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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, August 10, 1910, Image 1

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" Will California Produce the Rugby
Football Champions of the World?' 1
see article in
The Sunday Call
VOLUME CVILT.— NO. 71.
NEW YORK'S
MAYOR IS
SHOT AND
MAY DIE
Wocldbe Assassin Creeps Up
Behind Gaynor and Sends
Ballet Crashing Into
His Head
ISHOOTING TAKES PLACE
ON BOARD STEAMSHIP
**You Robbed Me of My Bread
and Butter," Screams Dis*
charged Employe as He
Opens Fire
COMMISSIONER EDWARDS
WOUNDED IN HIS ARM
NEW YORK, Aug. 9.— William J.
Gaynor, mayor of New York
Ctty f was snot in the head and
seriously wounded today as he stood
on the promenade deck of the steamer
Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, b}- James
D. Gallagher, a discharged city em
ploy*. Gallagher was overpowered
and arrested.
The shot was fired at 9:15 o'clock
lhi& morning. 15 minutes before the
Kaiser Wilhelm tier Grosse was due
to leave her pier at Hoboken, X. J.,
and the mayor was receiving God
speed from a group of friends, prep
- ' \; :\u25a0 \u25a0 '-*':':* \u25a0-. -- - v - \u25a0 . f -\u25a0: .
-- :"
aratory to a vacation trip to Europe.
V -
Wound Is Dangerous
The bullet struck him behind the
right ear and ranged downward, in
flicting a dangerous, though not
necessarily fatal, wound. And unless
blood poison develops surgeons arc
hopeful of the mayor's recovery, al
though at his age — 59 years — such a
wound is grave.
Tonight the mayor is at St. 'Mary's
hospital, Hoboken, surrounded by
specialists, with members of his family
r \u25a0 • -i \u25a0
near. All reports from the hospital were hopeful, and this evening six X-ray
negatives of the wound were taken to facilitate an operation for the removal
of the bullet.
Gallagher, the wouldbe assassin, is locked in a cell at Jersey City.' , He
expresses no remorse. , . '
./J The big liner was gay with flags and ringing with shouted goqdbys
when the tragedy occurred. Most of those who had been aboard the ship to
say farewell to friends or relatives had gone ashore, but a Jittlc group re
mained to talk with the mayor. They were standing on the port side of 'the
vessel, near the promenade deck forward, and were in thcacf of posing for
a group photograph \viien Gallagher, unnoticed, pushed his way almost to
the mayor's side and fired pointblank at his head.
FIRST CARTRIDGE MISSES FIRE
He used a 38 caliber revolver and an examination later disclosed that
the first cartridge had missed fire. This probably saved the mayor's life,*
for Gallagher, when he first pulled the trigger, was less than two feet away*
Backing: off slightly in his excitement, he pulled- the trigger a second time
and sent a bullet crashing into the mayor's neck. ' ; * '*' '• '
William H. Edwards, commissioner of street cleaning and the former
Princeton football star, lunged forward just as, Robert Ada'msbn, the mayor's
secretary, struck Gallagher's arm. A's he did so, a second shot 'pierced
Edwards' sleeve, inflicting a slight flesh wound on the commissioner's right
arm, which, in the excitement, remained undiscovered for hours.
GALLAGHER STRUCK DOWN
Unmindful of his wound, Edwards hit the man a crashing, blow in the
face and they fell to the deck together, Gallagher struggling With the strength
of desperation and pulling at the trigger in an attempt to fire another shot.
Edwards rained blow after blow in Gallagher's "face, while- Adam/on
and Archibald R. Watson, corporation counsel, .flung themselves on 'the
struggling two in an attempt to grasp the weapon. When Watson had
obtained possession of the gun, Edwards and Gallagher continued a bitter
struggle about the deck, Edwards now crying and shouting in his anger and
excitement, and Gallagher panting and exhausted. When Gallagher was
completely subdued a pair of steel nippers were slipped on his wrists by a
special officer and he was rushed through a threatening crowd off the vessel
MAYOR REMAINS CONSCIOUS
During the struggle with the man who had attempted to take his life;
Mayor Gaynor, though badly wounded and bleeding from the mouth and
nose, did not once lose consciousness. ? , ';-l"
The impact of the bullet did not even throw him from" his feet, but he
raised his hands to his ears and with his face contorted with, pain he stag
gered in a daze and leaned pimply across the ship's rail until Adamson went
to his assistance. . > . . ; ' '
Then some one drew a steamer chair to his side and into this. the, mayor,
sank. A few minutes later he was removed to. a. stateroom, where the ship's
surgeons temporarily bandaged the wound, preparatory to his removal Uo'
St. Mary's hospital. ;
Rufus Gaynor, a son, was the only member of the mayor's family present
Conifntied on. Page 3, Column 1
The San Francisco Call.
Blame for Train Disaster at Ignacio
PHOTOGRAPH OF WRECK ON THE NORTHWESTERN PACIFIC NEAR ICNACIO AND PORTRAITS IOF FIVE']
MEN WHO, WERE KILLED IN THE. DISASTER. I
Mayors Condition Is
Declared Satisfactory
! NEW. YORK, Aug. 9.—
! The following bulletin on
; Mayor Gaynor' s condition was
1 issued at midnight:
"Mayor (iaynor Is doing; a* well
a* oould I»e cxpfctod. He slept
* *«tine» — H« -I* peTtnrily ••nn.vojou.s.
There i* no evidence of infeetfon,
"KBUUIXAXD C. \VOI,FF,
"Houw i>l>yi>feiait. St. Mar)'*
hospital."
The following bulletin was
', given out by the surgeons at 9
; o'clock :
', \u2666\u2666The rndiocraphic examination
| of Mayor Gaynor** wound indi
> <-:ite* that the bullet In divided
> into two frneincntK. oeeupyiiiK
1 po'KitiouM that do not demand
> operative interference at pres
> ent.
\ "The condition of the mnyor
| in xatiNfaetory. He is rostinj;
| quietly.
> "WIIiMAM J. 'AKLITZ,
> "Vitutiug- phyfcfcinn
! "GEORGE E. BREWER
I v "GEORGE STEWART
J "CHARLES X. DOWD"
SAN: FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, v AUGUST 10, 1910,
CALIFORNIANS LEAD
TEMPLAR PAGEANT
Knights pf*Gommandery No. 1
Accorded Place of Honor at
Chicago Conclave
[Special Dispalch to The Call] !
.1 CHICAGO, Aug. 9.— The feature \of
the parade of 35,000 Knights Templar
today! was Company A," California com
mandery:Np. .1, which was accorded the
honor of head of the line as special-es
cort to the grand commandery 'officials.
From end to end of the line of march
the • uniforms and the
prancing ..horses of .this,, the .only
mounted commaridery, were the, center.
Qf"-, cheering. . - . . ' , . ? ;
; .The same attention has-been accorded
the Californians ever sfnee their.. ar- j
rival,. and. tonight everybody is. talking
about them. All day .yesterday the 10 j
rooms of the headquarters on the par
lor, floor of the. Congress hotel were
.thronged '.with . visitors. ' . t '
One of the rooms has been placed at j
the disposal- of Dr: Clarence. Bdwords
of the California development board
as headquarters .for the' Panama-Pa
cific exposition," and' here;' work , is be
ing, carried r .on, constantly with . good
results. Lectures are given and , pic- |
tures shown by Doctor Edwords twice '
a' day, to, large crowds,, and' thousands
of .pieces of. literature have been dis
tributed. * '.--'•- ; . f!<
NEW ORLEANS* CAMPAIGNING •
; ; New Orleans is here ' In 1 force and is
doing strong work. ' Chicagoahs' and
the' Chicago papers are friendly to New I
Orleans and great work is" beingdone •
by the southern city, -which is taking
advantage of this opportunity to press
its claims : before the- people j from all '
over -'the country. ' •
Tomorrow night the Californians will
hold 'their reception, the ''entire parlor •
iloor of the hotel having bepn engaged .'
for the occasion. The 'affair; promises <
to be one of the greatest functions of
th« week; ' ' * '
; One tragic death, one "accident that
physicians say will prove fatal, and a
dozen minor mishaps, rlue to the crowds,'
cast a shadow today over the^ parade of
what Masons .say "was the 'greatest :
number" "of, ;Knights\ Templar:
formed in line in. any city. . - \u25a0
There were more'than "40,000 Knights
in line, 1 while more than 500,000 spec- j
tators viewed tfie pageant, v; -\u25a0•- - ;\u25a0\u25a0
- The^flrst note of tragedy, came-when
Hermann Greshmann of Chicago, on his
way- to join his.; commandery, - was
caught-, 'in- the \ "death '.strip", ; between
two cars s ln. Templar way. and received' '
injuries. from^which he died on his way !
to a. hospital.,. In the grandstand, two '.
blopks away., sat ;Mrs.- Greshmann,' un- :
identified \u25a0 for three -\u25a0: hours, _ while . she
scanned the marchers for-her- husband,
not'learning.iof his death until Uhe pa
rade had passed;
ACCIDENT MARS DAY \
' .William Hackett,, a ..KnighC from \
Fostoria; 0., was 'thrown from his hor6e'
and;, was with; his j heel', in /the
stirrup for*; a; block "before knimal '
could beVstopped. Hejyvill probably die. •
In addition to these' accidents scores \u25a0
of women fainted in; the crush.,. \u25a0:. . » » •
,Unless>'sbme;i unexpected -candidate ;
develops .unusual. strength in the) con- •
clave the^chojee.' for the nextttriennial "i
gathering^lies. with': Los "^Angeles, New,
Orjeansjor.* Denver- *jV-: »'„••-»- » «<%s«y,, ; \u00844 vt" •
RETAILERS PROVE
TRUST BOYCOTT
Judge i<. Satisfied . That Dealers,
Were^Discriminated Against
. ? .'Sy Fish Companies §
; .The. damsfge>suit;; in .which the Por
tola fish* cbmpany.* seeks to "secure $15,
000*fromTsix, 1 fish 'corporations and v A.'
Palatiini was strength
ened; yesterday, much testimony of a
consplracyUo put the plaintff company
out' of ' business^ being presented to the
jury "in Judge Hunt's „ court jby .Attor
ney James Devoto.- Some 15' retailers
have -testified* that the' defendants .re
fused -to' supply -them with' fish 1 while
they; purchased from , the " Portola com
pany. Judge Hunt ; yesterda'y ruled that
this point ' had ; been" sufficiently estab
lished, and: said \ he would- not admit
further -cumulative \u25a0 evidence - along" the
same-lines." f \u25a0\u25a0'\u25a0'\u25a0 '\u25a0 ""• - ' -\u25a0":•" - :\u25a0:_.
: .» Clifford 'jSatania testified 'that when
he talked with' Trapani "of ; the Western
fisli; coinpariy.'aboyit ithe boycott , on \u25a0' re
tailers iwho* purchased"; from ; the. Por
tola, t Trapani said to him ':: - \ .'; •
j> fit is -for"* any one out
side, of > : the - combination \to . do . busi
ness.- 'Paladini* and ithe Western- com
pany control all: the! other companies in
the combination,-- and make them do
whatever they order." _
PLAN FOR 1 COM BJS ATI OX
\u25a0 Testimony, tending: to -show a com
bination "was j given < by JU ; Gazzalo after
W. '.M. - Madden,' \chief.; ; attorney | for ithe
defendants;- had jmadei desperatejeff orts
to ,' keep ; it out. % Gazzalo » said * that : last
July,; J.I 8.-lngugllal.of -Uhe "; California
fish; company; told; him -that /a .combiria'
tion-was to ube. formed, -to -take- effect
"August'il. r< -ilngugliat said? further sthat
the- flrms- in I,^he«i1 ,^he«i proposed: combine t had
agreed(not t.to; take ! employes; one ( from
the other;'! and Ing"uglia".wanted Gazzalo
to cleave ithe>We6tern.companyi and ? go
to ; the. Californlai before > the 'combine
w »s;:formed.' V'v;,;,. . ; -.;, . . T.:^:^;
BIG TREE GROVE
IS GIFT TO STATE
pliree Hundred and Twenty
f.VAcres of Sequoias in Tulare
ifcs County, in Donation i
tk&f. \u0084-\u25a0.,..\u25a0'".\u25a0;\u25a0\u25a0-\u25a0-.-\u25a0-.\u25a0- p - -
t>,*To .be preserved for all time,- the ,peo
\u25a0ple;\)f California- have, had presented to
tthem ,320. acres of big jtrees,. said to be
among the- finest standing specimens of
;the v sequoia gigante'a in the', state, by
of Orosi,' Tulare coun-
f ty.'if- The' gift was reported yesterday
[.afternoon at the meeting of the regents
; ( of the state ".university,. to whom it is
"given to t be held in trust. , Theltract is
yvvithin four miles of Millwood, Tulare
county, where is situated the General
Grant nationalpark., \u0084
/'The donor declares" that it is, to be
used as a playground for the people of
California,^ that they are' to camp there,
free^of (charge and that it" is. tq ; be used
for. research -and instruction in forestry.
. Another . gi ff t was of
$3,500 ;by the :Albert /Sidney /Johnston
chapter of .the Daughters^of the_Confed
eracy,"" for the establishment of "a schol
arship at, the university.iJOibe known as
the Albert Sidney Johnston scholarship
and: the" beneficiary -to .be' either): the. de
scendant-of a!confederate veteran- or, a,'
member ' of | the chapter. .This j was ac
cepted .Avithi thanks, by the regents," sub
ject-to the approval of the' finance com
mittee. \u25a0 \u25a0-.- \u25a0•".;',.:\u25a0 \u25a0':,_,. '\u25a0 :\u25a0.-... \u25a0-"•'"..-.\u25a0 *
i \u25a0,'; Other, gifts reported ?were: $1,000 from
Mrs.*Phebe'A;:Hearst in/relmbursement
\u25a0f (^expenditures made by the university
for | anthropological - publications ;\ from
Mrs.iHearsti'also/came portraits, of her
self^ and of the 'late | Senator .* George
Hearst, r doneJri ollsiby. the Swedish art-"
iist.^-Carl^ Oscar. ißorg, ?one?toibe - hung
in- the Hearst memorial mining/building
and. the Mother; inV Hearst , hall;! by ; Mrs."
,Kate ; T. Cousins, Berkeley, present
edit a marine ipaintirigVby^a^ California
artist.'VC.f.J. }Denny,-;'andv- William :H.
, Crocker,,, gave : a -meteorite 'found in
Rochester, N.-Y.. . • :' \ -.. '
:"\u25a0 -1 Frederick i Parker ; Gay,/ A. , 8.. -; M.ID.,'I D.,'
of itheJlarvard medical school.'hasjbeen
appointed* as; professor/off pathology I at
aisalaryiof \u25a0$4,ooo:aTyear.r
=- /^^^WEA THER
YEST£KDffI(£-M&imum temperature 58.
\hnmhhun\eso. ' */s -%X
FQR££ Jsfyj OF&J&DA V — Clouds:
threakning*weather iV^e \orning; fait dur
ing i^^da^f^xod^at9^o*ith»€st winds.
SAYS HE FORGOT
ABOUT TRAIN TO
FOLLOW HIS OWN
THE DEAD
JOHN WILKINSON
H;-W. EMERSON
PINCUS LEVIN i
M. A. BANKS
A. W. BANKS
HERMAN BAYER
W. E. POEHLMAN
GEORGE RILEY
NEIL NIELSCN
G. CRIVELLONE
T. W. RICHARDSON
W. B. BURTON
THE INJURED
BURT SPEAKER, fireman No. 18,
Sausalito — Broken right arm
and injury about head.
E. L. LYTTAKER, engineer No.
18, Sausalito — Broken left leg
and injuries to head.
ERNEST LAVORAN, newsboy,
674 Broadway, San Francisco
:,*\u25a0•' —lnjuries to head and body
bruised.
A. C. BURNHAM, Los Angeles-
Injuries to head, chest and
face; fracture of right leg.
FRED SAVAGE, Cotati— Bruised
slight cuts and bruises.
R. C. VAN TAGEN, captain of
schooner T. R. — Left leg
broken and h.ead injuries.
ENOCH VAN PELT, Los An
geles — Left leg and both arms
broken; compound fracture of
left arm near the surgical neck
of the humcrus.
JAMES GARFORTH, Novato—
Bruises about head and body.
J. W. KANE,' Novato— Left, leg
broken, and injuries to head.
W. S.. BACHELOR, Petaluma—
Right ohoulder. and arm frac
- tufed. Sent to St. Luke's.hos
, .pitaL . .'. , - .
"A. Y. O." MARK
BLOOD STAINED
HANDKERCHIEF
Initials Considered Important
Clew by Officials Investi
gating Kendall Murders
[Special Diipatch to The Call]
CAZADERO, Aug. 9. — Two blood
stained handkerchiefs with the initials,
"A. Y. 0.," on them were found today
hidden in a sack on the porch of the
Kendall home. The initials are con
sidered an important clew by the of
ficials. A piece of- bloody ducking and
a blood stained hatchet were also dis
covered. '
For miles around the dwelling house
of Thomas Kendall and his father and
mother, Enoch and Eura Kendall, the
search for the remains of the murdered
famtly at Lion's ' Mouth farm was con
tinued today with meager results:
for months back^the history of the
Kendall family, was traced by the
searchers who are investigating the
terrible crime of which the^ Japanese
Henry Tamaguchi is accused.
While the posse, working at the
ranch under orders from Sheriff Smith
and District Attorney Clarence F. Lea,
was investigating the mountain cabin
on the place which the Kendalls owned
at Black " Rock, two miles - from the
farm they leased, it was learned that
several months ago Enoch Kendall had
occasion to suspect' that he was being
fired upon by A. E. Collins, a neigh
boring rancher and the propriAor of
a confectionery store "in Cazadero.
During the spring Kendall senior
and Mrs. Collins were walking to
gether from the, Collins house to Black
Rock farm and when at the cabin on
the latter place Kendall- tried to em
brace Mrs. Collins. Mrs. Collins re
sented the demonstration,' but realizing
the age of Enoch - Kendall and the
friendship • that existed between her
family and his, she made no mention
of it at; the time. Later she told
"Uncle. John" Cox, a neighbor. "Uncle
John" advised Mrs. Collins In the mat
ter, ' but said nothing at the " time to
any one else.
Kendall Apologizes
: Subsequently the woman told her
husband. Collins was incensed at the
act of the old man, but on thinking
the matter over decided ;lt was better
to forget the affair. One day, a few
weeks .later, Kendall was in the hills
near; the Collins place. ; He heard some
shots 1 fired ;_and Immediately ran home,
believing he "was under fire from Col
lins' gun. vHe told his family that
Collins i had shot at him and confessed
to ; his,\son, >Tom, *of his attempt to
embrace Mrs.t Collins. , But there was
to be )nV feud between the Collinses
Continued on Page 5, Column 1
Xb^jce^pinjb- cents.
OFFICIALS OF
nn in orri/
n A Srrii
iiUfiU uLLII
CAUSE
General Manager Palmer Says
That Conductor Mistook
Two Trains
BERKELEY MAN'S DEATH
INCREASES FATAL TOLL
W. B. Burton Succumbs to
Crushed Chest After Endur»
ing Hours of Agony
EIGHTEEN YEAR OLD BOY
MAY BE AMONG DEAD
TWELVE dead, one missing and
eleven injured is the toll paid
in the wreck on the Northwest
ern Pacific railroad near Tgnacio Mon
day night, when, through the negli
gence of Conductor George Flaherty, a
work train crashed into the Santa
Rosa north bound passenger train.
The death list was increased by one
yesterday, when \V. B. i Burton cf
Berkeley, after hours of frightful
agony, caused by a crushed chest and
other broken bones, died at the North
western hospital in McAllister street.
That the wreck may have claimed
another victim became known yes
terday, when it was reported that
Charles H. Fisher, an 18 year old boy
of Brooklyn, N. V., and cousin of Pin
cus Levin of Santa Rosa, was miss
ing. . Fisher had just come from the
east in company with' Levin, and, ac
cording to M. Levin, brother of the
dead man, was with Pincus Levin on
the ill fated train. M. Levin came
to this city yesterday in search of
Fisher, and .failing to find him, gave
it as his opinion that the boy had
perished in the wreck.
Victims Are Recovering
It is the opinion of the physicians
at the Northwestern hospital, where
the injured are being treated, that
there will be no more fatalities. ;AU
of the victims are resting easily, and
now appear on the road to recovery.
While the wreckage was being?
cleared away yesterday, General Man
ager \V. S. Palmer of the Northwest
ern Pacific and other officials of the
road were busily investigating the
cause of the disaster, with the purpose
of absolutely fixing the blame.
Palmer, from a conversation had
with Conductor Flaherty, gained the
impression that the latter had mis
taken the Glen Ellen train for the
Santa Rosa train, and, believing the
track clear, had ordered the engineer
of the work train to pull out. The
Glen Ellen train, which usually pre
cedes the Santa Rosa * train by 20
minutes, was late Monday evening,
and reached Ignacio almost at the
time when the Santa Rosa train was
due. .It was Palmer's opinion, there-*
fore, that Flaherty had mistaken the,
one for the other.
But the Call last night located Fla
herty at the home of his brother, L. S.
herty, 1037 Pardee street. Berkeley, and
obtained the first direct statement to
the public that has been made by the
"I Forgot," Says Conductor ;*
Flaherty told The Call representa
tive that he had not mistaken the
trains — that he was fully aware that
the Glen Ellen train had reached Ir
nacio, and that for some Inexplicable
reason he forgot that another train
was following It. He declared that
the blame rested solely upon him. al
though he added that the engineer of
the work train was inexperienced. % and.
trusting solely to him, was unable to
remind him that the Santa Rosa train
had yet 1 to reach Ignacio before the
track would be clear. - Flaherty's full
statement and acceptance of all blame
for the dlstaster appears elsewhere in
these columns.
The bodies of most of the victims re
mained yesterday at the San Rafael
morgue, where Coroner Sawyer Is pre
paring to hold the inquest. .Meanwhile
it* was a day of mourning in Santa
Ros&^and ePtaluzna. where, man^ of

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