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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 12, 1910, Image 5

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FISH ROCK BALLOTS
DRIFT IN THE MAILS
Package Deposited by Post
master at Gualala May
Cause Him Trouble
Adrift in the mails, ivithout post
scp or mark to indicate what post
offlc* It had been deposited in, there
\u25a0cvfls found yesterday by the postal
•-ispectors here a package containing
about 100 ballot* cast in the recent
election at Fi.sh Rock, Mendocino
count v.
A conflict betwoeh- th*» federal and
Ma:f> laws is bejievefl to have been
the rfiu«e for th* violation . by A. R.
Tarrra-fcr, postmaster at* Gualala.
wh«t* It vras finally learned the pack
u?» had been mailed, of the stringent
it* that no mail matter shall be for
warded stamps.
nlesi ho can produce a very good
fxerec Tarwater viill he reprimanded
hy tho department at Washington he
rs.;.*- hp forgot to affix stamps to the
rs-'vsse and because it exceeded the
"•ripiit allowed for first class matter.
AMUSEMENTS?
CTVARvVEAJL %ctSTOC>KIOn &¥ONNI\Si
Safest gjid Mcst Ma«=iac«nt Theater in America,
MATIUTE TODAY A2«'D ETERY DAY
INTERNATIONAL VAUDEVILLE
TflF. IMPHRTAI. RUSSIAN DANCERS (By
\u25a0^\u25a0^<-»r:»l- r^rinission of the Cr.ar of Rus*ia>; CA-
MTLLG OBER. Persian Star and Phenomenal
V—«?jm: NEW YOUK TRIO: FELICE MORRIf?
«n4 CO.'. in 'A Tall For Help": THF. OLD
sn;,ruKß FIMM.ERS; FRANK MORRELL: GCS
OVT.AW TK1O: NEW nnPirETTM MOTION PIC-
TtRES. lj»«t W«>1; or LIONEL BARRVMORE
•ml MrSEE RANK IN. assisted by Doris liankin
-;ri ••Th« White S!«Tcr.''
KTf-nir.c prices, irv. 2.V. SOr. T.V: hox s<>sts $1.
>I«t. rrirfs <pxr-»pt Sundays «nrl Holldaj-fi 10c
SV. \u25a0'\u25a0Or. moNKS: r»oi!glas TO. Home CIoTO.
* S. LOVERICH- MANAGEP
r lis Btreet !>>&r Fillmore — Cla*s A Theater
MAT. TODAY— LAST TIMES— TONIGHT
MAX FIGMAN ia "MARY JANE'S PA"
Co»rir.en<-:njf trith Metine* Tonforrow (SUNDAY)
>AM S. and I.KF. SHI BERT. Inc., ITesent
fffjr
BLUE E^OUSE
A f>.r. c ia Thr*^ Arts, from tbe German by
Clyde Fit<-1).
Mfftt Pr!<"«-s- 2.V t.» |X: Sat. and Sun. Mat^
ricra- C">~ to^T.V. Tir«r tim«» til ihpnc prices.
P knnip?/' THEATER
Vsr^.2.\JL\A'W&lL ,. h ,, r> W c t t 1134
\u25a0 S. LOVERICH. Manager.
. KATINEE TODAY AND TOMORROW
• Tonight rt\<\ Tomorrow- Niyht
\ T.a^r Tim*-* of MAX DILL in
"THE WHITE HEN"
' CMameaeioc Mondar Nigbr, Nov. 14,
MAX DILL
In riip cifr^r Plxley-Lader« >lus!<-nl Comfdy
I "THE GIRL A\D THE BARON"
Ni^'hr rn-1 Stin«j/y MaTir!P»> Pr'^fs— C.V to
fl: Ssrnrday Matinr><» '"Pop"' rrices — 2."> c
sr.'l r-ii".
A t£s[ y&jj/l tPA^jS Sm. N>Br Marliet - !
( V1 *"» J&iS&^JfOM* Of TZT. Market I"rv.
MME. NAZIMOVA
» MATTSEE TOPAV AT 2
LAST 11 Mi: TONIGHT
"THE FAIRY TALE" * j
COMMENCING MONDAY EVENING.
Wm.Faversham
;n "THE WORLD AND HIS WIFE"
?»>»;s Uea'ly Now at Theater and Emporium
I Ck7 A Fl fetter and Steiner
AIIA/ /* K\ i '^~° West 1400
IUV»rL£L» rS6\ Home Phone S-4242 !
BCLjUSCO & MAYE\ . . . .Owners end Managers
TONIGHT— STA>A^RD UNIVERSITY I
FOOTBALL . \ :AM NIGHT. |
MATINF.K* TfIDAY
\;.i] Tomorrow — Tonipbt and Tomorrow Night
LAST IIUES OP
TOO MUCH JOHNSON
W-'liam Clil<tr**« Imp»»ri«habl«» Far<«e Comedy !
A Splendid I'Utorial^ Productioa
Pricpg—Mpht. 25c to $1: Mat.. 2.V: to 50c.
seats for sale at Box Office and Emporium.
v<. lt wcfk—' TjjE-ORF.AT JOHN CANTON."
,IL \J3§2H MATLVEB TODAY
TOXICHT—^JtBT TIMH OF THE < OMEPV HIT
TUII LI. Jlllli \u25a0iWIBMIIHIIIWI \u25a0! \u25a0I.JWI 111 JJIWII
m m I B|B V' WB a <j^3 ra FA X fcj |9s«
Ritb fnC Nihlo and n IVrf*v»t Company.
BECINXIXG NKXT MONDAY
BLANCH WALSH
In Her La.te»t Succom. "THE OTHER WOMA2T'
Seats on Ssilf. Matins* Wed. an'l Pat.
I^S^> FAREWELL CONCERT
TOMORKOW AFTEBXOOX at
2:30 COLOIMA THEATER
S*>sts st ShTtnan. Clay & Co.'« Today; at
Columbia Tomorrow.
mmc. f TTUM ANN AXD HER
MZA Wlflflnlill QUARTET
Thursday Xfeht at XoTeltv Theater
Sunday Aft.. \or. 2Olli at Columbia
Sr>Hts iiow oa >n]<» «» Shorinsn. O»v & Co.**.
LURLINE
nUSH AVD LARKIN* STS« '
OCEAN WATER BATHS
SirfmmJnff and Tab Bath*
Fait water direct from the oceaa. Open
vrerr day aod •"Vfning. including Sanders
and TbolMayn. Iroai 7 t m. to 10 p. in. Spec-
tators' gallery fr*e.
Natatorium rpsertred Tnesday ana Friday
ißsorßlß* from 9 o'clock to nooft for women only.
••Filtered Orfan Water Plunce"
COJCrOSTABLY HEATED
\u25a0*'' Hot Air Hair I>ryerB for Women Bather*.
PORCELAIN TUBS, with bot. cold., salt
arsd fre*n water. Each room fitted with hot
and «oid salt and fresh •bower. •
E&AIfCH TTJB BATHS, 8151 GEARY ST.
BTEA& DEVIEADEBO
' .\u25a0-\u25a0-•
>^^V NE of the engagements of the month that will be of particular interest
i | to'the girls of the younger set is that of Miss Rowcna Wilson and
X^ y Theodore Lyman. Miss Wilson has been a guest at. most of the
winter affairs and lias' entertained the girls of the local' set many
times at her home in Berkeley. She and her sister. Miss, Joy Wilson, are
close friends of Mrs. Ralston White and Miss Dorothy Boericke. They
attend the Greemvay dances and are members of- tne Berkeley cotillon.
Lyman is a son of Mr. .and Mrs. W. Lyman of St. Helena, and has
passed most of his time here and in Berkeley. He is a graduate of the
University of California, and was conspicuous in college affairs. He is^ a
grandson of Bishop Lyman, who was at one time pastor 'of Trinity church.
The family has a wide acquaintance here.
The date for the wedding has not been announced, but it will be an
event of the later season.
Miss Anna Olney will entertain at a luncheon next Wednesday at her
home in Pacific avenue. There will be three complimented guests at the affair
who have just returned after passing the summer in other cities. # Miss
Dorothy Van Sicklen and* Miss Marian Marvin have been- traveling in the
east, while Miss Lillian Van Vorst was abroad with her mother, Mrs.
Caroline Van Vorst. There will be a score of girls at the reunion.
Mrs. Eugene Brcsse and her daughter. Miss Metha McMahon, write
descriptive letters of their trip through Germany and their visits in the
large cities abroad. They arc enjoying a/i extended motor trip this month
in Germany and are visiting many interesting places that are ordinarily over
looked by travelers. They will remain in Europe indefinitely;
Cards have been re
ceived from Mr. and
Mrs. Dallas Baehe Pratt
of New York announc
ing the marriage of
their daughter. Miss
TCortstance Pratt, ana
Walter Klngsley Still
man, "flic wedding
! took place Wednesday,
November 2, at Grace
church and was one of
the society events of
the winter in the, east
ern city.
The bride is a cousin
of Mrs. Clarence Martin
Mann of this city and
may visit here on her
wedding journey to the
orient. The maid of
honor \u25a0at the wedding
j was Miss Beatrice Gor
don Pratt, and there
were several others In
the bridal party. Mrs.
Stillman and her sister,
I Miss Beatrice Pratt,
! have always dressed ex
! actly alike and were
I frequently mistaken for
; twins, although there is
I a year or two difference
in their ages. They are
both very attractive
pirls and have taken
part in many of the
tableaux and amateur
entertainments that are
given each winter In
New York for charity.
A. O. H. BALL ADDS
$625 TO CALL FUND
Substantial Sum Is Netted for
Orphans by Brilliant Dance
and Entertainment
Call's Orphan Fund
Rolls Up to Over
twelve Thousand
I Yesterday was a big day for the'
I little orphan girls of Mount St. Jo- !
[sep/i's asylum. Afore than a thou-,
I sand dollars rvas received by The
\Call for its relief fund, and the total
\now fools up to more than $1 2,000. !
! The sums received yesterday lucre ;
las follows: ;
[ PreTlons!yAckn<mledged.sll,ns«47!
\ A. 0. H. BALL 625.00 \
!J. U. COFFROTH'S ATH- . \
1 LETIC BENEFIT 387.60;
: SHUMATE'S PHARMACY 25.00!
•PATRICK DEMPSEY.... 10.00 !
ITWO FRIENDS. 2.00 '<
* • - j
; TOTAL $12,165.07;
Through the generosity of the An
cient Order of Hibernians of San
Francisco came one of the largest
contributions to The Call's fund for
Mount St. Joseph's orphan asylum yes
terday. As the result of the eleventh
annual ball of the order a check for
5625 was presented with the heartiest
Rood wishes of the donors for the good
work carried on by The Call.
A committee consisting of County
President P. B. Mahoney.'County Treas-.
urer Thomas R. O'Day and C. B. Flana
gan brought the money and expressed
their pleasure in being able to add so
materially to the fund which is making
life a happier thing for the sisters and
orphans.
The ball, which took place at Dream
land October 29, was one of the most
successful affairs of the year, both so
cially and financially, and too great
credit can not be given the officers and
committees "of the organization who
planned the event.
tf^x RACING
/fifij*<ffi NEW- CALIFORNIA
4*2 JOCKEY CLUB
\vtT^4^k MKLAN!J WCE TWCK
i OPENING DAY
v Saturday, N0v., 12
RACING EVF.RV WEEK DAY. RAIN OR SHIXE
. . Fir? t . Itare at 1 :40 p. m. . .
AdiolstiloD — Men. (2; Ladles, $1.
Tor sperlal trains ctnppins at the* track, take
K. p. Kcjtt, foot of Market re: leaTe at 12 m.;
thereafter erery 20 minute* until 1:40 p. tn. •\u0084 No
tmokini? in the lant two cart/ which are reserTCd
for ladies and tbelr eecortJi. - '
THOMAS H. WILMAMS, Fresideit.
PERCY W. TREAT. Secretary.
JKa&sißßKa£>f^ss^.*!e£*!^.ig3fep«nHß^Hiß
THE SAN FRANCISCO GALL, SATURDAY, yOYEMBER 12. 1910.
THE
SMART
SET
The luncheon party
seems to be a favored
mode of entertainment
this season and one of
the most-Mnteresting of
these affairs will be
' given by Miss Erna St.
a£ her home in
California street. Tho
party' will take place
Tuesday, November 29,
and will be enjoyed by
a number of the debu
tantes and younger
giri.s.
* * •
Miss Dorothy Graves
entertained the girls of
the polo group from the
klrrhess yesterday after
noon at a tea given at
the Fairmont. The.mer
ry company was chap
eroned by Mrs. Laurence
Irving Scott. Among
those who enjoyed the
reunion were Miss Edith
Metcalfe, Miss I.urMn©
Matson, Miss Frances
Stewart, . Miss Florence
Braverman and Miss
Kathleen de Young.
•' ''• •
Mrs. Ada Dougherty
Clement is enjoying a
visit with friends at
Bakersfleld, but will re
turn to town for the
later winter.
\, . .
J Senator Francis G.
Newlands and Mrs. New
lands arrived, yfisterday
and will 'be at the Pal
ace probably for sev
eral weeks.
Edward M. Greenway
entertained at nn "open
house" supper party last
evening after the kir
mess- when every truest
\u25a0was bidden to come in
formally to the Fair
mont for a reunion aft
er the festival. The
tables were decorated
with roses, and there
were half a hundred
suests. Among those
who gave supper par
ties at the St. Francis
were:
Mrs. A. P. Hotaling:
Mrs. William Thomas
Captain and Mrs. Wil
liam Matson
Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Proctor.
Mr. and Mrs. John
Baker Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Fen
wick
Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Ol
ney
Mr. and Mrs. Tirey ' v.
Ford
Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G.
Miller
Mr. and Mrs. Milton
Pray .
Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund
Stern
Mr. and Mrs.- J. J. Moore
Mr. *md Mrs. Henry
Crocker
Mr. and Mrs. Earl
Cummlngs
• • • • •
Miss .Helen Sullivan
will entertain at a
luncheon Thursday,. No
vember 17, at her home
in Pacific avenue for
several of the younger
girls, who are looking
forward to the occasion
as one of the most en
joyable of the month.
SOUTH TO JOIN
INDUSTRY LEAGUE
Home Products Boosters Will
Take in Los Angeles
Me*rchants
The Home industry league is plan
ning to extend its organization to L,os
Angeles and the southland. At yes
terday's luncheon at the Palace lt was
announced that D. J. Alberga, acting as
special commissioner, would take the
preliminary steps toward inviting "the
Los Angeles merchants and manufac
turers to join the Jocal body in boost
ing California made products. v
In speaking of the proposed amalga
mation, Chairman Frederick C. Parker
jsaid yesterday that. the home industry
movement was meant to be state wide,
and that while he believed Los Angeles
•would profit b_y the splendid local or
ganization, the San Francisco manu
facturers and producer*! had . a great
deal to learn* from the, boosters of the
.south.
Parker was presented with a gavel at
the beginning of the luncheon,. whlQh
was well attended.
- A communication was read from
Mayor/ P. H. McCarthy, In which he
declared his determination to put noth
ing but California materials In the new
temporary city hall to be built by the
Whitcomb estate. The building com
mittee of the Masonic temple also de
clared by a communication that Cali
fornia materials would be given the
preference in the building of the""new
hall in Van Ness avenue.
The Associated crackers' company
announced through Ritchie Dunn and
P. I. Jacobl that a contract had been let
to a local firm for 3.000,000 cartons at
a cost of about $30,000. \
Richard "C. Queen reported on the
progress that was, being made for
home industry by the California Fed-,
eration of Women's Clubs. E. J. D.
Price gave a talk on salesmanship. His
committee has been enlarged, and now
Includes W. D. Degen, Nace Rogers,
Dr. C. V. Cross and R, Hubbard.
C. H. Hutchlns, general agent of the
West Coast life insurance company, ad
dressed the meeting on insurance, and
spoice of the great sums that were
yearly sent east to life Insurance com
panies. - \u25a0• \u25a0-..„;-
J. K. Gordon spoke of W. C. Ralston,
the. builder of the -old Palace, - as a
pioneer homo industry booster.
HOUR OF
MUSIC
Will Be Held in Our Recital Hall
This Afternoon at 3 o'Clock "
SOLOIST
MISS LILLIAN BYRNES
SOPRANO \u25a0
The Pabllc Cordiallj Inyited - \u25a0
Sherman^aj^Go
Kcnrny and Sutter 'street*
Take Ele't'ator to Eighth Floor
DR. LYMAN ABBOTT
EXPLAINS ELECTION
Editor of Outlook Believes That
Progressives of Both
Parties Won
NEW YORK, Nov. 11.— Dr. Lyman
Abbott, editor of the Outlook,. of .tvhich
Theodore Roosevelt is a contributing
editor, today gave out his (Dr. Abbott's)
interpretation of the recent election
embodied In an editorial to appear
in the next issue of that publication: •
Popular dissatisfaction with
present conditions, especially with
the high prices; indignation at the
manifest control by the special In
terests of .the •\u25a0tariff revision and
still more at the defense and eulo
gies of the tariff till; wrath at
the corruption and the hypocriti
cal pretenses disclosed in cer
tain influential republican circle^
coupled Xvlth the forgetfulness of
the fact that the exposure and
the prosecution were furnished by
republicans; a growing conviction
that there was an alliance between
the special interests and the re
• publican oligarchy, with the belief
that the easiest way to hit at Jt
was by voting with the opposition;
Indifference of opinion in an elec
tion, which, to many voters, ap
peared to be a contest rather be
tween persons than between prin
ciples — an Impression which a too
personal campaigning tended to in
crease; a general Inclination in"
America to make a change in po
. lltlcal control from time to time,
an inclination which the political
oondltions ..that prevailed in old
states does much to justify; some
fears in certain quarters, not less
politically effective because wholly
undefined, lest the specter of radi
calism should work navoc to busi
ness interests; the fact that the
republican party was divided be
tween the insurgents and the regu
lars, while the democratic party,
freed from the traditions of Cleve
land and the personality of Bryan,
was, for the first time In years,
united — all these causes combined \u25a0
helped to bring about a political .
revolution.
PROGRESSIVE MAX CHOSEX
But I do not believe the election
indicates a reaction and a revolu
tion. The fact that in every state
except Indiana, where there was a
definite popular insurgent move
ment within the republican party,
that party won in the election;
that In every state except Penn
sylvania, where there was no such
.movement within the party or
where it failed, the republican
party failed in the election; that
with the single exception of the
senator from Indiana, no senator
who .was retirpd by failure to se
cure a renominntion re-election
represents the progressive element
in the party; that of the governors
elected a decided majority repre
sent the progressive rather than
the reactionary element in their
respective parties, including such
representatives., of " progressive
thought as "Woodrow Wilson on the
,' Atlantic' coast and Hiram Johnson
on the Pacific; that the insurgents
are insurgents no longer, but are
recognized leaders in the republi
can party — all indicate that the
plretion. which is a signal triumph
of the democratic party, is not a
d^fent of- progressive principles
and does not Indicate a decadence
of t!ie progress,Jye spirit.
PART PLAYED BY. ROOSRVEtT
Nor do I think that the jack
o' lantern bugaboo of Mr. Roose
velt's Imagined- monarchical ambi
tions cut any considerable 1 figure
in 'the election. The fact that the
greatest falling off, in the republican
vote was in the state of Pennsyl
vania, where his voice was not
once hearil In' the campaign. Is
significant If not conclusive on that
point. * '
The simple fact Is that a demo
cratic triumph was publicly pre
dicted, by both democrats and re
publicans eight months ago. and
was foreshadowed by th«» enforced
retirement of Messrs. Aldrich and
Hale from the senate and by the
Maine election in September.
Mr. Roosevelt was called in to
' save the situation; he responded to
the call, but could not turn the
tide. He did something more Im
portant, he heartened the progres
sives in his own party, carried for
•vftrd in his own state the work
of party purification so well-be
gun by Mr. Hughes and did some
thing to inspire with the spirit of
genuine and national democratic
progress the party of his political
opponents. y
DERAILED FREIGHT CAR
CAUSES LITTLE DELAY
Western Pacific Clears Track
Within Two Hours
The derailment of_a freight car on
the Western Pacific near Portola, on
Thursday afternoon, which . was re
ported as likely to tie up traffic on
that road for some time, was cleared
up within two hours and trains are
afrain proceeding on thair usual fast
schedule. The accident wa# only an
ordinary derailment of a freight car
and trie report that traffic would be
stalled for an indefinite period was
exaggerated. No one was injured in
tho accident and the damage will not
amount' to more than about $15.
COMPAKY ACCEPTB AWARD— Santa Fe; N.
M.. Nov. 11. — Tbc Victoria land and cattla
company abandoned Its appeal to the Eupretna
court today and accepted th<^ award of th«
appraisers of $190,097.23 for land taken br th«
reclamation service for the Elephant Butt*)
reclamation project, on • the Rio Grande in
N>w Mexico. . . • /.
FOR DYSPEPSIA
Yqu Risk Nothing. by Trying
This Remedy
' We i want 'every "one troubled with in-
digestion and dyspjepsla to come to our
store and obtain a box of Hexall Dys-
pepsia Tablets. They contain Bismuth-
• Subnltrate and Pepsin prepared by a
process whl«ii develops their greatest
power to overcome digestive disturb-
ance. . . . ' t '.'
Rexall Dyspepsia Tablets are." very
pleasant to take. They soothe the Ir-
ritable, weak stomach, strengthen and
Invigorate, the digestive organs, relieve
nausea and indigestion, promote nutri-
tion and bring about a feeling, ot com-
fort. ' • I- -. /' ' '.:' \u25a0\u25a0 \u25a0 :; -'•"': \u25a0\u25a0 \u25a0-:
If you give Rexall Dyspepsia Tablets
a reasonable trial we will return your
money if you are not satisfied with the
result. Three sizes,' 25 cents, 50 cents
and $1.00. Remember you ca^| s obtain
Rexall Remedies in San Francisco only
at the Owl Drug C0.,,1nc., 710; Market
street. 778 Market street, \u25a0Post and
Grant avenue. Sixteenth and Mission
streets, "FlllmoraanJ Geary streets.
GIVES YOU r A DIFFERENT
CLIMATE
:' \u25a0"- SEEvPAGE 10 : : '
HOLLISTER THEATER
DESTROYED BY FIRE
[Special Dispatch to' The ! CalV\ '
HOLLISTER, Nov. 11.—Honningber
ry opera house, one of the landmarks
of this city, and the starting place of
William A. Brady as a theatrical marv
ager, burned to the ground at 1 o'clock
this' morning. ' "The Gay Widow," a
musical company, was playing an en
gagement here and all the scenery
and costumes were lost. It is sup
posed to have started from a cigarette
carelessly thrown on the stage. The
loss will exceed $5,000.
DAIRYMAN IS BAHKBTJOPT— Unfortunately the
J14.585 worth of IlTestock belonglog to Manuel
Vargas, a dairyman of Redwood City, has been
pledged, md h» may not sell his horses and
cows to pay debts, aggregating $9,500.. and
he yesterday sought relief from his worries by
petitioning the United States district court' to
declare him a bankrupt. .
|} BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AHD DEATHS j[
Btrth. marrlapp and death notices »ent by mall
will not b« Inserted. They mast b« handed In at
either of the publication offices and be Indorsed
with ths name and residence of persons author-
lied to hare the same published. Notices re-
stricted simply to the announcement of the event
are published once In this column free of charge.
| Marriage Licenses [
The following marriage licenses were Issued In
San Francisco. Friday. Korember 11:
COMBS — INGARfJIOI^A.— Kdward I* Combs, 47.
and Ullian SI. Ingarglola. 33, both of 2568
. California street* #
HAYES— KEr,I/r— George P. Hayes, 25. San
Francisco, and Mary V. Kelly, 18,- 418 Fre-
mont street.
JACOBSEN— NIELSEN— Louis Jacobsen, 34. and
Christine NJelsen, 27, both of 628 J street.
SCHArmO— NBUFKLD— Samuel H. Scbapirb,
27. and Gladys Neufeld, 22, both of Balthnore,
Maryland./ . \u25a0 .. •• : <
STORM— STONEtr-Alfred J. Storm, 25, 345
Twenty-third avenue, and Anna L. Stone, 22,
93 Sixth arenne. . • _ .
BIRTHS
ESBRMAN— In this city, Norember T, 1910, to
the wife of K. Eserman, a daughter.
REID— Jn this city. November B, 1910. to the
wife of D. 11. Reid (formerly Cora Scott), a
son. \
- MARRIAGES
LARSEN— WIND— In " this city, NoTe'mber ?,
1910, by^Rer. E. M. Stensrud. Lars Larsen
and JJargaretha Wind, both of San Francisco.
'gDEATHS
Boyarslty. Lazarus.. 70 McHale, Martin J..54
Boyd, James T S6 Ma boney. Jeremiah.. —
Coffin, l'ercy H 48 Mecke. Andrew 5i
Cook. Ellr-abeth W-. 62 Morrison? Agnes H.. 32
Conrter (Infant) Nelson. Peter 0....0 l
Cullen. Gerald ..... SS Pennaccbio, Salra-
Drought, Robort ... — tore 41
Everett. Nellie- C...' 22 Petrtt. Mary A —
Fisher, George C..:. 52 Qulnllsk. William... 52
Foreman, Andrew.. Rice. Mary E 50
(Jarber, Samuel..'... 86 RobPrts, Fredrick A. 59
Harmon, Frank .... 1 Rnppert. William... 6.0
Howpll. Lee R......26 Samuels. Julius «Q
\u25a0Hunsincpr, Electra.. 79 Shepardson. Elijah J. 41
Kane. Margaret SO Tannler, Henry 08
Kpmpkey. Augustus. 5$ Taylor, Jennie ...... 77
King.- Minnie ...... — ,-
McCarthy, John J. . 40 Turner (Card)
BOTARSKT— In this city. Norember 11. 1910,
Lazarus, belored husband of Mary Boyarsky.
and loring father of Joseph, Marcus, Lewis,
Charley and Jacob Boyarsky and Mrs. Sarah
Apte. Mrs. Cerilla I/eyin. Mrs. Lena Silver
*Dd Mrs. Fannie Karo. a native of Russia,
aged 70 years.
BOYD— In this city, November 10, 1910. James
T. Boyd, beloved husband pf Catherine M.
Boyd, a native of Rochester, N. V., aged 86
' yearn. \u25a0,\u25a0 .-\u25a0-.\u25a0\u25a0
Friends are rpsppctfully Invited to attend
.rha funeral iwvirps today (Saturday), at
2 p. m.. at the chapel of N. Gray & Co., 2196
Geary. street comer of Devlsadero. Interment
strictly private. Remains at the chapel of N.
Gray & Co. ' : ,
COFFIN— In thl« city. Norrmber 10. 1910.' Percy
H.. beloved fnn of Amelia W. and tho late
Fredprick F. Coffin, and loving brothpr of Sirs.
\u25a0 Minnie Coffin Hubbs and the late H. W.
. Coffin, a native of California, aged 4S years.
(Cincinnati 0., papers plpase copy.)
Friends and acquaintances arc respectfully la-
. vited to attend the funpral today (Satnrday).
November 12, 1910, at 11 o'clock a. m., from
the mortuary chapel of the Golden Gate under-, 1
taking company, 2475 Mission street \near' 1
Twenty-first. Interment (private* Cypress '
\u25a0Lawn cemetery, by elpctric funeral car from i
Twenty-Pighth and Valencia streets, at 11:80
o'clock a. m.
COOK — In Alameda. November 10. 1910. Eliza-
beth Wylde, relict of the late Francis C. Cook,
and mother of Mrs. L. W. Dake and Genevra
E. and Aubrey F. Cook, a native ot Nova
Scotia, aged 62 years. _
Friends and acquaintances are respectfully in-
vited to attend the funeral Monday, November
14, 1910, at 10:30 o'clock a. m.. from her late
residence, 1019 Walnut street, Alamedn.
C 0T r BTEB« l -In \u25a0• this city, November io, 1910.
- the Infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. .Robert
Courter..
CULLEK — In this city, November lt % 1910. Ger-
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\u25a0 criticism .-oC-Mi* .Win and M, work. There ire pomah, of >/ ~tZ%EL
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BIRTHS^,MARRIAQES, DE ATMS
ald Cullen. beloved father of Mr*. Fratfk Coo-
way and Mrs. Fred Knower and Charles and
• Lillie Cullen and Mrs. Jospph King and Mrs.
P. W. Pray and George Cullen, a native ot
; Sligo, Ireland, - aged- SS years.
DROUGHT— In this city. November 11. 1910. at
his late residence. 649 Folsom street. Robert,
beloved husband of the late Ellen Drought, &
native of Ireland.
EVERETT— In 'Alameda. Col., November 11.
imo. : Nellie Caroline Everett, beloved wife> of
Charles D. Everett of Oakland, and daughter
of Mrs. Caroline Boyer'of Meridian, Cal.. and
sister of I. Boyer of^ Oakland, a natiTe of
California, aged 22 years and 15 days.
Friends are respectfully Invited to attend
the funeral \u25a0 services Jironday, November 14.
1910, at 1:50 o'clock p. m.. at the Twenty-
fifth street Adventist church. Twenty-flfth
street near Telegraph avenue, Oakland.
FISHER— At St. Thomas hospital. In this city.
: November 10. 1910. George Chichester Fisher,
a native of New York, age«l 52 years. ((Brook-
lyn, N. V., papers plea*e copy.) -
FOREMAN— In this city. November 10. 1910.
Andrew, beloved husband of Hortense J. Fore-
man." and father of Andrew SI. Foreman, a na-
tive of Edinburgh. Scotland.
Friends and acquaintances are respectfully In-
vited to tfrend the funeral tomorrow (Sunday),
at 1 o'clock p. in., from King Solomon** hall, ,
Fillmore street near Sutter. under the auspice*
of S»n' Francisco, lodge No. 360, F. & A. M.
Interment Cypress Lawn cemetery. Remains
at the parlors of Halsted.* Co., 924 FUlmore
street.
GARBER — In thts city, November 10. 19tO. Sam-
uel Garber, beloved stepfather of Mm. Ellis
A. Holmes, a native of Pennsylvania, aged
86 years 3 months and 28 days.
Friends are respectfully invited to attend
the funeral services tomorrow (Sunday). N(>-
vember IS. at 2 p. m., at the chapel of N.
Gray & Co., 2196 Geary street corner of De-
vlsadero. under th« 'auspices of the general
relief committee, I. O. O. F. . Interment pri-
vate.
HAHMON— In this city. November 10. 1910.
Frank, beloved son of Walter D. and Gertrude '
Harmon, and brother of Allen Harmon, a na-
tive of California, aged 1 year 6 months and
25 days.
HOWELL— In ' BakersSeld. November T. 1910.
I»e 8.. beloved husband of Beatrice A. How-
ell. and father of Beatrice M. HoweUY and son
of Oscar and the late Effie Howell*- and
brother of Mrs. Opal Condax. a native of Xis-
souri, agerl 26 years 11 months and 4 days. A
member of Plumbers* Union and San Francisco
tent No. 18, Knlghtu of Maccabees.
Friends and acquaintances are respectfully la-
vitPd to attend the funeral today (Satur-
day), at 1:30 o'clock, from the parlors of tbe
Henry J. Gallagher company. 1314 Webster
street between Ellis and O'Farrell. Interment
• Cypress Lawn cemetery, by carriage.
HUNSINGER— In Fort Jones, Cal.. November 7.
1910. Electra Hunslnger, beloved mother of
I. W. and A. C. Hunslnger and Jits: Pierce
Evans and Mrs. A. A. Milllken. a native of
-•New Orleans, aged 79 years 10 months and 26
days.
Friends are respectfully Invited to attend
the funeral today (Saturday), at 10:30
a. m., from the parlors of S. A. White. 1214
Eddy street near Laguna. Pleass omit flowers.
Interment private.
KANE— In'Watsonvllle. Cal.. November 0. 1910.
Ktargaret Kane, a native of Pajaro valley,
aged 30 years.
The funeral tak**- place today (Saturday).
November 12, 1910. at 9 a. m., from tbe
family residence. In Watsonville. Requiem
high mass at St. Patrick's chnrch. at 10:30
a. m. Interment In Valley cemetery.
KEMPKEY — In Portland. Ore.. November 10.
1910, Augustus F. X.. beloved husband of
Catherine Kempkey. and father of Edwin. Karl
and Augustus Kempkey Jr. and Mrs. Minnie
Henderson, a native of" Germany, agfd 58
years and S months.
KING— In Oakland. November 10. 1910, Minnie.
wife of George J. King, and daughter
of the late Patrick and Mamie McCarthy, and
nlpc<» of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Totman of Rio
Vista, a native of San FrancUeo.
Friends and acquaintances are fesprctfully In-
1 . vited to attend the funeral today (Satur-
day). November 12. 1910, at 9 o'clock a. m.,
from her late residence. 10SI Sixty-seventh
street. thenc« to St. Columbo churcb. where a
requiem high mass 'will be celebrated for tbe
repose of her soul, commencing at f»:30 o'clock
a. m. Interment St. Mary's cemetery.
McCABTHY— In this city, November 11. 1910.
John J., beloved son of the late Cornellu* and
Catherine \u25a0 McCarthy, and devoted brother of
Daniel. James. Charl-s. Richard ami Thomas ;
McCarthy and the late William McCarthy, a
. native of San Francisco, aged 40 year 3 _
months and 7 days.
. Remains at tbe parlors of Mcßrearty A Mc-
Cormick. 013 Valencia atreet near Twentieth.
Interment private.
MoHAXE— In this city. November 11. 1910. Mar-
tin J., dearly beloved husband of Mary Mc-
Hale, and devoted father of Mary. Martha.
Delia. Peter. Rose and Margaret McHale. a
'native of County Mayo, Ireland, aged 54 years
and 8 months.
Remains nt the parlors of Suhr & WiebOldt,
1285 Valencia street near Twenty-flfth.
MAHONEY— In thi* city. November 9. 1910.
Jpremlah Mahnney. a native of Doonasleen,
County Cork. Ireland.
Friends and acquaintance are respectfully In-
vited to attend thp funeral today t?»turday>.
November 12. at 9 o'clock a. m.. from the
parlors of D. I. Kenny & Co., 1710 Eddy
street near Scott, thence to Holy Cross
church, where a solemn requiem high mass
\u25a0will b« celebrated for the repose of his *f»ul.
commencing at 9:30 o'clock., Interment Holy
Cross cemetery.
MECKE— In this city. November ». 19tO\ An-
drew, dearlj beloved husband of Carolina
Mecke. and .devoted father of Mrs. Annie
Laumelster and Andrew and Agnes Mecke. a
native of Duderstadt. Hanover. Prussia, aged
57 years 4 months and & days. A member of
Vereln Elntracht and Mlllmen's L'nlon No. 422.
Friends and acquaintances are respectfully
Invited to attend the funeral tomorrow (Snn-
day). November 13, at 10:30 a. m.. from the
parlors of Suhr & Wieboldt. IVS Valencia
street near Twenty-flfth. Incineration Cypress
Lawn crematory, by ll:S0 a. m. train from
Twenty-flTth and Valencia streets.
MORRISON— In this city. November 10. 1910.
V** t. \u25a0 \u25a0 ,t>
Agnes H.. dearly b'lored daughter oi AI«M-
der and Ellen Morrison, and loving sister of
, Jeanle H., Johan aod Hughlna Morrison, a
native of Amthsrlaadshlre. Scotland, ,ag?A 32
y?ars and 9 days.
NEXSON— In this city. November T, 1910* P«tw
O. Nelson, a native of Sweden, aged BI years.
Friends and acquaintances are respectfully
Invited to attend tne • funeral todar (Sat-
urday) at Woodlawn cemetery oa the arrtvul
of the 11:30 a. n». train from Tilrd and
Townsena streets.
PENNACCHIO— :ia~thiB city,, November 9, 131".. ' :
Salvatore Fennaecßfo 1 . a ijative of Elena Ca-
serto. Italy, aged 41 year*.
Friend* and acquaintance are resp^ffullj In-
vited to attend thp funeral tomorrow fJnadaj *.
November 13, 1910. at I n clock p. m., from
the parlors of Valeare. MarlnJ. Marats * Co..
640 Greco street between Stwktoa and PowtU.
PETTIT— In thl* city. November 9. 1910, Marj , ;
A., beloved wife of to* late Jamea V. Petttt.
*nd loving mother of Mr«. S. F. Gillies. Mrs.
J. Montgomery and Joe. Laura. Vincent. Irv-
ing aod Edwin rettit. a native of Ireland.
t>evada City and Sacramento. Cal.. pajers .
- please copy. v #
Friends and acquaintances »re r*«p»ctf>illT
jnvited to attend the funeral today (Sat-
urday). November 12. at lo o'clock, from tbe
parlors «f TUedor D>rk« & Cc. GOO D«Tlsadtr!»
»«n>et comer of McAllister. Int«rm<mt CJpre«»
Lawn cemetery by 11:30 a. m. traia from
Third and Towns«nd street*.
QUINLISX— In Oakland. November 11. 1910.
William Qn:nl!*V-. beloved «o n of the Ist*
Bridget L*«. and brother of Thorna* QuinlUk.
a native of Charleston. 3. C. aged 3i yetr*.
SICE — In this city. November IC>. 1910. Mary
E.. beloved irife of John Rle». * o*rtv» of
Illinois, aged 30 years « months and 19 rtay*.
Friends and acquit In turn*** are respectfully in-
vited to attend the fnneral tomorrow. \u2666Sun-
day), November 13. 1910. at 10 oVlcrk «. m..
from the parlors of tho Western Addition
funeral , directors. 1724 Devlsad»rr> str*»r h*
twp*n Suttee and Bush, where services will b*
condnctetl under the anspic»4 of Amltr n»-
bckah l«Ig« No. 1«1. Incineration, Odd Tel-
lows' cemetery.
ROBERTS — In thU city. November «». W<»
Fredrick A., "husband of XTary Robert*, and
father of Fredrick S. Roberts and Mrs. Sum
ncr Johnson, a native of Sheffield. Vt.. age-:
59 year*.
Friend.* and acfiuaintaa^M art rwpectf"!'*
Invited to attend th« funeral today tSit-
, nrday). at .1 o'clock p. m.. from the parlor*
of - the United Undertakers. 2«0« Howard
street near Twenty-second. Interm«at Mooat
Olivet cemetery.
RTTPPERT— In this city, N<rr*mb»r 11. 1910.
William Ruppert. beloved husband of the !at*
Maria M. Rnppert. and beloved father of
Charles jr. ' Rnpperr. Rev. Fr«l»rk* A. Rup-
pm. S. J.. and Philip and Michael A. Ruj*
pert and th<» late Jobanna Sollner. a nativ* «r
Bad»D. Germany, aged (50 yean 10 month* anil
16 days.
Friends and acqnalntanceg are r»#pectful!y in
vited to attend th* funeral Monday. November
14. 19U>. «t 8:3<) o'clcn-fc a..m.. from the par-
lors of G«nta«r Broth-rs. 34«0 Stxt»»nt*
street between Churcti and Sanchez. th#nc^ t*»
St. Anthony's church. Army strett n»ar Fol-
*om. where a renuiem Ifigh naasn will b* cele-
brated for the repose of hia soul, commenoinc
at 9 o'clock a. m. Interment Holy Croi«s cera
etery, by earriagea.
SAMUELS— In this city. November 10. t!>!<>.
Julius Samuels, beloved bnsband of E.«t&*r
Samuels, devote^ father of Jacob. UnjH.
Harry and -Oscar Samuels. Mrs. M. D. Stelw
and Mrs. Alfred Kellser. and beloved brother
of Elsie Sohwartx. a native of Germany, ag?4
70 year« S months and 1* d»v«.
TUe funeral services will tik? place tomor-
row (Snaday>. November 13. at 10 a. m.. fr»>m
hfs late re*ldence, 3W3 Clay street. Pleas*
omit flowers. Funeral and interment strictly
private.
SHEPABDSON— Eat-rcd Info rest. !n OakUad.
November 11. 1910. Elijah J. Shrpardswa, a
' native of California, aged 4t years.
TANNLER— In this city. November 10, 1910.
Henry Tannler. a native of Canton Bern.
Switzerland, aged BS years. A member of
Helvetia grov* No. lin. C. A. f>. r>.. and
Milkers' Prot»ctive Union No. SS6t of CaU-
forala.
Friends and acquaintances are respectfully in-
vited to attend the funeral tomorrow (Sunday >.
Nov*«mN»r IS. »t 2 p.ja.. from th<» parlors mt
H. F. Suhr JL Co.. 29ta Mission stre«t »»twf»n
Twenty-flfth and Twenty-ststb, wh«r« the
services will b«» held under the auspices of
Helvetia grove No. 151. V. A. O. D. Inter-
ment Mount Olivet cemetery, by el^ctrlf
fnneral cer from Twenty-elghta «nd Talencia
streets.'
TAYLOE— In Oakland. November 11. 1310. J#a- .
nle. dearly beloved wif» of M. V. Taylnr. a
native of Missouri. ag?d 77 y*ars 9 months and
1 day. (Sacramento. Cal.. papers pleas* copy. >
* Frtends and acquaintances are respectfully In-
vited to attend the funeral services Monday.
November 14. 1910. at 11 o'clock a. m.. at ta»
chapel of the Oakland crematory, corner of
Howe and Mather streets.
CARD OF THANKS.
TURNER — We wish to thank our many
friends for th*!r comforting sympathy and
beautuu! floral offering* in mir late bereave-
ment, the loss «f «nr l«vine daughter. Alice.
MR. and MRS. ROBERT TURNER and Family.
INDEPENDENT OF THE TRUST
—POR
Seventy-Five Dollars '
I TVTLI. FTTRNISH
HEARSE, IWO CARRIAGES. EMBALMING.
SHROUD AND CLOTH COVERED CASKET
JULIUS S. GODEAU
Moved t» main office. 41 Vaa Jfea» ar. Til.
Market 711. connecting all fiepartneot*.
Branch*"* — 305 Mentfotaarv ay. Oaklaaa. 1109
Franklin »t.: t«l. Oaktaad 4043. Los Aa«*lM.
827 South rlguero* at.
Auto Ambulance* mad Carriage* for Blr*
5

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