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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, October 24, 1910, Image 7

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MACK'S MERRY MEN MAUL CUBS AND WIN WORLD'S SERIES
COBS COLLAPSE IN
EIGHTH UNDER FIRE
Athletics Hammer Miner Brown
While Opponents Play \u25a0
Like Blind Men
Twenty-seven Thousand See
Last Contest; Winners Get
$2,062 Each
CHICAGO. Oct. 23. — The baseball
championship, of the world beiongrs to
the Philadelphia club of the American
l^ag-ue. The Athletics clinched the big
pennant, fast today with seven runs to
two for the Chicago National^,, and
th*re was none of the 27,000 persons
present to say that they had not won
fairly and squarely. Five g-am-is were
plp.yed. and the eastern youngsters
took four of them by outbatting, out
fiplding and outrushing the veteran
\u2666"Jlicagoans. They got the "jump" at
the start, and although Chicago punc
tuated their progress with a defeat
yesterday it really did not change the
situation a bit. The Philadelphians
were due. They won the American
league banner in 1902. but there was
no .world's series that year. Five years
ago the New York Nationals were too
strong for them. So in this year of
grace it was not on the cards that
they were to be denied.
PITCHERS FRL.L DOWX
Chicago's failure in the series can
be laid .to one causo — the weakness of
the pitchers. The club has maintained
Its piece in the National league race
by getting an odd run or two In small
score games. In the words of Joe
Tinker, "when they hit our pitchers
we're not winners."
Not one of the pitchers was able to
keep the hits down — Overall, Brown.
Pfeister. Reulbach. Mclntyre. Cole —
they all looked alike to the Philadel
phia hitters.*
While the series was not the most
profitable ever played, it helps to sim
plify the high cost of living problem
confronting even such heroes as the
Philadelphias. to say nothing of the
<"hicagoans. with winter coming on.
The players" share of the money
amounted to $79,071.93. Of this 60 per
cent, or $47,443.15. goes to the winners
and $31,<525.77 to tlie losers. As there
;ire 23 players on each team eligible to
participate, each of the Philadelphians
is entitled in round numbers to |2,062
and each Chicagoan to $1,375.
"They're a grand bunch of boys,"
fald Connie Mack, beaming on his men,
"and I'm proud of them. They never
quit. In the. first four, games we used
only 10 men. which speaks well for the
way the boys worked together, and not
until today did I make. any changes."
The performance of Coombs in pitch
ing ay.d winning three of a five game
series is probably unique. He had but
one day's rest between the second and
third games, but three days intervened
between the third contest and today's
exhibition. He had better control today
than in the previous contests, and foiled
th» opposing batters when hits meant
runs. Brown, for Chicago, pitched, ex
rpll*>nt bail, except in the locally dis
astrous eighth, and the holocaust of
that inning was by no mearVs entirely
his fault. . 1 ,
IVDTAX SUMMER DAY "»( •
The day was bright and the weather
of the Indian summer variety. Ground
rules, as usual, were necessary. Phila
delphia took the lead at the outset
when Hartsel, who went to left while
Lord played center in place of Strunk.
singled. The' Philadelphians present
cheered, for that was exactly the rea
son that- "Topsy" was played instead
of Strunk. He stole second while Lord
was striking out. and brought in the
first run when Collins hit to center for
one base. Brown struck out Lord and
I>avis in this Inning.
Chicago c-ame right back In the sec
ond, when Chance doubled to left, took
third on a sacrifice, and scored when
Stelnfeldt delivered a belated hit.
In the third and fourth stanzas the
Philadelphians were not threatening,
but Coojnbs did some stellar pitching
to save himself from trouble in Chi
cago's half of the fourth. Two hits
And a pass had filled the bases, with
one out, but the young Philadelphian,
settling to his work, fanned'the always
to be feared Tinker and Archer.
The easterners assumed the lead in
the fifth and were neve,r headed there
cfter. Steinfeldt's fumble gave Murphy
a life at first. Barry sacrificed and
I^app. who donned the catcher's mitt in
place of Thomas, sent him home with
a single.
CUBS COM* APSE
SThe Chicago team went to pieces in
c eighth. ::' n l \/
In their half of this inning, the Cubs
took a desperate brace and added a run
to their score, but that was all. Sheck
ard. the head of the batting list,
doubled to left and went to third on
Schulte's out. Hofman missed three
good one?, but Captain Chance produced
the need I'd hit and Sheckard scored.
Zimmerman ended the opportunities of
this inning with a long fly to left.
Coombs tightened up in the ninth.
Fteinfeldt and Tinker hoisted to Lord.
Archer made his first hit, but was
forced at second for the last out of
the series when Kling. who batted for
Brown, sent an easy grounder to Barry.
The score:
PHILADELPHIA
AB. P.. BH. PO. A. E.
Hartsel. 1. f 5 2 1 2 O 0
II Ills
Tot ,l m J 36 7 9 ,27 14;. 0
Fhfrktrd. 1. t .A 4*'. A 4*' 1* - 1 ° 2
Srhulre. r. f.. < * J «
Hofman r. f ...8 O 0 I 0 0
Chanre. 3b V-. * 1 - « «J «
Zimmerman. 2b 3 O 2 1 « 0
MeinfeMt. 3b -\u2666 0 2 O 11
VS2. ?::::-::::::: \\. I . \\ -|
53K :.•.•.•.•.:::::::::::: j } °J\° 1
Tot>l 34 2 10 27.15 -1
•Batted f9r Brown in ninth.
RCXS BY ISStSGS
Philadelphia 1 0 0 0 10 OS 0-7
Cbicairo 0 1« 0 0 0 0 0 1 O— Z
\u0084.- . SCMMABr -
Two base hits— Chance. ." Sheckard. Murph.r,
I^rt-d. Collins <2>. Sarrince lilts— Zimmerman.
Berry.* «olen bases— Zimmerman. Hartsrt; (2).
Ccllina <2>. Left on bases— Philadelphia <.. Chl
ctgo 7 Firot base on called balls— Off Coombs. 1
iHnfmstn. eff Brown 3 (Davis. s Barry. Lor.li.
first base on errors— Philadelphia 1. Struck o>at
— Br Brown 7 (Lord. Darls. Lapp (2». Coombs.
Raker Hartsel) *».r Coombs 4 (Tinker. Arcner
<2» HofmanK Wild pitch— Brown.- Time of
«Mjie 2 hours and I» minutes. Umpires — O'Dajv
\u2666 behind tb* plate*. Sheridan <on bases). Connolly ;
.in rijrbt field) and Blglcr (In left Held). _ . ,
1 THE GAME IN; DETAIL^ |
V - :—: — ;—;; — ; \u25a0 . : — "\u2666"
\u25a0 FIRST- XKNIXG.V
FhQtdelphi*— Steinfeldt played up for * bunt
on Hurt**!, but the Utter atngled, between rtiort
and second. Lord nj«de two strikes in , attempt
ing to bunt and 'then struck out.. Ilartwl^ Ftole
MM-ond Btandlng wp.' 1 a*' neither Tinker' nor Zim
merman ;coTpre<! itbe^ b«j. ; ,, IJ art eel . scored /from
BIG RALLY CLINCHES
GAME AND TITLE
Jack Coombs, who pitched three winning games against Chicago in world's,
series. (
second when Collins singled between second and
short. Baker was the second ont on a hlßh foul
to Archer. Collins stole second. Archer's throw
r#in* low. Brown settled down and struck out
Davis. One run.
CHICAGO— Dan's captured Sbeckard's ground
er and threw him out nt first. Coombs coTcring
the has. Schulte's weak effort retired him, Col
lins to Davis. Hofman went out the same way.
No runs. \;-:>x
SECOND XHCTKG
Philadelphia— Stelnfeldt made a neat stop of
Murphy's liot prounder and throw the runner out
at first. Barry pent a high fly to Tinker. Lapp,
who replaced Thomas as catcher for the purpose
of strengthening the battlnp, struck out. No
runs. .^'•'rlb-
Chicago — Chance hit for two basrs into the
left fipld oTPrflow. . Zimmerman was out on a
n"»t sacrifice 'bunt. Coombs to' Collins. Chance
takinp third. Steinfeldt's hit' was too hot for
.Baker, nnd Chance.' Fcorwl. ', Tinker /fouled out to
V^yU. .Ixwd tooij Archer's fly. I One run. .
THIRD INNING
..Philadelphia^oombs' Vtnjck nut. ' Ziuimermsn
raptured HartselV prounder near -first and the
runner was out to Chance. Brown jumped in the
air and made a one handM stop of Lord's hit,
throwing him out at first. No runs.
Chicago — Brown- was out, bis. bunt going
straight to Coomb?, who tossed It to Davis.
ShPckard Tras an *>a«y out.* Collins to Davis.
Schulte sent a hard drive through Coombs' legs
and was safe at first. He was ont stealing. Lapp
throwing perfectly to Collins. No runs.
FOUR JH INNING
Philadelphia — Chance needed no assistance in
disposing of Collins' grounder. Baker struck
out. DavJs grounded out, Zimmerman to Chance.
No runs. '
Chicago — The first base on balls was presented
to Hofman. Chance attempted a sacrifice bunt,
but Ovmibs threw to Barry, forcing Hofman
out at second, the Chicago leader being safe at
first. Chance took second when Zimmerman sin
gled to left. Baker stopped Stetnfeldfs sting
ing grounder, but. It went as a hit, filling the
bases. Tinker struck out. Coombs also fanned
Archer.- thus saving a threatening situation . for
the visitors. -No runs.
FIFTH INNING
Philadelphia,— Murphy was safe on Steinfeldt's
rrror, the latter fumbling his grounder. Barry
was out. Brown to Chance. feaCTiflclng Murphy to
second. Murphy scored when Lapp singled to
left center field. Coombs ont. Brown to Chance.
Brown settled down and struck out Hartsel. One
run.
Chicago — Collins made a pretty running i stop
of Brown's grounder and threw the runner, ont
at first. Sbeokard singled to center. Sheckard
was forced out at second. . Barry .to Collins,
Schulte safe at fir»t. Schulte was out at second
stealing, Lapp to ColHns. No runs.
SIXTH INNING
Philadelphia — Lord fouled out to Archer.
Sheckard camped under Collins' fly. Zimmerman
made a lightning play and threw Baker out at
fir*t. No runs. -.
Chicago— Barry made a speedy flop and throw
and Hof man was out at first. • Lord loped under
Chane«'s fir." Zimmerman made his -second, hit,
a clean single to right. Zimmerman, stole pee
ond. Lapp's throw belnjr Bhort. Stelnfeldt filed
out to dftfp center. No runf. .
SEVZNTH INWING
Philadelphia— Brown checked DaTis* - hot
grounder and Zimmerman threw the batter out
at first. Murphy doubled to left. Barry; hit to
Hofman, and Murphy made third on the throw
In- Lapp struck out. No runs.. :
Chicago — Hartsel captured Tinker's fly Just in
side the left field foul line. Archer went out on
three pitched balls. Barry threw Brown out at
first. No runs. . , "
EIGHTH INNING
Philadelphia— Coombs singled to right." Coombs
was forced at second; Tinker, to 'Zimmerman.
Hartxel safe on fielder's* choice. ;. Hart»el stole
second. Chance protested, but was ordered back
To his position..- Lord doubled to right, scoring
Hartsel. Lord scored on a scratch double .to
right by Collins.' Colling stole third. Collins was
caught at the plate, Zimmerman to Archer, but
Baker was safe' at first." Brown presented, his
firtt pass on balls to ' Davis. Baker • and Darts
scored following Murphy's, hit, which was too
hot for Zimmerman. ' The ball; rolled to; center
and Hofman ; threw ! wild to Archer, which " let
Davis In and put " Murphy on" third.' 'Murphy
f cored on a \u25a0"'fid pitch." Barry walked.- "The
6langhter ended when Lapp rolled one to Brown,
who threw him' out 'at first.. Five runs. : : >|?jbs§§|
Ohica»o-f-Sbeckard doubled to left. He • went
to third on Schulte'a out, Barry to Davis. Hof
man -struck out. : Chance singled to" right, scor
ing Sheckard. . Hartsel \u25a0 ran back * for Zimmer
man's fly. One run: ' .?
NINTH INNING .. .
Philadelphia — Coombs did not attempt to run
wli'-n he ktioked . a grounder : to Brown. Brown
jumped for Hartal's ;. l)ounder and the . runner
wa« €«it at nn.t.;. Lord; received" free 'transporta
tion to fli>t. Collins 'doubled to the. center, field
barrier. Baker fouled out to Chance.' '„ No runs.V
' Chicago — Lord; came to second' base to
take] Steinfeldt's fly. 'Tinker filed out 'to -deep
center..; \u25a0\u25a0' Archer singled ', to right.' 1 -.• Kling Iwttpil
for Brown. Archer; wag forced out at second,'
Barry unassisted, ; when Kllng . hit an easy ; one
to Barry; . No runs. "
Philadelphia FanslWild .
.\u25a0PHILADELPHIA. ;V Oct. 23.— There
was* general: rejoicing" here; this evon
lngr,*Tvhen . it- : becarrie ; known; that .the
local -"American = league ' club - had " taken
its fourth. game; from tthe Chicago;Xa
THE SAN F^ 1910.
tionals, "thereby winning the world's
series. . .
Philadelphia has been -baseball crazy
since .the home team, won the first
game of the series.
Today' a local newspaper announced
the game play by play through a
megaphone and there "was such a jam
in the block that mounted police had
to be called upon to open up a passago
way for the street cars.
1909 Holds Record
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
CHICAGO.' Oct. 23.— The worlds
series of 1909 remains high water mark
for total attendance and receipts, ,but
it lasted seven games, two more.than
this- year. --If. the- Athletic-Cub series
hadasgone two games longer it- would
have surpassed all records. In theiflve
games played the attendance wass6,sl2
larger' than the total for the^ corre
sponding, five games played last year.
The" receipts were $17,872 more than
those of the first five-games between
Detroit and Pittsburg. and the players'
share of the receipts this year was
$12,147 greater than' the poor which
was divided between the Pirates and
Tigers. . . V. " .
Here are the figures:
Attendance and receipts today, fifth
game: . "*
Attendance 27,374
Receipts ........: $37,11(>.50
Players' pool "20,042.01
Club 0wner5.. ...... ...T 18,3«1.04
National commlßslon. , 3,711.05
|* Totals for. the five games:
Attendance 124,222
.Receipts • . .„ ; .$178,980.00
PlayerK' pool for four games 79,071.09
Club 0wner5." ...... 77.510.01
National commission 17,398.00
The totar attendance- for five ; games
last fall was 117,710.. The total re
ceipts ! for the five games last fall
were $156,10.8. "-
The 1909 players' pbol amounted to
$66,924.90, of which the -Pirates took
$40,154.94 and the Tigers : $26,769.96. -
PARROT'S ABILITY TO \u2666
-TALK DUE TO TONGUE
The indefatigable German natural
ists have been gathering fresh data
touching: the mechanism . of --birds'
tongues. It. is, a notion popularly.en
tertained that woodpeckers employ
their sharp-pointed tongues as darts
jvith: which to transfix their prey. The
Germans contend | that while It Js true
that the woodpecker, like; the . humming:
bird, can dart out its tongue with ex
traordinary rapidity,, and -that Its
mouth i 6 furnished with an elaborate
mechanism / for this", purpose,' in
vestigation clearly . chows \u25a0\u25a0; that the
object of - this : swift motion is ; only to
catch tl}e prey, not: to pierce it. For
the purpose of holding j the J captured
victim,' the tongue is
furnished with a sticky secretion. »,
It fls- not; surprising •; to Jearn,: coti
sidering the . parrot's . ability to imitate
human speech;- thatithe. tongue of that
bird „ resembles, that,;; of ..'man., more
closely than any -other birds-t ongue.
It is not because; the parrot "possesses
more, intelligence than j other, birds but
because its tongue ! Is better; suited for
articulation" than •. theirs 'that it ; is . able
to amuse- us with its mimicry. :
The German investigations: disclose
the" fact that ,' the \. humming;*- bird's
tongue is, in some .respects,' : the most
remarkable of all; It Is double nearly
from- end to end, •so - that - the ; bird •i«
able ; to grasp its Insect 'prey. withTlts
tongue. • very., much as -if . Its^mouth
were furnished with; a pair of fingers.
ALCOHOL IS TO BE
RESTRICTED IN ITALY
Consul General\Tames A. Smltlv writes
froml Genoa that the Italian ministry, of
thei interior has recently directed a. cir
cular^ to ; the ; prefects } of the ; : * several
provinces; instructing thenTto report on
the V spread of: alcoholism" In; their re
spective ;districte.' -In'^order/to tenable
the i government xto adopt
measures it requests the fullest statisti
cal' Information ; as ; to 'i thercomparatlve
quantity; of. alcoholic-llquofs,", wine, Vetc.;
sold in the various'sections of the king
dom; during; the; last -10 £ years "and the
apparent results which, have "'attended
such"? sale. > '.- "\u25a0':-'='/\u25a0 \u25a0-' ";'\:/: " : '.\u25a0-.'\u25a0;;\u25a0
'"' \u25a0'\u25a0-\u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0"'".- . -•. fii-.r.-,.-.-, -. .^. \u0084., \u25a0'\u25a0-.': '.;\u25a0:\u25a0 - f
CHINA RUNS SCHOOLS
FOR POSTAL EMPLOYES
\u25a0 China .has discovered ; that: it\ heeds to
run; its; postal < and ; itelegraph *j systems
itself, i instead of.J depending s upon-? the
labor t of ; foreigners. m';- The|celestJal f em™
pire is.^.therefore.C opening'? schools"*. to
train" young; ~« men to ; enter , these ; two
services,' "; - .-• , '\u25a0' , ".\u25a0 _' •\u25a0-;'•- ;>-;\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0-\u25a0 -:. : •;.-.. \u25a0\u25a0' \u25a0\u25a0
KRAPP BLOWS UP;
GREGG SAVES DAY
Mohle rites Win in Morning, but
Lanky -Twirleri Heads off
Afternoon Rally ; '
Graham Allows the
Protest of Beavers
President Graham 'yesterday
threw ou t . last Wednesday after
noon's game, which ;.was won by
San* Francisco, and ordered it
played over. ',; l"c \u0084•
-' In this game Umpire Jimmy
Toman, who was . working -the
bases, apparently changed his de
cision at second on a forced play.
The truth of the matter is that
Toman did . not see the play. Mc-
Credie promptly registered 'his
pro.test. . .
Graham came to the conclusion
that Toman did change his ruling
and he therefore allows
Credie's protest -on this . ground.
As a matter of fact, the man.was
out, and had Toman been .watch
ing the play,- as he s should have,
there would be no protest and the
game would -have .goni.to San
Francisco. '
WILLIAM J. SLATTERY
The Seals and Beavers parted, with j
the honors evenly; divided yesterday, j
After, tearing off the only" run In the. j
morning; gamo across the", pond, San-j
Francisco tossers came over to their j
own lot and before .one. .'of the largest I
crowds which ever saw them play, fell
down and allowed the- Beavers to take
it. away, 3 to 1. Theywould have done \
better had they been playing their;
game.. but they did not show their form;
and that's the answer. ,
| Portland rode "along . easily enough
, for eight -innings and it looked like a
i 3 to 0 shutout beyond the 'question of J
a doubt. Then, at the eleventh hour, j
the Seals sent Mr. Krapp .on an aerial i
voyage. There is *no question that
San Francisco would have won- the
game then and there had not the lflng
headed McCredie yanked Krapp out of!
the box and called upon the life saving]
lefthander. Gregg, to help the losing
cause. He did it and he did it quickly, j
as he generally does. _ .'
10.000 FAXS HOAVIi '-,
Ten thousand howling, frantic fans
were shouting and yelling and jumping
around when the Seals awakened from
their eighth inning slumber and began
to Show a flash of old time form in the
ninth. It was groat to . look at that
crowd and it was also painful to look
at those Seals just as soon as Mr. Gregg
Olson. 5s ;.... 5 <> '» } 2 0
Kru R f>r. 1. f... :...V ? 3- w,i *-J '0 J>
Ryan. <:. f 4 0 1 0 0 0|
ShPPhan. 3b.. •:.. -T "0 0 0 2 0
Itapps. lb ...> *.. 1 2.n ; .0 0
Ort. r. f. ......."...-4" 0' I- 2; 1-0
Murray, c...... 3 0 1 •" J 2
Krapp. p n ox 0 0 Tt 0
Gregg, "p.: :...... -.'-... ".v.-.-.p o o o .1 ,o
Total 1 . . . . . . ..... . . . . • i 33 S S 27 10 0
SAN FUANCISCO \ '-.-. ';\u25a0'." \u25a0
* AB. R. BH. PO. A. E.
Pb»ir. 1. f 3 0 0-3 00
MrArdlo. J8 .1.. -10 0 1 3 1
Melrhior, r. f '......3 0 1 O 0 0
I^wlP. c. f 4 0 I 1 0 1
Tennant. 11) 5 0 1 14 . 0 0
Vltt. 3b.... 4 0 1. 1 ."• 0
Kerry, -c. •". o 0 , r, 2 n
Mohler. 2b ..........3 0 0 I .4 0
Henloy. p 3 0 0 0 2 1
•Madden 0 1 0 0 0 0
Total ........'. ..31 1 4 27 16 3
\u2666Ran for McArdle. In -ninth.'-.
RUNS AND HITS BY INNINGS
Portland 11 0 0 0 0 0 10—0
Ba*Phlti . ...2 1 0 10 0 12 I— S
Ran Kranclsco 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I—l1 — 1
I Haschlts ........0,1 O 1 0 0 10 I—4
SUMMARY -
Saeriflpp fly — Murray. One run.' 4 hits , off
Krapp in S 1-S Innings. Credit victory to Krapp.
Two base hit— Rapps. Saorlflcp hit— Krnper.
Stolen baßPH— Casey. Ryan. Rappa. Shaw.. Vltt.
First base on called balls— Off Krapp 1. off llen-
Ipy 2. Struck :. out— By Krapp 0. by H.cnley 4.
Hit by pitched ball — Shaw, Melchlor by Krapp.
H6ubl<> ,'play — Mohler, to Tennant. Passed ball —
Murray. Time of R»me — 1 hour. and 50 minutes.
Umpires — Hlldebrand and Toman.
| y ' THE'GAME IN DETAIL ; > I
FIRST INNING
' Portlands-Olson* Btruelt out. Casey" singled to
right and went . to . third on [ Krnger's . single "to*
center, the latter '. taking - second on' the throw.
Ryan •. went . out, • 3lcArdle _| to^ Tonnant^ Casey
scoring ran the play and- Kruger going to third.
ShfPhan; went ouCMohler to Tennant. One nin.
San \ Frincisoo— Shaw : was hit • by,' ; a pitched
ball. McArdl* strnck out' and Shaw> stole' sec
ond. ' Melchlor; filed to Olson. . Shaw - went to
third on a; passed ball. Lewis filed to Ort.'?Xo
f SECOND INNING
Portland Rapps beat an infield hit and, stole
second. : Ort went «at. Mohler to Tennant. ' Mur
ray filed to I^wls i and Rapps . beat th» '.throw tb
the plats. '. Krapp flied to Lewis. One run. ; ;
Sa,n - TrwioUco— Tennant went out, Krapp to
Rapp*. '\u25a0'..' Vltt singled over '\u25a0 second ; and ' stole iec
ond..:Berry,struck out.; Mohler went out, Olion
to Rapps. No ron».
THIRD! INNING, .
Portland — Olson went ou*t, Vltt , to Tennant.
Casey went out,. Mohler' to Tennant. Ernger
flled'.to I/ewJs/.: No'rnns. -
San rraaciaco-^-llenley; struck ont. ; Shaw went
out, Krapp • to " Rapps. McArdle hit to right and
was thrown out at first. ,No runs. . ; ; :; ;:
'\u25a0'\u25a0'\u25a0'\u25a0^L-'Yi. :>\u25a0".• rOITRTH INNING V.
Portland— Ryan "grounded to Tennant. Sheehan
walked.', Rapp« 'doubled to the left field bleach
ers. Ort flied to Berry. Murray struck out. No
runs.';'.,.; '\u25a0\u25a0;.;;\u25a0." \u25a0\u25a0vK:, 1 ;;./'"': '
'\u00841 Ban Trancisco— Melchlor . singled, orer 'second.
i>ewls - struck out. - Tennant struck out. Mpl
chior wag thrown out 'trying to steal second..: No
runs. '\u25a0'- •'- \u25a0'\u25a0.- : J.. -\u25a0'\u25a0.•-.':,-\u25a0"\u25a0 . .'• '•;
FIFTH INNING : -
Portland— Krapp went 'out, ; McArdle '.-. to Ten
nant. olson;weht out. -Vitt to \u25a0 Tennant. ..Casey
fouled to' Vltt. * No* runs." •' -. .;':;\u25a0 • \u0084 ; %
l> San - rrancisco-i-Vitt • filed \u25a0to Rapps. Berry
struck out. ' Mohler < struck \u25a0 out/ . No runs.
\u2666.; SIXTH INNING
r Portland — Kruger 'struck; out.;' Ryan went out,
I McArdle to Tennant.-. Sheehan -hit; to McArdle,"
| who'oTerthrew to Tennant, 1 - and ; Sheehan , went 'to
Wcond. \, Rapp« went" out," -Vitt^to' Tennant. ;'• No"
runs.' % .^"~" ' .' " ?:'\u25a0 ". " "-•"'>,
'' San Franclsco-^-nenley went out. Sheelian to
Rapps. J Shaw.flied; to" Casey/ SfcArdlc filed to
Krnger. No . runs. • ' > 5, v : '. - -: '.-... '\u0084
SEVENTH INNING
: ; Porttaad— Ort singled'to right. "^ Murray bunted
to Henley, 'who, threw Ort *outj at second.'^ Krapp
walked." . Olson • hit to Mohler, 'who touched sec
| ond; : forcing i Krapp, '-U and relayed \u25a0 thV.' ball'l to
Tennant, completing a double 'play on Olson.
NoVruns.'; ; \u25a0";.' -\u25a0-_-'\u25a0 ~- ! y '\u25a0 '..'-' -. -.:' ;,"; .. \u25a0 \ '
:5 • San ; rraaoisco-VMelcbior : flied ,>. to • Ort. \u25a0 Lewis
filed Jo Casey. " Tennant beat an infield hit. : Vltt
struck' out^No'rnns; T- - - : - '' \u25a0
:\u25a0•;:;:/.."•' f ' EIGHTH^ INNIU G , "/ : .:'
» Portland-^Casey beat an-, infield v hit and _ stole
second. ", Krnger ; bnnted *. to Henley,'; who fumbled
the \u25a0 ball.\Casey? going i to" third and ? Krngcr7 to
first/ ; I' Ryan"^ singled ; past 'I second :* and 1' Casey
scored.^ Kruger i went- to \ third; on' Lewis.,, wild
throw". , Sheehan iflied : : ; to t: Berry. \V Ryan r '>tole
second, vj Kruger -fasjruri]; down '/ between 'i third
and home. when: Rajpps failed to hit the hall on'a
"tqveer.e.. pi ay".' !'< \ Rapps " to \ Berry. * • One
I run.:; : -.;- .-:.;--;\u25a0•;/\u25a0\u25a0;..< V ;\u25a0/<:\u25a0- ,V,- ;-. - : V ;'• ;:.- ; - "£i';/j
it SaaFranciico— Berry ; went; : out,' Shethan to
SEALS HOLD BEAVERS
TO AN EVEN BREAK
Eugene Krapp,: Portland's crack tivider, who pitched; great ball until the
ninth yesterday, when he in as chased lo the clubhouse.
San Francisco Is Tied
With Vernon for Third
STANDING OF THE CLUBS
(Pacific Coast League)
dub— W. L. Pet.
Portland :..... ..105 v 80 • 567
Oakland ....113 DU 554
San Francisco.... ....105 '99._. 510
Vernon ..................105 99 515
Lo s Angeles • gg »? 462
Sacramento :.:.. 78 121 091
RESULTS OF GAMES
Sm Francisco 1, Portland 0.
Portland 3, San Francisco 1.
Vernon 6, Los Angeles 5.
Vernon 5, Los Angeles 2.\
Sacramento 4, Oakland 1.
:-;-; GAMES TODAY
Portland at San Francisco. DouWe
header. First game at 1 o'clock. \u25a0 .
Portland held its own by breaking even
with the Seals yesterday, while . Oakland
again fell by the waysido before tne on
slaughts of the Senators. '\u25a0 ,
Now Oakland's chances for the pennant
are dwindling fast.. Tho Commut«rs have
lost ; two : series in a \u25a0 row. the last one
being, the most disastrous, as- they
dropped five out of six irames to the tail
end ag-grregation of the league, the team
that never figured at all. \u25a0---\u25a0\u25a0'
Incidentally, th« beloved Seals are now
tied with. Vernon for third honors, thanks
to th» decision | of ..- President Graham in
the protested game of last Wednesday
afternoon. Now San Francisco will have
to' keep hustling' in order - to . head tho
Villagers - off. r; Vernon is playing • some
ball at the present time.' This should he
a warning for the Seals to heed.
Riippp. Mobler went out. Olson to Rnpps.^llcn
ley struck \u25a0 out. ;\u25a0\u25a0-\u25a0- No runs.* •
~: ; NINTH INNING
Portland— Ort struck out. Murray slncled to
left." .'Krappflfcd ; to Shaw. Olson went out,
Vitt to Tennant. No runs. \u0084 ...
"\u25a0 Sa»\ Franciaco— Shaw v filed to- Krager. Me-
Ardle "waited and was. replaced on first by. Ma<l
flen."-.Melchior wag: hit by ; a piched ball. Lewis
singled "to the right "field : fence. Madden
and 'Melcbtor, went to third. ' Krapp was relieved
by Greg&." : '-\u25a0', Tennant 'went out, Greg:*? to Ilapps.
Lewis going to. second. Vitt ended the game by
grounding : to Rapps." j One run. : ... •
Seals Win Thriller i
The .morning, game- across the bay
was as ' sweet ; and as- close' a"n exhibi
tion as > ever . thrilled 'any fan. From
the way the*rivali pitchers, -.Miller land
Garrett, ; were working : it looked as^if
they might ; go :20 . innings ;,without
run, but there; *,was a * sudden, and
sensational break 'in the ninth inning,
when the Seals ;ended ; it;by scoringithe
lonesome tally. The score : -
3I6^XIXG . GAME • '.
\u25a0''... AB. R. BH. PO. A. E.
Ryan, c. f ............. 4 0; 1- 2_O 0
Olson, -55. ...... ..V. 4 »> 1 2 0
Kruger.l. f.... ......... 4 ;o ;-i-; 3 o o
Casey,- 2b. ."..-.. . .... .'.'. . . •'! o\u25a0<0 \u25a0< 0/ : 1 * 1 0
Rheehan, 3b..........;.;. 3 . 0 0 2 3 0
Rapps. 1b.:... ........ ..4 .0 0 9 0 1
Fisher, -?c;:..... ....•."... 2 .•-•>• 0: s_: 1 p .-0
Ort. r.^f-.:..... ....... .^ <» 0 10 0
Garrett, p... ......... ...3 • 0 1\ 0 2 0
- Total. /.......:...'. .."..29 *0* . 4 .*25 0.1
•One out. when winning run was > scored. :\u25a0_•". -»\u25a0
- > SAN FRANCISCO o
- , AB. -.R.'.8H.'.r0. A. E.
Shaw.vl. f. .......... 4 •\u25a0(!*, 1 IV 0 0
McArtUe, 55 .....'...'..... .4 1 1-3 1 0
Melchlor. r. >f. ........ i: 3 0 2 0 0 0
Lewis.-?c.if."™.';.vnT. t r.;3. ; 'O -\u25a0 040 0
Tennantr Üb:.-.Vv... :. v .. r -t; 0 0 7 0 .(>
Xitx^ l .zt»'.'.\'.v.'xrr::Tr^:: r :-::v- -a - 0 2 20
Berry, cr^r:r;7;v.rr;-->-:r3 Ho; :o;« - 2 : 0
Mohier, 2b.........'.;... a 70:: 0 3 no
jMiiier. p...v..:..::..;v.:3 ,0 - 1 on ,;o
Total ;'„:../.... :..'.'... 20 . 1 .5 27 11 0
RUNS -AND HITS 'BY INNINGS' .
Portland.': -"..•/-;%%... .0:0 . 0 :\0 \u25a0 0 0 0 00—0
- Basehits v : TV: . . . ". 0 . 0 : » 1 \l* 0 » 0 0 1 I— l
San Francisco V. . '. 0: 0 "0 - 0 0 '.'. 0-\u0084 0 . 0 . I—3
.: Basehits ..•••••'••O';o:o .0 .0 2 1-0 2—5
\u25a0/\u25a0.\u25a0\u25a0 y - .'X: : , .ti.;- SUMMARY.-' \u25a0"\u25a0 \u25a0 \. '.','dr :\u25a0'^
; base;hlt"—^Shaw. 'McArdlp. Sacrifice. hits
Casey." ; Stolen •'\u25a0 base— Olson.*: i First : ; base
on *\u25a0 called J balln-^-Off « Garrett -I:-*, off >Mlllerf 2..
Struck : out— By iGnrrett . 4.- by ; Miller . ."i; \l Time ; of
pame— l honr and •S3 - minutes. ..' Umpires-^-Bilde
brand and Toman. . - "_ • - ; v -\u25a0 ..-"'- ' .
VILLAGERS MAKE
IT SIX STRAIGHT
Vcrnon Wins Sunday Double
Header From Helpless,
Hopeless Angels .
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
LOS ANGELEb\;.Oct. 23.— 8y taking
both games from the Angels today the
Vernon Villager:?., made it six straight
and are determined'to take the seventh
tomorrow. '.The Villagers won In the
morning by a score of 6 to 5 and in the
afternoon tho tally was 5 -to 2. The
score:
3IOR.M.VG CAME »
VBIINOX
. AB. R. BIL I'O. A. E.
Carlisle, c .......:: 1 1 1 0 0
Unrrrll. :;b. .5 0 2 *2 3 X
Hosp.l. f... - 4 0 W 4O 1
It. Brash»-a r. 2b... 4' 0-1 O 2-0
Coy, r. f... 4 1 2 :: 0 1
Fisher." 1b.... ." o 0 7 1 <f>
Lindsay, ss *. . 4 2 1 3 1 1
Hasty. <• :... .1 0 "l 4. 2 0
Brown. C. ..:. 1 I•' 1 <> 0 0
p., lb.. ..2 0 0 .1 4 0
Braokpurldjre. 1 lb., p.. 0 0 0 0 '1 0
•Ross .'. 1 I 100 0
Total ..."........'. .....S4 6 10 27 H ~4
•Batted : for Hasty in ninth.
LOS ANGELES '.
-. \u25a0 1 ' AB. It. BH. TO. A. E.
Dale.Vi c. t... 4 0 0 2 10
Bernard, r. t .....4 2 3 •" 0 0
Howard. 2b .......... 3 10 2 .1 0
IMllon, lb 4 0 1 12 2 0
Kennedy, 1. f.... 3 0 O 10 1
Halllnan. Ob.. .112 0 5 1
Ih-lmas, t>* 2 'O O 11 0
Smith, -c. .....: 4 1 2 4 0 0
Nagle, p...... ...a 0 12 4 0
Total ........SO ~5 0 27 16 2
:: RUNS AND HITS BY INNINGS
Vernon :...'...*.. 0 0 2 0 0 OJ 0 O 4— 6
\u25a0•.Basehits ...... 0 I' S i>-'l 100 4—lo
Los Anjreles ::.. . 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 1 0-^-3
Bnsebits ";...'.. 1 0.0 ,O" 3 2 0,1 2—9
SCMMARY
« Hits— Orf fkrhafor S In 8 . 2-3 innings, runs : 5. '.
Home runn— .Smith. Two base hit*— Carlisle. Coy,
HalUnan. Najrle, Sdilth, Bernard. Stolen baee^-
Bornard.. Sacriflro hits — Howard, Delma*.
nedy. Schafer (2). Fiwt base on called balls-^Off
Schafer-l. r»ff Xncle 2. Struck out — By Schafer
•!/by Na?le 1. Double play— Halllnan.to- How
ard to Dillon.- Wild pitch — Nagl<\ ;. Passed ball —
Hasty. Credit " Tlctory to Schafer. Time of
fame— l hour 45 minutes. - L'mplres^-McGreery
and Irwin. - : -, -\u25a0\u25a0','
AFTERXOOX GAME
I VERNON
AB. R. BH. PO. A. E.
Carlisle; c. 1.. ........... Z 1 2 0 0-0
Barrel!. • 0b. . . . . . ..,..-.'..• 3 122 3 0
l\r,e V , 1it. ...... ..X..:.. 4 1 12 0 0
R. ' Bra.«hear. 2b......... 3 0 0 2 10
Of>y. r. f.... ..4 0 1 1 o 0
Fisher, "1b...:. .......... .1 1' 1\u25a0- » l 0
Lindsay, .55.'. '.'..:... : : 4 "11 *3 2 "1
Brown, c ." .0 1 7 1 - y
Uitt/; -p.. ..-.:'.. .-..-..\u25a0....": 4. 00 1 3 0
Total .51 5 9 27 11' *I
LO.S ANGELES* SSB
>B."R. BH. PO. A.-E-
Daley, c. • f . .'. . -'. . . . . . .'.v4 -.0 1 3 ' 1 O
Bernard. -, r.'J t .'...:....:: .'T4 '.-1 o \u25a0 I* 1 (• 0
Howard; 2b..i.'... .4 O 2 1 ." 1
Dillon, lb.. .:.\u25a0."... ..;.f... 3 »'. O <1 H^ 2* 1
Kennedy. 1. f .:.'......... 4 o, ' 2 1 00
Hallinan. 0b. ...:..;..'.*.' 3 0* , v 1 .4 o
Dolman. ' 55. "1....;........ 4 0 2 12 0
Orendorff. . c:.. ":'... -.:/.. 4 0 :0: 0 3 :; 0
Delhi."", p.. ;'.'.-'?. .\u25a0:.-...-.....' . 4? 1 '< 2 4 1
hmltb/ \u25a0'lbr.-:;*. :.'.'. ."?';.-. .",!'/ ,o- 0 3 o o |
Total ..:....-... ...30 .29 27.1 D 3
RUNS AND \u25a0 HiTS BY - INNINGS
Verimn ......V... ;0 2*300 -6 -0' O 0 — 5
::TBast>hlts.Y. . ;:.: l;jl ;j 2-3": li 110.-o*o "1 — 0
Los Anprolcs :'.:.. i~ 0 -I) 0- O 0"O <> 2 «> — 2
Baiehtt? .:.;.. 1 1 0:1. 0. 0 ' 2 3 1— 1>
''summary
T\V<i base hit?— Carlisle^ Delhi. ' Stolen bas* 11 ' —
j Burrell.. Flshfrii (2), Howard./ Sa<rlfic«- hlt*-^-"
liurn'H.iß. l(r»s^b«r.;Flrst.ba»e on called ball?— ."
Off' nittl.; off :Delbi?l:j Struck out— By Hlttfi.
by -Delhl"4." l>onbl» plays — Delhi:- to.: Orendorff/ to
Dillon ;to"-!HalllBan:xHitt.; to- Brown tn Barrell;
Delniss to -DUlon : j Daley, • ti» • Hlnn."; P«u.«rd •- ball—
Orendorff.'"- Hit \u25a0.by^nitrbed:b)ill-^- Brown.' Time,' of
jjanifv^-i 7 hour '. 30^minutes. - L'niptres-^-Irwin.and
McGreevy.Y v ' :. "" ;~* . * -.•"•\u25a0 --*\u25a0
700 OAK ROOTERS
SEE PETS BURIED
Southpaw Pape Officiates f i
Funeral Ceremonies on the
Sacramento Diamond
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SACRAMENTO. Oct. 23.— The cllmbv
Ing Oaks were humiliated before tha
largest Sacramento crowd of the season
today by the recruit Pape of Boston. It
was really a funeral, with some 700
loyal Oakland fans as chief mourners.-
They had come to Sacramento to root
the Oaks -to at least their second win
of the series, but at no time In th©
struggle did they have a chance to open
their mouths, so decisively beaten were
their favorites. The Oaks were lucky
to escape a 4 to 0 shutout, their loss
run coming in the ninth Inning, with,
two men down, through a piece of bad
fleld^ig In center.
It was Pape's second win of the
series and he was more of a puzzls
than the score might indicate. He was
found for seven hits, but they were
scattered so widely that they only gave
the Oaks a chance to die on the bases.
he being particularly effective at that,
time.
Tyler Christian was given poor stxp-"
port by hl3 teammates and this, with
his own wlldness. beat him. He started
Heister off .with a wallt In the first In
ning. Briggs followed with a single to
center that Hogan let go by him and
Heister scored. Brlggs making second.
Williams advanced Brlsrgs to third on
his grounder, which Cutshaw booted.
Briggs was caught off third and run,
down when Danzig hit to Wolverton.
and then Christian tried to see how
many Senators he could hit. H©
knocked down Boardman an<i Burns,
forcing in a runner. The next two
batters wanted to be hit, but couldn't,
and were easy outs.
Captain Graham of the Senators had
to fill in right field with Joe -Williams,
a bush leaguer, so crippled was hl3
team.
In the ninth inning Harry TVolver
ton got on when Spiesman. one of the
regular catchers, filling in at seconfl.
muffed an, easy grounder, and scored
on a lucky two base hit by Cameron,
batting for illtze.
OAKLAND
AB. K. BH. PO. A, E.
Maffgart. I. t 4 O O 3 0 O>
Wares. ** 4 O V 1 2 O
Cntshaw. 2b 4 0 2 2 12
Uopan. c. t 3 O O 1 ©\u25a0' .1"
Pfyl. lb 4 O O T O O>
.Swander. r. f 4 0 2 1 0 0>
; WolTerton. 3b....» \u2666 10 4 2 0'
Mlfze. c 3 0 14 4 0-
Christian, p \ o 0 1 0 ft
Nelson, p. 2 O O 0 3 O>
•Cameron I O 1 O © O
••Llrely 1 0 0 0 0 0>
Total .35 ~1 ~T 24 12 ~3
SACRAMENTO
AB. R. BH. EO. A. E.
Heister. I. f Z 2 0 1 O t»
Bribes, c. f 4 0 2 1 ft ft
Williams, r. f 2 1 o 1 0 O
Panzlir. lb 3 0 0 10 ft 0>
Bonrdtnan. 3b .3 0 0 2 1 0>
Bnrns. ss 3 0 1 2>2 > 4 2
La Lons:e, c .4 O 0 8 2 o
Spiesuian. £b 3 0 0 2 3 2
Tape, p 4 1 1 O 2 \u25a0?»
Total 29 4 4 27 12 4
•Batted for Mitze in the ninth. ••Batted for
Nelson in the ninth.
RUNS AND HITS BY INNINGS
OakUn.l 0 0 0 0 ft 0 0 0 I—l
BasehiN 1 1001102 I— 7 ;
; Sacramento- ...... 2002 o'Oo>o x — t
Basehits 1 0 0 2 0 0 0.1 xx — t
SUMMAnY
Off Christian— 3 hits and 4 rnnm is 3 2-3 In
ninirs; oft Nelson — 1 . hit. no run* in 4 1-3 In-*
nines, j Two ba?e hits — Cameron. IWitg*. Stolen
buses — Cntshaw. Svrander. First bas« on c«Jlefl
balls— Off Christian 3. off Nelson 2. off Pane 1.
Struck ont— By Pape 0. by Christian 2, by Nel
son 3. Hit by pitched bait— Boardman and
Burns, by Christian. Double play — Burns to
Danzl;. Time of game — 1 hour and 50 minutes.
Umpires— ; Van Haltren and Flnney.
SAN JOSE TO HAVE
BIG RIFLE MEET
» \u25a0
H. R. and G. E. Milnes to Con
duct Publication
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SAX JOSE, Oct. 23. — A controlling
Interest in the San Jose Times, a news
paper started here several years ago
by Charles M. Shortrldge, was pur
chased yesterday ,by H. R. and G- E.
: Milnes, former San Josea.cs and exparl
i enced "newspapermen. They assumed
charge today after they bad taken over
the stock formerly held by Clifford J.
Owen, editor and business manager.
R. P. Milnes is to direct the editorial
policy of the paper, .while his brother
Is to be business manager. They an
nounce, that the Times will be an Inde
pendent republican newspaper.
A SORE
-' Is always niplcloo*.
wf^H^^^k. ss oft»n the won:
/jB B cases of <^>crsricra3
/Kr^^^^k BLOOD POf?O.V
fj& \J3f f.«iT-n «» « TINY
M ,^»«,-^3 SORE or PIMPLJ 1 ..
u^ _\ . Y >>«lJind ears becoms
\\ £A I Inflamed or lumpy.
\i Mem f me lips and
jf iSffl TONGUE. MOCTU
_aflD.^**'«j^jT CERATE; BASH or
artSS^^. ""^pi ULCERS br»ak out
lsm3S&S&3?*§S&iB& often fall; BONES
' ache, and br this
DR. MOREL, tlm^ EVERY PORE
51 Third Street ««« the body 1» pol-
sonM.
BE CAREFUL!
To I»t tanr lnj>sp«rlenced doctor or DRTTG
CLERK ' treat yon or to apply canstlc is '\u25a0
DANGEROUS MISTAKE and may cause life-
lone rejrrpt. • Proc^d thf rlsrht iray.
CONSULT MEMT ONCE. I will teH ywi
what It i*. It |t*» a simple note I wfn h»a!
Kin 24 lwmrs.Fß IX: If It's a BLOOD POI-
SON «- SORE.- I, will administer the proper
remedfas and "are yon the mln^rlßs of this
terrible disease. I fornlstx all remedies aad
tin* complete •*
CURE Costs One-Half
th<« charge* for poor treatment. The SMALL
FKE may he paid as you ran afford. If nn-
able to rail. WRITE for my Free Symptom
List. Prompt ad»lce sent ia plain eimlope."
Strietly eonfidentlal.
DR. MOREL AND ASSOCIATES
THIRD ST. near Market. San Francisco.
DR.JORDAN'S"«''
MUSEUM OF ANATOMY
\*Z~~ ' ' icne*T»i than tvoi) ><
/r*\ Wwlumt or «n y contracted 4ia«u*
.' 'U*jn '. positively cured Vr tkm oittort
i nrrHitrrt as Um C«»it FifihliilnJ
I rtl^3S*\ fifty y««r». .
|yH DISEASES' OF MEN
k//tos>s^\\ Con*uiUti(M ittm tnd itrietljr private.
K* p^ (^ Tr««tment pvMOiOf «r by W««r. « A
i - f9 f3j A positive curt in mrary um «\u25a0-
I (fejfqj dcrUlun. * - '
i T^SdL w "'« '•» s* 0 " 1 - *»«:loso*»«y
I frt«^7 or MARRIAGE. mM frm-im ,
\J 19 vWaaU* book forjan.) - <
i:DHJOMAN' ) S*!^S.F.iCAI:<
7

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