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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, October 05, 1910, Image 1

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A HUMAN DOCUMENT IS *-i
THE LOG OF A PIRATE POET
WHICH WILL BE PUBLISHED IN
THE SUNDAY CALL
VOLUME CVnL—NO. 127.
SPRECKELS'
EXECUTORS
DEFEATED
Estate of Late Millionaire to Be
Distributed Equally Among
Five Children
EACH TO RECEIVE
$1,000,000 FOR SHARE
John D. and Adolph B. Spreckels
Win Signal Victory Over
C. A. and Rudolph
JUDGE COFFEY AGAIN
RULES IN THEIR FAVOR
JOHN* D. SPRECKEI^S and Adolph B.
Sprerkels won their second victory
ov«r the executors of their father's
will, Rudolph Spreckels and C. A.
Fpreckels, yesterday, when Judge J. V.
Coffey. in the probate department of
the superior court, ruled in the matter
of the applications of the several heirs
for a distribution of the Clau? Spreckels
In a clear and able decision Judge
«"offey held that the gifts made by
tlaus ?preoke!s to his elder sons were
not "advancements" chargeable against
their interest in the estate of their
fAher. He ruled that John D. and
Adolph B. Spreckels should share in the
distribution of the 55,000,000 remaining
in the estate of their father after the
community share of the wife had been
apportioned to her estate. The five sur
viving children of Claus Spreckels —
John D. Spreckels, Adolph B. Spreckels,
C. A- Spreckels and Rudolph Spreckels
and Mrs. Emma C. Ferris (nee Spreck
r!c) — will each receive J1. 000.000 under
the terms of Judge Coffey's ruling.
The attorneys who successfully pre
sented the case of John D. and Adolph
Spreckels were A- F. Morrison. W. L
Brobeck. Peter F. Dunne and Samuel
M. Shortridge. Opposing them lor the
\u25a0axecntors were Charles E. S. Wheeler.
Charles S. CuEhing. O. K. Cushing,
Nathan M. Mora.n. J. Friedlander Bowie
ar.U TV. H. Gorrill.
Second Victory
Jufig« Coffey'B ruling yesterday was
the second comprehensive victory he
has awarded the elder sons against the
executors of the estate. On February
18 of this year the court held to be
void the clause of the Claus Spreckels
will which created a trust for the
life Interest of Mrs. Emma C Ferris
and provided for the inheritance of
k Rudolph and C. A. Spreckels. That dev
dsiem gave to John D. Spreckels and
Adolph B. Spreckels a fifth interest
in the estate, as it left the will stand
ing: "with no testamentary provisions
in so far as the children were affected,
and so the full property would be di
vided among the heirs at law. The de
cision was given in sustaining the de
murrer fil*d by John D. and Adolph B.
Ppreckels.
Question Raised
However, the executors of the estate,
not contented with that defeat, sought
to hamper the distribution of the es
tate still further by raising th« con
tention that John D. Spreckels and
Afiolph B. Spreckels had received from
their father an "advancement," or a
share, in his estate which was charge
able against their interest in the final
distribution. This contention was based
upon the following passage tn the will
of Claus Spreckehs:
"I .make no provision in this will
for my sons, John' D. Spreckels and
Adolph B. Spreckels, for- the reason
that I have already given to them a
large part cf my estate."
Over that clause was waged the bat
tle effectively decided by Judge Coffey.
The executors held that that writing,
<*ulch was in the portion of the will
invalidated by the February decision,
was binding on the court and must lead
to the finding that the gifts made to
John !">. Spreckels and Adolph B.
S-preckels wore "advancements." How
ever, John D. Spreckels and Adolph
B. Spreckels proved that the property
rr reived from their father was in the
form of outright gifts.
.Judge Coffey promptly disposed of
the executors' presumption in his. de
cision, which he concluded with the
following words:
"In this case we seem to be con
\u25a0
trolled by a statute which requires
the manifestation of an advancement
by a contemporaneous writing and a
total Intestcy. these premises
the ccnclusion«must be that the estate
should be equally divided among the
heirs at law. Decreed accordingly."
No Comment Made
The opinion of Judge Coffey was
written and was filed in court at noon
yesterday without added comment.
Claus Epreckels died in this city on
December 2S, 1908. lie left a will
written in New York, on May 11, 1907;
in which he disposed of his-estate by
creating a trust within a trust. The
.jiutire estate was to be held in trust
during the lifetime of his wife, Anna
C. Spreckels. On her death the two
rons. Rudolph, and C. A. Spreckels,
Continued on Pice 3, Column 1
The San Francisco Call.
Dynamite Plot Was Hatched in Oakland
Police Suspect an Organized Conspiracy
THE LAUNCH PASTIME. WHICH WAS USED BY THE'DYNAMITE'-SUSRECTS' AND THE NAME CHANCED TO
PEERLESS. DETECTIVE BURNS MEASURING SCREW HOLES WHEREKFALSE -NAME HAD BEEN FASTENED
Some of* ttiel detcctivts&ho^Mc'^ }^^^;Fr^^^ioJrighti j iHe\)^e: y
district aUorncyW office. 'Detective iHodgkmsrf
Detective Mulcahey of San 'FrahciscosGcorgc : H'.^P \ ' . / /
ARMED REVOLUTION
BEGUN IN PORTUGAL
King Manuel Held Prisoner and
Flag of Republic- Hoisted
on Palace '
[Special Cable to The Cell] *
PARIS, 4.— A, wirelessmessage
dispatched from Portuguese watershas
been received by Le Matin stating that
a revolution has broken out In Lisbon.
Warships are now bombarding the pal
ace". It is added that the army and
navy arc on the side of the revolution
aries.
King Manuel in Prison
[Special Cable to The Call]
LONDON', Oct.- 4.— The. 'Daily : Mall'
says: "A revolution broke out_ in_ Lis
bon Monday nigrht.^ King Manuel is- a
prisoner. • There has been • fighting in
the streets. A.U. communications! are
CUt." - \u0084-'"\u25a0-.,> r'.
The Eastern telegraph company, an
nounced thisafternoon the receipt from
its station atCarcavellos, 11, miles from
Lisbon, of. a. message* that ;all communi
cation with the capital was interrupted.
A Portuguese "merchant ' in J'* London
says that he received news of a plot in
Lisbon Monday. . The prices of Portu
guese bonds dropped i heavily on the
stock exchange here yesterday. :
The Standard 'correspondent, of the
Reuter telegram company confirms the
report of a revolution in Portugal,' and
adds that the rebels have captured the
Republican Flajj FJ'es^||||j
SANTANOER,. Spain. . Oct. 4.— A Ger
man steamer here has received a wire-,
less from the steamer Capo . Blanco of
the same line, lying off. Lisbon, that
warships began bombarding the palace
as soon as the rising within- the city
began. Shortly the revolutionists
hauled down the royal standard -over
the palace and' replaced it with'the re- ;
publican 'green and blue flag. <".
Fears for Gage's Safety
LOS ANGELES,-; Oct. .4.— The news, of
the ' Portuguese : revolution ; has resulted
in some apprehension; here '\u25a0 for "the
safety of- former Governor Henry.. Gage,
of California." . Gage was appointed
minister to. Portugal. last December and
left. Los Angeles to. assume; his duties
a few ; months " ago.v JVJlti ..Mrs. Gage j
and .his; family 'he is t supposed' to be In
Lisbon at this time. ' '. ; .
SAjST /FRA^ISCO, OCTOBER 5, 1910.
TRIPLETS ALL GIRLS, SO ONE WELL
HAVE TO BE NAME D "THEODORA"
'A OAKLAND. Oct.. 4.— Mrs. -John, Biu
fnejtti'of -459 /Forty-third street has given
birth, to- .three, girls .averaging, seven
pounds each. in weight. . BiuneUi.a car
penter, .was met at the door of .his home
his- return from, work .bj- the,at :
tending nurse, who .signaled- "that his
wife had, presented him with a .baby
daughter. ; Before -Blunetti. lmd reached
his wife's side a second daughter, was
MAN ENDS LIFE BY EXPLODING 100
POUNDS OF DYNAMITE UNDER BODY
CASPER, Wyo.," Oct. - 4.-^:Danlel xMc-
Millan, an expert, in the use' of powder
and dynamite, 'employed r at -the North
America asbestos mines, yesterday cotn
BANKERS INDORSE
MONEY ORDER PLAN
Financial. lnstitutions] Will Com*
pete With Postoffice and
' Express Companies :: .','\u25a0:
i LOS ANGELES, 'Oct. to
the thirty-sixth annual' convention of
the American bankers' association,
numbering about :ljsoo, met in .'session
aV'the-'Auditorlum 'today and 'took' iip
matters -of 'vast - importance V.tor the
banking interests. of 'the. United States, j
Reports r of ,' officers '"of the* association
were read and the convention' proceeded
to business.. •- :--;'.. .
.That the bankers, of ithe. United. States
are determined ,to 'have' a, money /order
system that -will? be -equal-to . that ;of
the' United':States>governmerit; and 'ex-:
press /companies^ was \u25a0-' demonstrated
when the -reports of -the/committee /on/
express , companies /and^lmbney .orders
was read, j 'The' committee recommend
ed I a i plan, that? banks;* shall: issue-* such
form of ; money, orders as'.are.'now^is
sued by -the government . through /.the
postoffice- department, and. express -com
panies: and have: some 'financial; ''instil
tution^ of merit'; act -as agent: '•.-.'. SSg&f^ 1 .
URGES SMALLER "MONEY- . . .
: ;Lee:McClung,^treasurer :of;theTunited
States, a addressed the^eonvention -today,
and urged a ; reduction -mi the'size, of
paper .money- and < a iuniform;" size- for
both'; treasury- and' United'-Statesi bank
note's. .-\u25a0 \u25a0 ;;' .- ; ;•\u25a0 ; ; «.'t--* :\u25a0',.-',
\u25a0 'McCluhgfread a telegram {from Presi
dent Taft reading as follows: ' -\u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0:*
' ' ': ; WhH«>'House,lOr.t.''4.'.iolo *' 7
r,p*> United States .Treasurer,"! Lee'
- Angela,-; Cal.— Please mjrvcotnpll-' *
; nifnts? \u25a0Dd.Bood^wlshess to <the , Ameriran-A
; banVernV association. . in -cession ' lii . Lo« 7An- i "
\u25a0;.-. •geles. ' and gujr* that-I;hopc^TrJthin'the 'next-"
fevr : ypars't.we.nitfy ", bare -'al-,a 1 -, rcrisiou ", of '-tfaeV /
, ' currency i,laws,-;K),tnuch!nppdr><).'.': v \u25a0\u25a0- '* .-'^. •:•.>;:«'
. WILLIAM U. TAFT. ! <
.born." As" the husband \u25a0 had finished
spreading^ the. newsj to rh'is : friends "over
; the telephone, he , was.; informed that a
third daughter had arrived ahd at once
ran ;out/of the house- to ascertain from
neighbors -sthe telegraphic, address 'of
Theodprerßposeyelt, injwhich honor, he
declared, . he would *name.. one of the
daughters "Theodora.'.' r - The /last born
child. has since died. \u25a0/\u25a0
mitted suicide by exploding; 100 pounds
of dynamite under his-body. His body
was'blo'wn" to* atoms :an'drthe. 400 : foot
I'evel'.'of the i'mine, where-lie-ended his
life, was badly wrecked." *
BOYS AND GIRLS TO
HAVE OUTDOOR FETE
Races v Games, JMusicand;Danc
; | ' ing| Promised at: School \ ;; ,
\u25a0 - % .-"; 'ofr Employmeht : ! i
i : The; children's autumnal-fete will; be
the .attraction , Friday /afternoon at" the
School -of : -Employment at '> Trocade'ro,
and -hundreds -of 'young" people are
looking, for ward * to .the. occasion. (
hours : will, be;- from .2 until .6 o'clock'
in :'\u25a0 the s picturesque ; ' grounds lof V the
school* in Sloat boulevard. •" Races' and
games, • a ; , program and 1 -, danc
ing will -be -features of the "outing. ,;
.; The -Italian Tarentella, -as : danced at
the kirmess; last year,: will" be* given
by, three' small pupils of
and: Miss Ruth:Carmichael .will; be one
ofjith'e dancers.-- The talented Osborn
children, ''Sophia' and Gordon, will sing
and i'dance] iii Dutch costume; . the min-^
vet, "as originally ' danced in the" time
of/ Louis- XIV, will be. given,- and; a
Russian dance that -is 'entirely*. new is
promised. -/\u25a0'\u25a0> A -\u25a0'\u25a0 \u25a0'\u25a0 t^~\l '\u25a0 ''\u25a0'\u25a0\u25a0 "\u25a0 >•\u25a0'\u25a0'\u25a0 \u25a0' •\u25a0 ; . v
: \u25a0:, Dorothy xWeinshankV will- give t the
American, flagfdance, and ,pupils' t of^MißS
Florence and .Miss^Geraldine.f Arnold
vfiU |j|WjS ian; lndian,: costume * sketch,' a
Japanese \u25a0 song V and j dance, '\u25a0 -'a H sailor's
hornpipe four .=i handed VreeL'-<l The
Hebre'w; orphanage : boys'. ibandi will play
Rnd.^tJiere^win ;be outdoors dancing? on
the 'platform ~'t or/the .-children- ,' : f, . ? ,
1 .The •"\u25a0\u25a0Ocean -El_lis>icars,\;yla-iPark'side;
arid-alspjjthe !?Ingleside .2 cars | pass tithe
entrance, ;«/while s automobiles f niayl' go
throughUne^gr.ounds.V; 7 . There,; will ibe 'a
lafge~ contingent :;. of f motorists?. at "the
fete. ' .. \u25a0 ' . , , \- : -' \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0':\u25a0\u25a0 : .:". • -,^ - r \u0084
j -\ \u25a0\u25a0:-.\u25a0:.\u25a0 \u25a0• •\u25a0 :\u25a0.. \u25a0: v •". "\u25a0 ;.« ":\u25a0-.\u25a0'\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 i
37 KILLED AND 25
HURT IN COLLISION
Cars Meet Headon in Illinois,
/Mangling Passengers and
Traction Officials
STAUXTOX. 111., Oct. 4.—Thirty
seven persons were killed and "30
were injured in a headon collision
on the Illinois interurban traction sys
,tem two miles north of here late to
day. At least three of _ the . injured
probably; will die. -.. .
. Report*^ from the wreck , conflict.
Some statements make the number of
injured as. High as. 50." Officials say this
is excessive." ~'. \u0084 ' " '
...Among the dead who have been iden
tified are prominent of the
traction" system. \u25a0
.' The dead at Carlinville are: ,
Sav.K. STREET, division superintend
ent of the Illinois .traction company,
Staunton. - ... V
'A. P.' RICE, auditor of disbursements
of the Illinois traction company, Cham
paign.
;J. -\V. .MlLLEß,. Gillespie, general su
perintendent of the Superior coal com
pany.
J. n. HABBEDGER, Jamestown, 111.
C. "WERNER. Champaign, 111.
\u25a0 RAYMOND BAUER, St.Louis.
D. E. BLACK, Springfield," assistant
superintendent of motive power Illinois
traction company. ,
T. J. KERWI.V, St. Louis.
MANUEL A. INDER3HLL, Baden Ba
den,; 111.' I' ; /
DR.H.C. GANOAVAY, Decatur, 111.
. L, J. SCHAEFER, St. Louis. :'
MRS. WILLIAM CLOUD, Benld, 111.
F..S. HILL, Princeton, Ind.
JOHN BLOTNA, Benld. 111.
4 3IRS. JOHN BLOTNAi Benld, 111. .
DR. E.AV, REDSHAMV Currin, 111.
H. B. ROBINSON, Benld, 111.
E.M. ROSE, a collector for a weekly,
magazine;- father is H. : E. J Rose,' 1015
.Wilson .avenue, Chicago.
•NINE UNIDENTIFIED AVOMEN.*
. ONErUNIDENTIFIEDMAN. r ...'<\u25a0
One of the unidentified«women is be
lieved ; torbe. a ;MisS: ? Lizzie"* McPh'erson
of; Gillespie, secretary.;, to .'J.W.* Miller.
Another f is believed > to-be: Mrs. .11. "B.
Robinson; of Benld;; whose' hus'band has
been identified as one/of the dead. ,' \u0084-
, The collision f was., -between" • local
\u25a0 train No. 14, north bound, and an" ex
;cursion'trai.n,'No. 73,- loaded with p'ass^
engers on their way to view .the parade
of the. veiled, prophets /at T- St.-. Louis.
The' accident was apparently due' to the
Uisregardvof -orders f bythe creiv of
train . 14,^in \u25a0, charge''of M.TA.* Leonard,
conductor,; and- John, Lisman of .Staun- 1
ton,- motorman.* ••\u25a0>\u25a0 iv . . - <
I Train Xo."l4'had.orders].to pass train
,No. - 73 • at . Sta'unton^. The flatter strain
iwas running 'In- two sections.'arid the
\u25a0 orders "given -to - 1 No. "14 .'were; explicit'
that it wait^f or both sections.'. The first
•section, of No.; 73 % had \ passed twhen the
crew of No.'. 14: pulled out*on/the main
track 1 and '{started f. north. , At Dicker
sons' curve, "a sharp bend two miles
from here, the two. tracks meet. Hills
rise north -and- south- from" the curve.
Confronted' with 'death, 1 the ' crews . of
;both trains set the brakes'and jumped
for their lives. ; , - ; : •
I "The "crews* escaped' without serious
injury.; None : of "the; passengers had a
chance ito escape. The . cars came to
;gether with< a : tetrificjerash, and both
were entirely demolished, being;, piled
in;one huge mass of .wreckage.'
It is not known; If any passenger
/escaped; uninjured. As quickly* as pos
sible,' aid was summoned from Spring-/
field, 'andi special "cars /were : started if or
itheTiwreck.^ Other cars werejsent 'north
from- Granite City; and took -many of.
the 'injured' to. hospitals Jin that; town:/
••: ,Thevwork; of .; unearthing the - dead
was'-continued.' . "•. : -- •' •
; j- General ' Manager Chubbuck iof ;*. the
traction ."'company, -Iwho;' was in \u25a0'. Peorla
when news of ;thef wreck* was, received,
* Continued >on " Pag-e *7, Column 1 4
ff \ THE WEATHER
4 3YEpTERDAY — Maximum temperature* 66;
ssj/minimum temperature, 50.
'FORECAST FOR TODAY— Fair _with
\s some cloudiness flight north winds.
WRECKERS TRACED FROM
RENTING OF LAUNCH TO
LOADING OF EXPLOSIVES
VK J. * "TV 1 » T» ± TT
Mysterious Peerless Proves to Have
Been "Pastime" Disguised by
1 Changing Its Name
BOAT FOUND IN ALAMEDA ESTUARY
AT FINISH OF EVENTFUL VOYAGE
Detective^ Follow Two Clews, One Here and the
Other in Los Angeles, and Profess to Be
Confident of Early Success
GEORGE H. PHILLIPS, shipping clerk of the Giant ponder company,
positively) identifies the launch Pastime as the one in which the ex
ploshes were carried atva\) from the plant September 23.
The Pastime is owned by Douglas A. Burrowes of Oakland and E. H.
Baxter of Alameda, from whom the launch Was rented.
Burrowes gives valuable information to the detectives and the police of
Oakland keep him incommunicado in order that the clew which he furnished
may not become public-
Police discover that one of guilty trio took name of prominent miner and
painted a scar over his eye to impersonate him.
Earl Rogers declares dynamiters took explosive to hiding place and then
;.' William J. Burns returns to Los Angeles. He declares that
the capture of the dynamiters is now a mere matter of hours.
The movements of the mysterious, crew of the launch are traced from the)
time they first began negotiations for renting the launch until they disappeared
with their cargo of explosives.
Typographical*, unions of Texas offer an additional reward of $1,000
for the conviction of the dynamiters.
• Important clew developed in Los Angeles, but is fcepf secret.
General Harrison Gray Otis, publisher of the Los Angeles Times, ia
arrested on a charge of criminal Tißie/ preferred by- Andrew Gallagher. He was
taktn into custody while preparing to attend the funeral of Wesley Reeves, the
stenographer to whom he dictated rthe article on which thelibel was based, and
who Was killed when the building was wrecked.
NEW CLEW FOUND IN
LOS ANGELES IS
KEPT SECRET
LOS ANGELES, Oct. 4.— The veil
of secrecy maintained by Chief
of Police Galloway' arid all his
subordinates since the explosion which
wrecked the Times' plant last Satur
day became thicker and more im
penetrable late today, when a report'
came in that the trail of the dynamite
conspirators had been struck in this
city. -
"I regard the second clew as quite
as important as that which is cngafcing
the attention of the detectives in San
Francisco."
This was all that half an hour of in
terrogation could elicit from the chief.
He admitted later that he had but two
clews worthy of attention — the one
discovered here this afternoon !and
that -in San Francisco.
Otis Arrested
One incident of the day here was
the arrest of General Otis, proprietor,
of the Times, on the charge of having
criminally libeled Andrew Gallagher,
a . San Francisco labor leader, in the
columns of the Times. He was taken
into. custody while preparing to attend
the funeral of Wesley Reaves, the
young stenographer to whom he dic
tated the article on which the libel was
based.
•'The arresting officer accompanied the
general to. the funeral and thence to a
justice court, where bail was arranged
for a habeas corpus hearing tomorrow.
Two Warrants Issued
;The charges , against General Otis
were contained. in two warrants. - They
.were issued some time" ago in San
Francisco, but as General Otis was in
Mexico, representing the United States
as a special .'envoy to the centennial
celebration, , they were not served.
Similar warrants, however, were served
on llarry Chandler, assistant general
manager of the Times, but "tie was re
leased under a habeas- corpus writ, is
sued on the ground that .the warrants
were insufficient.- The alleged libel was
contained in/ an article criticising not
only Gallagher.but Mayor McCarthy of
San^Francisco and O. A. Tveltmoe, fol
lowing*: 'the visit .of Gallagher and
Tveltmoe to this city to confer with
labor/ leaders ';hefe' regarding - strike
conditions ; here...... General Otis' bonds
were fixed at |100 on* each warrant, the
same as in the "case of Chandler. ' the
habeas /.corpus writ was made return
able^ tomorrow. -"' \u25a0
Funds, to be devoted to the relief of
fa/milies > of "the 'explosion victims /re-"
ceived a large addition today when the
American bankers' association, which is
Continued on Page 5, Column 1
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
SHIPPING CLERK
IDENTIFIES THE
POWDER VESSEL
IT was learned definitely that Oak- >
land was the base of operations
for the men who dynamited the
Times building in Los Angeles Ta?t
Saturday, when George H. Phillip?;
shipping clerk of the Giant powder
company, positively identified the
launch in which the men who. the
police say. were J. B. Bryce or Bry
son and William Morris or F. A.
Perry, carried away the explosive on
September 23. This launch is the
Pastime, and belongs to Douglas A.-
Burrowes of Oakland and E. H. Bax
ter of Alameda.
Captain of Detectives Walter J.
Petersen of Oakland and Detective
William J. Burns are certain that
the track of the men responsible for
the dynamiting has been picked up.
Detective Burns left for Los Angeles
last night to take up the trail of the
Evidence Complete
A complete chain of evidence, cover
ing almost all the actions of the men
from the time they began arrange
ments to secure the powder until their
final disappearance, is in the hands of
the detectives. The broken threads
of the trail were picked up yesterday
and \u25a0 pieced together, with the result
that .little room for doubt is left that
the gelatin powder was obtained In
Giant and then taken to Los Angeles.
The men disguised the Pastime by th«.
simple device of tacking a cardboard
over the name and pasting letters to
form the name "Peerless" on this.
Marks of the tacks and_ the cardboard
used were examined yesterday.
Money was no object to the mysteri
ous men. . They readijy paid a $300 de- ,
posit for the launch, and displayed a
large'rbll of bills to at least three, per
sons .with whom they did business..
Captain Petersen said that he belleverl
the men represented a. part of a gang •
or organization well supplied with
money and having a membership in.
Oakland. t He said -his investigations |
led him to believe that the three in- •
effectual attempts to blow up the plant
of the Pacific lumber company of Oak
land, a nonunion concern, were trace
able to the same agency.
Launch Rented
Two men who gave their names a3
J. B. Bryce and F. A. Perry visited
\u25a0Burrowes on September i:> and pro
posed to' rent the lauifch for a week..
Bryce conducted most of the dealinz. ,
•His description taUies in every partic
ular, with that of the man known aa
A. J. Bryson, who paid for the powder
in the San Francisco office, of the Giant .
• powder company and with the man.
hABRfIBfIBfSBHHfIHi WBKKKSKSBSSa

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