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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 12, 1910, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1910-11-12/ed-1/seq-8/

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In the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys
BANTAM MAY WIN
THE BRAND PRIZE
High' Scoring Fowls Are Not
Excluded at Stockton Show
Through Oversight
STOCKTON, Nov. 11. — It is possible
that a bantam will win the grand prize
offered by the San Joaquln poultry
Bhow. Through an oversight bantams
\u25a0were not excluded from the grand
prize entries. ' Joe Gianelli. who of
fered the grand prize, which is an ele
gant cup of considerable value, did so
with the understanding that it be
given the highest scoring bird in the
show. Bantams are among the high
«st scoring fowls, and unless the Judges
find when looking over the results that
some other breed of chickens scored
higher the cup will fall to a bantam
exhibitor.
The institute conducted under the
auspices of the University of California
today was largely attended.
Further awards were announced to
day a* follows:
Cornish Indian Games — O. E. Crawford of
Stockton, third rock; William A. French •of
Stockton, all othpr awards.
Pit Games — Asa M. Clark of Stockton, first
cock.
Golden and S.'lrpr Bantams — Henry A. Hoyt of
\u25a0 Saul a Ke*a, first wk, first and second hen; Ar
thur Owen <>f Stockton, frst cockerel, first pul
let; R, L. Woost«r of Stociton. second cock and
third hen; silver. Arthur Owen of Stockton, first
cockerel and first pallet.
Silver Spangled Hamburg* — C. G. Siegfried of
Alameda all awards.
Black Breasted I>d Gam# Bantams — Georjre
•". England of Los Angeles, first cock, first cock
«wl. second hen. £r»t pen: J. Wlldreth Crow- of
Oakland, second and third- cockerel, first hen.
first jmllet: Ben M. Woodhull of Stockton, second
ctwk and third hen.
Red Pjrle Game Bantams — Ben M. Woodhull of
Srocktnn. first cock, first and second hen and
first pullft.
Buff <"<v-h:ns — KdwJn Richards f>f Stockton, first
and second cockerels, first and third pullets:
Wl'.llem A. French of Stockton, third hen and
i-eoad pallet: P- H. Pendelton of Stockton, first
and second hen.
White La-.igshans — C. F. Coffelt. all awards.
Golden Penciled Hamburgs — C. G. Siegfried of
Alameda. first, second and third pullets, first
hen. £r?t cockerel mid second cock; H. R. Xoack
Of Oakland. fir*t cock, second cock, third ben.
Buff Wyandottes — Nat Sabin of Stockton, all
swards.
Columbian Wyandottes — Schmidt & Gnenter of
Sunnyvale, second cock, third -cockerel, first and
ihird b<*n; C, G. Siegfried of Alameda, all other
awards.
Partridge Wyandottes — Xat Sabln of Stockton,
all awards.
Light Br&braas — A. L. Jenkins of San Rafael.
flrst and second cock, first hen; J. W. W'akefield
if Ac»c2po, second cockerel and third pullet: T.
J. Gill of Oakland, third cwk and second hen;
William A. French of Stockton, first, cockerel,
third hen, first and second pullets; William A.
Garden of Stockton, third cockerel.
R. (.'. White and R. <". Black Bantams— Henry
A. Hnyt of Santa Rosa, all awards.
Buff Cochin Kautams — Ben M. Woodhull of
Stockton, first anil third cocks, first, second and
third hens, first and second pullets, second cock- !
erel, first and second pens: Fred Arnold of Stock
ton, third cockerel; H. R. Noark of Oakland.
second cock, first cockerel, third pullet, third
pen.
RUDOLPH KNEIF, COOPER,
IS BURIED AT NAPA
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
NAPA. Nov. 11.— Rudolph H. Knler,
formerly a well known cooper of this
city, who died Tuesday at Winehaven,
Contra Costa county, was buried here
yesterday. Dr. Richard Wiley conducted
the services and interment took place
in the Napa cemetery.
Up to 1907 Knief lived in Napa, Then,
to extend business interests, he moved
to Winehaven.
The parents of Rudolph Knief lived
in Browns valley, where he was born.
His father was J. F. Knief. a pioneer.
Rudolph Knief was 47 years old. He
leaves a widow, Mrs. Ida C Knief, and
a nephew.
ASSAILANT IDENTIFIED
BY 4 YEAR OLD GIRL
Neighbors Remember Seeing
Loiterer in Neighborhood
Four year old Hazel Ullrich, daugh
ter of Mrs. Joseph Ulrich. 3216 Eigh
teenth street, was the victim of an at
tack by a man whom she later identified
as Frank Bert. Bert denies the accu
sation, but he is being held by the po
lice pending an investigation. The
» -hild said she was coaxed into the base
ment of 2175 Folsom street by Bert,
who was identified by neighbors as
having been seen loitering in the
vicinity.
SALESMAN ACCUSED OF
TAKING FIRM'S MONEY
Charge of Embezzlement Pre
ferred Against Donald Gregg
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SACRAMENTO. Nov. 11.— A charge
of embezzlement has been preferred
against Donald Gregg, a traveling
salesman, by Thomas Longton of tha
Ix»ngton produce company. Gregg is
accused of collecting $102 from a Chi
nese in Nevada and appropriating the
money to liis own use. Gregg is be
lieved to be in Bakersfield.
FATHER IS KILLED
WHILE VISITING SON
Skull Crushed in Jumping From
a Locomotive
[Spedcl Dispatch to The Call]
GRASS VALLEY, Nov. 11. — Peter
aiaxthlsen was killed last night near
this place in Jumping from a South
ern Pacific locomotive, upon which
he had been riding while paying a
short visit to his son, who is an engi
neer. His skull was crushed by the
fall and he died while being taken
to a hospital.
REVOLUTIONARY HERO
DESCENDANT IS DEAD
LfcAuTROBE, Pa., Nov. 11. — John B<?at
ty died here in the same room In
•which he was born 84 years ago. He
•warn a. grrandson *of Benjamin Beatty,
\u25a0who crossed the Delaware with George
\u25a0Washington to participate "In the bat
tle of Trenton during the revolutionary
war. The family had lived on the
Beatty farm here for more than 100
years.
NEW SAN JOAQUIN
BANK AUTHORIZED
The Bank, of Hugrhson, San Joaquln
county, was authorized to open yes
terday by the state banking- depart
ment. -The institution, which is in a
thriving portion of the valley, begins
Tvith a capital of $25,000, fully paid.
Its directors are A. X. Crow, li C Quim
by, Verah MacPherson, J. W. Holeman
and W. N. Holeman.
REPUBLICAN OF 78 TO
WALK 75 MILES ON BET
NEW YORK, Nov. 11.— Although he
Is 78 years old. John C. Pauldlng, a
veteran republican, will walk from
New York to Poughkeepsle, 75. miles,
etartingr next Monday to fulfill a bet
on Henry I*. Stimson. He called on
Mayor Gaynor this afternoon and an
nounced his intention to start.
BUILDERS ACTIVE
IN SLOUGH CITY
Many New Structures Being Put
Up in Business and Resi«
dence Sections
STOCKTON, Nov. 11. — Although late
in the season building permits were
Issued during the first 10 days in No
vember aggregating $44,875. Homes
are being rushed to completion in all
parts of the city.
iThe erection of four fiats to . cost
JCOOO has been begun by F. C. Brandt
in South Sutter street, between ."Wash
ington and Lafayette. • A two story
house is being built in Oak street, be
tween San Joaquin and Hunter, by
Joseph Martyn to cost $4,000.
The building in Weber avenue, be
tween Sutter and California streets, oc
cupied •by Studebaker Brothers', is
being increased a story at a cost of
} 10,000. -•'-\u25a0 .••-\u25a0
Work has been started on a new par
sonage for the Clay street Methodist
Episcopal church In the southern part
of the city. V
Plans have been completed for three
cottages of -five rooms each to be
erected by .Peter Boscacci In : South
American street. v . ,
A building permit has been Issued
Mrs. Ella Westfall for toe erection of
a residence at the corner of Channel
and Sierra Nevada streets at a' cost of
53.000.
M. F. Smith has been granted a per
mit for the erection of a home at the
corner of Ophir and Willow streets in
the Oaks. E. Marcen is completing a
house in Pilgrim street in the Oaks.
Hugh W. Campbell is preparing^ to
erect a cottage in West Acacia street,
near Edison, and Silva Rossi will build
a home, at the corner of Van Buren
and Poplar streets.
FIVE BOYS HAZE A
RIVAL FRAT MEMBER
High School Lads Leave Victim
Lying Unconscious
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
EUREKA, Nov. 11. — Five high school
boys, Harold Quinn, "Warner Melendy,
Leslie Axe, Gerald Monroe and Wes
ley Davis, are under arrest on a charge
of assault as the .result of a hazing
in which they participated last Sat
urday. They beat Percy Wrigley so
badly he was rendered unconscious and
left him lying in Sequoia park. The
boys are members of the Jacobins,
a fraternity, and a rival of the one
to which young Wrigley belongs.' .
Baby Business
thousand, homeless children nave found homes and ov<jr,two - ,•
thousand mothjprly women have found sons and- daughters.
pages that ever appeared in any magazine, filled to the margin
several hundred baby 'faces ; smiling a Christmas message to you ,
THE SAJST: FRANCISCO CALL- SATURDAY, M)VEMBER 12, >1910:
WASTE CHARGED IN
PEAR BLIGHT WAR
County Horticultural Commis
sioner Accused by Assistant
of Showing Favor
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SACRAMENTO, Nov. . 11.— Charges
that . Horticultural^- Commissioner
Bloomer- has , been wasting county
money In waging a fight against .'pear
blight In this .county,- have been . pre
ferred' by his assistant. Prof. Elmbre
Chase, and the matter is cohsidere'd 'so
serious that , a hearing been ; set
for next Friday by the supervisors.
.Chas© alleged; that w Bloomer ; was
spending county money in ! doing . work
which the property, owners were -sup
posed to do for .themselves and -further
declared ; that his. superior . was -en
croaching on districts which Chase, -by
agreement, should control.
• .The two commissioners have not
been" working in J harmony since their
appointment and * the .feeling' of .the
board* is to depose both.-
SIX PRECINCTS VOTE -
"DRY" IN GLENN COUNTY
Question Has to Be Submitted
Every Second Year
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
, WTLJjOWS, Nov. 11. — Latest returns
received at, the, office of the • county
clerk show that six precincts in Glenn
county .voted /.'dry" and from Novem
ber, 1911, no saloons will be permitted
to.be conducted in them. The precincts
which have" voted to eliminate saloons'
are ; Elk . Creek, Newville, Grapevine,
Jacinto, Orl'and and West Side. Accord
ing to the ordinance which went into
effect the saloon question will be voted
on every two years in the county.
MAN WHO SHOT GIRL
MUST SERVE SENTENCE
H.W. Vaughn Is Denied Rehear
ing by Appellate Court
[Special Dispatch 'o The Call]
SACRAMENTO, Nov. 11. —H; W.
Vaughn, who was sentenced to 10 years
for shooting his former Bweetheart,
Cella Skehan, at Marysville a year ago,
because she would not. marry him, was
denied a rehearing by the appellate
court today. Vaughn shot the girl
twice from ambush when she was about
to enter her home near Marysville,
CITY BUYS AUTO
FIRE APPARATUS
Porterville Purchases Latest
Type of Hose Cart and
Engine ,
[Special Dispatch lo The Call]
PORTERVILLE, Noy": 11.'— Additional
auto fire apparatus has been purchased
for-the.Porter\'ille fire-department, the
latest acquisition: including the; most
advanced type of * cart, .capable of ; car
rying \u25a0„ approximately /half \. a mile of
three; inch hose; and a fully .equipped
engine,- capable of carrying a comple
ment of: five men beslde_s the chauffeur.'
-When ' these machines are added to
the, 'equipment and . thej projected
changes in- the flre.alarm system com
pleted. Portervllle will have one:- of
the best fire protection systems in*- the
SanJoaquin valley. ." ; . ' / .
d^Mik FREDERIC \
Tnie lover and brave adventurer, his escapes-
are thrillingly ; exciting; mystery surf ounds him
with a veil 'of fascination.
Moire baffling than Raffles, metre searching ;
than Sherlock Holmes, more ; compelling^ than
\u25a0k The Leavemvorth : Gase, The Social Bucaneer is
Monarch of Mddehi Mysteries
imniuslruUdbyKing The BOBBS MERRILL CO t Publishers At all Stores^
MRS. BUDD PASSES
AWAY AT STOCKTON
Pioneer Woman of. Central Cali
fornia and Mother of Late -
James H. Budd Is Dead
STOCKTON, Nov. 11.— With the death
of s Mrs. L. M. Budd, mother of former
Governor. James H; Budd, tonight a pio
neer ' .woman ' of' central \ California
passed from ajife' of history making.
She came to Stockton when there were
few. houses and resided, here over 80
j'ears. " . Her , husband was the late
Joseph H. \u25a0 Budd, and she leaves, besides
a son; .John H. Budd, rand "three grarid
childrenr a host "\'ot .'warm • personal
friends. . Mrs.; Budd : was .79 years of
age'and a 'native of Wisconsin.
EXPLOSION :KILLS FlVE— Hillsboro, DL. j Not.
,-H.' — Five; men are 'dead and' lß injured as the
: result of- an explosion in the mine of the Shoal
Creek coal company of ' Chicago at Panama, 12
miles north* of here,- today: \- \u25a0\u25a0
W&t Whit? wxnxßt
GRANT AVENUE SUTTER STREET- POST STREET
BOYS' AND YOUNG MEN'S OVERCOATS and
SUITS. NEW STYLES for WINTER WEAR
• DUTu uUllo
NORFOLK and DOUBLE BREASTED MODELS; the
LATEST PATTERNS IN ALL-WOOL TWEEDS, CHEVIOTS AND
WORSTEDS; NEW COLORINGS AND EFFECTS; ALSO
NAVY BLUE SERGE, SIZES 6TO 1 7 YEARS : - \u25a0;.??\u25a0.
BOYS*' OVERCOATS
VERY' LARGE ASSORTMENT OF WINTER STYLES; LONG CUT; CON-
VERTIBLE OR AUTO COLLAR; ALL-WOOL FABRICS;
FIRST CLASS MAKE ; SIZES 2]/z TO 1 7 *^f^
YOUNG MEN'S OVERCOATS *
long, double or single breasted, convertible colla£^
models of hrst class fabrics; new mixtures *
of grays and browns; all sizes
$12.50 to $30
BOYS' and YOUTHS' HATS and CAPS in great variety
OF STYLES AT REASONABLE PRICES.
APRONS FOR MAIDS AND WAITRESSES; WITH OR WITHOUT; BIB. IN J
CAMBRIC OR LAWN, 35£
APRONS WITH OR WITHOUT BIB; DEEP HEM; CLUSTER OF TUCKS,
OR EMBROIDERY, 50^, 75^
APRONS WITH OR WITHOUT 818, OF EXTRA FINE LAWN; TRIMMED
IN EMBROIDERY OR DEEP HEMSTITCHED HEM
§1, $1.50
PRINCESS MODEL APRON MADE OF DOTTED SWISS; TRIMMED IN
". ~ \u25a0 " ctwicc IIM^CPTTn'M Sis^ *2,r%
MISSES' and CHILDREN^ COATS :
CHILDREN'S red REEFER COATS of cheviot; full; .
TAILOR FINISH; LINED THROUGHOUT; EMBLEM ON SLEEVE;
MILITARY BUTTONS; SIZES 8 TO 12 YEARS *
JUNIORS' red REEFER COATS of cheviot; fall weight;
LINED THROUGHOUT; BLACK VELVET COLLAR AND
' EMBROIDERED EMBLEM ON SLEEVE; SIZES
12 TO 16 YEARS. $7.50 % . . . 2
MISSES' RAIN COATS of rubberized mohair? semi-
nTTING MODEL; BUTTONED TO NECK IN RED,
GREEN, NAVY, GRAY OR BLACK;
A COMPLETE STOCK OF
WOMENTS, MISSES' and CHILDREN'S, BOYS'
4 and YOUTHSV SHOES
misses* and children's BUTTON and LACE SHOES, in-
cluding THE'NEW HIGH CUT STYLES FOR WINTER; WELTED
extension soles and orthopedic lasts;
~" 6 to 11, $2.25 to $3.50
I" ,11Ht02 % 52.50t054.00 .;
YOUNG LADIES*. BUTTON AND LACE SHOES IN MEDIUM AND
HIGH TOPS ;'WELTED EXTENSION SOLES AND FOOT-
FORM LASTS ; MEDIUM LOW HEELS
•-; '\u25a0:. $3.50 AND $4
women's BUTTON and LACE SHOES in patent, tan, gun a
METAL CAKF AND VICI KID; XURN AND WELTED EX- ,M
TENSION SOLES; CUBAN, AND MILITARY
HEELS; THE LATEST SHAPES
women's finest grade BUTTON and LACE SHOES;
PATENT, TAN; GUN METAL, GLACE KID, BRONZE, SUEDE,
CRAVENETTE, VELVET AND SATIN; HAND TURNED
AND WELTED SOLES ; SHOWING THE LATEST
CUSTOM MODELS OF THE SEASON s
$5, $6, $7 TO $10 HPT;
A HNE ASSORTMENT OF BOYS' AND YOUTHS' SHOES;
BUTTON, LACE AND BLUCHER STYLES, FOR SCHOOL AND
DRESS WEAR; MEDIUM AND HEAVY WELTED EXTEN-
SION SOLES; MADE ON COMFORTABLE*
Wi to 1 3J4, $2.50 to $2.75
THE LATEST NOVELTIES IN SLIPPERS AND ORNAMENTS
FOR AFTERNOON AND EVENING-WEAR ARE NOW
A -SUTTER. GRANT AVE. KoeQST STS*»; "

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