OCR Interpretation


The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, December 30, 1910, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1910-12-30/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 1

'BACK TO AFRICA !"\u25a0
IS THE CRY OF CALIFORNIA
NEGROES. READ OF THE
GIGANTIC PROJECT IN
THE SUNDAY CALL
VOLU^IE CIX.— NO. 30.
LINE TO AID
ORIENTAL
TRADE
Pacific Will Make
Through Rate From Chicago
and Missouri River Points
tLOST BUSINESS WILL BE
REGAINED BY THIS CITY
of Tariff on Outward
Bound Shipments Will Re
vive Traffic
•MERCHANTS GET CHANCE
TO MEET COMPETITION
transcontinental freight
I bualness between the orient and
!*• the port of San Francisco is to be
restored shortly after January 1, when
the agreement between the Western
Pacific railway anj the Toyo Kisen
Ka.isha (Oriental steamship company)
goes into effect.
San Francisco will regain the busi
ness It lost through the stubbornness
of the freight officials of the Southern
Pacific and the Santa Fe, and the com
petition between San Francisco and
Puget sound ports for this business is
bound to become unusually keen.
Announcement was made yesterday
by Freight Traffic Manager H. 1L
Adams of the "Western Pacific that that
company would publish within the next
few weeks through rates between Chi
cago and "Missouri river points and the
orient, and that the tariff would abide
by the ruling of the interstate com
merce commission and show the pro
portion of the rate received by the rail
road.
More Trade at Lower Rates
The announcement not only comes as
a surprise but is certain to gladden the
hearts cf the merchants who have be-
loss of much of the business
of this 'pojrt.
Since the interstate commerce com
mission ruled that the railroads must
publish their proportion of the through
rate between Chicago' and Missouri
river points and the orient on all
freight shipped through San Francisco,
and since the railroads declined to pub
lish their proportions, San Francisco
has lost the largest part of its out
bounJ oriental business.
Paget sound ports have gained this
business because the Canadian Pacific
arid Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul
railways would not stand in with the
Southern Pacific and Santa Fe. This
decision of the Western Pacific and the
Toyo Kisen Kaisha means a material
reduction in the cost of outbound orien
tal shipments through this port.
Present Charges Are High
At- the present time the rates through
San Francisco, outward bound, are the
established "domestic rates to this city,
plus the steamship company's rates
from this city to destination. The rail
road receives just as much for the haul
from Chicago, St. Louis and west to
San Francisco as it formerly received
for the through haul from those points
to the orient, when the steamship
companies took what they could get
out of it.
Only a few years ago the transconti
nental railroads made the same rate on
paper, beer and other commodities from
points in the United States to Yoko
hama as it ma'Je from the same points
to San Francisco. The eastern mer
chant could ship to Japan as cheaply as
he could ship to San Francisco, not
wftfcJEtan'Jing the fact that the steam
ship company hauled the merchandise
several thousand miles.
For Competition Via Suez
The result of the Western Pacific
agreement, which will become effective
when the Toyo Kieen Kaisha and the
Pacific Mail companies sever their
present relations, will be to bring
nearly all of this ' outbound oriental
business back to S&n Francisco. These
rates, Adams explained yesterday, were
necessary to meet the competition of
the Suez route, although the rates via
the Suez route are not at all stable..
The business that was taken away
from this port by Puget sound will be
regained to a large extent.
Just what the rates will be has not
been determined. Tentative schedules
have been prepared, which undoubtedly
\u25a0will be adopted and make the rates
from Chicago, St. Louis and points
west thereof to oriental ports via San
Francisco the same as those now pre
vailing from those points to the orient
via Puget sound.
Since the order of the interstate
commission the railroads, with the ex
ception of the Canadian Pacific and the
Chicago. Milwaukee and St. Paul, have
published only the inland portion of the
rates. The rates over nea have been
separate and the roads have been re
ceiving as much for the inland haul as
the railroad and steamship company
formerly received for the entire haul.
' 'ovfe percentage received by the
;iship companies since the roads
• '\u25a0;*'&'\u25a0 to publish through tariffs has
«*ri (exceedingly small. Even when
coutlnucU on Page 2,: Column 7
Mrs^D/L Hanbury,
Who Was Robbed:
In Vallejo Home
GEMS TORN FROM
WOMAN'S DRESS
Millionaire's Widow Despoiled
of Diamond Brooch on Her
Return From Party
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
VALLEJO, Dec. 29. — A diamond
valued at $2,000 was torn early
this morning from the waist of, Mrs.
David T. Hanbury, widow of the ec
centric English, millionaire. Avho died
here in October, by a thief who con
cealed himself in her home, threw his
arms about Mrs. Hanbury on her re
turn from a party, siezed the brooch,
threw the woman to the floor and es
caped through the front door. Mrs.
Hanbury was found in a faint by her
mother, Mrs. Mansfield, and assisted to
her bedroom.
At first . Mrs. Hanbury . thought the
attack was a jest on the part of some
of her; friends and exclaimed, "Quit
your foolim ." Whejtjhe thief rij'ix**
her waist ir^ order to rclease~the.gems
she became aware of her peril and
cried oat. .
The thief was evidently hiding be
hind .. the. . .door of the dining room
through' which she passed on her way
to the . kitchen. He threw his arm
about her waist and a napkin over
her eyes, keeping his identity a secret.
The local police have several persons
who were at the house under surveil
lance, but no arrests have. been made.
THIEF BEATS GIRL AND
HER PARENTS WITH IRON
Burglar Trapped in Bathroom Tries to Use Pislol and
Fights His Way to Street With Jimmy
- [Special Dispatch to The Call]
OAKLAND, Dec. 29. — Trapped this
evening in the home of Constant Meese
at 1411 Telegraph avenue by the un
expected return of the family, a bur
glar made his escape after fighting his
way down the stairs, using his jimmy
as his weapon. iHe struck both Mrs.
Meese and her daughter, Miss Grace
Meese,' " with the heavy \u25a0 tool, cutting
their faces and leaving them dazed at
the top" of the stairs." At- the landing
below the burglar. -"used . the Jimmy on
Meese, whom he laid out with a single
blow. • \u25a0 \u25a0 *
"The burglar was ransacking the
room's on ; the upper floor when Meese,
his wife and daughter returned at 8
o'clock. The intruder took refuge in
the bathroom and Grace Meese stepped
to the door, saying, "Come out of that
room."
The burglar threw the door open and
faced the women with the drill -he
FIRE CHIEF HEARD NO "GESUDHEIT,"
AND SNEEZE CRACKED PAIR OF RIBS
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
IX)S ANGELES, Dec. .29.— Kerchoo! 1
sneezed John Todd, battalion .chief* of /<
the flre ( department, in the throes of a i
severei »ld. Kerchoo! and with "a final 1
spasmodic sneeze that shook his frame j
and rattled his teeth, Chief Todd broke \<
two of his ribs. Todd has established 1
his reputation as' champion sneezer,^ of '/-•
the fire department. He contracted a i
cold, became worse and took to his 1 i
FIERCE FIRE THREATENS GREAT
DESTRUCTION AT MESSINA, ITALY
REGGIO DI CALABRIA, Italy, Dec
29:— A fierce fire, which is believed to\
be raging still, has destroyed the/wood
en; buildings around the. harbor at Mes
sina. This information was brought
here today by boat. All telegraphic
and telephonic communication vwith
Messina has tjeen interrupted,.'
- Among the burning buildings are; the
The San Francisco Call.
POISON POWDER
USED BY BURKE
ON ETTA SMITH
District Attorney Tells of Find
ing Arsenic Mixed With
Boracic Acid in Tent
Employe at Sanatorium De
scribes Actions of Physician
Before Explosion
HARRY DAVIDS
[SpeciahDhpatch to The Call]
\u25a0 SA"MTA ROSA, Dec. 29. — Besides' the
charge of dynamiting the tent of- Lv
Etta Smith, evidence was produced at
the hearing oe the trial of. Dr. Willard.
P. Burke today to prove ; that he ; at
tempted to murder the woman 1 by ar
senical poisoning after . the explosion.;
In support of this accusation District
Attorney. Lea, testified; to the finding of
a powder with which Doctor Burke was
treating Lv Etta .Smith for a wound
in her arm caused by the dynamite-ex
plosion and which he said contained a
mixture of arsenic and boracic acid.
Lea was corroborated by Dr. Thomas
Price, professor, of cemistry at the
Affiliated medical colleges' of San Fran
cisco, and by. Dr. J. . W. Jesse and Dr.
S. S. Bogle, the county physician.
Ruling Against Defense
The defense fought hard to eliminatu
evidence regarding the alleged poison
ing, claiming-, that it had -nothing in
common with the crime named in the
indictment. • * . .
Lea argued, '-•however, that Burkes
acts after the explosion were admis
sable to , show the intent, . and Judge
Seawell upheld him.
The sensation of the poisoning charge
was lessened to a great degree by the
common knowledge of it, and interest
waned as the progressing hours
brought forth little more than tech
nical dissertations of the effects of ar
senic.
The expert witnesses seemed to be
agreed on every po'nt, "except the pro
nunciation of the word "wound."
Popular excitement was revived at
the close of the day, .when Earl Ed-
whose legitimacy was questioned yes
terday,' ' was called and" made even
stronger the link connecting Doctor
Burke with the dynamiting. • Thej spec
tators came trooping back to the oourt
room and gave greedy ear to every
word uttered.
Actions Before Explosion
"I saw Doctor Burke," said Edmunds/
"about. 20 minutes before the explosion;
Continued on Page 2, Column 3
used as a jimmy clasped in his. hand.
He drew a revolver from hfs pocket
and pointed the . weapon at Miss Meese,
who stood in front of her mother, and
seized her purse, saying, "Give me. your
diamonds." *
The daughter resisted and the; bur
glar attempted to shoot her, but the
revolver failed to fire. Then he at
tacked the woman with the jimmy.
Their cries brought Meeso into the
house and, after felling him,' the bur
glar escaped through -the. hall window
by which entrance had been effected.
The police trailed the burglar a short
distance by cards from Miss Meese's
purse, which he threw away after tak
ing the money It contained. That was
all he secured.
Constant Meese is a brother of- City
Treasurer Edwin Meese. He Is a mem
ber of the firmof Meese and Gottfried,
iron founders of San Francisco and Los
Angeles. -^ \u25a0
bed. Then the sneezing- developed and
continued until two , ribs"~were frac
tured, and the. service of , a. physician
had become necessary. The, fire com
mission today took official .cognizance
of . Todd's sneezing ability by allowing
him a\ 10 days' leave in
which to recuperate. Todd is still con
fined " to his ; bed,; but he no ' longer
sneezes. HHS^'' '
postoffice, the telegraph office an^ ; the
railway station. _ r When the .boat was'
dispatched from Messina 'the -fire was
Slaking rapid' progress. : Troops had
bjen. called out ~ini arujeffort to keep
of r the .lowri.' : :\u25a0:.-\u25a0: \u25a0:.-\u25a0 -';-.: - -.'-I-./ \u25a0'-'. ; )'\u25a0 -'-'~<]a : ::' .
' No fear ; was . entertained at' the. time
for Ui c - 'Am er I can \qua r ter, which Is
about "a mile distant^." ~ * ;'\u25a0 :;:;'; -\u25a0 ;•
SAN FRANCISCO^ 30, 1910.
POLITICAL PAST
IS DEAD, SAYS
HIRAM JOHNSON
Governor Elect Will Condemn
No Man on Basis of Former
Affiliations
Legislators at ; Conference Cheer
Inspiring-; Speech :'6f State's
NextlExecutive
GEORGE A. VAN SMITH
No man wlll^Ve condemned on the
basis of fbfmerV-political- affiliations.
Every man will* be measured- by '}. his
deed^ and not by. his professions. Every
man will be accepted^s a genuine serv
ant of the people, imbued with' the de
sire to make government • responsive ',' to
the people and-vthe' -people, only, until
he shall prove the contrary by his: own
acts. The foregoing; epitomizes Hiram
W. Johnson's greeting of the members
of the legislature" yesterday. '•\u25a0
Governor elect >;KiramW. Johnson's
brief speech to (thejlegislatiye confer
ence was as inspiring as it was unex
pected by the > great majority 'of the
men who heard fand cheered it. They
expected him to ltalk. about bills, about
the conferenceVand ; its work or, its
Continued on"; Page 2. ; Column 4
MEMBER OF BOYS'
CLUB DIES IN EAST
Columbia Park- Pupilt Expires of
'%\u25a0 \ Heart Disease While in :
CHICAGO,- -Dec. 29.— Harry
of .San Francisco, died suddenly., here- to
day in' the swimming"' tank; of 'the Cen-'
tral T. M.'C. A. ;, Hastings was" a mem
ber of the Cokimbia Park boys' club "of
San Francisco, -which, is; touring: the
country appearing at Y. M.'.C A. gather
ings. .\u25a0 k \u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0•\u25a0•\u25a0'\u25a0\u25a0/\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0•\u25a0-;' , . .. '\u25a0
Hastings was 14 years old, a musician
and an athlete. . " • j ' *,' '
The boy with -several other members
of ithe club \u25a0 had been in the Y ta.nk some
time and; had;asked<his friends to wait
for his "last dive." ; The body' failed to
rise, and when it had been : recovered
Hastings was dead. Physicians ' say
death was due to heart disease.'
Family Receives .News
- Harry Hastings ! was the'son of Harry
J. Hastings, a'book bindej'livingrat 13l!
Jersey street. The news of .Harry's
death 'reached the family!: last .night
through a- telegram -Jsent !\u25a0\u25a0 by Sidney'-
Peixotto, : in' charge it \u25a0• the' Columbia/
Park ; boys on ; thelrjeajtern trip. ;
The boy attended ' the Horace >Mann^
school, in-this city; ;£hree years ? ago
hefjoihed/th^icolumb^j^rklboys'/or-'
ganization,. being one; tf its best music
ians. Frequently, : he knd _ his
Emile, accompanied' sc*utlng • parties ; -Vo
other, towris.v '.• .; -I; - • ; > \u25a0:[
\u25a0 Besides Emile thjre is : another
breather, Clarence,;; 12 {years \ old.; The \
sad riaws has^ prostrated. Harry's pa- j
rents.'the brothers'and two.sisters. - |
CANAL pORTIFKjATIONis
TO BIE I QIBI^LteRLIKE
Guns, Batteries a^^iyiinesWiil
Be^ Strongest Possible
: [Special: Dispalclv to \Thc Call] . /'
; ;wASHmC^ON^Dec!;29.--.The /Pana
ma v 1v 1 canal '-wilY '^e-^d-tifled withX the
heaviest, most^modem "most; approved
"arid|most:complete : gi|i<;, :>^
sy s tem?. of *m i nes :.; k rit wii to ..' military'a ry '
science;;;.. /;,-\u25a0 . ;;.r, ''\u25a0V-'\^-'|-'-"'"- '" ; '?& ' ; -
Every detail^ of j.tliejiians. the 'nationali
board of .: :. defense iworred ; out for the
protection "of the. caual;v;ilP<beicarried'
through.*," '' - \u25a0*" ;r':-"; r':-" V : -- : • " ,'".
'4rcfrffl? x ?. e &^^
BARGAIN SALES ARE NOT
FOR THIS POOR WOMAN
* r ? n -Hearted Judge Prohibits Shopping, for a Year, just
Because She Stole a Bit of Silk
Swimming
LOS ANGELES, -r Dec. v 29.— Sentenced
by .v an judge- to ;keep out
of all department stores for a year/and
just when; the -big; reduction, sales v *are
at^ hand, the' world*iooks^ dark to. Mrs.
Mari a • Fernandez,"^wh o U was convicted
today of stealing silk from one , of the
shops. \u25a0\u25a0'••;•' \u25a0> • • •'.
When arraigned I for :sentence : Mrs.'
10 PER CENT WAGE INCREASE GAINED BY
WESTERN CONDUCTORS AND TRAINNEN
. CHICAGO, Dec. ,2»:— Wage demands
of conductors and trainmen employed
on 50 western- railroad systems were
settled today ; on the basis of an; in
crease of 10, per cent.; The agreement
was reached at a conference late, in
the; afternoon and the ; new rates of pay
took effect at once.
FJy the "increase granted $5,000,000 " \u25a0
annually "will be added "to '.the? pay rolls ;\u25a0"
of the -roads involved- and .75,000 em
pioyes will be affected.- -.
.: Coupled with the settlement of 2tHe^
engineers 1 j demands < last Saturday, \thV "'
present '•\u25a0 agreement - makes a \u25a0 total of
$9,000,000 annual wage increases grant
ed by the, railroads, in Chicago, confer-,
enceS;Wlthin a'week.- ;
- The: settlement- virtually.marks, the '
end^of'the great wage movement be- \u25a0;
SALOONMEN TO EVADE LAW PLANTOWN
6 MILES LONG AND 300 FEET WIDE
• Dec. 29.-^-Saloonmen -in the
county^ out6idej the" incorporated Uowns
haver :a';uniq'ue ;: plan:-!f or /evading, 1 the.
new: county; ordinance (prohibiting' sa7 :
loons. and' diye'srou'tside of , incorporated
jtowns." ..: ' \u25a0'- ' \u25a0\u25a0'-'' -\u25a0\u25a0 -•\u25a0•\u25a0< \u25a0. '- <V-'.
" ;; It is : ; proposed ;to^layj-out;a ; rewtown,
i^rniles^ Jons : and", 300 ..feetj^iwidei in ;
pla'ces,'\o; include the saloons '.'whose ex-;
istent'e>is threatened. 1 " : The "View r town
MT. WILSON IS CROSSED
HOXSEY HAS ICY FLIGHT
' Relative position^ of ' Aviator Hoxsey over Mount Wilson.
• , : [Special Dispatch to The ', Call]
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
'-,; [Special* Di/paich'jo The Call]
Fernandez asked to be Placed on pro
bation: .The' court" consented, but made
the provision,! that the woman must not
enter a dry* goods store for a" year."
\lf.she wishVs to make a purchase she
must .send another person inside the
store while she r.emains outside gazing
helplessly at the bargrains displayed
in the show windows!
gun by railroad employes of the coun
try more than a year ago.
;: "A demand of 15 per cent r wasV ~* c "
sented originally and this wa y scaled
down until the Yallroads ; jffered a
raise of 10; per .cent. In, ** eturn for
tMs proposition the cop iuctors aad
tfainmen withdrew > derr inds f or cer
tain^ rules- covering- conr 11 -? 113 of ;em
ployment. and other i inf""® 1 " 8 : affecting
theVemployes. The • set* •«nent includes
;In all brar. 2hes of tn ® ' train
service.- '."",• ' t :'"'" ; '•' - ' . i
' ; Eyer>- . importat^ railr , oad system;
'beginning with t ie > , Illlnois Central
lines, 1 operating ; f est to the ; Pacific
coast and from Po* A ? tnur C Ontario, f n
the 'north, fncludli? the Canad . iai » Pa
cific and ' the ; Canaclf n N ?rthern, to the j
gulf -of Mexico "andf he R - 10 G raride, lis I
party to the settlenf"*- '
would include Edgewr, 11 * 11 ' and Igrerna,
\u25a0villages ; in opposite,i;v ec H on^ °? . he
county; and /several i : '^?'°H se ? be^?, en
the, villages/ By i/^orporating . as a
town the saloonmer uld c °ntrol the
town ordinances . , ( * nd ' : retain-* "their
licenses. • )
: Tlie ;saloonmen( propose to -build . a
bpuieva'rd;toconr* ct all sectlo is of .the
proposed town • sld5 Id Pf omlse °° increase
in taxes.' - •"/' • "^
*y£S7^Qi4i^/^e3Lfc^^^rc, 52;
low'esr^^^^^^^^^^^^^
\u25a0FORECAST^6IfT6 l S^--ClQud^ with
* showers; moderate south wind; warmer.
PRICE -iFIVE CENTS.
AIRMAN SEES
SNOW PEAK
4,200 FEET
BELOW
Aviaior Soars Over Bearing
Orange Groves to Frozen !
Mountains in 1 Hoar
and 28 Minutes
WRIGHT BIPLANE CARRIES
THE INTREPID BIRDM
Hazardous Flight Made Throaj
Heavy Pall of Zero Vapor
Fined With Stinging
Particles of Ice
CALIFORNIAN NARROWLY
ESCAPES DEATH IN CRASH
Hoxsey's Feat Greater
Than Crossing Alps
Hoxsey** flight exceeds in
duration, distance covered end
altitude the sensational flight of
George Chavez over the Alps
September 23, in accomplishing
"which the aviator n>as fatally
hurt.
. Chavez rose to a height of
7,300 feel, starting from Brig.
Switzerland. He was endeavor
ling^ta reach Milan, Italy, and
thus win a prize of $20,000 off
fered by the Aviation Society of
Milan., when a gust of wind ,
wrecked his machine above Dom
odossola, Italy, 50 miles north
of Milan.
Chavez had previously broken
the then altitude record by rising
8,409 feet at Issy, France.
AVIATION*FIELD, LOS AN
GELES, Dec. 29.— Adding to
the laurels he has already worf
in the present meet, Arch Hoxye^i
holder of the present world's, altitude\
record of 11,474 feet, today flew over!
Mount Wilson, the highest peak* of]
the mountain range which rims thejl
valley in which Los Angeles. Pasa
dena and the towns of the orange, bell; 1
He. Under ideal weather conditions,*
he soared 10,005 feet into the sky and
cleared the crest . of Mount Wilson
with 4,200 feet to spare, and returning
here landed safely, but nearly frozen. 1 ,
Lieutenant Vernon Boiler and sev
eral other army officers, who are. here;
to see the sights, were quick to ob
serve in Hoxsey's performance a ne\r \
way of transporting armies . across <\u25a0
mountain range**'' an< * predicted" the
early relegafi^ 111 ?f the army mule as
an essenti-* 1 ' * n scaling heights.
Army Cross Alps.
~Lieuf enant Boiler, who came here .
from ort Whipple, Arizona, said. that
a biplanes could transport an
arr 13 *^ °' I°.ooo men across mountains
as 'high as the Alps in a day.
,' Hoxsey used a heavy stock Wright
biplane, equipped for passenger serv
ice, and he made the journey from the
field •; to. a point beyond the mountains
in 1 hour and 28 minutes. The dis
tance traveled in going is estimated /
at 34' miles. On an air line the distance /
from the field to the is^
less than that, but Hoxsey circled over
the field until he had reached his maxi
mum height before he pointed the nose \
of his machine toward the raiigei He
was out of sight s of the crowd beWe \u0084
he made -the attempt at topping the
peak, but prior to starting he-had an- -«
nouncedhis intention to do so. \u0084.
Flies: in Freezing Air
*\u25a0 The news of hl3" success was; flashed
tp aviation field by telephone from the
Qarnegie solar Observatory on Mount
Wilson," directly above which the avi
"sctor. sbareVL
**' £1 t^-was- fearfully cold, and , when I
got! to* a point just above tn « summit
I; f^und' that , the' haze, which obscured
the, .mountains from - the aviation field,
wa s a heavy ' pall of : vapor filled . with '\u0084
fine ice . particles that stung my ; facei '
I am certain that if I had had a re- <
cording thermometer with me, it would
have shown the temperature '-.of th©^
upper, altitude -to be» far below zerV *a
However, hurdling , mountains -Is m^
easier than climbing 11,000 feet /
a- valley or the sea. The earth hi
not seem so far away."
Craft Crashes to .Earth
Hoxsey's \u25a0 performance was $/
interesting feaV accomplished tali

xml | txt