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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 10, 1910, Image 5

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G. O. P. MAJORITIES
CUT BY BOURBONS
California Congressional Dele
gation Republican, but by
Reduced Margin '
Kent Will Have Normal Lead
and Knowland Was With=
out Opposition
Whi> California -will return a solia
republican delegation to congress the*
incomplete flprures Indicate that the
republican majorities have been cut
down In most of the districts. ' !
Judge Raker gave W. R Englebrlght
a hard fieht in the first distrirt. With
nearly half of the precincts heard from
the incumbent Is leaning by eHghtly
more than 1,000. This lead phould be
increased to 2,50Q when all the figures
are sn.
"William Kent will secure almost the
normal lead of <S,t)Oo over 1. G. Zum
walt in the second district. ,'r~-~\u0094
Joseph R. Kno'wland was re-elected
In the thir district without opposition.
\u25a0U'lth three precincts to hear from
Julius Rahn has defeated Walter 31ae
arthur In the fourth district, tvtilch Jb
in Pan Francisro, by a vote of 9,549 to
EL A. Hayes has beaten Thomas E.
Hayden two to one In the fifth dis
tri>-l.
With two-thirds of the prectnets
heard from in the sixth district Con-
E-r*»saman J. C Needham is leading A.
1... Cowell by less than 1,000, but the
precincts yet to hear from undoubtedly
will give Needham a comfortable ma
jority, much smaller, however, than his
lead of two years ago.
In the seventh district, which em
braces 1..0*, Arsgreles county, William P.
Stephens Is leading Professor Ix>rin, A.
Hand ley two to one.
S. C. Smith has defeated William G.
Irving In the eighth district, but the
democrat gave the Incumbent a hard
battle. With a few more than half the
precincts heard from Smith is leading
by nearly 4,000. Following are the in
complete returns from the several con
gressional districts:
rinsT mstri'ct
COUNTIES $ X-Z £?
I|= 1 1 ?t\ - ?
ApUw I 5! 1 i
Amador i 22 221 1,031 i I.<H6
r*<»i *fort* i s: i 1
raierprss ! 34 31 ! 1.080 1.030
Klskiroa B2 li «\u25a0 'JM
M<v3<*< 21 11 64 120
\u25a0ttumboldt CS ! 52: 3.629 1.31<t
Trinity C2\ 1 8 IT
Shsfts t-4l 28 »3«j W
r^*s"n i 22 : 1O ISO 2^
T-hsraj 35 sa! 74<V 1.284
Pfaunu • 22 22 426 425
Pirrr* \u25a0 21 , 2l! 1.321) 1,356
>>T*^a j 4G: j •
Plerpr I 49 S |... j
FA Horado I 35 32 ! 045 »""
M«n« 7 5 18l! P6
r.faripoFa j 19j 11 177] 297
Tctal I Sf»! 270 i 10.413 s ft.326
SKrONP PI STRICT
i v. j i? 2: r"
COUNTIES j- f 2.2 §= =s 1
;gi T? : r ' r
B'it'p j «!> : lj 2i 6
•Sutrrr j 191 17, 773!
Vuba I 23. Jlj 4*:»! 375
M*Ti<jorino -. ;..t C 4( 21 7fl 7K
•iiT.n S 171 8! ICS: Ki6
Cnlou 1 23 23! flSf. 1.149
£K-~TamTtlr, : 75 c^J r>.">42- 4.«&8
VoSo 161 1« 1.r.«58| 1.7J>3
I^if I 17| 10 355f. 451
Poaom« i 72i '3 lKo! 135
Marin ' 3.*ij 2SI 2.284 1.044
T<-ilal I .V.r,^ ]R2! 12.017! 10..T00
Turnn mstriot
111 1 "X x i - r
t \u25a0 "" fe
S-.'.Sllr, i ?,1 1 lTj 1.007
OntM oof-ta 1 451....J
AliUß^a ! I»4| 155] 20.051
Tr.TB! '; 2741 10<V 21.5«S
* FOI RTII DISTRICT
Z = ? -= Sr-
; •" 1 - A *i c \u25a0" I \u25a0
: : I : I• •" : I :
S««: FrEncisro.. ..i 116; 112 !>.549!f>.3n4; 34)1.149
' '• FIFTH DISTRICT *
s, b "*i "r " p•'
iini.li Tm *» \u25a0? i ~ r5 •*
COt NTIES -• .] r.-< -i —
1 r rf\ :.g
Francisco j 23fl 2."52| 21.7. T .fi 10,441
.Ntn Maten I 3SJ 35 2.3»«! 1,051
s»nt» Clara J »» 9« 8,430' .".,s*l
Tf>TRU '{ 373] "363J 32.582] 15.073
SrXTH DTSTRICT
7. y» W-tp In lfliQ.
? _ c > r
Santa Cruz 50j 50 2.12»j I.R3S
MontPTPj- 4SI SG 1,917 1.K58
San Benito 19] 17 »31 .1.413
Fr«>fno \u0084 1121 *? 5.466- 4.7«>0
Klnps ...»...' — . v . I
Ms'ipra 27 1 4 ,19
Mf.-<^«l 29 2 20 23
Pranls!«us 35 32 1,831 1.558
Ran J-^aquin SST 58 3,721 i 4.075
Tot»!<= ! 30nT 2K2 lfi.Olft! 15.074
SEVENTH DISTRICT
I>T6 Angelw I 402| 31 111| ~2G
EIGHTH DISTRICT
Fan Lui* Obi(=po 39 0 f»f>4 '453
Santa Barbara ...*. ' 43 30 1.0.24 1,479
Vetnnra ..: 25 ioj 740 446
Kern fiS 35 722" 1.763
Tulare ' _ ..-
Inyo 24/7 374 132
tan Bernardino 88 7« 4.049 4.4(>4
Oranjre 43 2» 2.373 1.107
RlTftrFlde «3 SI) 2.557 1.5 M
SaD Di«!j;o ........ 85 C 5( »,«<» . I.4fi.V
Iwperial 19| • ST 204 . 34S
Totftl» 572 326J 17,140| 13.272
RETURNS FROM 48 COUNTIES GIVE
JOHNSON A PLURALITY OF 21,354
Complete returns from 2,403 precincts out of a total of 3,159 in the.entire state of California show a total vote
for Hiram Johnson of 149,145, as against 127,791 for Bell, or a plurality of 21,354. This plurality may be either
slightly increased or decreased by the additional votes from the precincts still missing. The precincts included in
the following table are from 48 out of the 58 counties in the state. The vote shown below for lieutenant governor
and justices of the supreme court does not include as many precincts in all cases as that for governor:
Jq _o For Governor Lieut.Gov. Supreme ' Justices
;'2 c 2 ;'«' ?$• 3 : " n % 1% 5 E *? 5 i " : 55 * \u25a0\u25a0 . 3S { \u25a0*' '*£'
::g -g j, .:.o .;•;\u25a0.";\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 : .as' . : £ -..•>. . : % .. :' \u0084o-\u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0•\u25a0§.
COUNTIES. ;|g »2 © ; * : '. ; x ;h ; '\u25a0 \u25a0'. \ '\u25a0 Pj \
* i \u25a0 \u25a0 i : : : \u25a0!\u25a0 - ' : '•* \u25a0 ! .' :, \u25a0\u25a0•\u25a0 • '"
AlanifSla IJV4J 1»4 1 15,1."»2 H r Sl» f>,o7s| 15,«»7 11,430 21,300 21^*^8 7^23 9,610
Alpine r>| ..... ....... .... .. . ...... . ....... ......: ....... ....... ...... . ; ... .. .
! Aninlor 22 22 1,050 1,170.. 1,010 1,152| .................... ..|. ...
nn<t«» i «n| 1....... 4. .............. .—. — ....................
Ca!avora« 34 31 1,037 1,105 1,020 1,128 1,080 1,074 070 1,021
Coluna 23 23 039 I^l2. .. 400 090 418 492 JW4 918
Contrn <"o««tn 4J> 49....... 2,011 2,324." 2,806 2,019 1,520 2,000
Del .\«ne , S 4 1«3 108 13T» 178 198 169 05 • 115
El Dnradn JW 32 749 1,034. '. 705 099 740 784 554 887
Fresno '. 112 80 5,802 fi,08," .............. .....'..............-. ..:.....
Glenn 17 17 535 i»55 35. ...... BRO 880 007 503 700 ' 781
Hnmbotdt 03j »">7 2,073 1,770.... 2,073 1,610 2,784 2J822 843 021
Imperial 10 S 360 343 :........ .
Inyo 24| 14 ..» 844 508... ........ ............:..:....
Kexn O«! '40 J,737 2,145... 1,570 2,008 1,710 1,676 1,724 3,775
XI"X« 2l| 21 1,500 1,140.. 1,394 1,064 1,440 1,480 967 1,130
Lake 17 10 037 723........ 28-' 339 2f14 308 309 848
L«s«en 22 12.. 2»3 104.;* 214 158 116 113 99 106
Ixi* A-npreleft 402 350 26,303 . 19,306 .. ........ .......................:....
Mndcra « • • • 27 ..-. ...\... .......
>lnt!n ;S5 35 1,975 1,002... 1,735 .2,030 2^49 2,472 »23 1,506
Mnrlpwa 10| 19 216 381 .............. 167 310 100 166 255 278
r<rn(i<>i>lnn 04| ....... ....... ..
Merced 29i .. . .. .......
Modoc 21 8 .' 343 331. :.... 306 319 213 225 205 217
Mono 7 7 227 150 215 141 207 106 91 116
Monterey .' 48 3« ... 2,440 1,556 1,558 1,008 427 403 400 560
]\npa 27 19....... 1,147 1,7X2 1^256 1^92 1,660 1,495 796 1,247
,\pvada 46! 46 1,307 1.300 510 1 1,175 1,826 . '. .
Oranwe 43! 4S 3,02« 2,<1f10..... .] 3,077 2,365 3,1 13 3,489 2,126 " 2,1 14
Placer . : 49| 49 1,545 1,595.. 1,400 1.229 146 163 142 155
Pluraan 221 22 617 433. 570 387 557 592 353 418
HiverM.lo 03 50! 2.949 I^4o 649 3.020 1.574 2,577 2,864 1,863 1.430
Sncramento • 75j 63 . 4,810 5,538 4,475 5,459 5.352 5,574 3,449 4,534
«an llcnlio • • 1»! 17 1.257 14f70 1,005 1,567| 1,026 1,166 1.160 1.235
Sun Bernardino 8S! 74 3,500 3.108.. ...a. 5.534 2,856 i 2,952 3.897 3.770 2,582
San Dlcco 95j! 65 4,077 2^33|.«. 3.768 2^96 3.915 3.782 . 2.688 3,682
San Frcorixoo 352 !| 350 ... 24.053 23,603| 9,502 . 20,091 27,957 28,386 29,907 11,157 22.800
San Joaquln 581 5S 3,904 3.53S ....) 3,761 3,859 4.320 4^23 2.736 3^95
San I.nlHtOblapo 391 39 2,009 J,2«5 627| 712 505 645 771 467 '674
San Mateo i SSi 35 1.980 1,«56| 120 ... 1.704 1,634] 2,265 2.218 844 1.381
Snnia Barbara 43 43 2.006 1.770| 1,871 1,614 1.920 1,9(M 1.223 •' 1,369 '
Snnta ( lara ! 99!' 06 «,978 5,3851.... 6.644 5,399| 7.165 7.563 3^.89 4.572
Santa Cmi I 50; 50J 2,517| 1.812| | 2,240 1,772! 2.032 2.308 , 1.202 1.952
Shnsta I **l 28. ...... 1,033! 1,014|. I | SBl 993! 943 1,028 721 834:
Sierra : I 2 »!j •••• •••\u25a0•! ••• • •••• ••••• ; •••• ••
lilanvT".. .'.'.'. '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '..i ..".i sii)""Bj '.'.'.'.'." "i.Yoo!"i,s22'.'.:::;:i: :::.:: *i;is4" 1,303; :; : i,'M6:'i.M3 U 'iioo : 's^!
Sonoma I ~2|i 1 1. | • ..... ..| . ......
Stanislaus 35!! 32;. 1,886 1.732 1.550 1.698 1,730 1.985 1.436 1.763
*i Utt^r 10! l IT i 774 ' 705 727 ° 47 f142 7 »7 505 010
Tehania - I »Ml 33j 1,070 1,111... 077 1,097 909 1,042 963 lU)6S
Trinity •••! 2? | • ••••••
Tuolumne. -•• ' 2i * 2a i 1.058 1,155. ,045 1,075 038 937 878 " 844
Ventura » 10 736 657 728 589 704 750 520 5«>3
Yo?n ,-. I 1«! 10 1.5551 1,891 .. . 1,537 1,771 1,540 1,717 1,790 I,S^5
luba '..\'.\\..... ! gS)| 1 »l J - 761 1 So ° '\u25a0\u25a0 G»3 00l 864 870 «15 JSs
To4a! .'\u25a0 '!.-M.->9i'2.403! \u25a0] 149.145 J127.791 17,124 |102,850 l 09.9701j114^15 120,225 05,109 85.611
BOURBONS TO MAKE
GAINS IN SENATE
Many States Change From
Republican to Democratic
Legislatures
Revised returns which give the po
litical complexion of the state legisla
tures that will elect United Statas sen
ators are shown in the following table:
Seat Dow Complexion of
State held by Legislature
California. Republican Republican
Connecticut • -Republican Republican
Delaware Republican Probably Rep
pj cr j(; ft ...Democratic Democratic \u25a0
Indiana Republican Democratic
j nwa Vacancy In doubt
Ix>ulsian'a Vacancy Democratic
Maine .. : Republican s Democratic
Massachusetts ....'.-- Republican Republican
Maryland Democratic Democratic
Micliijran Republican Republican
Minnesota Republican Republican
MissfisiDDi Democratic Democratic
i Miwourf Republican Democratic
i Montana Republican In doubt
I Nebraska Republican Democratic
Vpvada Republican In doubt
New Tprscv .'.Republican Democratic
Nmv York" Republican Democratic
N»rth Dakota Repoblican Republican
o!) j 0 Republican Democratic
PennsylTania Republican Republican
Rhode' Island Republican Republican
Tence«Fee Democratic Democratic
Texas Democratic Democratic
tfah .*. Republican Republican
Vermont Republican Republicans!
* :< ready chosen
Virginia • .Democratic Democratic
Washington Republican Republican as
.• • ! sured of seat
WPFt Virßiriia Republican Democratic
Wi=<-o n sin Republican Republican
Wvoraing Republfcau Republican
REPUBLICAN TICKET
ELECTED BY KANSAS
SALINA. Kan., Nov. 9.— United
States Senator Joseph L. Bristow, who
took an active part in the recent cam
paign for the insurgents, said today
of yesterday's results:
"I am very much gratified at the re
sults in Kansas. We have elected the
entire republican congressional dele
gation by majorities ranging from
1,000 to S.OOO.
"Governor Stubbs has been re-elect
ed in face of the most terrific fight that
has been made on any republican nom
inee for governor since 1882, when
Governor St. John was defeated fqr., a
third term. While Governor Stubbs'
majority is greatly reduced from that
of two years ago, the fact that he won
in face of tremendous forces arrayed
against him, marks his election as a
great victory."
Majority Is Cut
TOPEKA, Kan., Nov. 9. — Late re
turns indicate that W. R. Stubbs, re
publican, has been re-elected gover
nor of Kansas, but by greatly reduced
figures. Against a majority two years
ago of 40,000, he will have but from
5,000 to S.OOO this \u25a0' year.
All the eight congressional districts
have returned republicans.
The complete republican ticket has
been elected, most candidates leading
Stubbs, but the legislature appears, to
be democratic.
The socialist vote was the lightest
DEMOCRAT IS CHOSEN
WYOMING GOVERNOR
CHEYENNE, Wyo.. Nov. 9. — Returns
from yesterday's election in this state
are far from complete, but there "seems
to be no d'oubtf of ' the election of
former United States Senator Joseph
M. Carey, running as ; a democrat, :as
governor. The count in 176 i precincts
out 0f.450 gives Ca'rey 3,264.:Mu11in, re
publican. 1,223. Mondell is re-elected
to congress by a largely decreased
plurality. The legislature -is probably
republican. -I "„ \u25a0>. ' \u25a0 ,
Mexico and . Return,' $80
On the Christmas; holiday: excursion
leaving San Francisco December 14 and
Los Angeles December, 15.
conducted. Dining,* parlor', and; observ
ation cars and Pullman vestlbuled
sleepers. Go via Southern Pacific and
National Railways of Mexico, return
via Santa Fe. > Side trip from-Williams
to Grand canyon. If desired,
ditional.. For details see agents South
ern Pacific { Flood building, Palace
hotel. Market street, ferry depot. Third
and Townsend streets,: and -Broadway
and Thirteenth street, Oakland; Santa
Fe, C 73 Market' street;. National--Rail
ways of Mexico, Monadnock building.*
Wh*>n it comes.' to facing 1 i an" finpmy
some rhen show their .retiring.'disposi
tions. : . -. v • -
THE SAN FEANCISCO CALL, THURSDAY, NO^E]VIBER 40, gI9IQ.
BEVERIDGE GOES
DOWN IN GULP
Indiana -Democrats Swallow
Senator and Take His Hopes
as a Chaser
INDIANAPOLIS, Nov. 9.— Senator
Beveridge's hopes for another term at
Washington went glimmering tonight
when reurns showed conclusively that
the democrats have elected the, major
ity of the Indiana assembly. Accord
ing to the latest figures, the democrats
will have a majority on joint ballot
of 32.
John W. Kern has been indorsed by
the democrats and in all probability
will become the colleague of Senator
Shively, also a democrat. •
It is conceded the democratic state
ticket was elected by about!s,ooo.
Of the 13 Indiana members in the
national house of representatives, 12
will be democrats, Edgar Dean Crum
packer of the tenth district being the
only republica.n elected.
Senator Beveridge, who had hitherto
refused to acknowledge his. defeat, to
day admitted the tide was against him.
•'Fortunes of war; It is all right; 12
years of hard work; clean' record; I am
content," he said tonight. *
For the first time in 13 years the
democrats have control of every branch
of the state government, the two Unit
ed States senators and all but one mem
ber of the congressional delegation.
Governor Marshall's term has two
years to run. The program of demo
cratic legislation, as announced in the
party's platform, , includes repeals of
the county option law and ;the substi
tution of a law providing for city, ward
and rural township option units.
OKLAHOMA THROATS
MUST REMAIN DRY
GUTHRIE, Okla., '. Nov.' 9.— There is
little; room for doubt tonight that Lee
Cruce, the, democratic candidate, has
been elected governor, of Oklahoma.
Joseph W. McNeal, the republican gu
bernatorial candidate, refuses to con
cede his defeaC \u25a0 ~ :^v'-.
Bird S. McGuire and Dick T. Mor
gan, republicans, of. the. first, and^ sec
ond, districts respectively, have been
re-elected to congress.;. The democrats
gain one congressman, James S. Daven
port, of the third district. ' Indica
tions are that the democrats will have
70 of the 109 members . of the legis
lature.Vj % r *
The woman suffrage and the local
option amendments to the constitu
tion were both defeated by, 3. t0 1 vote.
The defeat of, local option leaves Okla
homa still under statewide prohibition.
SOUTH DAKOTA VOTES
DOWN EQUAL SUFFRAGE
PIERRE, S. D., Nov.j9.— The repub
lican state and congressional tickets
were elected: by a -majority of ». from
10.000 to 15,000. The legislature "is
almost unanimously republican. Equal
suffrage and county option were voted
down.
Republican Victories
SIOUX FALLS. S. D.. Nov. 9i— Willis
C Cook, chairman, of the republican
state committee, today made the fol
lowing statement: "We claim that
Governor Vessey and the full repuD
lican state ticket have been elected by a
majority of not" less Ithan 12,000.
dications' are ; that the majorities -for
Congressmen .Martin and ; Burke, re
publicans, will run, above that : figure. 1 '
TEXAS DEMOCRATIC V
GOVERNOR ELECTED
DALLAS, Tex., Nov. 9.— Colquitt ,(D.)
for governor received a majority of
approximately 130,000. The socialists
polled 5,000 votes. The, legislature will
decide- whetheror not a, statewide pro
hibition -amendment shall be submitted
to; the voters. . . " : <
HARMON'S PLURALITY
ESTIMA TED ]A r 50,770
CLEVELAND. Nov.. 9.— After receiv
ing unofficial returns, .'from r all "of xthe
S8 counties ;in the -state,\the Cleveland
News- figures Judson^HarmonT* r demo
crat, has been 're-elected' governor ;by
a; plurality 0r;80,770^K" ;\u25a0:•:.;::
SOCIALIST WINS
SEAT IN CONGRESS
V. L. Berger of Wisconsin First
Member of Party Elected
to National House
MILWAUKEE. TTis., Nov. 9.— The
social-democratic party appears to have
achieved \ notable'^victory yesterday
by electing- Victor L. Berger, fifth dis
trict, to represent Wisconsin ip con
gress. Berger,. if the unofficial returns
are correct, will have the distinction of
being the first social-democrat to sit
in congress.
In addition to this the party, swept
Milwaukee county, electing its county
ticket from top to bottom by plurali
ties ranging from 3,000 to 7,000. the
latter being attained by William A. Ar
nold, the candidate for sheriff The
vote for governor inMilwaukee county
was:
Jacobs, social-democrat, 23,812; Mc-
Govern, republican, 20,030, ' Schmitz
democrat, 15,895; Van Bureri, prohibi
tion, 805.
13 LEGISLATORS ELECTED
Added to this the socialists elected 13
members to: the legislature, one sena
tor and 12 assemblymen from Milwau
kee county.
Berger was pitted against Henry C.
Cochems, an "Insurgent" republican,
and Joseph P. Carney, a democrat. Ber
ger's plurality unbfßcially is estimated
at 288. Cochems is the young man of
university football fame who placed
United States -Senator La Follette in
nomination for president at the last re
publican national convention.
STATEMENT BY BERGER
Berger today gave out the following
statement:
"The United States of America now
gets into line with all the other civi
lized nations of the world and the
working class of Milwaukee has the
immortal honor of starting a new chap
ter in American history. •\u25a0 - \u25a0.•'.•;.\u25a0•\u25a0•
"The reason for this is obvious>. The
working classes of Milwaukee have
been educated by a" literature propa
ganda of [ many, years. They have been
taught the cardinal truths of socialism,
which is nothing more or less than the
political economy of the working
class.
"TRUSTS DID THE REST 1 '
"Economic conditions, the trusts arid
the trust prices did the rest. These
facts f urnish, examples of the theory
we expounded;
1"I deeply feel the honor of ! having
been selected as the first man to repre
sent social democracy in congress, but
I'alsoifeel the great responsibility." I
can only say that I shall givejthe'best
that is in me in the future, as I have
in the past, to the great cause which I
have espoused, which, after all, is the
cause of humanity." .-*/\u25a0:'-
Bie Socialist Gains
' NEW YORK, Now 9. — Marked gains
in the socialist vote throughout the
state, are shown in the \u25a0 returns from
yesterday's election. ; Figures • avail
able . Indicate a .total vote ' for Charl es
Edward' Russell, nominee for governor,
of 65,000, -nearly double the . 33,994
votes of. 1908. In New.York city Rus
sell received 27,230.v ... ;i; a,".;--
Most significant are the increases up
state. Sixty-five cities that gave a
vote of 7,850 -a year ago show 28,000
this ; year. "Outlying districts, which
"formerly showed | less v than ." 10" votes,'
this year reportffrom-100 to 500. .•\u25a0\u25a0". -.:; •;\u25a0;
Among' the large cities that show,
substantial; socialist gains are Buffalo,
Schenectady, Syracuse and Rochester.
SHAFROTH WINS- BY -'S;',
PLURALITY OF ' ISjOOO
\u25a0DENVER, Nov.^,9.—^John F. Shafroth.
democrat, has been governor,
of "Colorado by. a plurality estimated; as'
high T asUs,ooo. ; He i.has carried Denver
county fbyj at' least. 12,000 :and; his; party;
leaders claim that he?has also carried
theroutside counties >J' 3,000. Repub-;
lican State ,ChairmahMcDoriald ; ; con
ceded fShaffoth's election tdhighClbut
is - claimingK the. -election ; of , several Vof
the '* candidates; on t the,: state
ticket.i. \u25a0 Democratic^ Chairman ; ; Bradley,
asserts i that ; the = whole • state j ticket ', has
been\successful.: The; proposaljto .'sub
mit? a!. constitutional;; amendments for'
initiative -and referendum has* carried
2 tojl. .*. . -..,-\u25a0\u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0'\u25a0-•\u25a0• -.- \u25a0• :.'
\u2666:-'\u25a0\u25a0 '•' ' \u25a0 -?'\u25a0 ;.';'' %\u25a0-\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 :\u25a0'\u25a0\u25a0'-\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0- "
BOURBONS GAIN
GREAT VICTORY
225 Democrats to Be in the
House as Against 165
Republicans
Lone Socialist to Take Seat in
Congress When the New
Members Enter
Democratic Majority
In House Totals 29
Democrnin elected .'...... . .'iSaS
Republican* elected 168
' SoclaltstM elected ....'........ 1
Total . . ..... - . ...... ;381; 381
Majority of h0u5e. ......... . .106
Democratic majority. . '. 29
Democratic p1ura1ity. ........ 60
CHICAGO. Nov. 9. — Returns on the
elections of representatives to. congress
indicate that the ./democrats will have
a working majority of 29 'in the next
house. v \u25a0:, • _.: •,;..-.. - . ' - •\u25a0••
The ' number of " democrats elected to
congress, according to the latest re
turns, is. 225. The .republican repre
sentation will be 164 or' 165, or eight
seats less than the democrats now have
in the sixty-first congress. }V
-The twelfth Pennsylvania district,
normally republican, is given as dem
ocratic, though the result there is not
certain.
Absolute confidence is not felt in the
returns for some of the Wisconsin disr
tricts, and it is not Impossible that the
official figures will change the totals
for the two parties. ;
GAIXS.BY STATES.
Congressional gains were made by
the republicans and democrats in the
following states and districts: •
... Dun. Rep.
Connecticut, • 2d 1 --':...:
Illinois. Gth. 7th, 9th, 16th... ;4 r».
Indiana, 6th 1
lowa, 2d... .' 1
lowa, 4th. Sth ......' .. -;2
Kentucky. Oth 1
Maine, 3d, 3d ;.. 2 - ; V.'.
Maryland, 3d/6th... :....... . 2 \v.£;>.
Massachusetts,' \u25a0\u25a0 3d '.. 1 ...
Massachusetts, 14th ..:..... . . 1
Michigan, Ist, sth.. .' 2 \-W
Missouri, 11th, (R.), 13th, 14th, 15th.
, lfith it 4 1
Nevada, at large ' A 1
New Jersey, 3d. Sth. 7th, Sth 4
New York Ist. 3d, 4th. sth. 13th.
15th, 17th. 21st, 25th 27th, 33d, Sfith 12 ' ..
New York, 32d...... .. 1
North Carolina, sth. Sth, 10th........ 3 i\.
Ohio, H6, 7th. 11th, 15th. 18th, 19th. 21st 7
Oklahoma, 3d......... 1 .:
Pennsylvania, sth. Sth, 12th, 14th. 22d.
24th 6 '*;•:..
PennsylTania. 10th. ..- 1
Rhode Island.. Ist.. 1
West Virginia, Ist, 2d, 3d, 4th 4
Totals ..... . . .'1 '. 57 ,6
Net democratic gain, '51.
DELEGATIONS COMPARED
The following table shows what the
political complexion of the. various
state' delegations in the sixty-second
congress will be . as indicated by re
.turns.^The makeup of the sixty-first
\u25a0 congress is also compared:
62D CONGRESS CIST CONGRESS
\u25a0\u25a0 Dem. Rep. ' \u25a0 Dem. Rep.
Alabama -....9 ..Alabama .....9
Arkansas .... 7 ..Arkansas .... 7
California 1 .-.. .. 8 California 8
Colorado ..... 3 .. Colorado ..... 3 ..
Connecticut :..l \u25a0 4 Connecticut \u25a0; ::"?-\u25a0_ 5
Delaware ...... I| Delaware .v,v"l
Florida ...".:. 3 '..Florida 3
Georgia. ;:11 . . (ieorgia 11
Idaho lildaho ,?vl
Illinois ..'....10 15! Illinois 8 19
Indiana 12 lj Indiana 11 2
lowa ........ 1 2 lowa .... 1 10
Kansas . .. 8' Kansas 8
Kentucky 9 2, Kentucky 8 3
Louisiana .... 7 \u25a0'. . . | Louisiana .... 6
Maine - 2; Maine". ....... .; s - 4
Maryland 5 1 Maryland .... 3 3'
Massachusetts. 4 • 10! Massachusetts. 4 9
Michigan .... 2 .10 Michigan 12
Minnesota ... 1 S Minnesota ... 1 8
Mississippi -8 ..Mississippi... 8
Missouri ...... 13 3i Missouri 10 ;V X 6
Montana .. 1 Montana * -.^1
Nebraska .... 3 . 3! Nebraska 3 3
Nevada ........ . 1 Nevada 1
New Hamp. .... 2!NewUamp 2
New Jersey^. .7 3 New Jersey . . 3 7
New York ... 23 14 New York ... 12 . 25
North Carolina 10 .. North Carolina 7 3
NortU Dakota. .. . 2 North Dakota. .. V=2
Ohio '.. ..15 6 Ohio 8 18
Oklahoma ... 3 2 Oklahoma .... 2 3
Oregon ...... :. 2 Oregon 1.'..:;;2l .'..:;;2
Pennsylvania . ! 10 *21 Pennsylvania . 5. 27
Rhode Island.. 1 1 Rhode Island.. ..-'-• 2
South Carolina 7 '.. South Carolina 7. ?''.:;
South Dakota . . . " 2 South Dakota ... 2
Tennessee ..*. S 2 Tennessee 8 1
Texa5...:.... 16 .. Texas ........ 15
Utah ........ .. 1 Utah ...:...... /-'I 1
Vermont. '...'..\u25a0 .. ' '\u25a0> 2 Vermont .?' \u25a0\u25a0*- J J-.
Virginia ..... 9 1 Virginia . 9 1
Washington".. .'..' "3 Washington ..... 3
West Virginia 4 1 West Virginia. ..->is
Wisconsin ... 1 - 0 Wisconsin 1 10
Wyoming .... .. 1 Wyoming :...:. l
- Total .......225 164 Total ..... .172
Vacancies' 4. .
NORTH DAKOTA ELECTS
DEM OCRATIC t GOVERNOR
•FARGO. N. D., Nov. 9.— The repub
licans have carried every < office except
that of "governor, although by greatly
reduced majorities compared with two
years ; ago. .The republicans concede
the election of Burke, -democrat.
. Hanna and Helgeson, republican con
gressmen; win by 'big majorities.
' The legislature \u25a0 is ' overwhelmingly,
republican.; ' ' -. '
DELAWARE TO ELECT
REPUBLICAN SENA TOR
WILMINGTON, . Del.. Nov. \u25a0 9.—Re
turns tonight show the next legisla
ture will- be composed: of 31 republi
cans and 21 democrats. United States
Senator Henry Dupont,, republican, .will
be re-elected. . . - '
Vthe keystone/
\ TO HEALTH y
ItoStette^sJ
I STOMACH * j
X BITTERS I
reward f orits
derful merit the Bitters has
become the > ; r e c qg n i z c d
leader as a-tonicrand pre- .
yeirtive , : pf h Stomach: and
Bowel --Ills as well as:Ghills/
Colds and Malaria. Try
I it>andsee. ; AllaDruggists;
a ] — — \u0084 . .. : —. ' ~" —^ T^ 1
I'S\' - ;^'mVf- '. ? -th'e* world's best sewing silk," can be bought -^ . ,
{Jn&lu3' ia San" Francisco only in The Emporium V//7CfUd
Notion Department, in the Third Aisle.
I Silk Lined Dressy Net Waists in
I Several Pretty Styles: Sale Today.
|| 200 charming waists, fetchingly . fash- / k
I] q> A __ ;'_'- /\y ioned with girlish yoke effects, stylish CTff QP
m &m W Jyjl' side fluted ruffles or heavily embroidered J) **w m yj
\u25a0 j&± designs. A choice of three-quarter or full {
II , length sleeves. Cluny, Val« laces and Ja
H 4tedp ' embroidery used in the trimming of them. i
I •'\u25a0\u25a0'".'\u25a0\u25a0.' " . •
I Womeii'&All Wool Sweater Coats
H Single and double breasted fancy weave, white, cardinal ,#,**. #^ \u25a0\u25a0
H and Oxford. All sizes— 3o inches long. Unsurpassed C y y X
| ValUeSat >^s&g^^^ Z D
| ftZL4«2«o£4ac~JsQbfi. Is Always a Special Price — \
1 A Money Saving Event
I Taffeta Silk Peff/coa/s—a Sale
¥i Brown, light blue, purple and black, full flare flounce, the
\u25a0 colored ones ruche edged. AH worth very much more GT *% f% C
I than A^B^fajfJ^&fea: $£.yD
I Pretty Trimmed Hats
i «§§|wp[g!^3il? A special line of velvet, silk and plush hats trimmed
§ J* f ancy wings and flowers. (Second Floor.)^r f q*
1 ''^^^B^v 7^ c New Managers
I I>lX^^m^ Purchase !
M / /aM«k Presents supremely fine values, but a
a * I JfMSvk limited quantity of
I laU Velveteen Frocks \
1 i' «^^^^ Velveteen is the craze of the hour. It wears
Dj . - 'ai^^^a better than velvet and gives the same rich
H i^^^^l effect for a much less price. Two distinct
H i^^^^Kl styles in three-quarter sleeve, 18 inch flounce
m isPiilfllJ " ' frocks. One finished with lace cuffs and
H BBEUhhI yoke, the other with silk and buttons. Al-
1 ißraS^ terations charged for. (Second Floor.)
\ Handsome Silverware $
latlessThanCostPricesn 6^^m
lin the Annual I Sale SJmJ 1
B Samples, ' manufacturer's odd lines and discontinued j^^^^^K^
I] patterns at practically less than the cost to produce /s|l^pl^f^V
I them?; A" wonderful" opportunity -for ' the Christmas . f^^^^^^Mi
3 purchaser. "From among the many hundred itenra — -||^^^fß^^^J
I Candelabra, 5 light. . $5.85 /^^^^^M
H Perforated Sandwich Tray, $2.85 __^^^_-_ T f ' '^7T-jLr I
H Fern Dishes, pierced frame, $2.15 *j^||3jsS?s*^iU I'-^i^'J^l). t
i Crumb Tray and Scraper, $2.15 Msgg^j&C \ys*P^<?- lj * l ' J
fi All are quadruple silver plate on :.'!fF*^ *$2»
\u25a0 white metal. t Handsome patterns. ... ;\u25a0*
Gathering Friends
A LITTLE girl can always get somebody to
play with by using the Bell Telephone. It
* is just as useful to her as it is to her elders.
There is no need to be lonesome with a tele-
phone-in the house, because you can at least talk
with your friends, even though they are far away.
Bell Service is universal.
l^lgjfl \u25a0lneracinc lelephone
and 1 elegrapn Company V^S^7
5
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