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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, July 03, 1910, Image 38

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1910-07-03/ed-1/seq-38/

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38
SKY DOMED THEATER
THE CARMEL IDEA
Leafy Playhouse in Which
Drama Will Be Interpreted
by Artist Colony
Everybody in the Town by the
Sea Working for Success
of First Production
the Italian out of doors theaters in the
natural and unadorned beauty of its
location. It was to be dropped amid
the pines like the needles and the cones
which fall and carpet the forest — a
thing- of and consonant with its en
vironment. Home seats, a fence to keep
its boundaries plain — not marking It
«>ff. but embracing it — a stage through
"which the pine trees grow, throwing
a natural foliage for curtains, a little
band stand so covered with leafage and
screened by bushes that the orchestra
would seem as integral a part of the
place as the buzzing of insects in the
sunshine or the twittering birds in the
branches, a rustic entrance, and tree
branches swaying over the pathway
were what Williams Imagined and
Heron started to realize.
A society was formed of the artists,
writers and other inhabitants of beau
tiful Carmel. .About 200 of them fol-
Ipwed the lead of Sterling and Williams
and Heron and Mary Austin. Then the
development company which interests
Itself in the work of building up the
place was Invoked and now the stage
is placed, the benches are set under
the dome that the tree branches curve
overhead, the seats for the instrumen
talists are ready and every night the
forest is vocal with a host "of the chil
dren of Israel, the Amalekites and the
6oldiers of Saul rehearsing the play.
"David" is ready to s<!ng and the pub
lic, is invited to come and listen to the
episodic pageant that Miss Skinner has
schemed and Garnet Holme has pro
duced.
• •
THE plan of the people of Carmel
now Is to give wood masques and
pageants every year and perhaps
twice annually. Possibly George Ster
ling will write a piece for the Forest
theater and it is probable that others
will create plays and dramas designed
\u25a0with particular reference to out of
door presentation. Jack London should
write a western play, whose action
would transpire in the open, and others
of our California authors should try
their hands at plays for Carmel. Out
of such efforts advancement of art
would surely follow and, if the intent
be not deliberate, the spirit of the'west
should find utterance under the trees
of the suburban, sky roofed playhouse
which nature placed on the slopes of
the Santa Lucia range, four miles in
land from the one time capital of Cali
fornia.
Just how much of Williams* dream
will come true is not a safe prediction
at this time and the projector, of the
scheme himself unluckily is away. He
writes from Arizona, where he" has
gone in search of health, that he will
be back soon. It is a pity that he can
not be in Carmel on the night of July
9 to see the first of what may be a se
ries of notable and inspiring presenta
tions.
MEANWHILE Carmel. as I found
it a few days ago. Is doing lit
tle else but working for the suc
cess of the first production. Carmel
Is a scattered settlement; the streets
are fortunately not too much like city
pavements and the population is more
ijeighborly than thick. There is a
unanimity of effort in the town such
as no dramatic project save perhaps
that of Oberammergau has even en
joyed.
Take the leading lady, for instance.'
Fhe is a young girl. Miss Helen Cooke,
whose beauty even Doctor Genthe, who
himself is a Carmelite, raves over. She
plays Michal, the daughter of Saul, and
her girlish winsomeness should be as
unusual as effective on the stage where,
ordinarily, sophistication stalks. She
is the daughter of Grace MacGowan
Cooke and the niece of Alice Mac-
Gowan, both of whom are known to the
world of letters. Alice MacGowan plays
the role of Astar. Maude Lyons is a
shepherdess in the play and a short
story writer whose works are seen in
magazines. Bertha Newberry, wife of
Perry Newherry, and content to live in
a reflected glory and Carmel. is Sarah,
a tiring woman, whose companion in
the play, Elisheba. is played by Mrs.
Jessie Francis Short, known in the
world of pictures as an artist who6e
forte is landscape, as seen in the pic
turesque portion of Monterey county,
where most of her brushes are kept
busy. George Manship, protege of Gar
r.et Holme, who discovered the young:
man's talent in Berkeley, has been im
ported to play the role of Saul. George
H. Boke is to be the prophet Samuel for
an evening and then reassume his rela
tions with a practical world as profes
fcor of law in the University of Cali
fornia. Ferdinand Burgdorff, the artist,
will be Nadab, the captain of a host;
J. TV*. Hand, who sells real estate in
Carmel, but who is, they say, a humor
ist at heart, will be Hushai, a shepherd;
J. E. Beck is another humorist, who in
serious moments sells drugs to a com
munity that rarely requires them:
Reardon Is the plumber of Carmel and
a captain in the play; Frederick Leidig
is another captain in the drama and a
captain of industry in the town, selling
groceries between rehearsals; B. Heinz
is a student at Lick, who sojourny in
Cermel, and will be a soldier boy;
Reimers is a husky student from Cali
fornia, who is Holme's business aid and
also a soldier in the play; Miss Ahda K.
Tleimery will associate with Mrs.
George Sterling and will mourn at suit
able intervals during the action of the
drama, and Vera Connolly, mother
mourner in the play, stops writing
short stories long enough to rehearse
under the trees that roo"f the forest
theater.
You see, there couldn't be a finer ex
hibition of the democracy of art. Sin
clair himself could not desire a closer
mixing of brains, brawn and commer
cial sagacity than is collected together
in Carmel to play Constance, Skinner's
drama, "David." All the world is rep
resented in the diverse vocations, from
plumber to poet, and all the world is
invited to see the spectacle next Sat
urday night.
«vvi; •
THIS is the gtory.that the play
will tell:
The play opens where the
youthful shepherd is met by the
high priest Samuel and anointed by
Mm king: of Israel. The dramatic
rejection osSaul by the high priest,
the mad Jealousy ot the discrownea
monarch, the treachery by which he
seeks to destroy David, sending: his
young daughter. Mlchal, as wife to
the shepherd king, and designing
that she shall be his instrument of
vengeance — this makes a swift,
brilliant drama." -
The love' story is - peculiarly
touching,, "shadowed from the -first
by tragedy, when; young Michal
and the shepherd lad ; love each
other at -sight, unguesslng the fu
ture- where Saul .shall slay.. ' hi*
daughter. ~rith his own hand, mis
taking hff for David. : . r
The poefking of the bible story,
is often tufcen as a type of optlm
isin vancaishlng the -powers of.
darkness. " His- slender -might of
fering tht weapon of a song against
i .<>\u25a0:•\u25a0\u25a0:\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0• «
Gossip Abut- the Theaters and the - New DramatIc Offerings
the power -of the mailed hand is
peculiarly attractive. The somber
figure of Saul, the tenderness of
Jonathan, the. beautiful picture of ;
brotherly love- between the son ' of-.
Saul and the shepherd youth, the
splendid defiance of Astar, -the Atna- .
ekitish princess, for her captors,
the impressive utterances of Samuel,
the high priest, the tender beauty
of Michal's devotion — these are
woven skillfully into a play which
never flags in interest.
Relief Is given by the naive com
edy between the ignorant shep
herds, David's friends, who hear
and retail garbled accounts of the
great events at Saul's court.
The crowded audience chamber,
the shepherds in the hills at dawn,
the glittering barbaric pomp of
Saul's train, give stage pictures
worthy the setting of ancient pines
and rimming mountains which sur
round the forest theater. -
Special war' chants have been
composed for the soldiers of Saul.
The eastern dance and old Syrian
songs will give additional interest
and add marked color to the pro-
duction.
But the real story Is In the dream that
Williams h~d, the efforts of realization
that Sterling and Heron and Miss
Austin and the band of enthusiasts have
made to the end that California may
enjoy more of art, extend the limits of
its influence and help a community to
thrive under the Njiingled influences of
natural glory and artistic endeavor.
BIG VAUDEVILLE BILL
AT CHUTES THEATER
Program of Notable and Varied
Interest Is Assured
There will be a vaudeville celebra
tion at the ChuteS theater for the week
commencing this afternoon, an unusu
ally strong list of attractions having
been secured.
Arnoldo's performing leopards aifd
panthers, seven sleek, treacherous ani
mals who have been subjugated and
taught to do an act that is renowned
all over the world, will be a distinct
novelty. Mabel Bunyea. and Melville J.
Gideon, known as the "American beauty
and the song writer," promise a-musi
cal divertisement. Miss Bunyea scored
a hit in the long run of "The Girl in
the Taxi" at Cort's theater, Chicago,
and Gideon, a pianist, is well known
for his "0h... You Kid," "The- Billiken
Man" and other popular songs.
Georgia Gardner, and her company,
will present "Too Many Darlings,"
abounding in bright lines and amusing
situations, and Joe Morris, _a Hebrew
comedian and parodist, _\y.i ll make his
first appearance in this city. Court
ney and Jeanette, a comedy juggler and
his assistant, .promise a lot of fun. ;
Gordon and Henry, famed as * "those
twisting dancers," will also: be new.
Guido Deiro. a remarkable aecordaori
lst who made a hitat the Chutes the
ater recently, lias been re-engaged and
will be heard in classical and popular
selections. The biograph will complete
the program.
Monday full returns from the John
son-Jeffries episode will be announced
from the stage in the afternoon and in
the evening there will be a grand ball
and torpedo carnival.
This Wee fcs Jtitrdcfioris
COLUMBIA— Mrs. Fiske in "Becky Sharp" and "Pillars
.• of Society." \u25a0 : i%^'-l^-: r&i \u25a0-'\u25a0_'\u25a0, . .'\u25a0 ;BWi
ALCAZAR—Virginia Harned in "The Second Mrs. Taii
queray."
PRINCESS— Ferris Hartman in "The Maid and the
Mummy." ; \u25a0 \u25a0 .' ;'; : ; . ;: Vv ."7^-:^ -^
ORPHEUM—LiIy Lena heading vaudeville bilF.
AMERICAN— MusicaI comedy and vaudeville.
WlGWAM— Vaudeville.
CHUTES— Vaudeville ; and openair amusement park.
IDORA PARK, OAKLAND— Weber's ban<tf
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, SUNDAY, JULY; 3, 1910,
WEBER'S BAND TO
PLAY AT IDORA
Oakland A b'^ent Park Of=
f ers New Attraction to Fol= {\u25a0
low the Russians
It is a big thing for one to say ho
lias "the prize band of America/ but
that Is what John CV Weber claims to
have. He will bring his splendid or.
ganization to Idora park for a limited
engagement, beginning Thursday. July
7, and from the legion of admirers that
this popular bandmaster has; there is
sure to be ; a large gathering of ..his
friends at the opening concert.
John C. "Weber has a band that on
many, occasions has \u25a0 captured first
place in band competitions. Twice he
has been awarded -the championship of
the country, and the Elks '', conf ered
honor on him of being their .^ greatest
bandmaster at the- big convention held
three years ago : at Philadelphia.
Weber does not-try to bring influence
qver his audience by eccentricities of
conducting, but as a musician -he leaves
It for, his : audience Xoi decide 'Whether
his band Js worthy :of recognition, y
As : soprano soloist, ..Weber has Miss
Blanche Mehaffy,' who " possesses 'a
beautiful, resonant ' voice. The k names
of many of Weber's Instrumental solo-,
lsts are : well' known' to-loyers of band
music. The cornet soloists are ,Ferd
R; Weiss . and | Sinion ; | piccolo,
Ralph Dye; French: horn, FritiziKoch;
euphonium, ,: Carl • Kohlman,' and- xylor
phone, William Bellstedt. * ! ' .
But four days remain before Thaviu
and his popular: musicians and dancers
will n\ake their departure from" "the
park beautiful." The^ farewell con
certs- o|T the Russians^ will be excep
tionally fine,' for music -lovers have
stamped this band/ as one of the best
to play from Idora's shell.
LILY LENA HEADS
ORPHEUM BILL
English Singer and New Ballet
Are Features o! the Big .
Program
The Orpheum program for this week
c6n tains^four of the most successful
headline acts In vaudeville. Lily Lena,
dainty English singer of story songs,"
who made a tremendous hit a' little
over a year ago.'will make her reap
pearance and is sure of an enthusiastic,
reception. Miss Lena has profited; by
tier recent visit to Europe' and returns
with an entirely new ;.repjertoire of
song's and many trunks of costumes.
Lois - Fuller's . beautiful ; dancing rsur
prise,; "The Ballet of Light," which cre
ated a furore at the Metropolitan opera
house, New York, will share headline
honors . \u25a0 with , MissY Lena. It realizes
childhood's dreamsof fairyland. Bursts
ofvirridescentcliarm; will illumine the
dancer at every move. Every move of
the dancer will have suitable . prismatic
accompaniment— the': slow,, languid
movements of the .orient, the whirl of
the ; gay pas seul, the sinous. swaying
of the Spanish fandango, and 'the prim
and stately measures of the old English
dances.of the days of bluff King Hal:
La, Loie will disclose ; in this*- ballet the
ability of her. pupils. These comely
barefooted .maidens will disport them
selves In severely; simple Hellenic garb
and interpret the works of the masters.
..A special feature of the ; new program
will ..be the return engagement of i Will
M. , Cressy and Blanche M. Dayne, who
.will appear ,iniCressy's; sketch : of } New!
Hampshire- 1 if e, "Graspin g \ an.Opportu
nity." W^. ' ;:\u25a0 '\u25a0';. ; \u25a0,-.. :.-- '\u25a0- •\u25a0 .\u25a0^^;--.::"V."-
'p) Captain \u25a0; Maximilian Gruber , and "Miss
'Adelin'a's \ equestrian "review£will?iritro
duce V Minnie, t a i three I'elephant.^ 9
feet;, in* height;;:^ Sherling. \u25a0"\u25a0\u25a0 anr English
thoroughbred s race" horse, and- Snetcher;
ai7: year -oldt'Shetland/pony,'",: are J also
clever ! andfente'rtalhlng' features of: this"
'act. V- / "*_""'" ' ;v; v - C".'. '\u25a0 /\u25a0<.'*< '. '' '
*^This i week the engagements
of the- Five? Olyrnpiers,^."VVhite andjSim-'
mons;and' ; pe, ; U6n:- ItlwlllJalsoTbeithe
last^of ",:Arihabellev;Whitfordi .who" is
proving quite asensation.
HARTMAN BEGINS
FAREWELL WEEK
Noted Comedian at Princess
Produces "The Maid and
the Mummy"
With tho matinee today the farewell
week of the Ferris Ilartmaoi season at
the Princess will be started on its way,
and the initial production for stock of
"The Maid and the Mummy" will be
given. This musical comedy is the one
that -served Richard Carle so well
throughout the cast, and l Hartman will
be the only comedian outside of Carle
himself to have appeared in the piece.
As may be well imagined,, tliere is
considerable of an Egyptian flavor to
"The Maidvand the Mummy?' The
spirit of the land of the sphinx .has
beeii grasped in fine fashion. ..Carle of
ficiated as his own .librettist, and the
attenuated comedian is quite as ready,
with his pen as many ansauthor^un
known to the stageitself. It is bright
in, line' and whimsical in idea, this very
eccentric comedy." Originality in Its
truest expression- is its keynote.
.The "story concerns the efforts of Dr.
Elisha Dobbins; an archaeologist, in
securing a mummy upon which to per
form [certain experiments. The doctor,
be>it known, has invented an- elixir of
life. He is also a great student of
things ' Egyptian. Wherefore hois de
sirous of killing two birds with . one
stone. - ij ;.:;\u25a0- \u25a0\u25a0 ' \u25a0 ' \u25a0'. -'\u25a0 -~ '\u25a0 " :
:':By. bringing a mummy to life he. will
be enabled to test the efficacy of his
elixir,, and, /incidentally, should the^ef
fort "px-ove" successful— of which "there
is- not ; the;. slightest doubt in the doc
tor'siinind—rhe^will be;in a -position to
gain from the-rebbrn^ mummy all man
ner ; ! of priceless knowledge concerning
the ancient land of the Nile/ "
Flo, the v doctor's daughter, .is be
loved 7 and in turn-loves a young .Bra
zilian; Avho. staggers under the sobri
quet fof J Don . Romero de Cabanos.*' \u25a0 Pa,
like a true comic opera parent, does not
altogether approve „ of \ the. match, " but
finally agrees to give his consent. upon
the Brazilian, who' professes for .love's
sweet -jsakey being an Egyptologist,
securing" him I a class A specimen of
mummy, for.; his experiment.
Don Romero goes; in his plight to
Ferris Hartman— or, rather, "Washing
ton Stubbs, an impecunious curio dealer
—whose curios, consist mostly of stage
props, for he; Is,~in sooth, a* reformed
actor. .'Stubbs has a mummy case. r but;
no^mummy.Vso Bolivar, his man of all
work,': isipressed c . into : service. "\u25a0.\u25a0;\u25a0\u25a0 For. '{a.
consideration Bolivar agrees to be
come"; as fine a.'; mummy , as may be
found;
In? -'order.': that v the mummy may not
find:! himself >: in :: . strange "surroundings
\u25a0when; he" is "awakened, the; doctor , has
an i Egyptian; room; built: in his -house;
his . family 4 and . servants ? are required
to \u25a0/ dress - after' the % ancient Egyptian
mode/ and the lofus becomes a motif for
theihouse "'decoration;- ; And so^r, the
mummy is brought '.to? life ; the doctor
and; his theories triumph-^-f or a time;
at J ; : any j rate; \ the curio : dealer ' corrals
sofneTcoin of the realm? and the hand
of his'r former.; leading woman, to whom
heVwa*s':-in'- arrears, for? back rsalary;Xthe
doctor's ? daughter Jweds? the • Braziiian
of Jher.;heart, and \ everything r turns out
just ";as! nicely 'as you .please. >l . : : . ,
'5 Hartm'an"? should ;be j a"^ hit as i Wash
ington '? Stubbs.^forj the ? part •iwas sdem'^
ingl^*\built"<for}.him.fjHiS7 drolls person?
allty^willt stand vjhtmHri?; fine ;stead Tfor
the ." role."s ; My rtlej Dlhgwall iwi 11 ',_ be jthe
maid : arid iWalter/delLeonJ' the , mummy.'
Composerj Robert' Hood 'Bowers has'sev
eral «• solos linY the) score>that^will f show
Miss | Dingwall's delightful^ sopranblto
advantage.^ft r v '\u25a0 \u25a0'-.'-':.'"'''"' \u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 '\u25a0': "\u25a0'.'\u25a0-="
MRS. FISKE PLAYS
AT THE COLUMBIA
Noted Actress Presents "Becky
Sharp" and "Pillars
of Society"
One of the most remarkable plays
that the American stage ha 3 witnessed
is "Becky Sharp." One of the most un
usual,and interesting is '•Pillars of So
ciety," gloomy Ibsen's single drama,
which is shot with hope. Mrs. Fiske
will present these two plays during her
two .weeks' 'engagement that opens at
the Columbia tomorrdw night. All of
the evening performances, as well as
the matinees on Saturday, will be de
voted to "Becky Sharp." "Pillars of So
ciety" will be produced at the Wednes
day matinees;
The origtiral announcement of the
production of "Becky .Sharp" created
much interest. This due to the
popularity of the novel, the fact that it
had never been successfully dramatized,
and the public faith in the ability of
Mrs. Fiske to give it discreet and ade
quate treatment. Langdon Mitchell, son
of Dr. S. "Weir Mitchell, executed the
manuscript and gave Mrs. Fiske the
part of "Becky,", which is considered
by many of her admirers the greatest
character she has ever created. She has
made it "the immortal Becky."
The" production of the play proved a
triumphant moment for the modern
idea of naturalness In acting. Mrs.
Fiske had long been the master of this
advanced idea of the art, but up to that
moment had displayed it principally in
emotional roles, such as "Tess of the
DlUrbervilles. It was therefore a sen
sation when the distinguished actreSa
applied her art to the intricacies of per
fect comedy and won a complete tri
umph.
That it will receive a splendid pro
duction at the hands of Mrs. Fiske and
the Manhattan company, as at present
constituted, there is no room for doubt.
The company has been fairly compact
for several seasons. Most of its mem
bers have been with Mrs. Fiske during
the* two years of "Salvation Nell," and
to those who understand the value of
the careful training which Mrs. Fiske
gives the members of this 1 company
there is every guarantee of a perfect
performance.
Ibsen's "Pillars of Society," the mo3t
popular play, of the great Norwegian,
will constitute the novelty of Mrs.
Fiske's engagement, since it has never
before been presented in San Francisco.
The title, "Pillars of Society," is. like
so many of Ibsen's titles, an ironical
clew to the story of the drama. The
"pillar of "society" in question is a cer
tain Consul Bernick, a captain of In
dustry, to use Carlyle's oft borrowed
phrase. He is the personification of
hypocritical respectability— normal in
small towns — and he is protected by the
"cautious lying silence which holds' its
tongue so carefully In small circles and
wraps around its consciousness of guilt
garment after garment of false . pro
prieties, spurious indignation and pru
dent hypocrisy."
Included in Mrs. Fiske's supporting
company are Holbrook Blinn. whose
performance of the regenerated bar
room *ot in "Salvation Nell" was a vital
and striking featur©-of that production;
Henry Stephenson, Harold Rnssell. Ed
ward Mackay, Sheldon Lewis*. Frank
aieCormack, Wilfred Buckland. Robert
V. Ferguson, R. Owen Meech. Alice
John, Florine Arnold. Merle Maddern.
Veda McEvers, Jiabel Reed, Helena Van
Brugh and numerous others.
Music in the Park
The program of music in Golden Gate
park today will be as follows:
Anthem. "Star St>ansle«l Banner."
March, "Hock DwuschHnd" Schreck
(a) Msrche. "Scenes Pitloresque" Massenet
(b) "Angeln*" ...; Massenet!
Overture. "Oberon" C. tod WeMr
Scenes from "Ballrt in Maactaera" G. Verdi
Ballet suite. "William Tell" Rossini
Mosaic, "Le Rol dc Labore" Massenet
(By request)
Overture, "Mljnon". A. Tbonia*
Waltz. "Casino Tanxc" Gua»l
Gems from "Soulkiss" Le»»
March, "Keep a Movin* "... *...Ted Snjder
"America." .- -
AMUSEMENTS
TVVO WEEKS MONTI AY NIGHT
BEGINNING rIVJm/Al JULY 4
Harrison Grey Flske presents
MRS.
Ami the MANHATTAN" COMPANY.
-Every Nlebt and Saturday Matinees
"BECKY SHARP"
Wednesday Matinees — Only Times
"I'IMjARS OF SOCIETY"
Curtain rises erenlngs at 8:15,' -Mats, at 2:15.
k i ck 7 AD Sutler and Steincr
/lLlj/iLnK' phone West vo °
•\u25a0"•.V: *. " M'.HV Home Phone 54242
BELASCO & MAYER. Owners and Managers.
MATINEE TODAY— TONIGHT
Last Time of Miss Harned's Own Version of
nCAM IP L, Em"
PRICES— Night, -3e to |l; ; Matinee, 25c. to 50c.
COMMENCING WITH MATINEE TOMORROW
• FAREWELL WEEK OF
VIRGINIA HARNED
Supported by .WILLIAM COURTENAY and
tlie Alraiar "Stock Company in
" THE SECOND MRS. TANQUERAY "
By ARTHUR W. PINKRO.
Prices— NigUt, 25c to fl; Matinees, 23c to 50c.
Jnly 11 . - - - -\u25a0 - JAMES K. HACKETT
S. LOVER ICH* MANA6ER
ELLIS ST. NEAR FILI.MORE. Class A Theater.
Commencing With MATINEE TODAY
" . Special Matinee- Fourth of July
Ferris Hartman
And His Bis Slnrlng Company in Richard Carle's
Great Musical Coaedy Success,
The Maid and The hiunpy
ETeninjr Price*— 2sc. W>e , and Tsc. •
gnd'gnnday Mat. Prices — 25c and 50c.
|§NO FIREWORKS
• No firecrackers allowed upon the grounds today
:or -' tomorrow. . Spend both days with us, : brlnj
i'tbe culHlren: " Good amusement and clean fun,
I but j no boisterousness.
1 ' -tTIIAVIU'S BAND. 2 ' concerts dally. HERR
MAX BlNG.'. barytone; MISS ANNA WOOD-
! WARD. - ; soprano. l-y"j|3B8BKB8SBB
; i'/l Bring"' your \u25a0'' lunch." or patronize the restaurant.
i Make a day;of it. - \u0084 ;
';v Next Masquerade and ! Kaba Car-
j nitali oa skates. : . , --•_ , * ' '\u25a0
[ :;\u25a0;\u25a0\u25a0; .-'Telegraph at ZGth", Oakland. "
STAR SYSTEM
SHINES AT ALCAZAR
Jamea K. Hackett's season at the
Alcazar begins July 11. It promises to
extend the success of SHss Harned's
star system at the popular Belasco
house. There' is no - American actor
better known than Hackett. whose
name Is indlssqlub^y connected with
"The Prisoner "of Zenda." "Hackett will
remain at the Alcazar six weeks, open
ing in "Samson." He also will ap
pear in "The Prisoner of Zenda.*] "John
Glade's Honor," "ilonsfeur Beaocalre."
"Don Caesar's Return", and "The Pride
of Jennico." .
AMUSEMENTS
Safest. Mast Magnificent Theater in America.
WEEK BEGINNING THIS AFTERNOON.
MATINEE EVERY DAY
A GREAT N£W SHOW
Welcome Return of Direct from the Met-
Everybody's Favorite ropolltaa 'Opera
House. New York
Lily Lena Lois Fuller's .
THE DAINTY ENG- Beautlful Dancing
LISH SINGER OP Surprise Feature.
DAINTY STORY "THE BALLET OT
SONGS "LIGHT."
CAPTAIN 3IAXI3IILIOX GBUBEB
AND 3IISS ADELINA'S
EQUESTRIAN REVIEW.
Special Feature
Return Engagement of :
TOLL 31. CKESSY k BLANCHE
DAYXJE "
Presenting Mr. Cressy's New Hampshire
. Episode
, "GRASPING AN OPPORTUNITY."
FIVE OL3IPIERS
j HUMAN STATUARY.
FRANK WHITE & LEAV SDDIONS
In Their Black Face Study,
"THE BAND WAGON.
IDE LIOST
2 HANDS AND 12 BILLIARD BALLS,
i That's All:
ORPHEU3I 3I0TI0>" PICTURES
SHOWING LATEST NOVELTIES
7 . Last Week — Immense Hit. . \u25a0*'-'\u25a0'"'
. The Original Brinkley Girl.
ANNABELLE WHITFORD
IN A SINGING NOVELTY
Evenlns Prices — 10c. 23c. 30c. 73e: Box *
: Seats. $1. . Matinee Prices (except Sundays '
and Holidays) 10c. 23«\ 50c.
PHONES DOUGLAS 70— nOME C 1370.
Market st. near 7tD. Phone Market 3SI.
< Direction SULLIVAN & COXSIDINE.
Week Besr. Sunday 31atlnee, July 3d
Entire Change of Bill Sunday*
JAMES POST COMPAXY
In "MURPHY FROM PAIUS"
i ROMANO BROS.
Australia's Premier Athletes.
THE LOXGWORTIIS
' ',''- '4 Vocalists.
ARTHUR TROUT
The Human Fish.
DALLE HOI.LE
'-^-.V--' Operatic Baritone.
WALKER Si JOKES
i * Acrohata.
. SPECIAL.
MATINEE. JULY 4TH. READ FROM THB
STAGE, by Special Wire. .
RETURNS OF JEFFRIES-JOHNSON FIGHT.
Matinee daily. 2:30— 10 c. 20c.
Two shows nightly, T:3O. 9:15 — 10, 20. SOc.
ALL SEATS RESERVED.
Aviation Meet
Emeryville Race Track *
— -Two Days — •
July 3rd and 4th
Sensational Flights and Bacw
Curtis Aeroplane
Farnum Biplane
All types of flying machines. Xrocx first maeUns
to prewnt time.
Van Tassell will mako a distaaos fllrflt. -
Vosmer and O'Brien will attempt to breai dl*.
tanc* and endurance records 'ln
their Aeroplanes. •"
VARIOUS OTHER SENSATIONAL TZXTCUXa
Returns by rounds of the Jeffries- Johnson fight
Admission to all features: •'&
50 Ceqls Children 25 Cents
YAUDEVIIXE THEATRE
EVERY ABTERNOON AND EVENING.
A VAUDEVILLE CELEBRATION!
. ARNOLDO'S PERFORMING LEOPARDS and
PANTHERS; BUNYEA and GIDEON. '-Tha
American Beauty and th« Song Writer";
GEORGIA GARDNER &. CO.. presenting "Too
Many -Darlings": JOE MORRIS. Hebrew Come-
dian; COURTNEY and JEANETTE. Eccentric
Juggler*; GORDON and HENRY. *Thoae Twlat-
ins Dancers" ; DEIRO. Famous Aceordeonlst.
and the Biograph. Prices — Afts.. lOe and- 20c;
Ntshts. 10c. 20c. SOc. • . ..
Theater- Patrons Admitted Free to Gntf:/"*->
Torpedo CarniTal, Grand Ball and JfeffrtewlUa-
son Returns. 4to of July.
IMIRW/fiiyi THEATER
if Illflf Hlfi Mission, near 22d
WEEK BEGINNING VTUh 3IATINEE TODAY
Sr ROAD SHOW
A GREAT GALAXY OF VAUDEVILLE STABS.
MADAM BEDIM and her Trafned Horses;
ROGERS. STEWART and ELWOOD in Popular
Melodies; DICK CROLIUS.& CO.. in the sketch -
hit. "SHORTY"; STRENGTH BROTHERS, tha
Muscular 31 awls; DEAN and PRICE, in "A
Tleasant Mistafcß"; HAVERLEY and TVELLJJ
the Race Track FaTorites: THE HOLDS-
WORTHS. Singers. Dancers, Banjolsts. Latest
Motion Pictures. 10c. 2iV. SOc. Mat. (except
Sundays and Holidays* — 10c. 20c.
BOOKING NIGHT EVERY F2IDAT
JULY 10— JOHN L SUILJYAN
I LURLBNE
; BUSH AND LARK IX STREETS
OCEAN WATEBL BATHS
and Tnb' ; Baths*
- : Salt water direct from the ocean. On«n
«T«y day ani , eTening; Including Sundays
and holidays. fr,om 6 ». m. to 10 p. a." S™.
tators' gallery free. \u25a0 ™* S>l) * C -
Nitatorium reserved Tuesday ' and ; Fr!da»
mornlog* from «9 o'clock to noon for women •
only. 5- . ' " \u25a0\u25a0 .---\u25a0 - •• \ ~zr \
"Filtered OeeamWater Plonge" V
-\u25a0 Comfortably heated. . PORCEULTV XTTBa
with hot, -' cold, salt and fresh water' E«^h
room ntted with hot and cold salt and treah
shower. . . "•«•«
\u25a0 Branch Tub Baths, 2131 Geary «t. »e»r
DeMsndero. - uear

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