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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, June 15, 1910, Image 3

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CHARLTON WAS
SEEN ON TRAIN
FOR LUCERNE
Indications Are That Missing
.: • Husband Is Alive and in
Germany
Man Answering Description in
Every Way Left Como Night
Body Was Found
{Special Dispatch to The Call]
COMO, Italy. June 14.— There is
every indication that Porter Charlton
is alive. More than that, he probably,
has gone to Germany by way of Lu
aernf.
. • .The Call correspondent, who reached
, here from Milan* tonight, learns that
fi man fully answering Charltonss de- ,
Ecription, wearing a rain coat and
carrying a valise, went to the railroad
station here at 1 o"clock last Thursday
rright. This, of course, was after Mrs.
: Mary Scott Castle Charlton's body was
vifpund. -in a trunk in Lake Coma.
". ;fr«nke Poletti, a passenger, saw this
rn*fi- check his valise and started with
.Jiip on the midnight train. The man
presented a book ticket good for six
ijipnths between Como, Venice, Lucerne
*iid Basle.
;>V|l\T; >V|l\T TO SLEEP
-.=•.\u25a0-; After boarding the train the man.
if^PPosedly Chariton, and who seemed
:V>Ts' : weary, took off his shoes and slept
:.im'til the conductor awakened him to
:.sr?=k for his ticket. Polettl left the
.:.tr*fn at Lugano. r r V
-.T.here is information, too, that Charl
ton was se^n by several persons as late
iff 7 o'clock last Thursday evening. The
"etithorities permitted the newspaper
tonight to examine the
village at Moltrasio, where the crime
..\u25a0u*ls. committed, and the villa which
Charlton leased from the Russian ad-
A.^hiurer. Ispolatoff.
'/'Many letters were found in the villa
.'fzip-m Mrs. Charlton's brother. Captain
• J^i/6-tt, and also manuscripts of poems
n;n.d plays by Mrs. Charlton.
T^i-re were indications that one man
. JilHil. iai ried the trunk containing the
: .licKl>v.iion-ii the villa staircase and had
.found it heavy, as there were dents in
• '.th^ \u25a0" .wall. Minute examination shows
:i races of blood on the stairs. Plainly an
. ci.lpjript had been - made to wash out
JKome of these stains.
\": >Tlie Charltons brought three trunks
;-sinda valise to the villa. Two trunks
iaT.e , still there. The third contained
\u25a0'\u25a0M*?; Charlton's body; there is no valise
Jn-the villa.
XpVE LETTER FOI.VD
..•Among the letters found was a very
. f£rvid love missive from New York
signed "Fred." A letter Mrs. Charlton
Avrpte to her first husband, Castle, had
been torn and stitched together.
.-•\u25a0\u25a0 -Mrp. Charlton's body was buried to-
: <iay in a pauper's grave not far from
\t-Jie villa.
:V-".;-It has been learned that Charlton
; wrote on June 6 to the Russian, Ispo
ilatbff. who is under arrest, that he and
.his; wife were leaving for the Riviera,
•On that afternoon he went to the post-
Joffiee and made inquiries with reference
to steamers leaving for Alrics. He
i: posted the letter addressed to Ispolatoff
without a stamp, which is taken as an
\u25a0indication that he was exceedingly agi
tated.
\u25a0•-\u25a0 On the evening of the same day he
..questioned a fisherman near the spot
; .where the trunk was found as to the
depth of the water in the lake.
RETIRED ARMY OFFICER
; ; V NOT GUILTY OF MURDER
Jury Acquits O'Connor After
Five Days* Deadlock
TOMBSTONE. Ariz.. June 14. — Cap
tain Stephen O'Connor, U. S. A., re
t-j'red. was acquitted tonight of the
murder of Dr. A. S. Russel. The jury
was out five days.
Captain O'Connor, who is 76 years
old. was accused of having killed Rus
.sel last January in satisfaction of a
feud which started in a dispute over
mining claims.
l\ Major O'Connor, son of the captain,
who obtained a transfer to Fort Hua
chuca, so as to be near his father, con
ducted the defense. The trial -was a
•costly one and when it became evident
that there would be a deadlock attor
neys for both sides Insisted, that an
"agreement he reached.
; When the jury made its latest report
today the court remarked that it must
decide, even if the jury had to remain
locked up 10 days more. The verdict
of acquittal followed at 7 o'clock to
night.
OLD SOLDIER KNOCKS
COMRADE DOWN TWICE
0. . '
Failure to Display Flag Memo
rial Day Causes Trouble
Daniel Dougherty, 468 Twenty-sixth
avenue, and his neighbor, Patrick
(Haran, are old soldiers, the one 69
years of age and the other 50. Dough
erty's wife presented Haran's daughter
\u25a0with an American flag on her promise
that she .would display it on all proper
occasions. \u25a0 . ;-
When Dougherty looked out of his
window on Memorial day the flag was
not to be seen and he walked over to
the Haran residence and told Haran
that he was deseeratingr the Hag by
keeping it in the house on such a day
and that he believed Haran had no
respect for the flag.
Haran called Dougherty a liar and
knocked him down twice. Dougherty
had Haran arrested on a charge of
battery and the case was partly heard
before Police Judge Weller yesterday
anrt continued till June 21.
EVIDENCE IN BLEACHED
FLOUR CASE TXPLODES
Formation of Gas Shatters Bot
tle in Court
•4 KANSAS CITY, June 14.— The con
tents of a bottle, said by government
\u25a0; attorneys to have contained bleached
-flour, exploded during the flour trial
here today while Prof. S. F. Acres of
the chemistry department :oO Johns
Hopkins university was on the stand.
"What caused that?" asked an attor
. ney.
"The formation of pyroxide gas in
the flour," answered the professor.
Decomposition, as well as bleaching,
would cause gas to form in flour, ex
plained the witness.
Alfred Steigel. professor of clinical
medicine in the University of Pennsyl
vania, testified that nitrates, when in
troduced into a. human body, were
highly injurious to health, but added
that in 50 years of practice he had
never seen a case of nitrate poisoning.
Paralso Hot Spring*
Round trip, fare i reduced from $8 to
56.25, including auto. . .Autos assured
for all guests. •
TRADERS LOSE
BY LOW RATES
ON STEAMSHIPS
Kosmos Line Reduces Tariff for
Freight From Seattle to
Central America
Pacific Mail Meets Cut, but San
Francisco Is Still ata
Disadvantage
What practically amounted to a
monopoly, by San Francisco merchants
of trade with the ports of Central
America has been knocked on the head
by the Kosmos line's new freight tariff.
The advantage of a' cut of from 25 to
50 per cent under the former rate is
overshadowed by the fact that the new
tariff makes the rates to Central Amer
ica from Puget sound the same as
from San Francisco. In other words,
it practically shuts out the San Fran
cisco merchant from all trade with the
lower coast except in California prod-
Cut to Aid Merchants
The Pacific Mail company has met
the cut and reduced its rates 10 per
cent below the Kosmos line's new
tariff as far as it applies to business
between San Francisco and ports be
tween here and Ancon. This was done,
Pacific Mail officials say, .not as a re
taliatory measure, but for the purpose
of preserving to San Francisco mer
chants some chance to compete for the
business that once was all theirs.
When the Kosmos line first started
running its ships to Puget sound the
freight tariff to Central America was
from J1.50 to $2 higher than from San
Francisco. This differential placed the
San Francisco merchant on an equal
footing with the Puget sound mer
chant, and the San Francisco merchant's
connections enabled him to hold the
trade.
Reduction Hurts Trade
With a tariff which enables them to
reach the Central American market as
cheaply as the San Francisco shipper
can sell his goods there, the Puget
sound commission man is now in a
much better position to do business.
Wages on the sound are lower and the
cost of production less.
San Francisco has little grain and
no flour for export, but in the past,
protected by the differential rate, the
local merchant was able to buy these
products in the north for his Central
American trade. The new tariff has
shut him out and there is no relief in
sight. His old enemy the Pacific Mail
has done all it can to help him. but
unless the Kosmos line restores the
differential a large part of a business
that the San Francisco- merchant rer
garded as a sort of birthright will be
carried past his doors - with a Puget
sound tag on it. It is probably the
first time on record that a reduction of
rates has not been welcomed by the
San Francisco shipper.
GRIMALDI AGAIN ON
TRIAL FOR MURDER
Stabbed Pasquale Piagentini
; During Quarrel
For the second time Emanuel Gil
maldi was placed on trial In Judge
Cabaniss* court yesterday on a charge
of murder. In a quarrel he stabbed
and killed Pasquale Piagentini. Gri
maldi was tried about two months ago,
but the jury disagreed and was dis
charged.
Grimaldi is a cook, and was formerly
night chef at the Fairmont hotel. The
killing of Piagentini took place at 3
o'clock the morning of October 6, 1909,
In a saloon at Broadway and Kearny
street. The night before Piagentini
had picked a quarrel with him, but the
defendant refused to fight.
When Grimaldi returned to the saloon
in the early morning Piagentini was
still there, and resumed the dispute.
Grimaldi says he feared for his life,
and drew a long cook's knife from a
bundle he was carrying .and stabbed
Piagentini in the stomach. Piagentini
died later the same day.
A rosebush in a garden at Freiburg
covers 90 square yards and bears 10,000
buds.
Even a short man may have his long
suit.
of $1,50 SHIRTS aLJ 05
il BRAND NEW SPRING 1910 PATTERNS IN STRIPES _
M AND DESIRABLE NOVELTIES. ALLURE COAT H
\\l STYLE, PLAITED OR: PLAIN, ATTACHED CUFFS, M
\\B ALL SIZES. $1.50 GRADE, 1 05 H
|I A BIG SPECIAL AT. Vyi - . ' . . -V.- . * .; J
i NEGKWEAR. special at; 121
WE HAVE PURCHASED THE SURPLUS STOCK OF \u25a0
A LEADING NECKWEAR MANUFACTURER. IN THIS LOTrARX 200 [j
DOZ. NEW SPRING SHAPES AND t COLORINGS! IN yFANCYr FIGURED |J
FOULARDS^ WIDE END FANCY STRIPED 4^IN-HANDS AND! PLAIN \u25a0
PASTEL SHADES IN THE NARROW*TIESi«SO; SUITABLE FOR THE if
CLOSE FITTING COLLARS. A GREAT VALUE AT 1 2V2C. |j
"CLARION" GUARANTEED HOSE ? 1 5<i
IN A LARGE VARIETY OF NEW PLAIN COLO^. THE BEST F^V^i
GUARANTEED HOSE ON THE MARKET. OUR GUARANTEE FOR m
6 MONTHS* WEAR WITH EACH BOX OF SIXIN ASSORTED SHADES. I |
THE SAN GALL, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, : 1910.
WITNESSES SURE
HAND WAS SOBER
Five Employes -ofvQuartermas
ter's Department Testify to
Captain's Condition
Officer Advised by His Dentist
to Use Brandy to Relieve
Pain of Toothache
Contradictions of the charges against
Captain Daniel W. Hand were heard at
the trial of the accused officer yester
day, the defense introducing a number
of witnesses who declared that he was
sober on May 3, the date on which it is
alleged he was under the influence of
liquor the second time.
. Five employes of the quartermaster's"
department at the Fontana warehouse,
Frank M. Carter, Louis B. Brandt, John
G. Bliss, George Chaplin and Walter R.
Redwood, testified that they saw Cap
tain Hand on. that, date,; took care of
him on the fourth floor or drove with
him to the general hospital, but all
were positive that, he was sober save
George Chaplin, woh declared that
Hand was Buffering from " extreme
nervousness.
A DEFIXITIOV OP DRUXK
Redwood assured the court that the
captain. was not, in his opinion, drunk,
but later gave his definition- of that
state as follows: "If T see a man- stag
gering from the, building to the curb,
letting. out a warwhoop every now and
then, insulting everybody and wanting
to fight everybody he meets,' l will call
him drunk — but not before. Maybe if I
saw him drink about two quarts of
whisky and stagger around the room I
would think he was drunk, too."
Dr. T. H. Morris, Captain Hand's den
tist, was called to the witness stand
and declared that he had frequently ad
vised Captain Hand' to filU his mouth
with brandy, oil of cloves or tobacco to
relieve the pain of' toothache. .
Frank S. Burr, a friend of Captain
Hand, testified that the defendant had
been with him at his room at the Hotel
Tallac in this city from March 25 to
March 29, the period of his absence from
the transport dock, and was in a nerv
ous condition, but at no time under the
influence of liquor. He said that Cap
tain Hand asked him to telephone to
the dock- that he was ill. This he had
neglected to do, as the line was busy at
first and he forgot it later. '
TO TAKE DEPOSITIONS
Questions and cross questions were
sent to the following: Colonel Joseph
H. Dorst. Third cavalry; Colonel James
Parker. Eleventh cavalry; Colonel H. M.
Andrews, First field artillery; Colonel
E. D. Hoyle, Sixth field artillery, and
Major Charles Menoher, First field ar
tillery, with all of whom Captain Hand
saw active service in the Philippines.
This morning General Thomas Mc-
Gregor, U. S. A., retired, will be the
first witness, to be followed by Captain
Hand.
The transport Buford, which was to
have sailed today, will not leave for
about a week, orders to that effect hav
ing come from the quartermaster gen
eral. Too much ice fills the rivers of
the north still, but the transport is
ordered to be at Seattle on June 26. to
meet the Sixteenth infantry, and take
that regiment to Alaska. , On the'return
trip the Buford will bring the Twenty
second infantry from Alaska to this
city en route to Fort Sam v Houston,
Texas. .-• : •:;.'' ;\u25a0 • ' .-• .\u25a0 i-v i-. '• '\u25a0'\u25a0 , '\u25a0
Captain Pierce A. Murphy,: First cav
alry, who has just returned from a
month's leave,' left, yesterday for Wash
ington, D.-C, where he goes to act as
counsel for Captain S. P. Lyons, Twen
ty-fifth* infantry, who is to be tried be
fore a court martial.
FRIENDS OF HEBREWS
SHOW THEIR STRENGTH
One-third of Membership of the'
Duma Sign Abolition Bill
ST. PETERSBURG. June 14. — The bill
providing for the abolition of the-Jew
ish pale, which has been introduced in
the duma, has no chance of enactment.
Its introduction, however, is . of im
portance, as it shows the strength of
the element which favors giving, the
Jews the right of unrestricted residence
in Russia. It is signed by X 65 r mem
bers of the opposition, one-third of the
totals membership. • .
After some discussion the measure
will be shelved along with the bill
for the abolition of the death penalty
and similar proposed legislation.
1 The Rossia prints ; today an official
statement by Premier Stolypin regard
ing Jewish expulsions.
\u25a0 According to the minister, the .He
brews in Kiev who were subject, to
expulsion number 448. The govern
ment is disposed to relax the rigor of
the law so far as it is practical in
Kiev and other places, particularly to
the advantage of Jews who were well
established in business. " -'. . -
The statement sets ; forth that the
minister of the Interior has sent in
structions to the provincial authorities
to permit Jews to reside in summer
resorts. "? V* ,
At this gtage of the game the hogpen
Is mightier than the sword.
WATER COMES LIKE
A THIEF IN NIGHT
West Sunset Residents Stay Up
Late With Pots and Pahs to
Capture Elusive Liquid A
Spring Valley Provides Only a
, Few Drops at Midnight;
Mains Dry AH Day
While the Spring Valley water com
pany retains a battery of clever law
yers busy before the board of super
visors expounding the virtues of the
company's service and fighting changes
in the existing water rate law, bucket
and pan brigades are the vogue in the
west Sunset district, where more than
2,500 residents have; been without suf
ficient water ; to. meet the ordinary re- 1
quirements of house keeping for a week
past. \u25a0 -•';.. _\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0' '. ' '\u25a0'. :\u25a0 . \u25a0\u25a0' •\u25a0:
Water is a luxury, It is scarce andit
is elusive. It is elusive, avow the.citir
zens, because the' eccentric flow may
come on suddenly for a few minutes in
the dead of night, wherefore watches
are organized, alarm clocks are set and
all available pots,^kettles and pans put
beneath the various faucets.
COXDITIOXS IXSAXITAItY
But the situation presents its serious
side' also, an<j this is shown by the
charges that Banitary conditions are be
coming so bad as to-be amenaceto
health. . -
': The drouth has not been felt uni
formly because of the difference in ele
vation-throughout the district. .
Astute laundry drivers, aware of the
situation, are doing a thriving business.
Morning, and evening' regularly the
pilgrimages to the two windmills and
the single pump in the district are made
by men, women and boys. "
With no water to answer household
purposes, it is impossible to water the
flower beds and lawns. The cutting
winds from the west and the strong sun
are parching and killing the greens and
flowers. .
Even Sol Getz, real estate man and
property owner, makes his daily jour
ney with the pitcher to the windmill.
So much Mrs. Getz, living at 1224 Forty
fifth avenue, admitted yesterday when
detailing how a vigil was kept late into
the night for the coming of the. water.
"Sometimes it runs at night, and then
we fill the tubs for the next day,", said
Mrs. Getz. "My husband frequently has
complained to the company, but they al
ways say that a water main is out of
order, and that is all the satisfaction we
get." \u25a0-'•"; :
XO WATER IN DAYTIME
Mrs. S. Michael of 1279 Forty-fifth
avenue said that for, a week past not
a drop of water has been obtainable in
the daytime. \u25a0 ~
At Mrs. Wolf's, 1227 Forty-fifth ave
nue, it is related how It was necessary
to utilize milk and make chocolate one
morning because there was 'not
enough water for coffee. V. Van Wie
of 12S8 Forty-sixth avenue keeps two
big bathtubs full of water by watching
the flow and drawing in the still hours
of the night.
"The treatment of this district by
the water company is a shame," de
clared Dr. W. M. Hilton of 1245 Forty
sixth avenue. "If it were not for the
fortunate fact that there are wind
mills and a pump in the district we
would "find ourselves, in. an appalling
situation." , ; , ;"": \u25a0 :
Louis' Binder of",42o{r J street said:
"I.left-.a bottle, under the faucet all
day yesterday and barely drew it full."
"I have been making inquiries
throughout the district and the water
situation in general," said A. C. Camp
bell of the Ocean Side promotion asso
cialoni "The company collects regu
larly every month, however, and shows
.no inclination to better matters. The
largest main, in the district is a four
inch pipe and this runs only a few
blocks. The others are two inch mains.
The .fire department will not give us
protection with such, an inadequatte
supply. Finally the pressure is so
weak that it will not carry to the sec
ond floor. The service is an abomina
tion." v r ' >\u25a0,'\u25a0
Other protestants are: Mrs. R. E.
Brabhan, 1467 Forty-sixth avenue; -Mrs.
A. Jeans. 1548 Forty-fifth avenue; Mrs.
J. G. Decatur, 1475 Forty-fourth ave
nue; Mrs. Knutsen, 13S1 Forty-fourth
avenue; Mrs. Kaiser, 1286 Forty-sixth
avenue; Mrs. . Isabelle Davis, 4125 J
street, -and Mrs. Ij. Woodmansee, 1258
Forty-fifth avenue. - > ,; •'
FIRE DEPARTMENT DRILLS
AT NAPA STREET FAIR
Baby Show Today Will Be Fea
ture of Carnival
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
NAP A, June : 14.— The merchants' car
nival and street fair continued in ope
ration here today, with interesting fea
tures. There was a drill of \u25a0 the ; Napa
fire .department and several" acrobatic
performances. ~- Queen "\u25a0'. Hazel . -Delucca
reigned, with, Miss Norma. Muzzio and
Miss Annie Gracchi as maids of honor.
On Wednesday there will be a' baby
show. - h , •.:"\u25a0\u25a0-\u25a0 .
It doesn't mend matters to fix the
responsibility of a. railroad wreck.
PERKINS PROMISES
TO HELP SHIPPERS
Uniform Lading Bill Measure
May Pass; Congress j at
This Session
Commerce Chambers All Along
Pacific Coast Work for
Its Passage v
Shippers throughout the
States, and= proportionately those, who
ship ; out" of San Francisco . and coast
ports, will profit by the adoption of
the uniform lading, bill which is ex
pected to pass the seriate at this ses
sion of congress. .
Senator Perkins in. a wire to Secre
tary/Burks of the chamber of com
merce yesterday declared that he was
supporting the bill and would do what
lay in his power to effect its passage.
The_biU passed. the house June 6 and
is before the senate committee on in
terstate and foreign commerce,,, of
which Stephen B. Elkins is chairman/
The Elkins committee is expected to
send the measure through for the ap
proval of President Taft .'before the
close of this session. -' / ;
.The : uniform*': lading, blllr measure
provides, a,; form 'of lading Ito super
cede that "now in general use. [ The
present form is marked ""not negoti
able"," and precludes the t shipper from
obtaining advances on: his shipment
until if Is actually delivered to the
consignee.- . In , San. Francisco this
means "often a delay of a month or
more. ', ; ; , \u25a0
By^'the terms of the' new. measure
the uhiform>bill of .lading, which is
made out «to" the order of a' consignee,
will not' be marked' "not negotiable,"
and. may as a result be turned 'ln at
the local bank as soon as received.
Thus a cash advancement '.may -be j ob
tairied by the shipper weeks before the
actual'dellvery. What is known as the
"straight-bill of lading," made out for
delivery to a specified person, will not
be changed.
For more than a year the chambers
of commerce of "Spokane, Seattle, Ta
coma, PortlanJ, Oakland, Los Angeles,
San -Diego and San Francisco have
been working for the passage of this
measure. .. v . , • .
EASTERN MINISTER TO
SPEAK AT DEDICATION
Dr. W.C. Bitting to Deliver Ad
dress in First Baptist Church
When the First Baptist church of
this city is dedicated in September the
occasion Will be marked by an address
by Dr.W. C. Bitting of the Second Bap
tist church of St. Louis. Rev. George E.
Burlingame of the Sao-- Francisco
church received a telegram which
stated: that the Second Baptist church
of St. Louis had consented to the re
lease of its pastor for one Sunday in
September that he might deliver the
dedication sermon here. The service
will probably: be held Sunday, Septem
ber. 4. .
Doctor Bitting is one of the most
conspicuous church leaders of St. Louis.
He was for 22 , years the pastor of a
prominent church in New York city,
going to the St. Louis church In No
vember, 1905. •
The First church of^this city is mak
ing extensive preparations for the
opening service in the new building,
which will probably be in July.
| Telegraphic Brevities |
AGED COUPLE REMARRY— Tacoma. Wash.,
June 14.-fTbat they might spend their last
days together, Mr. and Mrs. J. Latnley. aged
81 and 69 respectively, were remarried here
today after a separation of 10' years. They
were married in 1856 In Oregon. Lamley bavins
come, to this country from Illinois nearly seren
/years earlier. .
MURDER SUSPECT RELEASED— l.earenworth,
Kan., June 14. — Dean Erhart, who was ar
rested last nieht in connection with the mur
der of Mrs. Katherine Schultze, the wealthy
' widow- whose body was found in the ruins of
her home here last week, waa released late
tula afternoon. A comparison of his - finger
prints with those found on a window of the
burned house showed no' resemblance.
The doctor who speaks but one lan
guage : may understand many tongues.
**jrfO^!!^^^^^Bb|N£s^i
iirlinoame
CrOWand
MnvirotiSL
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Country life is growing more popular \\q[\] Q\\ f h& TCflt
problem, does avvau vvith it, a /»<^
sijrelg Gind eqsilij. Send,
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f2 3 MO NT GO ME R V STRE E t
S A N \ F R. A N C I SCO
Phone vkewnjr 11 1 Home C 1475
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* throwing away so many
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liberately throw away points in
life's battle?
At $20, $25 and $30
We offer you a wide and choice
selection of perfectly built and
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Will help you win the battle of life.
They are the product of America's
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means absolute perfection!
Mail Orders Filled Promptly
Koos Bros.
Market^ and Stockton
THE REALTY UNION
First National Bank Building
San Francisco, California
Authorized Capital, $3,000,000.00
Roosevelt Johnson, Manager. Jesse B. Fuller, Secretary.
G. F. Hanson, Treasurer.
Six Per Cent Interest Paid Upon AH
Investments
• USE CALL WANTS—THERE'S A REASON: SUCCESS
3

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