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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, September 12, 1910, Image 1

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"AN ARMY OFFICERS WIFE;*
READ THE OTHER SIDE OF
THE STORY IX t • t it': :
THE SUNDAY CALL
VOLUME CVHL— NO. 104.
FIVE MEN ARE
NEAR DEATH IN
AUTO SMASHUP
Fred Stratton and Harry J.
Knowles Injured When Ma
f chine and Car Collide
ffrty Was on Way to Golf
J ']' Links of Qarempnt County
? Club
XSpcclal Dizpaich to The Call]
\u25a0/'. OAKLAND. Sept. H. — Five men
prominent in business and club circles
- «>f this city and San Francisco narrow
.Jy escaped serious injuries at noon to
: cay when the automobile in which, they
. *<re speeding toward the golf links
.\u25a0;* i the Claremont country club col
lided with a south bound streetcar a.t
• Sixty-first street a.nd Shattuck avenue.
\u25a0 of the party received painful cuts:
. *hd bruises, while the others, aside
from suffering- a severe shaking up,
escaped unharmed. The machine was
. .^•recked.
. t ; .Those in the automobile were:
\u25a0}f?yfyt€T Henstoawr, brother of President
Wiliiam G. Kenshaw of the Union sav
\u25a0;i. nS-.sn S-.s bank, and Justice F. "W. Henshaw
Htf .the supreme court.
. Cr*ars;e D. GrtTnirood, 1399 Jackson
;;fctt«et. San Francisco, vice president of
.--.liye Savings Union bank.
jv ; iVr<hur Goodall, ISI7 Jackson street,
.:^raeral manager of the firm of Good
:i4Ji, Perkins & Co.
•.v^j^r**! «=. Stratton. ISOI Harrison I
'*ff.t*t. collector of the port of San
•Francisco.
~;\u25a0"/tintry~ ;\u25a0" /tintry J. Kmnilc*. 1167 Oak street,
fri" insurance and commission broker
yVith offices at 310 California street,
;£an Francisco.
. '. P-lanning to spend the afternoon at
• A he- golf links, the party drove along
• t Fhattuck avenue from down town. As
-\u25a0.^ixty-first street was reached, -where
.if he turn up to Claremont waa to be j
.^nade. a streetcar approached rapidly
"-from the opposite direction. The
.•\u25a0chauffeur in making the turn mis
.;sudgx-d the distance and without warn
'\u25a0ingr the automobile and car. crashed
i'togetherj
;.': The occupants of tlse machine were
thrown violently to the street Strat
;t:on was bruised about the face and
while Knowles was huried
; ; p..g;a.Sn£t the car, receiving bodily in
4ar;es. Both men were obliged to give
; ;cp their contemplated sport at the golf
lilikF, and went to their homes. Hen
:>haw. Greenwood aiid Goodall later ap-
Tieiared at t!:e club and carried out
.t!:£.!r original plan to play golf.
BUSINESS IN IRON
P AND STEEL IS SLACK
Cir&pd Trunk in Market for
:pX 10,000 Tons of Rails
r^NKTV YORK, Sept. II. — Last week a
Vfliadow fell on the brighter prospects
,r<f the iron and steel Industry. Business
:i!i both finished and crude material was
and is being followed by
.decreased options at the finishing mills
;krid blowing out of blast furnaces.
*. • In the central west, where the heav
iest accumulation of iron is carried,
•jiierchant furnace stocks increased
nearly 20,0ft0 tons in August. In other
\u25a0jfcjictlons, with the possible . exception
;.<©? Alabama, stocks also increased, the
t;<*>tal estimated surplus being about
•3r?00,000 tons.
-.: "Bales of pig iron wers disappointing,
aggregating scarcely 50,000 tpns in all
feectlons, or only half of the tonnage
•placed during the preceding week.
Ttsllroads placed a few more structur.il
\u25a0eteel orders for bridges and buildings
•ca.lling for about S.OOO tons. No rail
c/.ritra£ts were placed, but the Grand
Trunk is in the market for 13.000 tons,
ririterest is developing in New York
fiibway extensions, which will call for
15>,000 to 240,000 tons of rolled steel.
. "A- reduction of 423.000 tons in unfilled
orders on the books of the steel cor
-lurration during August indicates that
tnew bfcsiness last month was about
\u25a0Bso',"Cl7.ions, as shipments were close
to' a. :s4lion tons.
FUGITIVE COUNTERFEITER
:. IS ALL BUT CAUGHT
Criminal Who Escaped Federal
:. ; Officials Gets Away
'[Special Dispatch to The Call]
.. \u25a0 R^rNELANDER. Wis.. Sept 11.—
J.ohn llcNea.l, a convicted counterfeiter,
Vhe escaped last winter from jail in
California and for whom a $10,000 re
ward is offered, was in this city yes
terfiay and but for a fluke would have
Jseen captured by Chief of Police
Ctra-üb.
.'The man had been here seyeral days
»nd was located by Chief Straub, who
tveiit to arrest him. The man's com
panions gave the alarm and McNeal
etepped into a saloon and out the back
door and escaped.
- It is believed he made his way to-"
ward Duluth and the wires have been
kept busy notifying the authorities
along the line.
[WOMAN STRUCK BY
k AUTO PASSES AWAY
Mrs. Bertha Burrow, 3468 Seventeenth
street, who was struck by an automo
bile Thursday night, died at St. Luke's
hospital yesterday. The chauffeur. H.
Meleher. who previously had been ar
rested, was charged with manslaughter.
"• .'- \u25a0 : -
The San Francisco Call.
Actor's Attemptto
Fly Ends in a Bath
Robert Loraine's Airship
Balks: When # Two
Miles at Sea
LOXDOX, Sept 11.— Robert Loraine,
the actor, all but . accomplished an
aeroplane flight across the Irish chan
nel today. Starting from Holyhead,
Loraine directed his course to Dublin. ..-.
Although he had trouble with his en
gine, he got within two miles of the
Irish coast The breaking of a wire
then forced him to descend to the sea.
He swam - ashore and his machine
was picked up by a steamer. The dis
tance across the channel is about 55
miles. • ' *. '
AIRSHIP DROPS WITH
AVIATOR INTO TREE
Craft Stands on Its End When
Rudder Breaks
TOPEKA, Kan.. Sept. 11.— Soon after
Harry Ginder, In a Strobel airship, rose
in the air tonight at the fair grounds
the rudder of his craft broke and it
was whirled round and round, stood at
angles near the perpendicular, first on
one end and then on the other, and
the drag rope finally caught in a tree
and the "airship settled down into an
other tree.
$20,000 Aviation Prize
PARIS. Sept. 11.— The municipality of
Paris purposes to offera prize of $20,000
to the French aviator making a flight
with a passenger from Paris to Brus
sels and return on the occasion of the
visit of the city council to Brussels on
September 26. '
ARKANSAS TO VOTE ON
REFERENDUM REFORM
W. J. Bryan Makes Vigorous
Campaign in State
LITTLE ROCK. Ark., Sept 11.—
Election for state and county officers
will be held throughout Arkansas to
morrow and a vote will be taken on the
initiative and referendum amendment.
The gubernatorial candidates -are
George W. Donaghey (democrat), An
drew I. Rolland (republican) and Dan
iel Hogan (socialist). Indications are
that Governor , Donaghey will receive
the usual democratic majority.
William J. Bryan made a vigorous
campaign for the Initiative arid ref
erendum last week.
The state is now governed by local
option, but it is belie\ed that the tem
perance forces will make a fight for
a state wide prohibition.
BANKER DIES IN HOME
OF ACCUSED CASHIER
Discovery of Shortage Hastens
End of I. S. Hallam
ABILENE, Kan., Sept. II.— I. S. Hal
lam, president of the Abilene state
bank, died at 6 o'clock In the home
built by John A. Flack, the missing
cashier of the bank, who is said to be
over $25,000 short in his accounts.
Hallam went to the home Friday
with Flack's aunt to get some family
heirlooms. During the visit he col
lapsed and never recovered conscious
ness.
Hallam was 67 years old. Before
going to the Flack home he signed a
contract pledging all his property to
make good Flack's alleged shortage.
His death is attributed to the nervous
strain- resulting from the discovery of
the alleged sUortage.
DUNCAN McKINLAY IS
% GUEST OF PRESIDENT
Defeated Congressman Cam
paigns for Colleagues -
BER%*ERLY, Mass.. Sept. 11. — The
only arrival at ' the - summer White
House on Burgess point today was
Representative Duncan E. McKinlay of
California, who had. just finished a
speaking tour of Maine in the interests
of the republican candidates.: " -
Representative McKinlay will be the
president's guest for two or three days.
The California congressman expressed
the opinion that Maine would be saved
to the republican party, but by a small
plurality.
After his visit in Beverly is ended,
Representative McKinlay /will go to
Virginia, North Carolina and- Tennes
see. . . .
BELLBOY TO BECOME
VETERINARY SURGEON
Attaches of the Palace Give
Dinner to Associate
A'complimentary diner was given last
evening bly. the bell boys of the Palace
hotel to one of .their number, J. A.
Woodslde, who will leave shortly to'
take up a course' In veterinary surgery
at Chicago. Woodslde has studied medi
cine. for the last two years and was per
suaded to make veterinary work; his
aim by some friends who attended -the
convention of practloners at the Palace
last" week. Among the bellboys pres
ent were 'Joseph > Watklns, George
Marks, Joseph J. Maurice, -William
Sheppard, Thomas Mackel, John Strain,
Frank Scott, Sidney Verge, Lesley. Lilly/
Martin A. Betero and Fred Hawkins. ,
ENGINEER TAKES POISON
WHEN GIRL SAYS
Rejection of Marriage Proposal
% Causes Despondency i^
Because; Miss Agnes -Tara, .22 years
old, refused to marry him; -.' Louis Smith,
an engineer on the steamship; Siberia,
tried to\commit ; suicide inher^' presence
last night by swallowing' poisonous tab
lets. He was \ rushed - to}. the,, harbor
emergency .hospital. It- is? feared- 1 that
he will not recover.^-Smith, visited Miss
Tarai at*? the / Venus -lodging : housed 235
Kearny *6treet, and proposed; marriage.
He was ,rejected.-", rejected.-" He. ! then. bade % > the
girl t farewell.', told- her;he : : had c s no more
desi re to' live and swallowed the* tablets.'
SAN^R^GISGO^
$57,500 STOLEN
FROM SHIPMENT
OF ALASKA GOLD
\u25a0 \u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0 - ;•' \u25a0 - -\u25a0\u25a0 ... ,
Lead Substituted /for/; Bullion
Shipped from Fairbanks on
Steamer Humboldt
Efox From Which "Treasure Had
Been Taken Is rßesealed
Byjhief \u25a0
SEATTLE, Sept 11.— Gold \ bullion ;
-valued at^557,500. part of a ship- '
ment'of VlTOiooo'.from the -Wash- |
ington-Alaska bank of
Alaska, to the 'Dexter-Horton r nati*onal
bank of Seattle on the steamship Hum
boldt was stolen in transit:
SEATTLE, Sept; IL— Gold bullion
valued.at, $57,500, '.part of *aVshipment
of $170,000 from the Washington-
Alaska ,bank of Fairbanks, Alaska,- to
the Dexter-Horton national bank of
Seattle on the - steamship I Humboldt,
was stolen in transit. '
When it left Fairbanks for Dawson
and White -Horse the gold was "con
stained in three wooden boxes and was
in the care . of . the Alaska-Pacific ex
press company. When the boxes 'were
opened by the Canadian customsofficers
at- Dawson the gold bars' were foarid
to be as stated inV-the -express com
pany's papers. The boxes were opened
again at the United ' States assay office
in Seattle Friday* noon.t.and one con
tained, pigs of lead,; but nog-old.: J
- United States Assayer. Calvin I]. Vilas
said tonight- that the; federal; authori
ties wererabsolved from v all
bility,: as. the vault, was opened /and
locked by the telephone company elec
trically. The box arrived . at the; office
with .seals \ unbroken, was locked up
and the next. day was brought outrwith
the seals intact. • , • i;,, ;
Photograph ,0} I: the overturned, automobile: tinder which Miss Florence- Pardee lost her lif e yesterdaysafter
noona short distance south of Chapman, on the- road jromChrte- Madera' to San Rafael T^he dotted line
shorn the course o) [the automobile as if;n>eni!;a/pnr iffte rog'J^nJflfia.ben^p/ungedf over'an^enibankmant * ;
$4,000,000 POWER
PLANT IS SOLD
Priest Rapids, Second Only to
Niagara Fells in Power Value, I
- Changes Hands /< : I
\u25a0' SEATTLE. Sept. \l l .—^Control of j the
water, power of Priest ; rapids,' on the
Columbia river, in Grant and ' Yakima
counties, Washington: was sold .last
night by the Hanford irrigation and
power company to the^ American power
and light company of New York. *';'\u25a0
.The. rapids are said to be the most
valuable In North, America for water
power, except Niagara falls. .
/= The property . of \ the Hanf ord I irriga
tion .company, is estimated'tb be worth
$4,000^000: The company owns a'power
plant.;: irrigating system and ia large
tract' of land. all. of which are included
In the.'transfer.
FIANCE SHOOTS GIRL, '
RIVAL: AND HIMSELF
Slayer:' and i ; : MaJd^Dead, but
'* '-\u25a0\u25a0, SuitbrlWiUl-RVcoyer' '•'\u25a0\u25a0-
V-'ABE"rDEENVViS.' V D..rt SeptVll.— .lay
Harbison. '\u25a0.'. aged *,26,'s tonight,
hls'sl9" year \u25a0,' old *i fiancee, '*?Adele' * Kiser,'
"and r shot 9 Dr.'^Boyd Clinite,^ a \u25a0jydungr,
dentist,^? in the Jliorae .^ of>;the % young
j woman's I.parents"jlnjßedfleldI .parents "jlnjßedfleldi 1^; He< then'
turned. the revolver | upon rhimself.^"\:
"FIGHTING BOB"
INDORSES CITY
FOR EXPOSITION
Heroof AtlanticFleet^Trip Says
; Canal Opening Must Be i
/ Celebrated Here
San, s Francisco ; Should ' Play
• Host^io 'Navies bfi All the !
World; He \ Says;:
•\u25a0 \u25a0 \u25a0» \u25a0 -\u25a0• .->\u25a0'. -t - •\u25a0:/\u25a0\u25a0:- >i . .' .. ... .....
: A . DMIRAL ,; ROBLJE Y .; D. ; EVANS,
\u25a0A-V ; one of : the • world's .greatest
\u25a0 ;'\u25a0 - \u25a0 naval experts and commander of
the .Atlantic fleet ,on its memorable
cruise around the "world, has
a' champion' of San Francisco as : the
site * for the '\u25a0_ Panama- Pacific interna
tional .exposition. To directors; of: the
exposition, yesterday J. at the , Palace
.hotel.; he his 'earnest- support
inj behalf, of. this icity -and spokei par
ticularly ;of the importance of holding
the exposition where a marine demon
stration; could be successfully' carried
out; ' .' f i \ ; . \u25a0
"San^- Francisco is the place where
the "exposition should be held,"/assert
,ed Fighting Bob last night; at; a ; con
ference with representatives of the
exposition." "This city is. tlie metropo"
flistTpfi'the coast and, the,; natural\ter
mlnusrof the canal- on this coast,: just
asiNew Orleans" will^be' on- the/i other
coast"^ San: Francisco .has; the^.best
• harbor .on the coast, While New. Or
leans-is an inland city,' 100 mifesi'from
the. sea." \u25a0\u25a0 : . ; \u25a0 \u25a0 •>.*«\u25a0•
Would^ Exh ibit Resources \ \>
• Gavin; McNab, James .McNal}, ;Krank
L. Brown> and ,the, : others present ien-
: gaged • I^vahs in a-serieral discussion of
the fair,'and , its importance, 'in£"wnich
Evans ppjnted; out one 'of- theV'niost
important, things ; that '.would-be^accomT
plished - would. l'be '.- the "bringing- to this !
coast; 'of the people" of the' east "and
giving' .them'an'.idea of: the undeveloped
resource's "of the West. -He gracefully
parried; an attempt- to.- involve him \in
a discussion of; the activity of the Illif
nois, Central railroad in ' trying." 1 to se-'
cure ; the r fair for .New; Orleans. ' \u25a0. /
' "Now you are treading on tliin : ice," j
said! the admiral merry- twinkle j
inhis eye. \ "The purpose, of the,- canal
is .to benefit -the arid, not
the transportation companies and make
it possible ".to 1 have, this part of; r the'
country, built ;iip ami settled as '.thickly.'
as^the •eastern."-^' .. • \u25a0 - • ; :: SM?M I
Eyans' commented briefly on the
proposition; of >;' fortifying /the -/canal
zone.. He .was: of., the- opinion that \the
strengthening (off the; navy would ."solve
the; problem. \ I He. did (not overlook
the ; opportunity of -calling attention -to
the |f utility; of^ trying to -'guard V sea
board without an adequate navy.
;, "Not only ".your t commerce- but your
actual life-; on this 'coast /depends on
the friendship \u25a0of other -countries,'\ 4 sald
lie., , "Of .all the'exposltiO|n.ever : igiveh ; ;
none . has I had -such an ; .opportunity as.i
this. There is v onlyi one Panama scanal."5 canal."
It; means {jjrnuchfto -this ; west coasty To j
make ' it? mean all . i it should _:you :'\u25a0 sliouicjf I
have- the/fleets vof) all ; r the^countries of j
|the;\ world ;'\ here. to. participate ;in (the j
| naval | ! pageants. . " , - fr • —
Urges Adequate Fleet V . .- -
.:'i i "ThißVqueßtlon^^wlH;;-,cpme / rup.^asjVto j
,whether] or ? riot ithis ;harbor :Is properly
"defended. The' best way : is; to i have 'the
pe'opl e^h ere and U et them \u25a0 see for.' them '-*;
Continued \u25a0 on^FaßC '2, Column [3
B \u25a0it "' mm iX H m 9 B\u25a0' ' > wwfc \u25a0 I fff B * B MS M Q"jß' WM \ Q ""'""' fi '*'" *"" BJr 3 1^ « n t^
PINNED UNDER AUTOMOBILE
- Miss Pardee^-tt ; as t instdnily 'killed > yesterday in an automobile acci
dent between Corte i Madera 'and: Chapman in Marin county. She was
the eldest daughter of former Governor George C. Pardee.. ,' tV;
BLAZING GUSHERS
SCORCH HEAVENS
Flames, From Burning Oil Wells
Shoot 300 Feet Into
the Air ; ... : - :^>----'
. BAKERSFIELD, . Sept. . ll.^— Flame's
shooting 300- feet in-, the; air.fronr two
blazing gushers of the ; North Midway
gro iip- ; of ;Howins.^oil. w^elis .kept 1':' this
city and the entire TVestfSideibil, region
Inr a. state: of 'intense excitement for
three, hours this afternoon..; ; \u25a0.\u25a0'; i .
r * ...The flames,': .the origin" .of which '; is
unknown, started ~> in ' w^ ! : No^ s6 T of^the
American oil fields company on section
; 36-31-22.' : ;'7The Honolulu : well, which'
has been Vjuiet" for some time, began
spouting, soon after; the fire started
and immediately .took fire. Thef flames
shot . in , "all .directions 'arid; the • 200 ; men
who 'were rushed out from here strug
gled- desperately \u25a0 to; keep the -fire; away
from^.wcil^'Nq. t79, ; which ; is j making
, 25,000 v" barrels ja.^day;; . the * Santa ;~Fe
gusher ; and , numerous „' other '.big^pro-;
ducers/iallf "vvithinVHalf- a 'mile*: of c'the"
blaze; tV'tr' ; " .-' ;.;.' ' .;" "... ' . \u25a0\u25a0'.\u25a0\u25a0'
1 -While !the7flarnes'\yere at? their-height
*a j fissu're (more 'than ?1.000 feet \long: and
of hinknown", depth*, opened; up; from t well
No."i 68;|rie*arvby;i arid, ebreakingi the j em
;bankmentsl6f-';aurnpgholes,"' caused Cthe
'loss? of '.'a"!? large), quantity*; oorf r - oil.;' ,';;;\u25a0'
BANDITS HOLD UP
GAMBLING RESORT
Fusillade of Bullets Ensues, in
Which One Man Is Fatally
Wounded
[Special Dispatch* to The Call]
\ ELY,' Nev.. Sept. |11.— One man was
fatally injured' and two were seriously
hurt in a'pitched battle with~a gang of
four»robbers, who entered the Southern
club J this morning and made a partly
successful effort ;to seize the cash 'at
the gaming, tables. , For a time shots
flew- indiscriminately.
The bandits, heavily armed, entered
rtho • club at an pearly' hour, and com
manded the: crowd,- consisting:, of a
hundred persons, to hold up their
hands.' The order was complied with,
the.men backing- against, the Walls, a n d
the "< robbers proceeded to " throw* the
money from- a^half f dozen tables into
canvas sacks iwhich they, carried.'
! After taking the; money "from ; two
tables ..the, bandits 'approached Ja*: third
where Clyde ? Tilf ord - back of theY table
.refused to obey orders *and : drew a gun
to resist. The actidnwas the signalfor
resistance : from- all • parts ' of.; the room
and a general "melee, began' which
lasted .fifteen mi nu tes - with the
batants 'firmg \u25a0 from 4 behind' tables and
; The robbers were finally repulsed, but
not i.untll several of;. the ;' frequenters of
the^place had been wounded. George
Mill was wounded 'in; the; left lung,
probably - fatally.*' Clarence McFadden
was struck:lntheUeg~by.a spent bullet
andjTilford had. his head cut open by
a blow froni the gun of.one-of the des
peradoes.. . * _":
£ , : Af ter being' driven out- of the place
and;- firing several shots, through the
windows, the robbers fled into the hills,
taking" about $i;doo. with /themV'
Indians have been requisitioned to
trail the and 50 special -officers
in automobiles and on '•{ horseback .are
in pursuit: : Tex^iiall, owner of "the
Southern" club and democratic candi
date for sheriff," is leading the posse.
ROCK > FALLS AND KILL'S
ERIE TUNNEL; WORKMEN
Nine Laborers. Meet Death and
Ten Are; lnjured ; *i
•NEW; YORK, Sept. 11.— At least -nine
laborers were killed -outright; today, and
ten~ others -were" injured in; the collapse
of fan -overhanging shoulder of rock
from * above the : western : mouth Vof k the
qld^Erie'tunnel which connects the Erie
terminal In* Jersey City . with the west-
t ward •division."; \ '\u25a0•':•\u25a0
'_ Of "the ' knpwtff dead , four -were Ameri-;
cans, three ; were junidentlQed and; two
were foreigners.- ;, ."">,
; vA M strip of -rock;4o. feet wide and 20
feet high peeled off- like -wallDaper and
\u25a0 toppled fon' theK men. ?. '-\u0084,'. -
_ • 7 7-HEWEATHER
XEST£RJSAY^-Maximum temperature, 62 ;
f^^AST^FOR TODAY— Fair; light
'^northwest wmd.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
HAS FATAL
Daughter of Former Governor
Meets Death While Riding
With Friends
CAR SKIDS ON ROUGH
ROAD AND OVERTURNS
Victim Suffocated by Pressure
of Machine; Companions
Not Badly Hurt
DEAD GIRL'S PARENTS
TRAVELING IN EAST
MISS FLORENCE PARDEE.
eldest daughter of Dr. George
C. Pardee, former governor of
California, 21 years old, and one of
the most popular girls in society
circles in the state, was instantly
killed and four of her companions
were slightly injured at 1:30 o'clock
yesterday afternoon when an auto
mobile in which they were riding
skidded off the road between Cortc
Madera and, Chapman park, in Maria
county, and turned completely over,
pinning the passengers beneath it.
The others in > the party were Mrs#
H. J. Sadler and her son,. Herman J."
Sadler, viee 'president of the Judson
manufacturing • company, both ii oi
whom live at 966 Eighteenth street.
Oakland; William B. Bryan of the
Frank K. Mott company, 1060 Broad
way, who lives at the Madison Park
apartments in Oakland, and Miss
Anita Thomson. 107 Thirteenth street,
Oakland, daughter of A. D. Thomson,
a bond broker. -
With the exception of Miss Pardee,
the others came out of the -wreck
practically unhurt, their injuries con
sisting, in the main, of slight bruises
and. contusions. Doctor Pardee ss
now in the east, and efforts were made
to inform him of his daughter's death
by teiegraph last night.
Suffocation Causes Death
The girl's death was directly due
to the machine falling
across her body and thereby prevent
ing her , breathing. This was iden
tically the same way in which Chief
qf>Police Brown of San Jose, who was
killed Saturday morning, came to his
end.
The accident was one of the strang
est of its kind. The machine was
traveling at a rate, of less than V\
miles an, hour, in broad daylight, amf
was being driven by Sadler with tho
utmost caution and care. Suddenly.,
through some cause Avhich could not
be definitely ascertained, it swung over
the embankment and turned slowly
over. Those who -had outside seats
instinctively flung themselves as . far
but of harm's way as they could, but
Miss Pardee, who was sitting in the
middle, had'not time to. jump clear of.
the danger.
The party were out for. a quiet after
noon ride. Sadler, the owner of the '
machine. .was at the wheel, and in fronts
with him sat Bryan. The three women,
were in the rear, Mrs. Sadler and Miss'
Thomson having the outside seats antl *
Miss Pardee the middle one. They had,
passed through Tuburon about half nn \u25a0
hour before and were on their way iv '
Larkspur, where they intended to '
lunch.
Rough Stretch of Road
About half a mile beyond Chapman
park an unusually rough piece of road
was encountered. It was littered with
roVks and marked with deep ruts, and
on either; side \u25a0 was an embankment
about 10 feet in height. To add to
the danger. It was exceedingly narrow, .
there being less than a foot margin on>
either' side. Sadler slowed dojvn as he
reached the bad section of the road and \
began picking his way cautiously
among the rocks and ruts.
"It takes ;an ' experienced chauffeur"
to keep on this road." said Bryan, a*
the machine . bumped and skidded.
"It does," said Sadler.
; Half a minute later the machine
skidded, suddenly and shot over the
side of the road. It hung for an in
stant, then' turned slowly over side
ways. -Sadler and Bryan were flung
from" their seats and. seeing the women
pinned underneath, immediately began
to; jack; the automobile up.
• Mrs.; Sadler was the first, to be taken
out. She was caught under the ma
chine, but uninjured. It -was tlia sam»

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