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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, September 02, 1910, Image 12

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THE CALL'S PAGE OF SPORTS
«MA/D OF MYSTERY- NOW IN VAUDEVILLE HAS EVERYBODYPVLLINO THE MYSTERIOUS STUFF-
FITZGERALD CHARMS
OAKLAND'S SLUGGERS
Trans-Bay Aggregation Again Defeated
On Their Home Town Diamond
WILLIAM J. SLATTERY
Oakland, the runner up for the Pacific Coast league's pennant, looked,
like a class Q brush aggregation on its own back yard yesterday afternoon.
The forlorn, trailing, almost forgotten Sacramento brigade played in and
out and all around the Commuters. Pitcher Ed Fitzgerald had the transbay
sluggers shcuiipg for mercy during the nine innings of action, and the' 3 to 1
.'care does not ever half illustrate or explain what the auburn haired slabster
from the capital city handed the Oaks.
It's a long lime since the transbay fans and the others who gathered on
the Oakland diamond saw such an exhibition of pitching as Fitzgerald gave.
He seemed to depend entirely upon his collection of curves, and the way he
bended these twisters over the plate caused the Commuters to do everything
but break their backs in their vain endeavors to -connect. Nothing save Oak
land luck ever boosted the lonely tally over the plate. .
Fitzgerald fanned eight men, and not one of his opponents could work
the stubborn twirler for a base on balls. He had Oakland at his mercy from
the moment be tossed the first shoot in the opening round until the game
came to a close. There was no argument to this,' either. Sacramento was far
and away the best team, principally because. Fitzgerald pitched such' masterly
ball. His work seemed* to inspire all the other Senators. • ,
Ralph Willis started in to do the t
easy to see that he was not there. H
tpe^d and. worst of all. the men behind
him did not deliver in the pinches.
Thus It was that Willis faded away in
th*. Fixtli Inning to make way for the
]*ft handed Nelson, who. by the way.
m^t with much better success. !
But no matter how the Oakland j
riitchprs worked they could not expect'
to achieve anything while Fitzgerald
held the Indian sign high over their
heady. He was the life and the eoul
of the wholf. Sarramento team. All its
•members appeared to be proud of the
. •work of their pitcher, and th«y showed
their pride by their actions.
gr>t Into trouble for th»s firet
.": time in. the third inning. For his own
benefit It must be stated that he was
hot wholly responsible for the two tal-
Hes which cane over the pan, but the
\u25a0.three blngles helped a lot. nearly as
jnu^h as the glaring error which Mitze
\u25a0 committed. /v^;.-;
. Fitzgerald started the rally with a
drive to center fi>ld. He caught the
Oa.kls.nd battery asleep and got away
'with an easy steal. Then Shinn got a
" pass and Van Buren perished on a fly.
Hcist^r laid down a bunt and dug for
Jsr.«t base. Mitze and Willis tore after
tho. ball. The Oakland catcher speared
it and heaved for first. It went wld« of
\u25a0 its mark, bounded into deep right field
and Fitzgerald and Shinn landed, pulled
up.
Sacramento skipped the next spasm,
but in the fifth they were right back
on the job again, fighting for another,
which they put ov*r handily enough.
Two were down a« Helster combed off
a nice one to center to be followed by
Perry, who found Willis for another
' «Tack. Boardman swung in with the
third wallop and Swander allowed it to
pet away from him. This gave Heister
-all the time he wanted to make the
plate.
Oakland's lonesome tally, made its
appearance in the sixth perioQ. Carroll
was safe on Shinn's error, the only
boot charged to Sacramento. Papa
Wolverton picked out a safe one to
right, which shot Carroll around to
third.' Cutshaw forced his boss at sec
ond, but wh!I« the play was being
pulled off Carroll sneaked in with the
run.
' There was a great collection of Oak
land fans -on the i-pot and they fairly
ehouted themselves sick' for a' victory
for their team. Every time an Oak
\u25a0lander w.ould land on .the bases a
mighty yell would rise from the stand
"jind the bleachers. But all this noise
Iliad no effect on Fitzgerald. He knew
that he had Oakland's number, so he
never bothered his head about what
flight happen If a batting rally started.
There was no chance for such a start. -.
Sacramento was dangerous in every
inning. Not a round slipped by but that
the Senators had one or more men on
the bases. Nelson pitched far better
wisting for the Commuters, but it was
c lacked control of thc*ball, he-lacked
Beavers Are Bears
On Their Own Lot
\u25a0 ._ : + ;
* STANDING OF THE CI-ÜBS ;
(Pacific Coast I.mrhci ' ' ]\u25a0
W. IS. Pet.
Portland* : . . . . 77 r.rt ..-.««
Oakland $2 an .544 "
San Franp|«ro ..... 7S 72 .520 !
;| Vernon .. . .. ... 78 73 .510 ;
j! I*o« Angeles ....... 7« 78 ,40'Jt '\u25a0''',
(| Sacramento ........ 54 02 .370 ' !
j! HESULTS OF GAMES |
]• - ">.Snn Frnnclpco S, Vernon 2. - v
I !f.j/ Sacramento 3, Oakland 1.
]| >/ Portland 4, L.os . Anceles 1. '<]
|! GAMES TODAY ;
I' OBkland-Sncranicnto at Rerre- |
111 1 at lon park. ' <
j!j San Fran«l«co at Vrrnou. <!
i| i/os Angeles at Portland. !
ball than did Willis, but nevertheless
he was lucky to fret by without allow
ing the Senators to come In with a run.
The score: • #
SACRJTMEXTO
• , iT: : ab. r. bii. ro. a. r.
Shinn. 2l> 3 JO 2 11
Van Buren, lb 4 0 1 10' 0 0
Heister. <«. f. 4 1 2-2 0 0
I'crr.r. J. f 5 0 1 :{ 0 0
Bonrrtnwn, 3b ..4 0 1 13 0
Brljres, r. f 3* 0 0 l 0 0
Burns, s* 3 0 1 0 4 0
Pplftmsn, c 4 0 2 8 1 0
Fitzgerald, p 4 1 1 0 2 0
Total ......34 3 9 .27 Tl 1
OAKLAND
i .- \u25a0,-\u25a0-. AB. R. BH. PO. A. H.
Mapcert. 1. f. 4 0 0 4 o 0
Wares, m 4 *0 -0 2 ", n
Hftgan. lb "4 0 0 12 0-' O
Carroll, c. f ......4 1 13 0' f>
WolTcrton. Sb 4 0 8 0 n 0
Cutchaw, 2b 4 0 1 I 5 0
S wander, r. f. .4 0 1 2 0 1
Mlt«<». c. - 3 0O 3 1 1
WitU*. p. ." 2 Ol 0 2 0
Nelson, p. 1 T) 0 ,0 S 0
Total ......... 1.. .....84 1 7 27 16 ~2
runs and nrrs by innings
Sacramento ....:. 0 0 2 0 1000 0 3
-.Raneblt* ....... 10 2 1 3 10 1 0 9
Oakland ......... 01.0 0 0 0 10 0 o—l
Baeeblts ....... 0 2 0 2"- 1 10 0 I—7
\u25a0 SUMMARY
Three run*, S hits off Willis In G 2-3 innings.
Two bafe hit* — Van Kuren. Wolrerton, WillK
Fimt bap*- on callfil h«ll« — iftt WiUls 4. off Nel
son 2. Srtrnck out— By Fltzjrerald B.' bj- Willis
2. .-'Stolen has*-* — Fitzgerald. -. Wolverton,/Cut
sbaTT. - - Double plar — Wares, to \u25a0 Cntshaw to ' Ho
gan. Wild pitch — Wil!i«<. Time of game— l hour
and 40 mlnuttS. Umpires— Hildebrand and Fin-
THE SAN FRANOisca OALL v FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1910.
SEALS TRIM WINGS
OF HOGAN'S FLOCK
With Their Big Sticks Thsy
Did the Trick; Count
'cm — Sixteen!
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
IX)S ANGEI,ES, Bept. I.— The Seai.s
got their revenge today.* overwhelming
Hogans Villagers to the tune of S to 2.
The principal instrument of vengeance
was Mitchell, the Seal's new pitche,
who had the sign on the Hoganltes
from the start. Mitchell was Avlld at
times and Vernon's only runs were'
forced. in when he walked men in the
fifth inning. In the sixth he walked the
first man up and Moliler sent him to
the bench despite the pleadings of
Mitchell and other, members of the
team. Browning relieved "him and fin
ished the' game. Mitchell, aside from a
tendency to wildness. pitched great ball
and in three times at bat got a single
and a double besides fielding his posi
tion well.
The' Seals took the lead in the first,
Mohler scoring on Burrell's error- and
Ross' boot of Lewis' single. Lewis
scored on Tennant's double. A double
play proved Bernon's undoing today, as
it did with the Seals 'yesterday. Car
lisle got in. front of one of Mitchell's
shoots in the first. Burrell walked and
Tennant fumbled Ross' bunt.
With the bases foil and none out, R.
Brashear drove to Vitt, who caught 1
Carlisle at the plate and Brashear was
doubzled at first. Coy. was an easy out.
After the third Inning the gaijo was
a farce. ,In the third the Seals scored
four runs. After Mohler was our,
Lewis singled, and went to 6econ& on a
wild pitch. .Bodle walked and. Tennant
singled. Vitt scored two with a double
and two more tallied* on a wild pitch.
Hogan, seeing the game.was lost, sent
Hensling and Hasty in to replace
Brackenridge and Brown. The Seals
scored their, seventh run In the sixth i
when Hensling was found for four hits, i
Shaw scored in the .seventh on two \u25a0
singles and a double steal. ;
Vernon's gift runs came. in. the; fifth. '
Fisher and Hasty singled. Hensling
fanned and Carlisle walked, filling the
bases. Burrel walked, forcing In a run
and after Ross fouled out R. Brashear
walked, forcing. in the second tally.
-Mitchell appeared nearly broken
hearted when he was sent to ihe bench
in the sixth, ' The crowd cheered him "
lustily. Bodie, who has a lame. ankle,
was replaced by. Shaw in the fifth. J
' vkrnon. ;;-' i \u25a0'-,'h.i^. '\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0£*£ ; I
AB. U. BH! TO. A. E.
Carli!»l<?;,c. f. 3 0 0 4 0 0 1
Bnrrell; 3b 2 «V 0 2 3 1 ;
Uoss.,l. f. 4 O 1 0 0 1
K. Brasbear, 2b. ...:....?. «> . 0 0 5 0
Coy, r. f. ............... 4 0:1.1 ;1. O
Hosp, sn. 3 0 1 -4 1 0
Fisher, lb .........4-1 1 12 2 0
Brown, C .1 0 0 1 1 0 1
Hasty, c. ...31 2. 3 I' ,(1 |
HmckenridKe, p. ....:... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Hencllnc. p. ....,200. 040
*N. Bras Lear ........ 1 0 0 .0 0 0
T0ta1....... V......01 2 C 27 .18 2
SAN FRANCISCO ) ,
\u25a0 ab. r; Birl.ro. a.ls.
Mwflden, rf 4 0 - 2 1 0 >0
\u25a0Mohler. 2b ... 5 1 1 S 2.-0
Lewis, c. f. '. 2 3 2 0-0
Bodlf. 1. f. 2 1 01 0 0
Tennant. lb. ........ . . . . 5 I ' S S 1 ; ; 1 \u25a0
Vitt,- 3b. 3 1 112 ,0
Berry, c. .......' .-.4 0 19. 2, 0
McArdle, ss. ........ 4 1 1 O 2 0
Mitch"U. p. ..........:.. 3 0 2 1-0 0
Browning, p. ....... I 0 1- 0 3 0
Shaw, ]. f. ........... 2 1, .1 . 1 .0 -^>
' T0ta1. .. ........ ... . \u25a0; .*. -3S ' Slf. 27 .12. 12 1
\u25a0 •X.' Brashear batted for Hensling in the ninth
inning.- . ;\u25a0 • \u0084- .. ...::-^-- \u25a0:-\u25a0.. ?
' RUNS AND: HITS BY INNINGS
Vernon . . ... .".... 0 :0: 0 0 0 2 ; 0 0 ; 0 0— 2
8a5ehit0........ 1 0 ,0.1 2 10 10—6
San Francisco....' 2 ' 0 4 0 0,11 0 1 0— «
8a5cb1t5........ 2;1 3 1 0 4 2 rO-2— 16
.: \u25a0\u25a0 > . :, SUMMARY..; ;--\u25a0 '::\u25a0-\u25a0 -\u0084;
Six hits and six runs off Brackenridge. in three
innings. Three hltn and two run* off Mitchell In
five innlnfcp. Two ba»e hits— Coy, Tennant.' Vitt
and Mitchell. Sacrifice ; hit— Madden. \u25a0:\u25a0\u25a0- Stolen
base — Madden." '.- First base. : on , called -balls-^Off
Bracke.nridge 2.' Mitebell" «/ Henftling 0. ; Struck
out — By i Brackenridge : 1. - M itchell 4, nenslingt ; 2,
Browning :. l.v \u25a0 Dwible- plays— Vitt- to 4 Berry >to
Tennant; XBrowninn.':to Berry 'to - Vltt; f Wild
pitch— Braekenridge (2 \.~ .Hit.. by, pitched' ball— \u25a0 :
iuriuio.%-. timiilr*— McGreeTy.^. • »\u25a0-.-\u25a0', < K---.'''"-:
BEAVERS SOAR ON
BACKS OF ANGELS
League Leaders Trounce Dillon's
Crew Through Latter' [s Loose
Fielding and Weak Hitting
PORTLAND. Ore., Sept. I.— Los
Angeles lost to Portland today, 4 to 1.
because of loose fielding and failure
to hit in pinches. Portland cinched
the game in the eighth inning", when
Krapp singled and Ryan reached first
, on a wild throw., by ; Delmas. Olson
took second on a single and an error,
scoring Krapp and Ryan. An out and
a smashing single by Casey scored
Olson for the third run of the Inning.
The score: '
LOS ANGELES. .
„ , . AB. R. BH. PO. A. E.
\>* l *r> c . f .30 1 40 0
Bernard, r. t. .4 0 I 0 0 0
J| 0 ,7 ar 'V 2b - 3 0 '0 • 1 .10
nillon. 'lb ...o 0 0 IS 0 0
X\ hoeier. 1. f .3 0 0 2 0.0
Hullinan, 3b ...4 0 1 1-2 0
nelmas. ks. ; 3 0 0 13 1
Ylarlng, c. \u0084 3 1 12 1. 1
Naple, p. '. \u0084.3 0 j 0 0 0
Total :..'.. ..28 \ I ' 5 24. 15 . ~i
TORTIiAND ; .
AB. R.BH. PO. A. B.
Ryan. c. f 41 0 0 0 0
01«fin.*-ss. ...........; . '3 \u25a0 r 2* a "\u25a0•»''. 0
Rapps. lb. 4 0 0 14 1 •\u25a0'• 1
C"«T. 2b^ 4 0 1 1-3 0
Sbeehan. 3b 4 0 2 1 1 0
Kpeas, 1. t. ..30020 0
gfV r. f .....3 1.1 01 1
Fisher, c. ............... 3 00 5. 4 0
Krapp. p. ....3 1 2 1^ 6. 0
Total .......... ....;. .31 4 8 27 18 2
, RDNSAND HITS BT INNINGS
Los Aneeles ... ...0 0 0 0 100 0- o^-1
Basehits 2100 2 000 o—3
Portland ......... 0 0 1 0 •>- 0 0 3 x— 4
Basebits 0 12 10 1 0 3 x— S
SUMMARY
Struck out— By K'rapp 5.- ; by * Najrle 2. ; First
base on called balls— off 'Krapp 5. off Nagle 1.
Two base, hit— Hsllinan. Sacrifice tit— Wheeler.
Stolen bases— Krapp, Dillon. Olson. : Howard.
First base on errors — T.os Ancele* 1. Portland 1.
Left on bases— Los &ng*le.n 3, Portland 4. Time
of game — 1 hour and 55- minutes. Umpire — Van
Haltrenl . '
Anaconda Selections I
First race— Klertrowan. Minnie and Cae»ar. •
Second race — Galene Gale,' Grace G and Parld
Warfl«ld. : •;, . • \u25a0 v \u25a0 " ; : ; ;\u25a0: ..-'. ,'\u25a0\u25a0":, •'.
•» Third race— Hannah Louise, Thomas Calboun
and Billy, Mnyhem. .
Fourth race — Lirlos, ConTent Bell and Jack
o* Lantern. \u25a0 «• .
Flfth:race— Budapest, Spring Ban and J. C.
Clem. ::\u25a0..-..: :\u25a0..-.. -\u0084 \u25a0„
Sixth race— Genera. Warfare and Ramon Co
rona. . '---_. \u25a0 : \u25a0" \u25a0 -:\ • '\u25a0\u0084..\u25a0 <*;'\u25a0'
156 Geary, Street, San Francisco.
New F"6ot
Ball Rules
j£L. Spaldjrtg's
oSJa a OFFICIAL
FOOT
j&^jß^m B3» Records m^ a b \u25a0
HL^Bw and . DAI I
IOT from all .\u25a0• fl """»
i ' V^a over tbe Allinr"
S«>nd for \ 3 country Illllllr
,F«>t Ban f> I \u25a0». - \u0084 ',•':. : UUIUljt
rrVr IT For 1910
;- •\u25a0",*•:. : '.;; B iRWeI by WALTERCAHP:
g<WN>^ > iPrioe I"0o
WORLD'S TARGET
RECORD SMASHED
CHICAGO. Sept.- I.— J. R.*Graham: of
Long Lake. 111., broke the world's ama
teur target record- today when he went
out. with 417 straight at the. final day's
shoot of the grand Qhicago handicap
tournament. "' .'\u25a0 :. • . ' '.' , : ,• • :
Graham really: broke 432 targets
without a miss, but 15 of these ar.c
elinilnated because they did not come
on the program. \u25a0 He got nine; unfin
ished on Monday in practice .arid; he
broke six this morning Jn tuning up
for the contest. • . • •" -. :
It was the' unlucky thirteenth^ bjrd
in the eighth event today that got
away'from the eagle .eye of, the great
wing shot. He had gone seVen : events
of 15 targets each without, a. "miss; giv--:
ing him 1(55 sti'alght.-iHe started ; oh
the eighth event. with -12 straight. The
thirteenth was a ".left quartering disk,
Which took an extra jump, just as Gra-
ham pulled \the ; trigger,- arid : he shot
under it. • ;.- \u25a0 ;•. . \u25a0 \,\ . •. :'\u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0• \u25a0• :
Graham finished up this event and.
the one following without -a- miss. The
former amateur mark was 366. heldby
Dan O'Connell of San Antonio, -Texas,
and made recently in a • registered.
Texas shoot. • . \u25a0•*• "—
Tq the Mart Who Is "AH In"
•A_ man who .was. not- yet .40, but who probably felt A man who was drunk all night felt so badly In the
like he was 70,- dropped into a: chair In our office. morning that he got drunk, again. His nerves w«« so
"I'm all ln:>my : back aches: I'm trembling all over. upset from overstimulation that he needed more booze
;I*m afraid of my shadow. -I've, got no energy for my to taper off on. Drugs act liko that, only worse,
work. I'd runaway- Lfrom ' an old friend because I jf r Doolev «ays- "A Atws in a. little nizen that a.
feel.aslftt would .be a task to; greet him pleasantly. null" mo re O f U^wWd kill fe" P
I can t brace : up; -I just want to lay down and sleep, . „,. v . _ «/",»;' *v# i
sleep, sleep: and I don't car? if I never wake up." Are> you » n Inrv Do you feel that your youthful
We see such men daily. We hear from them by every en-rgy.is exhausted? Are you full of pains and aches?
mail ' ' . • - . Are you easily tired, nervous, discouraged, worried, de-
"Drugs— l've taken enough to .float a ship. I had to spondent? Is the old cheerful spirit gone?
quit my stomach wouldn't* stand any more Be joyous, be happy and light hearted: feel the ex-
dosing." . • • . ; : t hllaratlon that comes from nerves full of electric
Nearly all the suf- .. .;;\u25a0 V \ " energy, youth and
\u25a0«rel"i«« re I"i« ??\Va V - ; " • \ \ • J&z**^ v1 «°r. You can. and
i came io us naa • inea • • .^gijHi^." «v \ ' \ /T*?*^^^^^ 'will if yon annlv
.they "werlTSd enough \u25a0-, . ttST\ r^V \ \ W£fs^& Electra-Vita.
to swallow they had- EgK» -4 \ \ I rvK£& f rMl ~^ «*« «^^-
taken drugs. - • . / .. <ggig &\ VA \ \ /^^^a«M C^ &t TTfi?^
Dr. Oliver W>ndeU • . : \u25a0 '^ s * *f . A], \\ \\ •* C^ >§||9^ VJCL X illO
were dumped into the " f [ ' - -i ; hCV r\ J * \ ' \u25a0*.'I-VV
it would be good for "=" = i ; /\ : "v^^cNt-^ \ >.- yC-^^^\ *X V
mankind, but bad . \\ ' . > .-. ./) «\u25a0 V \^^s&S?V?^| tSO^pT
Drugs won!t re- V ) \, _^-f— s /S&y^/ittilM |B
n ne r r^if F >°oouo 0 u- VaV- Q//
stonSch^can^ d?R*Jt ' ) I •>' V ' :\w \^&&W And brln^ or mail
Jgood. used- Electra-Vita for- a A few months and wrote • garding the cure of disease. We^n°send k thft W h^t
;?rad^a^^ '"'' "• '^ "^ «^2&~
of 35. i I aman old man made young." -. FREE TEST'of Electra-Vlta if you calL
* The; nice 'thing -about ; Electra-Vita is its simplicity. -'Consultation free. Office . hours. 9 a. m. to 6 t> m
•Its.powercomes'from dry cells, co that you put it on Wednesday and, Saturday evenings until S- Sund»v-
when you- retire and turn on the. current.- "While you 10 to 12. . . * \ *"""*•
;»leep ltjpumps energy into^all your, nerves and vitals. T~ — .. < _^_ -, ... _^ — — :: — \u25a0 \u25a0 \u25a0 .'
> For ithe"« man who is: exhausted it is lQvaluable. It B^l%^ If lp«^frt*a« V/ if*' A f***
rejuvenates him. i 3 ,r, ». \u0084 A lAC J&l^Vli €KmX m V ilcl V^O»
,' If you have a pain or an ache. .it removes the cause DEPT 4'
by'flndlngr the^weak; nerve and"; invigorating, it. 702 MARKET ST., COR. KEAR.VY, S i\ FR 4 vn«r ft
: You kn6w t tnere is no patn'that does not come from Please send me, prepaid your f\£* on CO
some weakness. .'Blectra-Vita Invigorates, and. that 1 . Illustrated book. J "^.V.iq pase
the T pain" by destroying the nerve ;.vi Mr .
feeling..- But^ that doesn't remove the cause. - Electra- \u25a0 AJ>ISL> •••••• • \u2666 . . : ; . . . '.\ ;..y. .1
Vita cures the cause by giving back the lost strength. V&iSSB&SBmBOk
into thehablt. A small AnnRP-W
dose today calls for- ai large one; tomorrow. " - Auuaaaa >t->
BIG LEAGUES CULL
STARS FROM MINORS
SeAls 'Lose; Bodie; Commuters, Thomas;
And Arigels Mourn Draft of Hallinan
GINCINXATI. 0.. Sept. I.— One hun
dred and fifty minor league players
were, drafted by the 16 clubs of the
.two major leagues when the national
baseball commission 'met here today.
Of these the National league secured
67. ajid the American league 4S. The
Brooklyn: nationals secured 15 players,
the New- York Nationals were the
next fortunate in the draw, getting 13;
Philadelphia national* 12. Chicago na
tionals; II and the Chicago Americans
:10. The others ranged downward to a
single . player by . Detroit, and this one
is under investigation, so that Detroit
may come out empty -handed in \u25a0 the
draw;' ' ... ... .' '\u25a0'•'.- !' . "\u25a0-• '\u25a0
A little less than $125,000 was de
posited with Secretary Bruce of ;the
Commission to coyer' the drafts. -.
\u25a0 The commission held. a long session,
;in which they placed a ban upon the
contemplated series between two all
star teams from '\u25a0 the American and Na
tional leagues that were scheduled to
make a; tour of. the country after the
world's championship .series. No spe
cific reasons for the ban were given,
except that it would interfere greatly
with the world's series'.
The following is a partial list of
players drafted and secured by major
league clubs: . . ' ... v'-'v.'
: : NATIONAi LEAGUE
: Bjr tinclnnatl— Froan Denver. Scbreiber.
Bt Brooklyn— From Sioox CHj, Quillea; from
i Wichita. Atchinson, .. ;
By St. Lonls-r-From Los Angelas. Hallinan.
\u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 : AMERICAN LEAGUE
Bt Chicasp — From San Francisco. Bodie. -
\u25a0 By •' Boston — From '. Oakland. Thomas; from
, Omaba. Rifgert; from Spokane. KlllHay. : :
Bj- PbtlartelPhia— From VanconTer. Miller.
\u25a0 List, of major league drafted players disal
10-we4 ty lot: \u25a0 \u25a0 .• ;• :• : : .
' NATIONAL LEAGUE \u25a0
Bj :C*lcaKO— From Spokane. KUlilay.
By: Boston— Frotn San -Francisco, Bortie
\u25a0 \u25a0By Brooklyn — From San Francisco. Bodle.
: By New York'— From Dearer. Schrelber.
WILLIAM
J. SLATTERY
Goldberg
Bj Plttsbarr — From San Francisco. Eodie.
AJEEHICAN LEAGUE
By St. Loul.«— From San Francisco. Bortie. . .
By Boston — From Los Ansel**.. Ilallinao.
By Detroit — From Saa Francisco, Bodle; from
Lfr» Anseles. Hallinaa. . :
By New York— From (Jan Francfsco. Bodie.
I'artlal list of players drafted by major league
clubs -where drafts were net aside on account of
players haying be»n purchased nnd^r apnrovpt
agreements filed with the national commission:
AMERICAN' LEAGUE
By St. Louis and Washington— From Sacra
men to. . Perry. \u25a0•.-.• \u25a0 • ._. •". - ...
-:\u25a0*\u25a0: NATIONAL LEAGUE
By Brooklyn — Kroa* Smcramento. Hunt.
By Brooklyn— From Portland. Gresjs. .
List of players drafted by major l»aca« elubi
set aaido on account of number: ;\u25a0\u25a0
i From San Francisco — Henley, by New York.
1 Boston. Plttsburz awl Brooklyn Nutlonals anrl
WashlTigtoa Americans: Vitt. by Detroit. Cbi
cago. Washlnsrtoo. CleTeland. New Y«rk and St..
T^nls Americans and Cincinnati. Brooklyn and
Chicago Nationals: Stewart, by Boston Ameri
cans: Sutor. by Chlcasto Americans; Bodle. by
Detroit.. Chicago. New York aad St. Louis
Americans and Boston. Pittsbur; and Brooklyn
Nationals.' : . ' . . .. .;. /
Decided that Bodie was subject tc
draft.
From Oakland — Majrgart. by Claeinaati.
Thomas, by- Boston Americans; Wares, by St
Louis Americans. /
Decided that Thomas was subject tt
draft.
From Lcs Anseles — Hallinan. by St. Lon!s
Boston and Detroit Americana: Najtle. by Cltts
bars Nationals and Washington American*;!^*
ley. by Brooklya Nationals; Waring, by Cucto
natl. . . \u25a0 - •';\u25a0 . :.: •'
Decided that Hallinan was subject te
draft.
Froa Denwr — Schrelber. by New York an«
Cincinnati Nationals; Cranston, by Boatoa Na
tionals.
Decided* that Schreiber -was subjecv
to draft.
From Omaha — Schoonorer, by New- York Na
tionals: Rlstirert. by -Boston Americaas. : ,
Decided Riggart was subject to draff
From Wichita— Hugh, liy Fittsimrs; Atcbt
son. by 'Brooklyn.
Decided Atchison was subject t&
draft. .' :'i~-^£gi.

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