged the cold snap
has made it look like a late crop, and
mills consequently will be dependent
upon old crop' supplies for a long
period.^' .
Preparations for enormoifS deliveries
on May contracts are steadily going
forward. It is said that the New York
cotton exchange had a larger force of
men engaged in preparing cotton for
delivery, yesterday than ever before and
according to the official figures the
stock of certificated cotton at New
York which was reported as 57,000
bales- toward the end of March had
mounted up to 151,000 bales by the
elost: of business Saturday with predic
tions that between 180,000 and 200,000
bales would be ready for delivery on
May 1. Moreover, the May shorts have
until the end of May . to secure cotton
for delivery on contract.
Damage -complaints from the south
were in many instances accompanied by
southern buying orders and almost all
the fresh buying for long account was
said to be for new crop delivery. It
was believed around the local ring that
the bull leaders were selling the near
position, at times during the. day to
prevent too rapid an advance or to re
duce their holdings, and it was the new
crop that chiefly reflected the broaden
ing of bullish sentiment. October cot
ton sold at 12.£Mc"or 57 points above
the close of last Saturday, while May
touched 14.92 c, or' si gain of only 21
points "from the closing price of last
week.
The opening advance in the New York
market was greatly encouraged by the
strength of Liverpool, which had the
bad weather reports before the trading
here started.
LICK SCHOOL AWARDED
$25,000 GINN BEQUEST
Decision .. of 'Boston Court
Favors Local Institution
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
BOSTON. April 25.— 8y a' * decision
handed down today by Judge Grant of
the probate court in this city the Cali
fornia School of Mechanical Arts in
San Francisco is to receive the bequest
of $25,000 contained in the will of the
late Frederick B. Ginn of Nordhoff,
Vontura county, California. The deci
sion was given after the executor had
asked, the court for Instructions in con
nection with the distribution of the
estate. _ /'
Judge Grant held to the California
law. that, after expenses were panl in
both states, California and Massachu
setts, .one-third of the- grosfe estate in
both states should be distributed for
charitable purposes, as provided for 'in
Ginn's will.
Mrs. Ginnis to receive half of $11G.
000. The Lick school waived all other
claims. .
SAN FRANCISCAN ASKS
POLICE TO ARREST HIM
G. A. Duncan Says He Spent
Chiclet Firm's Coin
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
•EL PASO, April 25.— G. A. Duncan,
who claims to be- the son of William
C. Duncan, president of the Greenwich
bank of New, York, gave himself up
to the police today/asking to be locked
up. lie stated that he was formerly
manager of the Sen-Sen chiclet com-
PHny, 191 Second street. San Francisco,
lie", declared ho thought he ha,d spent
money belonging to the company while
intoxicated. He does- not remember
when he left San Francisco and talks
incoherently about his past. Ho. says
his wife is now living in San Francisco.
The case is being investigated by the
local police department. '
MOVEMENTS OF NAVAL VESSELS— \m<vr
Tbina. April 25.— Tb»y cruiser Cbarlestcm of
the American Asiatic, squadron ' sailed for
Shanghai today. . Tlic Ruoboats Wilmington,
Callao and Samar remain hero.-
THOUSANDS HAVE KIDNEY
Weak and unhealthy kidneys are probably responsible for more
sickness and suffering than any other disease, therefore, when,
through neglect or other causes, kidney trouble is permitted to con-
tinue, serious result's are sure to follow.
Your other organs may need attention — but your kidneys most,
because they do most and should have attention first.
If you feel that your kidneys are the cause of your sickness or
run down condition, begin taking Dr. Kilmer's Swamp-Root, the
great kidney, liver and bladder remedy, because as soon as your kid-
neys begin to get better they will help all the other organs to health.
Prevalence of Kidney Disease passing, brickdust or sediment In th«
urine, headache, backache, lame bacic.
Most people do not realize the dizziness, poor digestion, sleeplessness,
alarming increase and remarkable nervousness, heart disturbance due to
prevalency of kidney disease. While D ad kidney trouble, skin eruptions
kidney disorders are the most common from bad blood, neuralgia. rheuma-
dlseases that prevail, they are almost tism, lumbago, bloating. Irritability,
the last recognized by patient or phy- wornout feeling, lack of ambition, may
sicians, who usually content them- be loss of flesh, sallow complexion, or
welves with doctorins the effects, while Bright's disease may be stealing upon
the original diseaae constantly under- you. which is the worst form of kidney
mines the system. trouble.
The mild and immediate effect of
Swamp-Root, the great kidney, liver Swamp-Root Is Pleasant to Take
and bladder remedy, is soon realized. It , . . . ,»,_,.
stands the highest for its remarkable „If r0"r 0 " are already convinced that
results in the most distressing cases. Swamp-Root Is what you need you
can purchase the regular fifty cent and
STmntnm« nf KMiPr Trnnhli. one dollar size bottles at all drug
ajmpioms OI Kidney lronDle stO res. Don't make any mistake, but
Swamp- Root is not recommended for remember the name. Dr. Kilmer's
everything, but If you are obliged to Swamp-Root, and the address. Blng-
pass your water frequently, night hamton. N. V.. which you will find on
and day, smarting or irritation in every bottle.
If Yon Need a Medicine Ton Should Hare the Best
Swamp-Root is always kept up to its high standard of purity and excellence.
A sworn certificate of purity with every bottle.
SAMPLE BOTTLE KIIEE — To prove the wonderful merits of Swamp-Root
you may have a sample bottle and a book of valuable information, both sent
absolutely free by mail. The book contains* many of the thousands of letters
received from men and women who found Swamp- Root to be just the remedy
they needod. The value and success of Swamp-Root are so well known that our
readers are advised to send for a sample bottle. Address Dr. Kilmer & Co..
Binghamton, N. T. Be sure to say you read this generous offer in The San
Francisco Daily Call. The genuineness of this offer is guaranteed.
HAS NARROW ESCAPE
FROM SURGEON'S KNIFE
-...^ I;;"*' " i narrow escape from the surgeon's
tf^^^\»x^^^ m^^^^%_ knife, regarding which experience she
ySMyj ! I "For more tliaii five years I suffered
fs^F >^^^§"if^ r^^-*^*v^^ I from the worst form of stomach
Wr*¥ M&iSt"*^' 4 yt<^«- ' "** it^V 'I trouble, from which I could s>^t no re-
vSf J^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^k. \ ]Ui whatever - * { y caSe baffled all the
\ doctors. They gave me no hope at all,
/ B' : ' \ an< ' tlna "i" s ai f i my only chance lay in
/ v^i* f^S7%\ \ an operation, r experienced th^ utmost
I " \ tion - l Jreaded th<- surgeon's knife and
I Kl'*§ioS^K I '*§ioS^^ x *«^^<^* !^* S * -' -V I ment of the Cooper remedies and do-
1 bP**^~ '-•* . ''-- S I cided to give Cooper's New Discovery
\u25a0 \'|i^' ** '^NH[ / better, the pain having subsided eon"
IK, 1 . :..•..\u25a0 ; I siderably. Continuing the treatment I
\ Vi. ' \ **^f^ / improved steadily, and in two months"
\ *- 'H, - -\u25a0 'i/ 1/3 out feelin^ the least distress after-
Slx "* ''^<V* "'xr Jk i£yi\ tlU!n havf iuifl for yenrs. lam deeply
| j_jw V*3 A^/ prateful for what" COOPER'S NEW*
fh— »ik J>^ .^^TvV/^IoUV DISCOVERY has done for me. It saved
, - Fim^ my ljfe when tne doctors had given
\u25a0"" %^^*s£r me up."
We arc agents for Cooper's New Dis-
Mrs. Margaret Lambert, a reproduc- covery, the medicine which arcom-
tion of whoso likeness appears above, plished so much for Mrs. Lambert. It
lives at 151 Broad street. New Haven, has made a wonderful record in all
Coiun Mrs. Lambert recently had a parts of the country. The Owl Drug Co.
TELEPHONING TO THE COUNTRY
B^HE City and the Country are bound together
By the telephone line.
The farmer and his family use the rural telephone
constantly, calling up each other and the market town
on all sorts of matters and for all sorts of supplies and
information.
City people also find the rural telephone of great
advantage. A tiaveler from his room in the hotel talks
with the farm folks miles away. Without the telephone
he could not reach them.
The farmer himself may travel far and still talk home
over the Long Distance Lines of the Bell System.
The' Paci fic Telephone #£\
U^^^^l and 1 elegraph Company
!^iof§^ Every Bell Telephone is die Center of the System
\u25a0____^i_j___^i_^_i^l -1 \u25a0\u25a0-'• \u25a0•\u25a0"•- -\u25a0 ' \u25a0 \%
! Brings More for t* 1 © /Vloney Than Any ;
; Otherjlnyestment You Can ZVlalce \u25a0
3

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