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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, June 02, 1910, Image 12

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The Call's Page of Sports
BIG SMOKE IS LAZY
AND LACKS GINGER
Jack Johnson Works Gut Only to Ayoid
Disappointing Big Crowd
Johrastm'e gymnasium work yester-'
Cay afternoon was more of an accom
fioattag- nature than real serious train
ing 1 . The champion expressed himself
ma feeling lazy and he did not show the
spirit that usually characterizes his
boxing and other gymnastic" stunts.
It is probable that if there was not
a. fair attendance on hand to see him
Con the gloves the champion would
htve cut out boxing for a spin in his
xi«w 90 horsepower Thomas. He is
griving his now benzine buggy a good
tfane and o-utside of eating chicken
there is nothing else that gives the
champion more pleasure than riding in
his horseless carriage.
•*CA>" tf HAXGS OVER LITTLE
Johnson is practically without a
3naneger now and though George Little
Still retains his title he is very much in
the background and his duties are very
limited. Little said that he was still
Johnson's manager and that lie held a
contract which assured him of his job.
lie denied that there was any trouble
between himself und .It>hnson, but
•Johnson does not express himself in
the same tones, lie Intimates that he
is likely to make a change.
The champion was on the road in the
morning. He covered 12 miles of the
ocean highways. About 10:30 in the
morning he took a spin in his machine
after his road work and was gone for
about four hours.
He then donned his gymnasium togs
and went in for his indoor exercise.
There were a number of well known
followers of the game in the audience.
Jack Wooley of Oakland, a great friend
©f Jeffries, was a spectator. He thought
the champion was in grand shape. In
Baseball's Grand Old
Man Is "Broke"
CHICAGO, June L— A. G. ("Pop") An
eon. the veteran baseball man, who
managed the Chicago national league
team for 22 years, won cix pennants
and retired from the league in IS9B
\u25a0with a reported fortune of $200,000, Is
-broke."
The last financial straw blew away
yesterday, when a mortgage on his
home was foreclosed in default of notes
aggregating $6.500.
"But I'm not "all in' by a long shot,"
ea.ld An son.
"You can't keep a good man down, so
just say that I'll get along somehow."
"I warned 'Pop' not to go into busi*
•sees," said Mrs. Anson. '/But it's all
right now. I've had my little cry and
•we'll give up the home when it's called
tor. We've lived here 26 years, though
»— all through 'Pop's' prosperous days —
end, of course, it's hard to have to
leave. But Anson is in good health,
and f?o long as that is the case we'll
get along all right."
The Call's Form Chart of Races at Emeryville
Order In whi^h horsps figure In The Call Handicap Is Indicated in black face type. t
OAKLAND, Wednesday. June 1. 1910. — One hundred and fortj -sixth flay. Weather clear.
yrack fe»t. E. C. Hcpprr. presiding jodge. J. J. Holtman. starter. •'
6761 FIRST KACE— Futurity conree; selling; 3 year olds and upward; value to first |150.
index.] Horse and Owner. |Wt!St. M. — % Btr. Fin. 1 Jockey. I Op. Cl.
*C 7£6 .(DBUEIf. BUSK. 0 < Ramsey) llli 2 ... 2 I^2 2%1 1%1 l^lKirschbaum . 3 IS-5
C 723 (2)ZMMA G. 5 <J. Sohreiber). 109 fi ... 7 3 3 % 8 1%2 1% W. Gargan.. 3 4
«752 llley el Torar. 3 (Baldwin >... 103 4 ... 1 >^1 2*42 l¥-3 2 Callahan .... S 10
«727 i(B)KELTOU CLOTH. 4 (CainijlO*! :t ... 9%62 5 1%4 1% Selden 10 10
6730 jGalTanic, a (C. M. I'olV) 11l ."• ... 4n 4n 4n 52 Taylor 12 15
67M Ampedo. C (Waylnn.l & C 0.).. 114 1 ... « 2%8 1%7 2 6 \t, Leeds 7-2 4
673f> lElredele. 0 <K.*A. LeijrJii 114 S ... 3h 5h BJ£ 7 2 Frach 13 15
6715 'Little Buttercup. « (Malr.v)... 111! a ... 10 2 9»i 8 1 Bh, Mentry 10 20
6634 iWho. 4 U. Kailey) 109 j 7 ... Snlo 1 »J£ 9 % Cotton 30 60
673-1 Id Pere-'ho. 4 <Menlo I'arkt.. 112 11 ... 11 11 11 105 Vosper ..... « 7
«737 tension Boy. * (O'l^ary* 114;10 ... 5h 7^410 111 Elgentapf ... 12 20
Time— :23 3-5, :4*. £94-5, ID!M-3. At post S minutes. Off at 1:54. Bush. 1 place, 1-2
show; Emma, fc-5 place, 4-5 sbon-; ToTar, 2 show. Winner b. r. by Lord Dalmeny-Mlnyon.
Trained by F. Nerille. Scratched — 6720 Hannibal Bey. Start pood. Won easily. Second
und third same. Hifrh price — Bush 7-2, Emma 5, Melton Cloth 12, Ml Derecho 8. Burning
Bush wa» outfooted the first psrt. made bis run from the heart of the stretch, wore the 1
race down, winnlntr easily at tho end. Emma G held the rest cafe, closing resolutely.
I!"y el Tovar n« excuses; went <>«t to tb" front, but stopped badly. Melton Cloth nerer
<lacc*rt>us. Galvanic froine speed. Ml Dereebo away poorly.
g"JjgO KECOND KACE — Kour and a half furlongs; selling; 2 year olds; value to first $150.
index. 1 ~ Honte and Owner. jwtst. *j "i % Str. Fin. I Jockey. V Op. Cl.
671» ](8)ABE SLUPBKEY (Murphy) 10*1 1 12 1 lVsl h Vosper 8 10
6719 lAbolla fßnm* k W-> 89 2 2*4 2 h 2 h ''Selrfen 10 12
C72»J Polly V B <S. H. Haror) 89| 8 .35 3%3 1% Nolan 15 20
€744 Ban Ann (P. Henry) 107 7 4h 4 I^4 n Coburn 10 10
€726 iPaeia (Onkwond S. VL.) P» 5 6 1*45 2 51% Buxton 10 15
€T26)J(2)PEARL BASS (C. Heath). 103! « 5b 6 2%e n W. Gargan.. 3 7-2
<e7l9)'RolxTt Hurst (Van Garden)... 107] 9 8n 7 2 7 2 \u25a0 , Cotton ...... 6 7
6647 lEitta (SHoraroeuto Val. S. F.) «S -4 11 11 82% Callahan .... 12 20
C7SI j'Matnle Woods <St. Vincent)... SS 11 10 1 8% 9 2 C. 11. Miller. 20 20
€781 (Fonte!i<> <W. M. Bntterfleld). . fl2ilO J>2 9ilo 2- Groth 30 30
6729 {(I)CLARA HAMPTON (Ryan) msl 3 ... ... 7 *410 211 Klwhbaum ,| 2 8-5
Time — :23 3-5. :«8 2-3. :5T.. At post 3& minutes. Off at 2:18. Slupskey. 4 place 8-5 show;
Abella. ."» place. 5-2 show; Polly. 4 abow. Winner b. c. by Golden Badge-Rubescent.
Trained by a. March. Scratched— 67l!» Sir Bon. Start Rood. Won driving. .Second
*sm«>. Third easily. Hlch price — Abella 15. Mamie Woods §0, Hampton 5-2. Abe Slupskey
broke fa»;t, went right out, but had to be hard ridden to withstand the determined bid of
Abella, •wtiicb. was coming like a cyclone. Dolly V B's race the best she nan shown
*o far. Clara Hampton broke well, bot was pinched right off at the start, spoiling, her
chances. RUta stumbled jnst 'as the barrier went up.
R7R3 THIEI) RACE — Futurity course; selling; 3 year olds and upward; ralue to first $150.
tnflex.l Horse and Owner. IWt'St. H H % Str. Fin. I Jockey. i~OpT cT.
6720 ](2)TEAMOTOR. a <A.-Goodln).|lll 2 ... 2 n 2Vs 1 1%1 1 IVosper 6-2 11-5
6714 Sej-Tleence, 4 (TraTers) 112 7 ... 7 8 2*43 2 2 H Coburn 3 7-2
6742 Biskra. R a. Ptowe).. jio» 3 ... 4*^-5 1 2 1%3 2"4 Roberts ...... S 9
6742 (3)GRAMXB.CY, S (Appiegte) 85 6 ... 6 1*47 7 42% E. Cotton.... 4 5
6748 St, Francis, a (IX»nnison> 114 1 ... 3 1 3 1 S 1%5 h Borel ....... 10 10
<6720 i (IJTrTXTS 11, a (G. McNeil). 106 5 ... 5 3 4 n aY» d 5 Jahnwn 4- ©-•»
«749 lOombcry. 6 (Lynn & Co.) jlll 4 ... 11 IH4n 7 . Mentry ..... 6 5
Time — :24, :452-5. 1:00 4-5. 1:10 3-6. At post 1 minute. Off at 2:33. Tramotor. 1 place
1-2 show; Serricence. 2 place, 1 show: Biskra. ©-5 show. Winner b. c- by Indlo-Troller
Trained by A. Goodln. Start good- Wp n handily. Second driving. Third easily. High
price — Tramotor 13-5. Senricence 9-2. "Titus 6. Biskra 10, Combury S. IVamotor ran over
the leader at will the last qoarter. Fervl«ence did not seem to have any early speed
but closed stouth", wearing Biskra down the final sixteenth. Biskra showed good speed, but
hung a trifle at the cpd. frt. Francis and Comhory both stopped to a walk.
JR7QA TOURTH RACE — Six furlongs; selling; 3 year olds and upward;. Talue to first $250.
Index. j Horse and Owner. IWt'St. *4 M, % \u25a0 str. Fin. I Jockey. | Op. ci.
6745 llnclement, 4 (U. F. O'Leary). 97 1 771 3~1 S~h 8 2^l n Selden I : i
€751 (I)DADDT GIP, 3 (Sanford). P7 2 ... l^lUi «2 2U W. Gargan.. 4-5 7-10
6747 Banorella. 3 (PauUen) SS 6 ... 6 2U6 5 5 2 82" Callshan .... 10 15
\u25a0 6C73 (B)EEWELL, 6 (W.- Oahlll).. 104 3 ... 2*4 2 IU2 I*^4 6 Klrschbaum . S 9-2
6745 (8)KII) KORTH, 3 (Marshall) f« 4 ' .... S l^S I^6 3 5 2*4 C. H. Miller! 8 15
i 6745 Del Cnizador. 4 (Baldwin) 07 5 ... 4b 42 4 1%6 *4 Post 1" "1
T037 iDr. Mayer, 4 (RU-hardson) . .. 89 7 ... 7 7 7 7 ' Buxton* ...I* 100 100
Time — :28 4-5. :47 3-5, 1:12 3-5. At post \3\ 3 minute. Off at 3:02. Inclement, 1 place 9^20
show- nip, 7-20 place, out show; BanoreMa. 2 show. Winner b. h. by Peen o' Dav
naladrop. Trained by L. F. O'l^ary. Scratched— (6C92) Raleigh. Start good. Won driv
ing. Second and third easily. High price— lnclement 6, Daddy Gin 6-5, Sewell 3 In
clement came fast on the rail and Selden rode his mount hard the last eighth. Ga'rjran
lost the race through everconfidenee. He was watching Sewell and did not see . Inclement
until too late. BanoreUa came from far back with a tremendous rush and beat Sewell
for the chow. Sewell tired badly chasing Glp. Del Cruzador bad some early speed. \u25a0
6765 TKOOACE~°T K00 ACE ~° n * mUe * 3>d y " r(U: seUln *: 3 year olds and upward; ralue. to
Index.| Horse and Owner. r |Wt!St. % M» % Str. Fin.. I Jockey. | Op. -.. Cl"
(t:760u(2)8.0T JTTKIOR, 4 (Razor).! 108! 2.212 1»*,2 I^l nin Leeds ~2 %'
€750 Captain Bnrnett. & (Cotton).. 108 1 11 1 % 1 % 2 1%2 m Coburn *""""* 6 n
(ft 754) (BfKAIBEaHOFr, 6 (McPher) 10S 331 3 2 3 1%3 1 3 MiTayl™ "*"" 6 10
6750 (I)AKS-AK-BEN, 4 (ChappclU 107 6 6 6 4n4 4 4 « Cotton = """ 8-5 S-5
€754 lOrllene. a (Comerford)... 08 54n 4 h 5 2»45 2I 3 Callahan""*" 8 «
6748 IMiss Plcclc. 3 (J. Sehrelher) \u25a0 . 004 52 516 6 6 W. Gargan I- I' 5
Time— :24 2-5, 9:48 3-5. 1:13 3-5. 1:15. 1:39 2-5.1:40 3-5. At post *4 minute Off at 325U
Junior. 1 place. 920 show; Bnrnett. 3 place. 6-5 show :^Kaiserhoff. 11-10 show Winner
eh. g. by Isldor-Isabel. Trained by E. L.Jones. Scratched — 6750 Biased Start coon Won
first thre« driving. High price- Roy Junior 13-5. Aks-Ar-Ben 2. Sic 9 Roy JuSo?
hung oa to the pace the whole way and In a fierce drive all the last quarter beat Cantain
Burnett to the wire. Burnett ran big race, only succumbing right at the finish Kaiser
boff^ere the entire Journey. Aks-Ar-Ben closed strong, bur hi "ami a lithe 1^
6766 SIXTH R ACD— Five furlongs; purse; maiden S year olds; value, -to first $150. ."
Index. ) Horse and Owner. IWtlSt. \u25a0'- % Str. Fin. I Jockey lOn >r-i"
«*se K»)g&rycrg vostek (wmtruios t -....- a 2H2 2*^2 2m n vo» P e r .'.. Is 5 \u25a0 *
«Il| S^S?^^ <Sac. V.1.5.F.) 99 2 ... 1 l»|l 2*Al 3 25 Callahan . ' 8-5'
.6722 ttlßin IfEELT (C. LeScnre) 105 5 ... 4.t-4 1«Sn: 3% W. Garfai" 3 4
( %^ c -Fo^kini:-te ?\u25a0 -l^t^^^^- :;!;?;
Time— -.24. :482^. 1 :00 3-r.. At post % minute. Off at 3:58. Prince. '4-5 place 7-20 show-
Doweress. 3-5 place. 1-4 *how; Xeely. 4-3 s how. . Winner \u25a0 eh. c. by WVisky Kins TZn
Ttmer i^^ lD " d^ T J - F - ™«"- Scratched Jß732 Etnel McX. \u25a0'- Start good WoS drir-
.Second easily. Third driving. High price— Doweress , U-5. :^ Neely »T Heywood %\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0
i , Bunion 40 Qneenfuu 30. Prince Winter cl osed wlt^ a great burst : of , spVed final lO^nii
It . and held ber toseUier «Ue might hay. won. Bab* Keel,, was much the J(«t o?t&, others.
fact, he expressed the opinion that both
men were fit, though he said that Jeff
was a little more advanced in his train
ing than Johnson, who, he thought, did
not need to do as much work as Jeff.
WORKI2VG FOR SPEED
Shadow boxing, which has become
one of the features of Johnson's
training, was first indulged in by
the champion. He is doing a lot
of work to gain speed on his feet and
he Is showing improvement right along.
Johnson did some real work punch
ing the bag. He showed some artistic
frills at the bag and finished up by
slugging it. He finally struck it so
hard that the rope gave away and it
flew into the audience.
• Even in his boxing Johnson shows
the same cautious and defensive style
of boxing which has marked all .*ais
ring engagements. He is a puzzle to
hit as he watches every move of his op
ponent's muscles and is. there* with a
guard any time a blow is aimed at him.
When he is cornered his improved foot
work is displayed by the clever man
ner in which he extricates himself from
close places.
JUMPS OX SCALES
He jumped on the scales and tipped
the beam at exactly 215% pounds. He
maintains that he will go into the ring
weighing In the neighborhood of 210
pounds, but critics who have seen him
stripped think that lie has a great deal
more weight than &ye pounds to take
off before the fourth of July. He per
spired freely and as his work will be
come more strenuous from now on it
can be expected that he will be losing
weight right along. .
Mr. Nelson. Chats With
Mr. Taft
WASHINGTON, June I.— Battling
Nelson called at the White House to
day.
"Mr. Nelson, I am glad to see you,"
said the president.
"How do you do, Mr. Taft," answered
Bat, who should have said "Mr. Pres
ident."
The president and the Battler chat
ted for five- minutes. Nelson told Taft
that boxing was a noble enterprise and
that bills in congress designed to kill
the game should be defeated. . . The
president did not commit himself.
"Mr. Nelson," he asked, "how did
you get that shoulder development?"
"By using this right wallop," an
swered Nelson. "Don't yoiT ever use
yours?"
The president did not. say.
"President Taft is one of the finest
men I ever met," said Nelson later.
"He makes you feel at home."
THE SAN FR&STGISCO CALL; THtoRSD^^J^E" 2; 1910.
"Hope of the White Race" Sets
a Merry Pace at Rowardennan
«HIT HARD," IS
JEFF'S WAR CRY
Big Fellow Hammers Sparring
Partners in Eight Rounds
of; Slambang M Wing
BEN LOMOND, June I.— "Hit hard",
was the order today at Jim Jeffries'
camp .when the former, champion be
,gan boxing again after a layoff of
more than week. Jeffries laid down. the
law to his sparring partners before he
began, intimating thatif .they did not
slug he would, and the result was im
mediately noticeable. .
Bob Armstrong was the first man up.
He rushed Jen* from, the start' and'set
a lively pace for three rounds. Just
before time was called for the ; bout
Jeff \drove his , glove into Bob's midsec
tion and Armstrong doubled .up 'with
a grunt. \, s
Joe Choyriskl came V next for, three
rounds. and : the pair, stepped -around in
a clever sparring > exhibition,, Choynskl
displaying : even more skill than*usuai:
HAMMERS BERGER " \ ..""*,
The main . event, r however, '.was a \ two
"round go ;with Sam Berger,; who i came
last. Jeff evidently was saving: up for
his manager and. they, .went at if in
slambang fashion, /roughing, it I around
the ring until it looked; like a good old
knock down and drag.out battle.'* Sam
hit hard and Jeff replied in , kind; 'much'
to Berger's discomfort toward the, close
of the bout. "^ ; i; .> < \u25a0'-'\u25a0-'/.: ,% "-:.;\u25a0 • ;-"..
The inception of- Jeff's private eating
establishment, \u25a0 watched „* .over..: by 'his
wife, was another ' event rof - the "day.
Jeff, his brother and their >wives,*'. will
belong to .this mess, -which- will be
served from a privatakitchenandby a
private 'waiter. ''•' :
UP TORICKARD \ ; .\u25a0' ' 1 .
A signed : statement, was issued -by
Jeffries ; today twithi respect : to:the :W
cent. discussion:" as i tdj the .< possible ' re
tirement of Texßickard as referee aud
the substitution \u25a0of Eddie . Smlthi - The
statement follows: V -', > - ' - •
In reference: to^ the referee mat- "'\u25a0•• \u25a0
ter,> my position" is ".? this:-* 15 have
accepted Rickard'af ter^stating; my •
preference for Smith.- After accept-*
lng"Rickard," ; in whom I' have every '
confidence, -il"can*not* very-well^ ask '
.him to: resign.- Her is good -enough'
for me. - But inithe event of his not
wishing to:act,"'orHf 'he f feels? that
it Is against^the.fbest' interests of r
tha. match, fpr him to'offlciate,* then';;
1 Smith^is^ acceptable* to'me.", This-- ;
however, v is decidedly %up :.toVßick- '
ard.las I can* not 'accept; a; man and"
their ask* him t to? resign. 'Either- -
man.is acceptable < to: me.\ - " > - - - -
-, -:•:•: :JAMES;J.vJEFFRIES. : V
, "While ; on ; his yway/ to Santa*; Cruz i this 1
evening In -his automobile^wltlifa^party
of friends/ Jeff ries ' narrowly'.'escaped i an
accident.^ While jrouridingia^sharp curve
Jeffries' i. car/; suddenly?; camejon^tof a
horse >and buggy. £; Prompt » application
of "the 1 brakes-; averted ; ;a^ collision/? but
the ; horse I reared over., the : front' of ": the
car.andi'overturned'the;buggy/ ) throwihg
twoT women v into- the.: roadri . :'•"., _ \u25a0'.
The ;• animal, .tearirig.;itself;lboße' 1 ; from
th e 2 bu ggy, • ran '; away,*; but » was i cau ght
by Jeffries. aad f Dick ' Adams,'
Jim Corbelt and Jim Jeffries' mixing t it \ at Rowardemian.
— PHOTO BY PERCY 'DANA '
SEALS TAKE GAME
FROM HOOLIGANS
Roy Brashear's Two Home Runs
'{ With Bases Clear Are Vcr
* non f s Only 'Scores^
STANDING OF THE CLUBS
(Coast League)
W. • L. ret.
Portland .... . . . . .33 • \u25a0 2S 561
San Francisco. . . -. '". 34 « : 27 . • 557
Vernon '.. . . . . . . . . .33. 28 - 541
Oakland ....... .;34-'.. 20 . 540
Low Angeles. . . . . .30. 34 .469
Sacramento .. . . . . . .20,1.', .39 .339
RESULTS O F GAMES
Oakland 4, Lob Anßelea'l. ' ;
San Francisco 4> : Vernon ' 2, • : .
Portland ' 4, < Sacramento \ 3.
[Special Dispatch toTke{CalV\<: ; -- \u25a0 - r -
LOS ' ; ANGELES, June I.— -Two!_ home
.runs batted by Roy tßrashear,; the ; hits
almost in the saThe;spot,',back of
the -leftfield . fence, was.;; the \u25a0bestr the
Hooligans -could' do'v.today '. wnfle-7:the
Seals ; played "rings _\u25a0 around ;. them T^and
won,-, 4*to 2.\ '•'\u25a0 ' •\u25a0",/••;•\u25a0--\u25a0 \u25a0•-":.""\u25a0*,' •-.'\u25a0"- \u25a0,'"'•''"\u25a0. .vc--
The | Seals ,gathered' ft ;their i c runs;two^
at>'tlme,.starting'in-*tHefthifd.'.ri,East- i '
ley- singled" and --..Vitt ; was ' saf e'.onrHehs" T |
Ring's: slow. fielding." :;:;Mohler,i filled^ the
? ba.Bes? \u25a0, > Eastley- a'nd^Vitt scored > bn'two
outs and- ant error, iHogan- dropping^ the i
ball \when.i it '..wasi! thrown, to"; him to
catch Eastley. Score:*--' ,' ; '• ..< :
••t'-..'. '\u25a0'\u25a0 : : \-VERNONV: v-"/ ; v t '\u25a0'::'.• : -
VAB. K. BH.-PO.A^E.-
CarliMe, 1. f......'.V..'.;. 4-^? 0 ov20 v 2 \u25a0"•-' 0 \u25a0'• 1
Burrpll. ;3b: . 1 . . . . . . .7. . . . '4*.^ 0-2 ;1 C 2 0
Martlnk?. r. f......'...».f ......'...». .-4 -.<<)• >O«- 3- i 'O : » fl
R. 'Braehear,' 2b. -.- 3 -,* 2 ' 2 t 0'- 2 "0
Coy. c. f.:..1...'...-.;.... 3-..0 ".1 --2;',0 ;'O
Lindsay, m. .......;..-... 2 0 o•' 1- 6 » O
Fisher, ; 1b.'. . .- .*. . . . •. . .•;.•.- 2 : • 0 orl6 ' 0 ' 0
Hogan.c... ;-.'.. r.'..;..;.\r3 .""\u25a0* O^Ok 2 ,Vo . 1
HensllDsr,"- p r...;.........,2.v 0-. 0> O :-4: -4 • 1
•5t0ra11r .*.;..".....;. ...v.'l^-O >'.' o** O^OiiO
•^N.-sßrashear.\.v..-.r,3i to'.vo ,'. O.i : 0., 0
•••Hitt;y.......-.........'1.^ 0 : -o^o
'.T.nai ;.v. .;.'.\u25a0.\u25a0:... v..v.50?;v2^"b 5 27^14 i.z
. ;*Battcd for FUherintheninth Inning.
••Batted for Hogaii ln"the:n|»Ui.ipnlngr.'.-. .'.- ._
.:.. •••Batted for Hensling Jn, the ninth: Inning..,
: \ ' \u25a0" -.'";"\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 ;;\ t -'s an; franoisco' \: ' fs'X'"..': '*Ui
,-\u25a0,.. n. ''-''- " ; -'aab b
v Itt, 3b. •:..;............ \u25a0 3», : 2 >*• 1 "\u25a0• 0 ' 2 ?-\u25a0 0
Mohler, • 2b. ..... ..... ;;; U5 - 0 '\u25a0\u25a0- 1 'B>"1'4O
Melchlor, r. f.... ;;;..-; 3 "f 0 " 3 0 o*o
Tpo ?«n t , - 1 b . . : . : . . . . . . . , . ; 5.. I.V 2 'S; • ; 0 \u25a0 ' 1
Williams, c:. ....... ..... 4' * 0 , 1 . 6" 2,-1
Lewlß,} C .;f..r...:.......'4: 0 1 '6 0. 0
Bodie.t 1. . f ..;.....; . .-. ; . • 3,*o'C 1H 1 "- 0 0
McArdle.'fcs:. ~.':v. ..•.."\u25a0 :J&*'Oh l"2-'2^'O
Eastl'T. P- • • . . ..... .-.-. . . \u25a0' 4 $ 1 '<\u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0 1 •. ; ' ojv I^o
' iTotal; . ... . . . . ; . ...;!. .sif. fi ..lol 27,.~8i72
: 'i : RONS AND HITS JBX^NNIXGS,; :
Vl«rnon:i;-.*. "...'. '.".0r 0' 0" 0 *0i l" ONl>-o^-'2
\u25a0v.Basehits.t.-..-.'...140; V l? 01, Ofli o-^.5
SanFranclsco "....0" 0,2 ':0: 0 . ? 2 10, 0- O^O-r *
'. Basehlts . .... . .2 0,? 2 ' 1 »' 3 •1* 0X 1 " O-~ 10 |
SUMMARY*,: /-, . . ; :
V* 5, ome .' TOnB — R- ' Brashearr (2i J-' Sa'crlfic* > hits—
Bodle. ( McArdle. il.lndna.r,.i l.lndna.r, . MelcWor.",- Vltt.' '$ First
bag* on ' called | balls-fOff ; Hensllng . XX Struck! out
— B y . Hep?! in* * 2.;, byi Ea»tle,r.v 4. h Wild S pitch—;
™ < l i % l i ll fv'^ H<tlb 3r3 rl Pltcner-;P ltcner - ;; -SS I!Bher.'.1 !Bher.'.- Stolenbases
— > itt.-iMelcblwj (2).^; Time of ;jmm«—>'how.«B4 j
40 mlantes,-'UBiplr»^Hiidebraß(l.H - ; < - : : >;^-*
BIG CRASH COMES
IN STATE LEAGUE
San Francisco and Sacramento
\u25a0Clubs Are Dropped and Play
ers Are Scattered -
:The expected .crash in the State league
came yepterday. morning at the meeting
of. -the :directors in, Stockton. The San
Francisco; and Sacramento teams were
dropped- and it was unanimously agreed
that the other four clubs, Stockton, San
Jose, Fresno and Oakland, will continue
the 'season ; under ; a two day a week
schedule; to s take: effect after. this week.
I There y is a > bare possibility' tha_t- the
Oakland*? team 'may '. be transferred • to
Modesto... Cy; Moreirig, the owner and
manager- of the Invaders, Is- now dick
ering / with .la syndicate of - prominent
Modesto : businessmen.* .J:. J : •'"
r The'series'ScheduledHoopen In Oak
larid'thlsjafternoon has ibeen • switched
to Stockton. 1
Bakersfleld:! wlll^get-Pltcher Meikle,"
Iriftelder Mundorf.and Pitcher Griffln of
the* Baby; Seals. Catcher .Waring, goes. to
Guthrie.'Okla.-Cohwaygoes to San Jos«
and Pitcher. Berber is; being held for the
time* being." *Sheehiuv Carman",' McKune
and;Burke-have\ been. released outright
andjare\free to do astheyiplease.
I A" strong rflgh't for the I'best .'.players
in;.:?.the * 'dlsbaiided: 'Sacramento "State
league ; club .will beimade \u25a0 by; Manager
Graham bf^theiSacrame^to Coast* league
club, , which; controlled r. the^bush j team.
The magnate "contends : thati the' players
re ,Y e rt '-back C toi the Coast - league ; and
therefore. strings .,wlll»be';ke"pt on Eimer
Stricklett,\the fofmer) Brooklyn: player,
on^Catcher i ,Fournier andjon Al-Heisten*
Its is ilikelyjrthe j case be Xtaken^to
higher'baseballicburtSibeforelsettled."
£?« 29, SOBES & OLCEBS
' Old; Borea remain . open., and chronic ; ulcers refuse to beal because they are
-kept^conrtantly.yixritate^^ la-tlxe .Wood, Tnia Im-
purity^ of :,-\u25a0 the''; circulation comesj,^from various causes. A. long spell of de-
bilitating \u25a0\u25a0 sickness, "which "breeds disease germs In the; system, . the retention of
ref useVaAtters iof a b"ecauBej'of fa : sluggish -condition, of. the eliminativa
members, -,a continued malarial state of health, inherited bad blood, et<vare us-
ually ; responsible. But whatever, tha cause of tha infected circulation, the sore
orulcer OANNOT. heal until jhe" blood is purified. S. 8/ S. .heals sorea and ulcers
In the very ; simplest jway. It just goes Into .the circulation and removes the im-
purities and polluted matter^ "which are the means of keeping the sore open; then
the sore ia bound to heal. ,S.S. S. is ths finest of all blood purifiers, and not only
;does it, cleanse, the circulation .but it adds the necessary healing Qualities to the
blood, and in this way assists nature to quickly cure sores and ulcers, j Salves;*
.washes, lotions,' etc.; can do no permanent good toward healing an old sore because
; suchf treatme^ jdoes^h^t^
soothing "and cleansing,- but the healing must begin at tha bottom, and this is just
2v^tfSAB4S.^4o^-by.flr^
"and to 'all'? the flesh -.tissues. Book on Sores; and Ulcers free to all who
;wTtto- t mfrreo,ucrt-;foT* \u25a0'j'-:'<^r'-K^-"'.-j^''. : \u25a0 ' ' '•" k - J "'^' '''"•"**F ia f"f tßM W l> "WiHM
,*. JEHE ,SWT Vo.f ATLANTA, QA»:
'BULL' THORSEN IS
A CLASSY AVIATOR
Angel Twirler Goes Sky High
and Playful x Oaks Win
Another Game
WILLIAM J. SLATTERY
-. The Commuters took another giant i
stride pennantward yesterday afternoon j
by administering a 4 to. 0 crushing to
the forlorn Los Adngeles aggregation, j
Most of the fans on the job felt sorry
for- the southern swingers. They all
looked so helpless when the Oakland
attack began that one could not very,
well; help displaying outward 'signs of
sympathy, feut at the same time
of them rooted for Oakland. It was a
popular victory, as most of the Oakland
victories of late have been.
Had Thorseh exercised a little more
control of the ball it might have been
a good, snappy, evenly contested game
of baseball. But the same Thorsen
played the role of star aviator in the
seventh inning, - when he steered - his
ship, high into the heavens and soared
around there for a full 15 minutes. Nor
would he consent to alight till the Oaks
had annexed three runs.* The fumiy part
of It all is that only one little hit
figured in the making of these runs,
but that one looked like a million.
Oakland had a 1 to 0 lead when the
eventful seventh first saw light. Up
to that time Thorsen was pitching a
fair article of ball and his teammates
were giving him grand .support. But
he ' seemed to collapse suddenly and
without warning. He made his first
blunder by walking Wolverton and he
followed this up by slipping a pass to
Swander. The monotony was broken
temporarily when Maggart forced Wol
verton at third on a poor bunt.
But this was only a little diversion,
a sort of a teaser, as it were. The
bases were air crowded a moment later,
when Mitze waited for a pass_ Then
Harkins fared likewise and Swander
was forced over the pan. The bases
were still crowded to overflowing
when Cutshaw came up. Thorsen man
aged to put one over the pan and Cut
shaw immediately clouted it into far
right .field. Maggart and Mltze tore
through, making it three for the in
ning. The score:
LOS ANGELES
AB. R. BH. PO. A. E.
Daley, c. f 4 0 0 0 0 0
Bernard, r. f. 3 0 O O 0 O
Howard, 2b 3 o 2 4 4 0
DUlon, lb .10 o*lo
Murphy. L f.. 4 0 13 0 0
Roth. Sb. 3 0 0 3 10
Delmas, s». 3 0 0 3 4 0
Smith, c 1 0 0 3 5 0
Thorsen, p 3 0 0 0 3 0
. Total .................27 0 3 24 IS 0
OAKLAND ,
AB. R. BH. PO. A. E.
Cutfhaw, 2b...... 4 O 1 5-2.1
Wares, ss 3 O O 2 4 1
Hogan, c^ f. 3 0 1 2 0 0
Cameron, lb 3 O 0 10 0 0
Wolverton, 3b. \u25a0• 2 1 1 0 2 O
Swander. r. f 2 112 0 0
Maggext.l. f. \u25a0\u25a0..'.-. 2 1 0 '1- f> 0
Mltae, c 2/11 4 3 0
Harkins, p. . ........ 2 0 113 2
Total .................23 4 6 27 11 4
RUNS AND HITS BY INNINGS
Los Angeles .4. .00000000 0 — 0
Basehlts 1 0 0 0 01 0 0 I—3
Oakland 0 10 0 0 0 3 0 x— 4
Basehits ......0 4 0 0 0 1 1 0 x— 6
*" SUMMARY
Two base hit— Murphy. Sacrifice lilt— Koth.
Stolen bases — Daley (2), ! Howard. Wolverton.
First base on called balls — Off Ihorsen 9. off
Harkins 4. Struck out — By Thorsen 1. by Hark
ins 3. Double plays — Harkins to Mltze to Cam
eron, Smith to Howard to Thor*en to Smith.
Howard to Dillon. Cutshaw to Wareo. Time of
game — 1 hour and 35 minutes. • Umpire — Flnney.
Beavers Trim Sacramento
PORTLAND, June 1. — Nourse. the Senators*
southpaw, formerly of the Boston Americans
and Brown university, held the Beavers to three
widely scattered hits for seven innings and then
was hammered out of the box. being replaced by
Baum. who pitched good bail. The Senators,
however, could not overcome the Beavers* lead.
Score:
SACRAMENTO
AB. R. BH. PO. A. E.
Shinn, ss 3 10 2 3 0
Persons, L f 2 0 1.2 0 0
Briggs, r. f 4 1 1 I 0 0
Danzig, 1b... ....... . 4 1 1 11 O 0
Van Buren, c. f S 0 2 3 0 0
Darrlnger. 3b 3 0 0 2 3 0
Raymer. 2b 4 0 12 1 0
Splesman. c v 1 0 0 1 2 0
Nourse, p... 0 0 0 0 2 0
Baum, p « 3 0 0 0 0 0
Total 27 3 « «*24 11 0
PORTLAND
AB. R. BH. PO. Al E.
Smlth.wr. f...... .4 110 0 1
Olson, 55... .............. 4 0 12 2 0
Hetling. 3b........i 4 0' 3 2 1 0
Fisher, c 4 0 0 6 2 0
Rapps, lb 3 2 1 S 1 0
Casey, 2b 2-0 11 2 0
Ryan, -1. f....:. ...3 0 12 0 0
Speae. c. f.. ...4 o 1 5 0 .0
Steen. p. 2 0 0 0 3 2
Ort. 2b.....:.. 1 11 10 0
tMcCredlc. 1.0 0 0 0 0
Scaton, p 0 0 0 0 _0 0
I T0ta1...:..!..... 32 41027 11 S
\u2666None out when winning run was made.
fßatted for Steen In eighth. v *
RUNS AND HITS BY INNINGS <
Sacramento ...... 0 0 1001 01 0— 3
Basehits.... 0 0 0.0 0 2 1 3 o—6
Portland ....:... 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 ' 2— 4
Basehlts.. 10 0 1 0 1 3 2 2—lo
SUMMARY
Struck out — By Nourse 1. by Steen 3, by Seaton
1. First, base on called balls — Off Nourne 2. off
Steen 4, off Seaton 1. Two base hits — Hetllnsi.
Rapps. Van Buren. Smith. Sacrifice hits — Per
pons (2); Darrlnger, Nourse. Spiesman. Ryan.
Stolen base — Brigg*. \u25a0. First base on errors — Sac*
ramento 2. 1 Left on bases — Sacramento 7. Port
land 7. . Innings pitched — By Steen 8. by Nourse
8. • Charge \u25a0 defeat to NouT!»e. Credit game to
Steen. Base hits — Off Steen 6. runs 3; off Nourse
9. runs 2. Time of game— l hour and 45 min
utea. Umpire— Van Haltren.
\u25a0»--.'" \u25a0 ' " ; ' — — — — — — \u2666-
College Baseball
At. Cambridge. Mass.— Harvard 3, Philllns-
Exeter 0. .
.At West Point— West Point 5, Stevens.^^insti
tute 0. , • , .
• .At New Haven — Tale 0, Holy" Cross 0 (called
by agreementin. eleventh Inning>.' ..
..At Princeton — Princeton 9. Amberst 5.
WILLIAM
J. SLATTERY
GOTCH OUTCLASSES
GIANT OPPONENT
American Champion Takes First
Fall in Phenomenally Fast
Time of 654 Seconds
\ CHICAGO, June I.— Frank Gotch of
Humboidt, la., successfully defended
his title as wrestling champion of tne
world, by easily defeating Stanislaus
Zybsxsko. the Polish champion. In
straight falls at the Coliseum tonight.
Gotch outclassed his bulkier oppo
nent in every department of the game.
After Gotch had won the first fall in
the phenomenal time et -6 \u25a0%, -seconds, it
was only a question of how long the
Pole could hold out against tha bril
liant and varied attack of hi 3 rlral.
REMARKABLY QUICK FALL
Warned by his sudden downfall.
Zybszsko was more cautious, and .it
took Gotch 27 minutes and 38 seconds
to win the match with a bar arm and
wrist lock.
After the 'men shook \u25a0 hands Gotch
stepped back a bit and then made a
fierce flying tackle and before the Pole
realized what was happening his
shoulders were pinned to the mat. This
probably was t!r*> quickest fall ever
recorded In a championship < bout.
ZYBSZSKO SHOW'S FLASH
Zybszsko showed a flash of form
after about 15 minutes of the second
bout when he forced Gotch to the mat
byshe^r strength. The American en
deavored to extricate himself, but ho
was lifted in the air and slammed on
the mat again. In less than 30 seconds
Gotch brwke the Pole's hold and both
men were back on their feet.
Zybszsko was again forced to take
the defensive and Gotch roughed him
about considerably. They rushed to
the ropes and suddenly the Pole ap
peared to weaken. A look of distress
had crossed his face and as he turned
his back to the center of the ring he
was seized in a viselike grip and in a
few seconds his shoulders were pinned
to the mat with a bar arm and wrist
lock.
Hancock School Nine
Swamps Rivals
The lads from the Hancock school
slaughtered their opponents of th.c
Irving M. Scott school yesterday after
noon at the North Beach playgrounds
and captured the championship of the
Public Schools athletic league and the
Spalding perpetual trophy, jvhich they
will hold for one year.
After last Saturday's close contest
the southside boys looked to have an
even break for the championship, but
the Telegraph hill youngsters had
solved O'Donnell's delivery and In the
fifth frame Prentice was put In after
three runs had been scored. For two
innings Prentice -withstood the Han
cock sluggers, but in the eighth inning
he was hit hard. 15,,- . . ..,
National League
1 STAXDI.VG OF TUB CLUBS
NATIONAL LEAGUE I AMERICAN LEAGUE
Club— W. L. Pet. Clvb — W. L Pet
Chicago 23 IS r..-7!PhUaUelphla..2ft 0 74.".
New York. .24 14 Cl2;New Y0rk. ..23 10 «E>7
Pittsburg ..IS 1« r.211 Detroit 23 18 500
Cincinnati ..IS 17 ."l4!Boston 1!> W 54:;
S«t. L0ui5... .19 2O 4S7!Cleveland ...14 is 4.",7
Brooklyn .. .17 22 4.lß! Washington.. 1»J -22 4°l
Philadelphia. i:J 21 aS2|rhicago H 2o 553
Boston 14 24 otWiSt. Louis T 23 200
BOSTON. June I.— Chicago won the opening
game of Its first eastern trip today from Boston
Score: n. H. E.
Chicago 5 r 2
Boston ; 1 t, 1
Batteries — Overall. Richie and Kling: Brown.
Ferguson and Graham. L'mpires^ — Johnstone ' and
Moran.
• •
BROOKLYN, June I.— Brooklyn made It five
straight today by winning from Pittsburg, 3
to 1. «<>or»: R> jj E
Plttstmrg 1 a 1
Brooklyn •• 2 7 1
Batteries — Leifield 'and Gibson: Barger and
Bergen. Umpires — Blgler and Ensile.
PHILADELPHIA. June t— Wretched pitching
marked today's game and Philadelphia lonftn
St. Louis, 10 to 5. Score: R. h. E.
St. LouU 10 12 {
Philadelphia 5 8 I
Batteries — Harmon. CorrMnn. Sallee and
Phelps: McQuillan, Moran. Flaherty aud Moren.
Umpires — O'Day and Brennan.
NEW YORK. June t. — The New York Na
tionals today won their eighth straight game,
defeating Cincinnati, 5 to 2.
Score: ;, t , r. h. E.
Cincinnntt 2 4 I 1I 1
New York . . » .3 10 1
Batteries — Anderson. Rnwan, Doyle "and Mr-
Lean: Mathewson and Myers. Umpires — Klein
There were no game* played la the American
league this; afternoon. -Cold weather and rain
caused postponement* over the entire circuit.
i *»" DR. JORDAN'S""''}
i jMUSEUH OF ANATOMY'}
I 4| ~ ICRtATti* THAN CVERI ) V
f . ,yT"Y W— hiww or may contracted Jlmu« 7
X ('•+ l positively cured by tit* oMe* 0
; V tpeeialut *a tit* Gwut EtUbluhW I
IBM DISEASES OF MEN i
«/{ t^B^ l\ Coniult»tioti htm and rtrictly privttc F
F» (V Treatment perwiuOly or by Utter. A »
' 6 — &'—' \u25a0 positlv c Cure la «*«7 ute u> T
' T wsfy <••**•*•»- &
' m J/a+f* Writ* jar kook. philosophy J
\u25a0 f ft** 3 ?? Or WfARRIAGC. «MiU4 fr-,«-i» i
\ DB. JQBDAH. ZSSff S.F..CAL (
iff #5* I tnost COMPLETE
>L| W»~^R.iT ment enable me to
. -Xj-. HEgfir. have a ' keen un-
XNyjw d • r • t a ndlns of
/SXS,. Men's Ailments.
aKkscr— r * thetnselTt?s
weakness or disease come \u25a0 and talk It over
with me. I am williny -to • convince -you
FIRST before I ask you to p«y. Yon will be
satlsStd with the CURE and my LOW yvy<i
If. nnable to call I will . s«n4^ my Fr«l
Symptom List in a plain envelop*. Don't nut
off yonr trouble another month. It may h»
come incurable. *
, DR. rMORELr M0REL andassociates> 51 TbJrd st.
near Market. San Francisco, Cal.
hotel Rowiii
BEN LOMOND
accowmodation of famine after Jn&i-??****
» .y4. . JACK IJLCEY, jlaju^"

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