OCR Interpretation


The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 10, 1910, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1910-11-10/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 9

COAST CONGRESS
TO BRING MANY
NOTED MEN HERE
Delegates From Ten Western
States Interested in Up
building Vast Section
Defenses, Merchant Marine and
Pacific Exposition Subjects
to Be Considered
Thp Pariflc Coast congress, called to
ra*^t in San Francisco a week from
today, hss assumed an importance that
has commanded the attention of the
eniire nation. There will be delegates
not only from California, but from ten
western Mates, all lirterested in the
upbuilding of the section west of the
Rnrky mountains. Acceptances of the
invitation of Governor Gillett have b«en
ppnorai. Congressraon, United States
senators, governors, mayors and repre
sentative businessmen "will be pres
\u2666Mit. The disrussions will include coast
dofpnse, th*> merchant marine and Pa
«'ifiic Coast expositions.
PROGRAM MAPPED OUT
The program has been mapped out
;n a pfneral way for the three days
beginning November 17. It was an
nounced yesterday as follows:
THtrRSDAY MORNIXO. Nov«>m!>?r 17— The
r*rry. TrtlT I* lak*n about ,lh<» Hty In aoto
mobijps. TisiTinrthf THriou» i«>ints of Interest.
niIRSDAV AFTERNOON. Nownber 17, -
oVlock— Opcotef; and org*ni««tlon nf the
P« -ifir Coa*t coucresß. Addr*fS*es of welponie
br «i<»T«TDt>r GiU«t aa<l Mayor McCarthy.
Sfw^-hp* BUPi=ti>. Election of
oittt-Tf. f«f rar!fl<- Cotst oongrwiit.
rHrRSI»AY KVKMNG. November 17—Efcep
iloa 1n the |>ar!or» of t!i*> I'slscp hotel under
lh« ati*rlce« of the California olub and so
rirty Isriies of San Francisco, ussist^d hy re
'ert^iii rfimmittw.
FRIDAY MORNING. N«wnt>er 18. 9;30 oVlock
— lU-ptilar session. Subject, "The Merchant
Marine.-'
FniI»AY AFTFUNOON. NOTPtnber IS. 2 oVlocfc
f- -Regular *«>si:kin. «*ct!on 1. SnbJ«>«, "Per-
R:*aent Paoifie C«*tT Cooßre*s."
rniHAY AFTKi;N(X)N. Norembw IS — R^pular
*»»*!on. seeiion 2. Subject, 'Tsclfic Coast
NaTft! neferiß*-. 1 '
FKiIUY EVENING. Norember IS — Banquet at
§:he Palac* bofl ap<l«r «h*>~auispice9 ef the
>*gue «nd commercial organization?.
rATVRDAV MOUNINO. NoTrmber IV>—Excur
sion.
EATUHDAY EVENING. Noronber 19— To be at
Ethf rti*po*al of Tisitors. to be spent according
C> :!ni:vi<i:;al wishr*. '\u25a0: •„. -
BIG nECEPTIOX PIiAWEO
. The reception on Thursday night, No
vember 17, \u25a0will be the largest event
Ofllt* kind known to the coast. The
ladies of the California club will act
«.& hostesses. „ They will issue 5,000
invitations, including in the list the
riffi(Vr«; of thp army and navy, state
ard <ity officials.
The arrangements for the three days'
?*>ssion have been placed in the hands
?f committfrs, made up as follows:
FINANCE COMMITTEE.
C. C. Moore, chairman; W. 1,. Hathaway,
lame* Ralph Jr.. C*piahi WUUam Matsoo, An-
Srew Carrigan.
rnOCBAM CONrMITTEE.
SI. H. R'J.binji Jr.. Fred C. Parker, Stanley
tVJSar, TVm. H. Marsten. Oeorce W- Dickie,
J. A. MKJrepir. W. I*. Hathaxrar-
RECEPTION COMMITTEE.
Maror I', h! McCarthy. * , -\u25a0\u25a0
KriEs<3:er «J*nejßl T. H. BJl^s.
11-rv Adniirxl F.Jw*rd B. Barrj-.
li'nr A<Jnnlr*l T. f*. Pbelnf.
Ifeur Adrr.ira! Huw OJtcrfaauf.
Uesr Auinirsl Johu B. Millon. "
s*'n«i«r <;fK>rt<> C perVin^.
I'r-r.L I". Fliqt.
Pun'-an K. M»-Kin'.aT.
Wiliij-m F. Kncl^brlgbt.
J««-«ph R. Knowlaod.
JnJii:.* K«hn.
!".. A. Hayf.
jam** <". »e^h»ni.
f. S. f>tr*:Tt«a. collector of port.
Rcnjamin I. Wheeler. Unf^wrrftj of California.
J>»v"i<i St«rr -ktrxi»n. Stanford «niren>l*j-.
TV. <". lUlston. asslstaut treasurer United
ttste*,
iionter S. Kin?, president Panama-Pacific
ntcruarioaal ezpoelttoa nmipaiiv.
««j>i*iii) John P.arneson.
Jurorii Rolph Jr.
Cut-rsin I. N. Ilit>b«T<J.
V,'. |.. Hathm-sy.
i -AlfMiel Hsrrf* \Vein«t<v-k.
I'rfOerick J. Ro«n*r.
r. W. Van Sicklen.
< sptain William Matron, acting president San
"rnoHwo <-hamber of coraiuerce.
W. J. Duttou. Tlce president California de
rrlopment board.
Hor«..i. H. Allen, president Downtown asso
•i<!i<m.
M. 11. Robbini Jr., prrsldent Merchants* asso
eiit'i.m.
J'v-e,,!) h. Howfll. president Real Estate board.
Colonel George H. Pipj'r, Uom« industry
/\u25a0*Cl!<".
Z-<r-ih K. Eldrldco. Home industry lrsirue.
l\*ij!!«iii RaOi'oi-k. president Ship Owners' and
i»^-«-t.«ntc' tv» boat conspan.T.
F. t^. Samuel*. Oceanic rteacnehip romptßT.
J. A. M<"<»re*fir, president I.'nlon Iron works.
Rofcrrt S. Moore, preoiflent Monr« & Scott
r«»ri THH-kf.
WiiHrun FI. Jfar^ton. president Ship Owners'
l»s/H-;«ti"tn.
Jsm" McNabb, ei-president ehambej of com
»*:cr>.
« . \v. Hornick. The Call.
I"-iit H. Robert. San Francisco Examiner.
M. H. de Young. «"brcnlcle.
R. A. Crothere, Bn!ietin.
Fred Horue. Post.
I». C. Collier of San Piego.
Frank K. M"tt, mnyot of OaVland.
3. f>. Orant.
E. VT. Wilson.
RESOUmOXS CO>rMITTEE
Captain John Barneyos. Tice president Mer
h«at marine, league.
Georse W*. Pickle, chairman rxecutlre com
ci'tre Merchant marine. i«ague.
n'illixm Mutton. pre»ldent chamber of cora-
M. H. Robbies Jr., pre»!«jejjt Merchants' asso
latiu.
James Rolph Jr., president Merchants* ex
rbenpe.
Willis m H. Marston. prenident Ship Owners'
i»fw*i«ti<*n- • *
J. A. McGregor, president Union iron Trorks.
R. B. Haie. Panama-Paelflc International er
•wition compr.rr. "
Acdrew Furuset*, Fa!!or«* union of the Pa
•lf.r.
Victor H- Metcalf.
jo««>ph Scott, president lyos Angeles chamber
•f cftinmerce.
P. C. Collier. Pan Piego.
Th^xJore B. Witc^x. Portland.
Kmrett C. Origpn, president Taeom,a chamber
»f «v»ninierr*. - .
J. I). Lcwman, president Seattle chamber of
•Mnm»rt.
TTaUer P. Mackay, president OaVland cbam
iff of commerce.
F. W. George*on, president Eureka chamber of
•ommerce.
SICK WOMAN DROWNS
HERSELF IN THE BAY
Leaves Note Saying She "Would
Stand It No Longer"
VAL.LEJO. Xov. 9. — Mrs. Celia Soren
-on. wife of a Mare island employe,
irowned herself in the bay north of
:his city today. Hi health Is believed
'o have been the cause. She had been
ander treatment in a local hospital and
:eft unexpectedly at noon "today. A
aote pinned to her coat contained a
ai«-;Esage for her husband that she
•would stand it no longer." Mrs. Soren
loirleft a daughter 3 years old.
SENATOR ELKINS MAY
UNDERGO OPERATION
Patient Is Taken in Private Car
to Washington
ELKIX6. W. Va., Nov. 9.— Senator
?tfph*-n B. Elkins -was taken to Wash
netnn in a private car today,' accom
jsr.if-fj by his family physician. Sen-
Hot Klkins has not improved as^hia
*mj!y exported and It was deslrpd.that
t« be nearer the hospitalsjof, "Washing
ton and Baltimore should- aaJ operation
•ecosie necessary^ " .'.*•"'
Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys
SAN JOAQUIN IN
RIGHT COLUMN
Johnson Carries County and All
Republicans Win Except
[Special DUpatch to The Call
STOCKTON* Nov. 9. — San Joaquin
county went republican, Hiram TT.
Johnson having carried -it by 158 plu
rality.
All of the republican county candi
date. 1 ?, s»ave for coroner, w«r« elected.
The democrat* elected B#n C. Wsllaue,
coroner: J. "Vl*. Stuckenbrack of Acampo
as«semblym»n from the twenty-fourth
district, Charles Newton,, •upervisor,
fourth district, and Otto Yon Detten,
city justice.
Timothy Spellftcy received a majority
of 9 8. over A. J. Wallace. A. L. Cowell
of this city, who was defeated for con
gress by James C. Needham. carried
the county by 358 plurality, and W. C.
Wall, candidate for railroad commis
sioner, also a Stocktonlan, who was de
feated for tKe office by John M. Eshle
man. received a plurality la San Joaquin
county of 791.
The republican party controls the
board of supervisors. Chairman Arthur
Wright having been re-elected over C
H. McGurk.
Appended are the returns complete:
FOtt GOVERNOR
Hlratn XV. .T/vfcnsna . B.JW4
Th«-olore BeU S,WB
Johnson's piKra'it.r 156
FOU LIEirTENAXT GOVERXOK
Albert J. Wallace 3,761
Timothy Spellacy 3,859
Spenarr'% plurality 9S
FOR ASSOCIATE-JUSTICE, '.SUPREME COURT
Henry A. MMrin 4. "26
Max C. Sln« 4,223
Benjamin Bledso* 2,736
William P. Levrlor 3.595
FOR ASSOCIATE JUSTICE COURT Or APPEAL
Albert J. Bnrn«t 4,06.1
Hrnrv C. Gesf ord 3.01fl
Burnett 1 * p!uraJ[t.r 1,053
FOR SECRETARY OF STATE
FTanfc C. Jordan 4.140
Simeoa S. Baj-ley 2.»'7
Jordan'B plnraUty 1,263
* FOE TREASCRER
TT. R. Williams 4.22R
l\ipp«r S. M«lone 2.SW
Williams" plurality 1,422
FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL
T. S. W*bb 4.35.1
J. E. Pemberton 2,781
Webb's plurality \u0084 1,571
FOR SURVEYOR GENERAL
William Stephen Kingsbury 4,12»
E. W. Nolan 2.701
Kiopsbury's plurality 1,425
FOR CLERK SUPREME COURT
B. Grant Taylor 4.104
Hiram A. Blaachard 2,i9S
Taylor's plurality 1.408
FOR SUPERINTEKDENT OF PUBLIC IN
STRUCTION
MTvarrt Hyatt 4013
Thomas H. Kirk 2.793
Hyatft plurality 1.221
FOR SUPERINTENDENT STATE PRINTING
W!ll%m W. Shannon V. 4.3||3
D. W. Rarenscroft • ".SS2
Shannftn's plnrality 1.813
FOR CONGRESS. SIXTH DISTRICT
xi, L. Cowell <D.)..... •• 4.075
Jarae* Carson Ne*dham (R.) »• S,»l»
Cowcirs plurality 358
FOR RAILROAD COMMISSIONER
W. C. Wall <D.j 3.57S
John M. Eshleman (R.) • 3,187
Wall's plnraUty -' 791
STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION
John Mitchell. R 3.804
Friflk Garin, I) ,- • -»3'
Mitehel's plurality ••• 857
ASSEMBLYMAN 23D DISTRICT
B. H. McGcrnren, R 2,116
Ben Berry. D • M 25 I
McGowPn's plurality - •. 691
ASSE\TBLYMAN 24TH DISTRICT
G. M. St*«le. R 2.353
J. W. Stnckenbruck, D 1,703
StncVenbrnck'* plurality 650 j
/,, SUPERIOR JUDGE
J. A. hummer, R •• 3,082
D. M. Younff, D : 3,700
riumow's plurality 282
\u25a0 COUNTY ASSESSOR
John W. Moore, R ".* 4,J»74
Harry T. Fee, D • 2,938
Moore's plurality 2,036
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR
*at«> T. MeCown. R 5.0R5
George F. Thompson, D 2,937
McCown'« plurality .., 2,148
SUPERINTENDENT OP SCHOOLS
John Anderbon. It • 4.03S
D. W. Braddoek, I) 2.860
Anderson's plurality 2,078
FOR CORONER
B. C. Wallae*. P 3.229
N. P. BriirnoU, R - 2.95S
Wallace's plurality 2,271
SHERIFF
Walter F. Sibley. X 5.W5
S. M. McGar.r, D 2.444
Sibley'i plurality 3,141
DISTRICT ATTORNEY
E. P. FoUz. R •• 5.567
A. R. Bofue, D 2.32S
FolU'b plurality 2,244
AUDITOR AND RECORDER
James H. Kroh. R 4,143
John yr. McMahen, D ;.. 3,B^*
Krob's plurality 2183
FOR SURVEYOR '
F. E. Quail. R • ••' 4.477
Henry B. Budd. D 3.356
Quafl't plurality ' .".1.121
FOR SUPERVISOR, SECOND DISTRICT
Arthur H. Wright. R...... 1.259
C. H. McGurk, D 1.026
Wright's plurality 263
SUPERVISOR, FOURTH DISTRICT
C. L. Newton. D. 73»
O. J. Hemphill. R 610
Newton's plurality ....129
REPUBLICANS WIN IN
SANTA CRUZ COUNTY
[Sbeeial Dutetch to The Call]
SANTA CRUZ, Xov. 9. — Complete re
turns from every precinct In the county
sustain County Chairman Carl Kratz
enstein's prediction that Johnson would
carry Santa Cruz county by at "least
800 majority. The tabulated returns
give* Johnson a -majority of 813, a re
markable showing, when only four
years ago Bell carried the county by
a majority of 67.: over' Gillett. Wal
lace failed to run as strong as John
son. Spellacy holding him down to a
majority of 458. '
Needham, for congress, fell far short
of his usual, majority, having a lead
of 439 over Coweir. where, in previous
elections it went as high as 1.000. De
spite the heavy republican vote cast,
John Maher, - the democratic candidate,
was re-elected to the "assembly over
Alkenby a majority^of 251.
County officers were elected as fol
lows: District attorney, B.K. Knight,
republican; supervisor third district;
James Harvey, republican l^supervfsor
Pajaro district. ;J. ; <' Marquis, republican;
coroner and public administrator, Louis
"Wcsacndorf,'-'. republican. „ . y - ,'
SAy: FRANCISCO CMiL. NO^E^IBER 10 t 1910.
SURPRISES SPRUNG
AT STATE CAPITAL
Defeat of Courari for Sheriff
arid Johnson for Assembly
Are Election Results
SACRAMENTO, Nov. 2— The; election
In Sacramento county: f#r local offices
furnished several surprises, the biggest
of which was the deefat of Ira Conran,
republican, for sheriff by Supervisor
Dave Ahearn, democrat. The office was
conceded to Conran up to .within.. two
weeks of the election.
Another surprise was the overwhelm
ing defeat of Grove L. Johnson, dean
of the California legislature, for re
election to the assembly by Charles
Bliss. Johnson did, not poll one-tenth
Of Bliss' vote. _He ran on the prohibi
tion ticket.
Two changes were made In the
county offices, Harry Leonard defeating
D. McDougall for public administrator
and Frank Miller winning over Sur
veyor C. M. Pinney. The new super
visors chosen were John Kelley, repub
lican, and Thomas Jenkins, republican.
Placer County's Vote \
AUBURN, Nov. 9. — Complete returns
give Johnaon 1.545, -Bell 1,595, "Wallace
1.400, Spellacy 1,229, Jordan 1.730. Bay
ley 1.074. Assembly — Gaylord,. R.,
1.629; Ferguson, D.', 1.322. All> amend
ments were carried except No. 1. Coun
ty ticket— Lowell, D., clerk; Mitchell,
p.; assessor; McAuley, R., sheriff; Par
ker, R., recorder; -Evenden, R., sur
veyor; Seavej-, D., auditor; West, D.,
treasurer; Tuttle, R., district attorney;
Smith. R., school superintendent; Bren
nan, D., and Haman, D., supervisors.
BARS FACE ALL
BETTORS WHO BET
Police Will Tolerate No pool
rooms in This City When
Emeryville Opens
A .cold wave swept sporting circles
yesterday when Chief of Police Sey
mour announced that poolrooms and
betting places would not be tolerated
in San Francisco during the Emeryville
racing season, which opens next Satur
day. The frown of official displeasure
has also fallen on all the undesirable
followers of t|ie racing game, and
rigid instructions have been issued to
all patrolmen to exercise more, than
usual vigilance and round up suspi
cious characters.
\u25a0 Chief Seymour's opposition to bet
ting on "sure thing" propositions was
further emphasized by a sweeping order
that the time honored turkey raffles
of the holidays must be stopped. v The
ban has been clapped on tight and all
company' commanders instructed to be
on the lookout for saloons or - other
establishments that offer to supply the
Thanksgiving dinner table with a bird
through the chance method.
ROASTS TURKEY SCHEMES
Turkey raffles came in for a prema
ture roasting at the hands of the chief
of police. He said they were simply
betting schemes, in which the chances
of the citizen winning 'were very small.
Besides they were a means of drawing
persons into saloons, so that before
the bird was finally won or carried
home the winner had spent a sum
largely In excess of the actual price of
a turkey.
With reference to the Influx of racing
hangersbn who would come to this
city with the opening of the races
Saturday Chief Seymour was emphatic
that all persons seen loitering In; the
streets at an unusual hour who could
not properly -explain their actions
should be locked up.
BETTER XOT BET
He said he had heard that poolrooms
were already getting ready to do busi
ness, but that he would not have any
pool playing on this 6ide of the bay.
All company cpmmanders will be held
responsible for infractions of this or
der. Chief Seymour has taken a stand
squarely athwnrt the poolroom pro
moters and declares he will prosecute
severely all violations of the order.
Another order was that which pro
hibits the sweeping of carpets on the
sidewalks or the pweeping of side
walks without regard to passersby. The
police are instructed to, see that .rub
bish is not deposited on sidewalks and
that owners of property or the occu
pant must keep the frontage cleaned.
UNDESIRABLES UNDESIRABLE
The order reads in part:
The racing season will open on
Saturday. November 12, 1910, and
it- is reported to me that pool
rooms for the purpose of taking
b«ts on the races will attempt to
open throughout the city.
I want it distinctly understood
that this must not occur, .and tho
captains In their respective dis
tricts will be held strictly account
able if any such places are per
mitted to exist. >:/
As the winter season is now
here and it is presumed that, as
usual, an undesirable crowd will
flock to this city, committing dep
redations of all kinds, 'you will
therefore instruct the officers of
your respective commands to pay
Particular attention to strangers ,
ound on th» streets at late and
unusual hours of the nlght^ and
see that all suspicious characters
are investigated.
JOHN T. SEYMOUR,
Chief of Police.
ENLARGEMENT OF GENOA
>• HARBOR COSTS MILLIONS
Facilities for 10,000,000 Tons of
Shipping Annually
The plans for the balance ofr;thc
work required for the enlargement -of
the harbor and the ; lmprovement, of the
port facilities at Genoa \u25a0; have recently
been^ submitted. to the superior council
of public works at' Rome, says Consul
General James A., Smith of Genoa; The
plans 'and estimates \u25a0of -this; project
were prepared' by. the' municipal en
gineer's office at ; Genoa - and ; have } been
approved by the superior council. ; The
estimated cost, is to bej 33,000,000, lire
(16,369,000). '. When this final ?.work of
improvement, .commenced, in 1901, is
completed,, the' harbor; will have^facili
ties - for accommodating t fully; 10.000,000
tons of shipping annually;? and! the I cost
of the "worlc.from -the beginning? will
have been -.45,000,000 ; lire ? (18,685,000). -
EODT rOTTKD IN KANHOIX-^Spokapp.VXoT. 9.
The" body.;; of - R. j H. i l*atter»on. -, A-young • car
.\u25a0• pentf r. \u25a0\u25a0 was . found ; In i the . bottom '\u25a0. of ; a , *#wer
• . manhole at : Pacific . crenne and . IHrtston ; str«*«»t
\u25a0 : early > this : niorntng. y ;; Indications -ure; 1 strong
- that, the man.-was. murdpred: for, ?100, - which
-' b« ' was known to: hare possessed." Tn«!»dav
\u25a0 p'ght.-tMmßMßwiWft^fflffi
' A thick Jicad- incubates * many : -thin
BOYS IN DAY KILL
200 RATTLESNAKES
Lads Slay Serpents as they
Crawl From Cave in Pitt
River Canyon
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
, ALTURAS, Nov. 9.— Two small sons
of W. S. Chambers, residing at;Clover
dale, 20 miles from here, hold .the rec
ord, for the number of rattlesnakes
killed in one day.
The two went squirrel hunting. As
they passed through Pitt river canyon
a huge rattler came out of a small cave
and the boys killed it. Another fol
lowed and then another. In; all they
slew 200 snakes and "then made their
escape.- They were not bitten, although
they had a number. of^ narrow escapes.
fhe father of the boys has threatened
to use dynamite to rid the canyon of
the snakes. •%'\u25a0'\u25a0
RATE CONCESSION SUIT
WILL PROCEED TO TRIAL
Judge Refuses to Dismiss In-
Diana Standard Oil Case
JACKSON, Term.. Nov. 9. — The suit
of the United States against the' Sta
ndard oil company of Indiana, charged
with having illegally accepted freight
rate concessions, progressed only
through presentation of. the prosecu
tion'/! opening contentions today.
Then discussion on a technicality be
gan and continued until court ad
journed for the day. . '
Judge John E. McCall finally over
ruled a motion of the defense seeking
the dismissal of the suit. /
EDITORS BLAME
T. R. FOR UPSET
Foreign Newspapers Speculate
on Colonel's Future Polit
ical Influence
BERLIN, Nov. 9.— Today's newspa
pers give much space to reports and
editorial comment upon the American
elections, which are viewed as very im
portant.
Nearly all of the, papers discuss the
probable effect upon Colonel Roose
velt's future political influence. '
Some express the opinion that the
"new nationalism" will not figure In
party platforms forthe present. Others
comment adversely on Roosevelt's
chances of securing the republican
presidential nomination in IDL2.
T. *R. Partly Blamed
PARIS, Nov. S.'rr-.The French press
gives prominence today^to-'the Amerir.
can elections. Tha writers generally
agree that the high cost of living was
the fundamental cause of the repub
lican losses. The Temps thinks the
outcome was due partly to : a split in
the republican party, for which Roose
velt was largely, responsible, and in
a measure to the vengeance of the
political bosses and the trusts upon
Roosevelt."
However, the paper adds that it is
difficult to foresee the future, particu
larly whether Roosevelt's chances for
the presidency have been blighted.
The Sleele concludes that, the repub
lican party was hit as hard as Roose
velt was, and attributes its overthrow
to the unpopularity of the Payne-Al
drlch law and the opposition of the
financial interests. It does not think
the result indicates {he end of the
former president's political influence.
Takes News to Pope
ROME, "Nov. 9.— The results in the
American election were received here
with keenest Interest. Cardinal "Merry
del Val, the papal secretary, had a
message from New York which he took
personally to the pope, to whom' he
said the democratic victory meant a
defeat of Colonel Roosevelt generally.
IOWA IS SWEPT
BY REPUBLICANS
Governor Carroll, Nine Con
gressmen and Entire State
j Ticket Chosen
.-" DESMOINES, Nov. 9. — Returns from
91 counties out of 99 in this state
tonight show that the republicans have
elected nine congressmen and the en
tire state ticket headed by Governor
Carroll. The latter?splumliti..probably
will reach 15,000. '; , \u25a0 V
The democrats elected T.S. Pepper to
congress from the; second district^ In
the fourth. Congressman Haugen, .pro
gressive republican, claims to have won
by 108 votes.
Claude H. Porter, democratic candi T
date for -governor, led .in the pities,
returns from which were the first re
ceived, but when, the rural districts
beganto make returns today, Porter's
lead began to dwindle and Carroll
forged ahead. •„";-" ./'-.."
The vote on Carroll shows a repub
lican loss from two years ago of about
40.000. '" . .
The legislature is safely republican
with a majority of 60 -on joint ballot.
The progressive, republicans claim: they
will control the party caucus by ;20
votes. If this proves true, it indicates
that a. man of the Cummins stamp will
be i chosen "to succeed the late Senator
Dolllver. " i -.- .-. -'- .i-:-:.;' : - ' [ .">~-\u0094 : >
> Senator; Cummins declined to com
ment on the democratic landslides in
otherj states^ ' ' .-\u25a0 ' ,
"I haven't been quite able to discern
the hand of Providence. in the election
as yet," was all he would say.
ILLEGAL yOTERiTRIES
TO BURN A PRISON
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
rCOLUSA; Nov. 9.— James Brooks.Hu
bert 'Hannawlns 'and ; Theodore' Henry
are^ in jail , heroK charged with, illegal
voting iat I Princeton. : The three ( 'yrerti
arrested at; Princeton:^ as ai results of
theiflght between >,the saloon Tand \-antlsaloo.n'faction\ -antl
saloo.n'faction "there: yesterday. /'
They 'were -Placed ;in the town jail
at Princeton, tbut.f Henry j sot the
bedjclothes:in?an;attempt: tb}hurn- the
jail and* escape, , so the three were
brought ; hcrp: : -::, : :-: '\u25a0'\u25a0:;^.,.r. -;
"Feeling -ran high' : at - Princeton -fas • a
resultbf the local option-; vote. ' \u25a0 \u25a0:° \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0>
UNCLE JOE MAY
LEAD MINORITY
.% -•\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0•\u25a0•;•.\u25a0. \u25a0-."\u25a0..,\u25a0.
Speaker Cannon- Refuses to
"Talk on Election, but His
Friends Are Active
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
DANVILLE, 111.. Nov. 9.— Since the
returns from Tuesday's election have
heen known. Speaker Cannon has per
sistently refused tof make a statement
or give out any expression^ of his
views on the results, but says that, he
maj"NUfive something to give out, at" a
later ' date.
."You may say," he said. In response
to. a ;query "of 'the correspondent, "that
when I have fully [dissected- the re
turns -of Tuesday's election, I may
have something .to say, but until then
I" must decline to be interviewed."
FRIEXDS SHOW COXPIDEXCE
\u25a0 Being pressed further. Cannon' ad
mitted that he was: particuarly grati
fied with the result, in his own -dis-»
trict; which has faithfully stood by
him under all conditions for, the last 35
years, intimating that so far, as he was
personally concerned he was satisfied
with the. confidence -shown by his
friends at home, .who have known him
so long." Especially \u25a0 was . tljis so at
this time, when he considered the fight
that had been made upon him outside
of * his district and. by persons not
directly interested. in the outcome.
On the other hand while Cannon is
saying nothing regarding the results
of yesterday's elections, his friends are
at the outcome. in New York. Several
of his closest friends and stanchest sup
porters gathered, at the newspaper of
fiecs last night and applauded the
loudest ; when the ne^vs was flashed
that^ Herbert Parsons had been de
feated. When it was definitely known
that Stimson had been caught in the
landslide in' New York there was much
manifeatation of joy.
FOR MINORITY LEADER
There is considerable talk of boom
ing Cannon for the leadership of the
minority in the next house, but in an
swer to a direct question. Cannon, at
this time,' refuses, to say definitely that
he would consent to this an<r positively
declined to Btate' what his plans for
the future might be. :,\v_ r
."The landslide speaks for itself, I
have nothing to add to my statement
concerning my own attitude, which I
made Tuesday night." said Speaker
Cannon. ''Concerning causes and ef
fects I. am not prepared to . say any
thing as. yet.; We are all up in the
air as to exact conditions throughout
the country. I wish to get at these
conditions before discussing the situa
tion." . , .
Congressman "W. B. McKinley, chair
man of the republican national con
gressional committee, was^in the city
today " and had a short consultation
with the speaker, but its nature was
not divulged.
BAR TENDER PLAYS
DUAL ROLE IN COURT
Plaintiff in One Case Called as
Defendant in Another
" J. Mordin, a bar. tender In a saloon,
at Howard and Sixth streets, appeared
in a dual role. before Police Judge Shor
tall yesterday morning, when after, be
ing a complainant to a charge of pass-
Ing counterfeit money, he becaraa the
defendant to a charge of selling liquor
Qn election day.
Mordin had FYank Koski arrested for
passing a counterfeit JlO bill on him
which the latter said he had won In
a poker game, and then he furnished
a surprise to the court by -responding
to the call of his name to answer with
Frank O. Johansen for selling liquor
Both cases were continued.
INJURED MINER SUES
COMPANY FOR $10,468
William B. McLean Alleges Lift
'Operator Was Negligent
."William B. McLean, a miner, brought
suit yesterday in the United States
court against the Seven Troughs
Therein mines company of Nevada for
$10,468 for injuries received when Mc-
Lean was precipitated 65 feet to the
bottom- of the mine. He alleges the
engineer, in charge of the lift was neg
ligent and started, the car down so sud
denly that It was inverted and the
passengers were dumped down the
shaft.', --..'".
A ripe scholar may live to a green,
old age^' :?"'-".
\u2666\u2666\u2666\u2666\u2666\u2666\u2666\u2666\u2666 \u2666»\u2666\u2666\u2666<>»<»
J Famous "Pint of Cough J \
Syrup" Recipe i ' '--'A
:\u2666 ,- ' ,/-—/--\u25a0• -|v
A .\o Better Remedy nt any Price.' j ,
\u25b2 Fully Guaranteed, i •
\u2666\u2666\u2666\u2666\u2666\u2666\u2666\u2666
Maka n. plain syrup by mixing: one
pint of granulated; sugrar and % pint
of warm water and stir for two min-
utes. Put 2H. ounces of pure Pinex
(fifty cents' worthy in a pint bottle,
and fill it up with" the Sugar Syrup.
This gives you a family supply of the
best cough syrup at a saving of $2.
It never spoils. Take a teaspoonful
every one two or three hours.
The effectiveness of this simple rem-
edy is surprising. , It seems to take
hold instantly, and will usually stop the
most obstinate cough in J4 hours. It
tones up the jaded appetite and is just
laxative enough '.to be helpful in_a
cough, and.has a pleasing taste. . Also
excellent for bronchial trouble, throat
tickle,' sore lungs and asthma, and an
unequaled remedy for " : whooping
cough. ' \u25a0•; ' . .
- This recipe for making cough rem»
edy with Pinex and; Sugar Syrup (or
strained honey) is a prim® favorite in
thousands'" of homes in the United
States and Canada. The plan has been
imitated, though never successfully. If
you try It, use only genuine Pinex,
which" is the most valuable concen^
trated compound of Norway white pine
extract.'and is rich in guialcol and all
the natural healing pine elements.
Other preparations will not ; work .In
this, recipe. *:V; : V - !
A guarantee of absolute satisfaction j
or money promptly refunded epea with j
this recipe. Your druggist; has Pinex
pr;willget'it for, 1 you. Jf not. send to
the t Plnex Co., Ft. Wayne.lnd. r
FISHIN SEASON
J Too Scarce to AdTertise Beginning.
' .-. _.j ... of Week,
Owing to the inclemency of the
weather prevailing the earlier part
of this i week; ; seasonable ,i flsh was
scarce and ' there was none, to ; adver-- :
; tise. • Today. and tomorrow,. however,';
the public ; willf be. able to 'obtain a
good supply of soles.^Handdabs," shad,*
rockcod, - ; tomcod, :' barracuda, . etc.;
flsh dealers. .
Today for Fish in
-"< Season:
Sole* .;.. V. ;............««
: .;\u25a0. KantldfihM *. . ..... .••• • \u25a0 • • -7c
Shad . .V. ........ ...... •••sc
; Kockcod. . . . ........ •• • ".Nc
'. Tomrod . . . . • • ...... \u25a0•• \u25a0 • • -Sc
>Barracad«.. . •• \u2666 ....•, . . .Sc - s -".
KINGSBURQ VOTES BONDS i
FOR A WATER WORKS
KINGSBURT, Xov. 3.— A bond issue
of $26.0D0\for wat^r works and flre
protection for this city was authorized
at an election today by a vc'.e of 106
to 24. -
O i. i — .
THiEE STEW DXOWK— TiUamo»)i, Ore.. Xor.
». — r» Neldrrbfrger. Ga< . DavWJuw \u25a0 aact 1..
Biattler. dairymen of Xehalem. were 4rown#d
In the »balem rlv^r- l»?>t nisUt. Thp me^»
\u25a0were fortliue that strpam and irot Into deep
water. Tbfi horses wer» also drowned.
The Rocker $6.35
Big, massive and comfortable. Measures 31 inches across the
arms, and the back is high enough To that even tall people can
rest their heads. Solid quarter-sawed oak in Early English. Gold-
en or Fumed finish. Handsomely upholstered in heavy black leath-
erette. A Rocker that would sell at three times the price.
Seven Piece Fjf jf\
Genuine China i#^
Almond Set . . . %*&%#%*
Special Saturday Only
Thin, delicate china, exquisiteiy decorated w,tth pir # buds, and
gold. Something .that would be appreciated as a Chf.armaji icift.
The large dish measures 6^ inches lonff. th« small. on«» 2'rj inches.
\u25a0 ">-" " . ' -^
A Carving Set Free
With every Dining Room T*ble told before Thankglvlnff Day.
They are handsome sets, worth from 12.50 to $7.50.
V Open Saturday Nights till 10 o* Clock
/W Investment '™
We are selling 1,000 SIX PER CENT GOL.D BONDS — at th» par \%\nm of
5100; eecyred by a redemption fund in bank to pay intertst and bond* as
they mature.
The moneyja to be used to develop and build homes on a. tract of' '
1,000 LOTS IN MILL VALLEY j
Covered with redwood and laurel trees. {
THIS PROPERTY IS WORTH $750,000
Making your security "H times as much as bonded for.
These features will appeal to any woman, anywhere— drop \£% a liaa or exll
and see us. 5
GOETZMAN REALTY CO.
852-SWV4- £5« Fhelas^Blda;. I
11 \J *5 i B J I\J l\l li\ '
r^dl3C6 Newwt and Moit Popular Commcrc!^! Hotel.
_\u25a0'..*«\u25a0 \u25a0WWW 17-10 Porrell Street at Market
M'4f% 1a I; " Six «terlt» of io!Id comfort; 10 first dais eat-
,\g \ %0 I tns bonsm within one block. lUt«* »1, 11.50 to
„ ;. . \u0084 , - %* P*r <t*J. 223 rooas; not a darkroom la th»
Entirely rebuilt nine* the flre house.
en the original Market St. site y. £. aad A.W. TiTSLBTS, Pm?i. anil Mjr».
The Epitome Of Hotel Excellence Former owners Roy»l and HamUt»o H»t»U.
ma^ZZZZ^Z^ RFI B Fyn^ HOTEL
IM^iCT™^lfjriiilifnlirOTiWl Q ear y an( j T a yi or streets
V B 'W»r> \u25a0 ant Anai a liv European plan, from (2 • **r; American plaq.
iiriiri fi |a |1 II HI Alii from $4 a day. Ktery room Tith b^tti. Po«ttlT»!.T
UI I I ft" I II WI. 1 1 111 II I I I fireproof. Kamur and tourist botel. Half block
rill 9 i I WIIIIII If H I I from t'olTjmbU Theafr. Well Ugnt«d wmpl*
1 1 U I L L JIIIUUIinUI room ' or wsin«ft'»l trarelers. .
Society of. California Pioneers' Dulldlsc .
Fourth Street >>ar Market ¥ ¥ i \ Jf
California's .Most Popular Hotel |— 3 f\ir/\E 11/ i A^fAA
\u25a0too Rooms. £00 Bath*. | ||||f~l /vliflll I 1 13
European plan— $1.00 per day and up. Dining HUiVI 1 1 JLvlll V V
room ieatlngs ooo.-- Table d'llote or a la \u25a0 Carte ~ : •- . . \u25a0 \u25a0 \u25a0--
ser»ice.,av desired. - - . FRANCIS SMITH. Manager.
SPECIAI/ I.UXCIIEOX EVERY DAY The Hotel of Beflnemtnt for TamlllM »ad
from H>3o a. . m. to 3 p. m. — BO renti * Tonrists.
EDWARD nOLK IS, GEO. A.DIXON. Sacramento M. Xew Van »m Arm 'l
Manager. As*t. Manager. AMBBICAX PLA>
HOTEL STEWART HOTEL STANFORD
European- Plan, $1.50 a .day and up l ISO roonis'witn batty Bit** II diy up. »
American- Plan, ;^3.00 a day. and' "up. f' 250 Keaw v ttx««t iitweta gutter and BxuX, Q/
POSTMASTER FISFC TO
REPRESENT STATE
Postmaster Arthur G. Flsk. accom
panied by Postal Inspector H. B. Hall,
left last nfeht for Phoenix. Ariz., whera
he will represent the- California post
offices at the convention of postmasters
of Arizona and New Mexico. Post
master General Hitchcock notified Fisk
several days ago that he had been se
lected to attend the convention, which
will be-;in session November 10. 11 and
12. m*M
9

xml | txt