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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 19, 1910, Image 2

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FOUR MEN ARE
BROWNED LIKE
RATS IN TRAP
Hulk of Tramp Steamer Sends
Little Craft to Bottom Al
most Without Sound
Captain Plunges Into Water and
Is Rescued After Swim in
Cold Waters
for some time prior to the accident he
was running ahead at slow speed.
Tug Turns Over
. When struck the tug turned delib
erately over on the port side and sank
almost Immediately. While the Sea
Prince is about TO feet over all the
Greystofce Castle is 565 feet long and ;
weighs 3,436 tons. So high is the bow |
0 fthe big tramp that Captain Smith
rould not witness the collision and did 1
not know what had happened until he '.
raw the Sea Prince sinking. The river ;
boat Xapa City stood by and sent two j
lifeboats out, picking up Captain Lang
r^n after he had been in the water al
most half an hour.
'"I cannot account for the accident,"
Faid Captain Smith last night. "The
J^ea Prince has towed us out into the
stream and then cast off and was run- j
ning just ahead of me down the bay.
1 was on the bridge, and when I no
ticed her last she was two points off
The port bow. Either the steering gear
faiJed to operate or the signal must
have b«*en misunderstood, for it" seemed
to me that the tug passed directly un
der my bow. For a second I lost Fight
of her. The next instant I saw the
Hinall boat on its side in the hay off
my starboard bow. It seemed to indi
cate to me that Captain I^angren had
cither been misunderstood or that he
had made an attempt to cross in front
of us and was carried into the bow
by the tide. I reversed the engines and
put two boats out, but it was useless.
The crew were shut in like so many
rats and went down in the deck house.
"This is my first accident on the
• seas and I greatly regret the terrible
fate of the men."
>« TORIES DIFFER
Captain Langrcn declares that in
swad of heJng hit amidships his boat
was hit astern. , "I was piloting the
Greystoke Castle down the bay and was
some yards ahead of her when I real
ised that she had rammed us," said he.
•'The next thing I knew I was fighting
to gt-t clear of the pilot house and to
pave ray life. 1 think the tramp
steamer hit the rear of the tug. . I
made no effort to cross the bow. It
would not have been difficult for the
steamer to have run us down if she
had increased her headway. The crew
was eating at th<* time, and all were
caught in the messroom."
INVESTIGATION PROfeIABKE
It is probable the accident' will be
investigated by tlie harbor authorities.
The loss of the Js«»a Prince amounts to
about $7,000 to the Shipowners' and
Merchants' tugboat company. The
Greyrtbite Castle is a Liverpool boat,
owned by the'J: Chambers company of
that place. She " was under charter
with Balfour, Guthrie & Co. and was
outward bound for Ix»ndon. Liverpool
and Antwerp. She was undamaged.
August Haas, the cook aboard the
Sea Prince, was an old employe of the
Merchants' tugboat company, but had
been idie for aimost.a year until three
montW ago. wh*»n lie took charge of
the g-aliey ahoartl the ill fated tug. He
Ji\<*<i with iiis wife and three small
ohtldrc-n, two boys and a girl, at 2562
Hush slxfot. Ha was 45 years old and
a native of <"i«rrmany.
I'l,A\.\El) THIP HOME
Henry Schmidt, the fireman, was
about ;:7 years old, has a' wife and 2
y<ar old wn in Bavaria, . Germany, to
whom lie seni nearly all his wages
every month. He lived on board the
tugboat. About a wr<--k ago he bought
a ticket for Germany and had given
notice that he would leave San Fran
cisco December 1. He planned to have
Christmas dinner with his wife and
child in Germany, *nd then bring them
to \u25a0 this country, where he had been
working for 10 years to accumulate
enough money to buy a little home. He
always carried a picture of his wife
and child in his inside coat pocket.
The deckhand. I^angren. was known
only as "Ed.V and lived somewhere In
the Mission with his 'mother in law.
He had been married only eight months.
ATTORNEYS OPPOSE
COMMISSION RULE
Municipalities League 'Ends Its
Convention After Electing
Hodghead President
SAN DIEGO. Nov. IS.— This was the
last day of the California Municipali
ties Jr-agup convention, and -it was
marked by the long threatened on
slaught on the commission form of
government. Those city attorneys who
ere opposed to it ..had- their inning
in the lawyers' department this xnorn-
Attorney I^. D. WiiwJrum of Richmond
lfd the assault and wittily described
efforts to apply the recall In his town.
Mayor Hodghead of Berkeley and
others defended the commission form.
Most of the lawyers, however, appeared
to oppose it.. Some wished the mat
ter brought before the league as a
whole. The suggestion was defeated
and the subject was referred to the
next convention.
Officers for the ensuing year were
elected as follows:
President — Beverly It, Hodgbead, mtyor of
Bwkelej.
First rir? president — A. E. Oortson. Satr Diego.
Second rice president — W. T. PrulUrd, Santa
Crv.z. Cal.
Sorretary— H. A. Mason. R«nt« Clirt.
The several sections of the league also
chose their officers.
Then came the selection of the city
In which will be held next year's con
vention. Santa Barbara won, receiving
32 votes to 11 for Visalla and 2 for
Berkeley. Stockton and "WatsonvlHe
did not even vote for themselves but
cast. their lot with Santa Barbara. At
the announcement of the result the
vote was made unanimous.
LOS ANGELES WILL
HAVE AVIATION MEET
L.OS ANGELES. Nov. 18. — It was an
nounced today that plans for a big
aviation meet In Los Angeles January
12 to 22 have been completed, il. C.
Tunison of the American aviation com
pany has been placed in charge of the
preliminary work of the meew
NOTED MEN PLE AD PACIFIC COAST'S CAUSE
MERCHANT MARINE AND EXPOSITION NE E DE D
i Scene at the banquet last night: Left to right, C. C. Moore, Joseph J. Scott, Mayor McCarthy, Covernor Gillett, Frank : B. Anderson, Senator F.
j G. A r ervlands of Nevada and Governor Elect Taster L. Oddie of Nevada. . ,
MERCHANT MARINE
NEEDED BY NATION
Resolutions Adopted by Pacific
Coast Congress Urge Res»
toration of Flag on Seas
The first Pacific coast congress com
pleted Its sessions yesterday afternoon
after going on record emphatically for
the upbuilding ,of an- American mer
chant marine, for better coast defenses
and expressing Its hearty indorsement
of the San Francisco and San Diego
expositions. Portland was chosen as
the next place of meeting and • the
date &et for the second Tuesday in
July.
The deliberations, prooeding 'with the
greatest of peace throughout the day,
assumed a -more- spectacular aspect In
midafternoon " when 'Congressman' Ju
lius Kahn and Henator Newlands of
Nevada plunged into a debate of the
ship subsidy. Xewlands had introduced
a resolution calling, for the construe- ,
tion ft an auxiliary navy. Kahn
jumped to his'feetand declared his
willingness to vote.. for the measure
in congress, but asked Xewlands if he
"honestly believed" his democratic col
leagues would support, the measure.
The senator from Nevada replied that
he generally "honestly believed" what
ever he said, but that he could pledge
only himself and not his colleagues In
advocacy of the proposal.
POMTICAI. DEBATE AVOIDED
The committee on resolutions reported
Newlands' proposition as "inexpedient"
and the congress ratified the report.
The committee had taken the action
I to avoid what threatened to become a
! political debate. The resolution which
inspired the oratory follows:
Resolved, that w-e favor the con
struction -of an auxiliary navy,
composed of transports, colliers,
scouts, dispatch boats, etc., to sup
port the fighting ships in case of
war'; such ships to be used in time
of peace as training ships for our
naval reserves and also for com
mercial purposes in opening up new
routes of trade by lease to ship
ping companies.
Senator Xewlands estimated that-40
ships should be constructed at a cost
of approximately $1,000,000 each.
The morning ' session was devoted
largely to the adoption of a constitu
tion. It provides for three classes of
members — honorary. consisting of
congressmen, senators, governors and
lieutenant governors of the interested
states; corporate members, consisting
of commercial bodies on the Pacific
coast, and individual members.
' -.The resolutions adopted cover a wide
range. -They included merchant ma
rine,, canal tolls, coast defense, high
ways, breakwaters and expositions.
FOR COAST DEFENSES *
The declaration for coast defense
was contained in the following:
Resolved, that we respectfully
urge the congress of the United
States to take immediate steps to
provide naval bases, properly
equipped for the use and ' •main*,
tenance of 'a battleship fleet on the
Pacific coast; . . .
And we further respectfully urge
that the regular army of the
United States be Increased by at
least 25 regiments of infantry with
Proportionate increases in i field
artillery and cavalry, to the end
that our fortlfi?d harbors may be
• protected from land attack and
. the Pacific coast be thus given a
sure guarantee against possible in
vasion.
EXPOSITION INDORSED
The indorsement of the Panama-
Pacific exposition was the most com
plete given the city in the whole
campaign for the big fair. The reso
lutions read:
Whereas, the Panama canal, now
in process of construction, will
have opened to commerce: in the
year 1815. uniting the waters- of-- ; .
\u25a0 the Pacific and Atlantic oceans;
\u25a0 and \u25a0 .
Whereas, there is a unanimous
sentiment that the completion of
this gigantic work should "be cele
brated In a manner befitting the
greatest fcng-inecring achievement
. of man; and
Whereas, this mighty work was
• undertaken by < our -nation- pri-: ,
marily to bring its Atlantic and Y
\u25a0-" Pacific seaboards into close Com-.
\u25a0 munication: v also that' .America
might be in a position to compete
with all nations for. the vast com
.mferce of • the Pacific ocean, on « the
shores of which dwell more than
half the human race; and' . .
\u25a0Whereas, the trade of these peo- '\u25a0 -
, pies can best be developed through •
v our population on our western
shore line;, which is in: proximity, 1
and bound to them by the tie of a \u25a0
common ocean; and . ..,„..,
W,hereas, thenavy, which must -i
Insuro American dignity and power. ' '\
on the Pacific ocean, must have •
its base on Pacific seaports ;- and '
Whereas, it is logical «nd' fitting ',
that an . international, celebration"
. for the purpose of • commemorating ,
the .'union of two *\u25a0 great /.oceans" \u25a0;
should be held on one of ' yiem; and :
; Whereas, " San Francises 'Is •*- the *-'
only seaport city seeking > to;.- hold *^
this celebration;- and „ - '\u25a0\u25a0'\u25a0
Whereas, that city has th'efbl-' '
lowing facts In -her .favor: » Ii /-
Her citizens. have subscribed, for' I
exposition purposes, $7,600,000;- ' '*'
THE SAN PRANCISCa CALi:; NQyEMBER 19, 1910
Hearty Indorsement Given to Exposition and
Better Defenses , Demanded
\u25a0 Her people have voted a bond Is
sue in the sum of 55,000.000, and-for
the advancement of the same pur
pose -the people of the state of
California a tax- l«vy of $5,000.
'OOO, makinfr, without additional
subscriptions, the sum of $17,500,
000: She is the most modern city
in the world, havHig Jbeen entirely
rebuilt within five years; her hotel
accommodation is second only to
New York; her climate is healthful
and agreeable throughout -the 'year;
and her geographical situation'
places her not only in a position
to advance the commercial ambi
tions of the nation on the Pacific,
but would, through an exposition,
'.confer most benefit on our country
owing- to nearness of '• America's
greatest area of. undeveloped lands
and largest unused resources; and
- Whereas, it is the consensus of
opinion' of the president of the
United States, the members of
congress, other officials and citi
zens generally that : an • Interna
tional exposition bft; held, commem
orating that great event; there
fore b*> it
.: Resolved, that we most heartily.
-;' Inriorse 'the" proposed Panama-Pa
cific international exposition to be
held in San Francisco in 1915, -and
. pledge our co-operation and as
sistance; and be it further
Resolved, that all of the sena
tors and representatives -from'' the
Pacific -slope be requested to use
their ' influence to - secure for the
exposition in .San Francisco rov-'
rrnrnentiil Indorsement and-recog
nition; ..
Resolved, that a. copy of thl* pre
amble and resolutions be sent to
senators and representatives in
congress, with a request that they
assist in carrying out their letter
and spirit; and that a copy be also
sent- to the Panama-Pacific inter
national exposition company in
San Francisco, Oal.
MERCHANT MARINE PROPOSALS
The merchant marine resolution was
carefully framed to prevent friction
of. opposing views as to the exact form
the government assistance should.as
sume. The preamble recites the neces
sity of action and the final clause com
mends the subject to congress. These
are the resolutions:
Whereas, American shipping on
the high Beas is today at the low
est ebb. in the history of the coun
try, a condition which Is in the
highest degree detrimental to the
general welfare and our progress
and prosperity- as a nation, as well
as a national- humiliation; and -
Whereas, a strong merchant ma
rine is also necessary as an auxil
iary to our navy, which would be
practically useless in" time of war
without this necessary support;
\u25a0 and - , , \u25a0•.
Whereas, the remedy for this
1 condition lies in. the adoption by
our . country—of the methods ap
; proved and applied for- the build
ing up of over sea commerce by
the most progressive nations of the
world; it is therefore*
Resolved. that this congress
heartily indorses the efforts of the
\u0084 present administration and of the
congress of. the: United States to."
enact a law having for its object a
and purpose the upbuilding of our .
merchant marine and the restore- '*
tion of our flag upon the high seas.
The remaining resolutions adopted
by the congress declare against tolls
of any sort for American ships pass
ing through the canal, urge a coast
wise highway through^ Oregon and
Washington to connect with Califor
nia's proposed, road; favor' the con
struction of a. breakwater . at Monterey
and pledge support to the i San Diego
exposition.
TOXXAGE n UTY ADVOCATED '\u25a0..':
W. W. Bates of Denver, president of
the Shipping society of America, and a
well known writer on maritime topics,
presented a paper on the. merchant
marine. It. was lead by his. daughter.
Bates advocates discriminating duties
Instead of a direct ship subsidy. "His
argument was In^parf as follows :
.. "Customs duties are of two kinds,
tariff and ; tonnage. Tariff/. or' import
duties, apply to merchandise only.
Tonnage duties apply \u25a0 to' vessels only.
For each ton. of vessel admeasurement
the owner pays so .much; on arrival at
any port. Discriminating tonnage du
ties handicap; the "foreign, carrier, while
discriminating tariff; duties
the merchants who . furnish/ the freights
inthe foreign trade unless % they employ
American vessels. '.Thus may
be regulated, both as, to "trade; .'and
transportation, and .foreign-monopoly
of \u25a0 either can jbe ; prevented. /.: '\ =\u25a0 . .
"The"; protection of the ship subsidy
plan is f inequitable as between vessels.
Large', vessels j can v carry '^cheaper ' than
email ones.-, • ; ,'> .-..-.- .. -"*..
EFFECT OK DISCRIMINATION
"With discriminating duties *lt' Is:dif
ferent. : ' , They '. operate \u25a0 to " ; necure em
ployment .by . equalizing -/-footing , for
competition \ for; all : sises of .fthips.'; Ship
subsidy" takesf no thought.: for- and, can
\u25a0not^ of : : ltself 'secure- employment. It
simply, adds ito-rfreightt money,'-: If : by
chance : employment^shalli be' obtained
In competition with^ the foreign
ping "rings »that^ control^ it.' ; Our; carry
ing trade/ has f}decay«d^'<,not^Decause
f relghts^ruled'.tbo^low,- but vbecauseYof
the devices of ourrrivals-^-insurarice dis
criminations, t rrebate;-v contracts ;^.v' and
other " tricks •of • trade-^lhtended * tb^pre
yenr, the employment of \u25a0bur;vessels.. ; :
sharply
iand '. effectually/? operate" :^to ':i frustrate
;foi>«lgn> shipping-.' devices , arid* give; bur
ships: preference -for jour 'own trade is a
false, remedy,' sure to bring faiiure and
disappointment." . . .
KAIIJV DISCUSSES DEFENSES
' Among the.otlrer speakers of the day
were Congressman Bartlett of Nevada,
Congressman Kahn of California, Homer
Lea of Long Beach and George W.
DickleV; / -
/ Congressman- Kahn told of the
strength •of our coast defenses and de
clared, that- the: country was better
prepared than ever. . --/
"Our coast defenses need strengthen
ing:, however,"; said Kahn, "ami th g en
tire congressional delegation has been
urging this upon congress. AYe have
obtained five submarines which can -be
run into our. bays or the indentations
of our coast to offer some measure of
protection. ; The danger at San Fran
cisco Is. from a force that would land
some miles 'away and march upon, the
city. .
. '.'"We need better, naval preparations
as- well on this. coast. I think the time
has come when it is our patriotic duty
to insist that a big drydock be con
structed on San Francisco bay, capable
of handling the largest battle ships In
the navy." • ',; -..".,'. . .V..; *.{ : *j
DEFENSES CALLED HOT AIR- . v
Homer Lea., replying, to Kahn. stated
that our coast defenses consisted most
ly of hot air. ' There' were five separate
ways, he declared, foran'army to -cap
ture San Francisco without firing
PROPOSALS FOR JVAVV
"The Pacific coast defenses are by
no means what they should be,"' said
Lea.- "We are-open to invasion along
the entire \length of the Pacific coast.
The guns on the coast of Washington
and Oregon are placed at" forts not near
any point at which an enemy would
ever attempt to land.
"San Francisco is absolutely defense
less. There are five different ways in
which it might be seized by an enemy
without the firing of a single shot. An
invading "army, could land at Monterey,
seize the San Mateo mountains near
Stanford university. arid sever our water
supply. What does that mean? . Sur
render. It would require intrenchments
40 miles long and a force of 70,000 men
to defend the peninsula.
"An invading army could also come
down the Sausalito peninsula. It would
take Fort Barry without the slightest
trouble, and from there bombard 'the
city.' Its guns from this point would
sweep the whole southern section of
the city. There could be no resistance.
It would-require from 20,000 to 40.000
men to defend the Sausalito peninsula.
One! the enemy gained the slopes : of
Tamalpais, the city of San Francisco
would be helpless."
' Senator Newlands then presented his
plan | for constructing an . auxiliary
navy. He' declared that it had the ap
proval \u25a0of Senator Cummins of Iowa;
one. of the foremost progressives in
the -upper house. .
\u25a0 George W. Dickie presented' an ar
gument for a ship subsidy as against
discriminating duties.
Captain Bates of Denver explained
at length the nature of various bills
he -had framed to afford relief to the
shipping interests.
The delegates to the congress were
guests . last' "evening at a "banquet- at
the Palace hotel. This morning- they
will be taken for, a boat ride about the
bay. :. In the. evening: they will depart
for their homes. : - ;
AVIATOR FLIES HIGH
A MILE A MINUTE
Arch - Hoxsey Gives Exhibition
Under Contract, Disregarding
Opponent's Tragic Death
\u25a0-\u25a0' DENVER. Now 1 8.— A lone aviator,
soaring eaglewise. against ' the' dazzling
background of • the snowclad Rocky
mountains,, today. renilndedilO.OOO; spec
tators' at Overland park of yesterday's'
reckless •. rivalry which : culminated in
.the „ tragic , death \ of " Ra lph ; Johhstpne;
holder of the world's altitude 'record.:
; While *Walterßrookins of the Wright
team was speeding toward Kansas'Clty,'
guarding the body^oflthe'man "flwho, in
Brookins' > . own swords,- "flew as. he
pleased,";; Arch Hoxsey,' whose ; feats
Johnstone-ever sought'to excel, v gave
the two: flights called^fort mi his- con
tract and threw, in -another,-; one : to
please>the management and the crowd.
.: -What Hoxsey; failed to do ? im fancy
work today he made ' up' in speed.;;; Ris
ing at 3:?1 p. m ; he circled to a height
of about 2,000 feet, 1 taking nine minutes
to do Jt.s and then headed northwest
toward ;,the foothills. /. .
/ViHe.t reached"; the field = again; at
; o'clock, t and ; it- was k learned ?. from -his
description i of ,; a lake .'over .which \u0084he
passed n that iihel had; covered* an vesti
mated^distance'of :20. < miles^in r.2o'min
uteg.v Hoxsey estimated ? his t greatest
altitud«iat',3,soo;feet;from"the:groupd,*
\u25a0:or;. 8,700;- feet' above "sea'- level." -'f.-~." *
OFFICERS CHOSEN
BY THE CONGRESS
The Pacific coast congress
adjourned yesterday after elect
ing the following officers for the
ensuing year:
Presldeut —
GOVERNOR GILLETT of Cali
fornia.'
V.i«*e President* —
JOSEPH SCOTT of Los Angeles.
:.\.: .\. B. -HAMiEV of Portland.
T. 1.. ODDIK of Reno.
GOVERNOR WIM.IAM SPRY
of Utah; . ;-,
.1. O. \u25a0\u25a0 IiOW3IA2f| of Seattle.
CAPTAIN E. AV.' JOHNSTON or.
Nome, Alaska. .
JOHN F. KNAPP of Arizona.
-GOVERNOR MILLS of New
Mexico.
GOVERNOR RHADY of Idaho.
GOVERNOR FREAU of .Hawaii.
Treasurer— . \u25a0 ~ ' .
J. B.MoIiVUr.HLI.V of Seattle.
Dlr>rfbrs—
H. P., WOOD of Honolulu.
' F. W. (JEORGEffON of Eureka.
H. J. DARLING of Reno.
S. A. PERKINS of Tacoma.
JUDGE J. F. EM.ISON of Red
Bluff.- ,
CALVIN" A. COBB of Boise.
Idaho. ,
F. C. SAVAGE of Portland.
RUFUS CHOATE of .San Diego.
J.II. JOHNSON of Salt Lake.
J. E.VWICKHAM of I,os An
\u25a0 geles.
FRANK B. ANDERSON of San
Francisco.
ADMIRAL THOMAS PHELPS
- of Mare Island.
fc H. C. CAPWELL of Oakland.
WILLIAM L. GERSTLE of San
Francisco.
SMUGGLER CAUGHT
ON U. S. TRANSPORT
Mrs. M. A. Riordan Has Silks,
Laces and Cloths Worth
$600 Confiscated
Mrs. Maria A. Kiordan, a first class
passenger on the government transport
Logan, failed to declare -$600 worth of
oriental silks; laces and clothe.', which
were seized by Inspector John Toland
and ordered confiscated by the customs
officials.
In addition to losing her finery, Mrs.
Riordan will be compelled to pay a
fine of $1,800 if the goods prove to he
worth $600. -
The Logan arrived from Manila on
Novemberjl3 and" it- was. believed \u25a0* by
the customs j inspectors that everything
aboard-'' which'. was dutiable had been
declared," when Toland discovered the
silks and laces •: hidden. in ~ one. of the
cabins.-. ; ; ;aV; . V
Ill Carve That Turkey|li
_. with one of those keen-^£&
? PS^ - jgff^Br • ' J^^ edged, high grade carvers
.aßfr^ Cs^ town. No line of mer- I;
.'v'lh|^^l cliancli.^e is' more carefully 3
• \u25a0 : •'"^?™^s s .- \^^x^^" " selected than our cutlery.' |
y^S^K Every carving set in.«ur I
1 \^!s^^ VVs< *>v^4w big'stock.no matter what |
\&jp the price, will give you a
'....\u25a0.-\u25a0 : .-- ;J^T more elaborate sets are. I
We have a substantial, well, made carver and fork at . . ( . . .$1.75
'A superior set, both as to appearance and quality of steel, . » \u25a0 I
->at ;....:. : . . . .v. .... \u25a0: y:v.\-v:.\ .... . . .\ . ; . . ... ... . ......; .$2.50
I ; A beautiful set, made especially/for: hard usage, at . . . . . . . . . . 53.50 §
thrde-piecesets^with stag" handles, sterling. silver i
i -_\u25a0_ mountings,*?in; handsome' satin lined case ; a set- that com- 1
i • bines beauty and quality in; a high degree . . . . . . , . . . . '^ ..$5.00 I
Other scts;as;highas $25.00. : : , : • .v" |
TABLE CUTLERY:AND SILVERWARE. |
V; ;V We(carry : aj stock 'unsurpassed in quality and choice of* pat- I
'teVhs'atpfices'.that are right: always: " I
V' : . THANKSGIviNG^DINNER^REQUISITES. I
V NutCrackersrGranberry^nd Pudding Molds,; Turkey Roasters, I
irMeat: Choppers. ** Cake i Cutters and a'hundred other necessary, and- I
?>? > ; ,ijsefull'devices.*' ; ;^feerour.'display ; of " Domestic "and " Imported \u25a0; 1
VUtilities^-Instructive and Interesting 1 . Always glad"*to C^
?&-m V^ y^ :-- :.-^v;.:.:::;A/ :l^ \r .-7.:'\ : '\u25a0 ffi
1 VcOMPLETEioL'TFiITERS FOR KITCHEN AND DIMXG ROOM ' ]
y--> ;.;\u25a0\u25a0' a- 871-873 -Market Street."-- \u25a0 -;ii >-,'.. Opposite Powell. • * % .'\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0* i
ULEASSEMELY
AT PALACE FEAST
Brilliant Banquet Is Given in
Honor of Visiting Con=
gress Delegates (
Pacific Coast Needs Fleet for
Defense, Declares Naval
Continued from Pace 1
own. a country with a population of
400.000,000 industrious and peace loving
people, a country rich in resources
awaiting the touch of the wand of
progress. What is your attitude? What
i^to be your attitude to the great em
pire of China? That is a question I
wish to submit. You must do your duty
there or drop out in the race of na
tions. Your statcsment have already
recognized your duty there. I feel sure
that you^will do your duty.
"Many of you see danger out across
the Pacific, and there may be justifica
tion for this apprehension. But your
relief does not lie in armament.. Fi
nance and commerce have; relegated the
sword to second place.
"The Chinese factor is one you can
not. a/ford to disregard. The time has
passed when methods of force can be
used towarJ the Chinese people. They
must be dealt with through reciprocity
and co-operation. By 'consolidating
your commercial and financial relations
with the Chinese you will do, more to
allay any menace that may appear than
by any force at arm,". You will also
reap the greatest golden harvest the
world has ever known." .
STATESMEN IN
CONFERENCE ON
SENATOR SHIP
Republican Progressives As
semble in Santa Barbara
for Three Days' Session
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SANTA BARBARA, Nov. 15.— Fifteen
or more senators and senators elect of
the progressive wing of the republican
party in California arc holding a three
days* session in Santa Barbara.
While the senators are sworn to
secrecy. Concerning the purpose of the
conference, it was admitted tonight
that they are to lay plans for the next
legislature and probably "decide on the
man they will support for United
States senator.
Governor Klect Hiram "W. Johnson
will arrive tomorrow morning from
fian Francisco, and no "definite action
will be taken until he is consulted.
The senators would not make any
statements as to, their probable choice
for United States senator, nor would
they discuss any tentative action taken
MEASURES DISCUSSED
It was admitted, however, that a
race track gambling Mil had been
talked about. Tomorrow morning the
senators and Johnson will view the
site of the normal school ground, and
it was announced tonight that the
body would recommend an appropria
tion for the erection of the school
buildings. They also will recommend :
an amendment to the good roads law]
freeing districts that have built perma
nent roads from taxation incident to
the $15,000,000 bond issue.
SENATORS AT MEETING
The senators here are: i
E. A. Birdsall, Aubnrn; Miguel Estudlllo.
Riverside: Charles W. . B*»U. Tasadena: Edward
W. .StrovrbridsP. 'Hayward: John Rtetson. AH
meda: B. F. Bush. Smsun: N. W. Thompson. Al
hambra: C. V. Cutten, Eureka; U H. Roseberry,
Sunta : Barbara. \u25a0 ;r--' • - ' \u25a0
Those due tomororw are: \
A. E.. Boynton. Oroville: Marshall Black, Palo
Alto; -I.ee '"Gates and I>*slie Hewitt. Los An-
Keles ;, Doctor Arey. San Bernardino; E. O. Xmt
klns. Visalla, and Lieutenant Governor Elect A.
J. Wallace.
The conference will last until Sun
day night. Tomorrow the party will
be entertained at the Potter Country
club by Senator Koseberry. and in the
evening another conference is" planned.
The party will have dinner Sunday at
Shepards Inn, a resort In the moun
tains, and' the conference will be con
cluded there.
NATIVES TO ENTEHTIN— The n«>xt ent^rtaln
\u25a0 • n»Mif. : and : dance to be Rlv^n by tbe - Satire
S<>ns' and Daughters' literary and social «m
mlttc« -will b«» under the auspices of Swpioia
parlor No. IRQ of the Sons and Xt Veopero
parlnr No.- US ot the Panjrhters. It will be
in Oolden Gate haH next Wednesday crenin?.
ST. FRANCIS
UNION SQUARE
vitcd to inspect the cel-
lars and the new store of
the Importation Company
iust opened in the Geary
street addition to the
Hotel St. Francis.
The company exists
solely because of the de-
mand of clubs, hotels and
private cellars for vint-
ag e s not obtainable
through ordinary sources.
Prices for all standard
brands are as low as
those of any reputable im-
porting firm.
Wine lists supplied
upon request.
1 ci^OiionG l_^OLi*r'dS I \Jn/vJ
At Fountains & Elsewhere
Tho Original and Genuine
MALTED MILK
The Food-drink for AH Ages.
At restaurants, hotels, and fountains.
Delicious, invigorating and sustaining.
Keep it on your sideboard at Rome.
Don't travel without it
A, quick lunch prepared in a mnmte.
Take no imitatios, Just say "HORLKXS."
lit No Combine or Tpu&*
LURLSNE BATH?
BUSH and LARfiDf STBEETS
Branch \
2151 GEART ST.. nr. Derlsadero
| Porcelain tubs inta hot
and cold, fresh and salt
water. Each room fitted !
trlth hot and cold, fresh
and salt water shower. i
"Filtered Ocean Water PLUNSE" j
Comfortablj Heated and Con- I
stantly Circulating.
"Hot Air Hair Drier for
women bathers." Onrown j
Modern Lanndry. Towels 'v
and Salts thorough Ij
washed and sterilized.
IXSPECTIOX Ktrrgn
THE SASITABY TUB and
STTDEttDf 6 BATHS" j
CHICHESTER S PILLS
' V7*»-^t\ I^dle«I A»l!joBfl)ro|r1«if!>f/A
f>}\ C^l Vhl^hts-ter't Diamond lir*ni/A\
CXA&Q&& I'Hls In Red and tioia mtnUicXV/
— »T y fc'Jl boxrs. sealed mith Blue RiJ-bon. \/
It» ISf DIAMOND BSA.XD PI WX for »A
SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE
%* >'l-'|i| |i|H->»>"»H.»i| |ii|'i>ii|.|ii>.Hi> I l§
The CalFs
Branch Offices ;;
Subscriptions and advertise- ?
! ments will be received in -
- San Francisco at the follow- \
; ing offices; •
1657 FILI.MORB STREET
Marks & Fink • . ,
Open until 11 o"clock every night ,
16TH AXD MISSION STS.
. Miller's Stationery Store **;'-; ,
"\u25a0\u25a0-, , 1108 VALENCIA STREET
Blake's Bazaar " '
818 VAN NESS AVENUE
Parent's Stationery Store
2200 FILL. MO RE STREET
Tremayne's Branch I
553 HAIGHT STREET I
Christian's Branch i
1474 HAIGHT STREET i
The Atlas I
, 16TH AND MARKET STREETS i
. Jackson's. Branch --\u25a0, •
... 074 VALENCIA ' STREET \u25a0 f
1 iHßHHalllday's Stationery Store •
. XrNETEBNTH ST. NR. CAST&O *
\u0084 . Maas' Bazaar. TeL Mlaalon 2383 •

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