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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, March 17, 1911, Image 1

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BEST REAL ESTATE ■ ■ f" i ■ | /fe
BEST COMMERCIAL II
BEST THEATRICAL |l| !■ I IV
BEST MARINE 111 If If 1 I
BEST SPORTS II
BEST LABOR
. In THE CALL..
VOLUME CIX.—NO. 107.
BUCKET SHOP
GOES AMID
SQUEALS
Police Committee Votes to Re*
port Bill to Board of
Supervisors
OPERATOR MOSS IS
BITTER AGAINST THE CALL
Herget Retorts That Traffic Is
Not on Square and Ought
to Be Wiped Out
"ONCE IN POLICE COURT
AND WE'RE GONE," IS CRY
BY UNANIMOUS vote the police
committee of the board of super
visors decided yesterday to
recommend for passage the
much discussed municipal ordinance
to wipe out the bucket shops.
The outlaw traffic found only a single
defender, and that was H. A. Moss, chief
fit ' the '■rooked band. He struggled:
violently to prevent action, subsiding
only after Supervisor Herget. chairman
of the committee, had asserted bluntly
that upon Moss' own admissions he be
lieved the business to be crooked.
ThiK opinion received unexpected but
expert and somewhat intimate con
firmation when .7. A. Morris, publicity
spent- for Mobs, openly characterized
the operations of his chief as a form
of stealing.
The session of the committee was
enlivened, by pointed exchanges.' and
occasional Vycursioni far afield.
Moss Cries Loudly
• .Moss had repeatedly challenged the
faith, in which the ordinance was pre
sented and had protested that he alone
would be injured by its passage, pro
ifssinff at the same tim« integrity and
..legitimacy in the methods of his estab
lishment. Finally IJerg-et Interrupted-;
If.m. '■■*■••■■ ■ *..'-;.'——''—'~~ •'
"Mr. Moss," the, supervisor said, "I
know what a bucket shop is. I know
what graft is. 1 know what legitimate
business is.
"This ordinance knocks out the
bucket chops and not legitimate busi
ness. If you are doing a legitimate
business, as you-&"ay,"you have nothing
to fear.
"As a supervisor of this city, I in
tend to protect the unwary as far as
that can be done. I know the bucket
shops are crooked and I know the
stock and bond exchange is on the
level."
"Yes, It's Crooked"
"Do you mean to say," demanded
Moss, "that you believe ours is' not a
legitimate businessl?"
"Yes," Herget answered. "If you say
that your establishment Is a bucket
it is crooked."
"But we are the one house and the
only house 1 affected under this ordl
' r 'ss 1 complained.
"This ordinance aims at nothing ex
cept Illegitimate business," replied Her
get. "If your business is legitimate,
it will not be Injured. If it is not
legitimate, It will be injured and ought
to be. That Is all there is to the whole
matter."
Moss was represented by I* S. Moi
sted, an attorney, who added his prot
estations to those of his client.
In his opening^ statement, Moisted
j*sked for further time. Herget re
{ponded that the committee already
granted Moss four' hearings and was
prepared to act without further post
■ ponement.
Honest Men Unhurt
He pointed out the elimination
of the' single section in the- bill
to which exception had been taken
on the ground that legitimate busi
ness might be hurt. As the revised
ordinance stood, there had been com
mon agreement that no honest en
terprise could suffer under its provi
sions. .
;>on launched upon a
il denunciation of all who had
Kponsorf-d or ' ordinance.
1 that the regular broker-
I exchanges through
eted Mius' busi
• stablished boards and
were maintained by fraud
is and that in particu
lar i: r t(utton & Qo. and The c»)l
were in league to destroy the Mom
buck«tabop.
isiness is legitimate.
, as you M y it is," inquired He.rget
you object to the or
dinance? Legitimate business
rmpt from interference."
Once Raided, Goodby
•■Because th«j- can raid us. And once
raided and in the police court, our
business is gone," replied Melsted.
"But they cannot make fish ©1
and flesh of the otlu 'erget,
•and raid you if your business is leg
itimate, you "ill hr iafe if
c square."
At this point, Moss himself rose tv
his fraszled defense, n
\oted himself largely to in;
Continued on l'age 4, Column 4
THE San Francisco CALL
Pink Pajama Girl
Is Reported Bride
Of Grahame-White
[Special Cable to The Call]
LONDON,^ March 16.— Miss
Pauline Chase, the actress, and
Claude Grahame-White, the avi
ator,' were married iii New York
is the constant rumor here.
The report gives the date of
the wedding as Immediately after
Grahame-White arrived in Ameri
ca last August.
Grahame-White has an aviation
school at Herndon, near London,*
where he uses chiefly biplanes
made- by the Curtiss-Burgess
company. of Marblehead, Mass.
He has cleared an aviation
field of 250 acres, ai».i tried to
persuade the Royal aero club to
hold the international aero meet
for the James Gordon Bennett
'up there, but it refused.
AGED WOMAN IS
SERIOUSLY HURT
IN AUTO CRASH
Mrs. Fisher. Mother of H. C.
Stratton, Victim of Collision
With Trolley Car
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
OAKLAND. March 16.—Howard C.
Stratton, secretary of the Palmer oil
company of San Francisco; Mrs. U M.
Fisher of Spokane, his mother, ami
Mrs. .1. P. Marley of San Francisco, a
friend, were thrown from an automo
bile and injured this afternoon when
the machine in which they were riding
was struck by a Orove street car. Mrs.
I age. was
taken to the Kast Bay sanatorium,
where j condition.
nnrttr (Jm can of a
physician at the Sandringhain apart
cfsco.
rioui.
in his
car and was taking his tti I
Mrs. Marley for an afternoon ride
about Oakland. His mother was visit
ing him from Spokane and his trip
was arranged specially for her enjoy
ment.
Km Stratton swung from Fifty-eighth
street into Grove at a high rate of
sp^f-.l he came into collision, head on,
with a southbound Grove street car.
The occupants of the auto were thrown
from their seat?, the front of the vehicle
was tern away and the Render and for
ward end of the trolly car were crushed.
Mrs. Fisher an.) Mrs. Marley, who hn<l
occupied the tonneau of the auton
were hurled several feet into the
Stratton had been able to steady him
self somewhat by grasping the wheel.
By a strange circumstance no one on
the streetcar was hurt.
Passengers hastened from the car to
summon r>r. E. A. Majors, who lives
in the neighborhood. He found Mrs.
Fisher's condition such as to demand
immediate attention. At the East Bay
sanatorium it was stated that Mrs.
Fisher was suffering from a possible
dislocation of the shoulder, an injury to
skull, which appeared to be a frac
ture, and numerous cuts and bruises.
BtrattOfl and Mrs. Marley recoypred
sufficiently from the shock during the
afternoon to enable them to cross the
bay to their homes in San Francisco.
Mrs. Marley Resting Easily
At the Sandringham apartments at
11 5 2 K.idy street It was stated last
night that Mrs. Marley was resting
easy. Phe is suffering from a seven
injury to her hip and is under the care
of Doctor lagan. Mrs. Marley is the
landlady at the Sandringham. The
apartment house belongs to Howard C.
Stratton, secretary of the Palmer oil
company, and hp makes his home there.
Mrs. Fisher, Stratton's mother, has
been his guest during the |m 1 £*w
days at the apartment hou
Stratton is connected n<-,r
the Palmer oil company, but with sev
eral other large corporations. His of
fices are in the Crocker building. He
was able tr. Hp about last evening and
will suffer no
from the aciidpnt.
' The automobile, which was recently
purchased by Stratton, is a complete
wreck.
SKELETON OF CHILD
HIDDEN IN CHIMNEY
Bones Pound in Keg Apparently
Many Years Old
•SPRINGFIELD, Mass., March 16.—
Workmen installing a new heating
plant at the home of Alva S. BraJn
erd in Hazardville found a keg in the
old fashioned chimney containing a hu
man skeleton. The remains were those
of a child which possibly had been
disemembered or partly /cremated." The
house was occupied in the eighteenth
century and up to' 5 ]«,:<? i, v a family
which served in the Revolutionary war.
After 1832 another family occupied the
place. The general opinion is that the
keg was placed in the chimney when
the latter was rebuilt in 1830:
SAX FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1911.
Mexican Revolt Fast Honeycombing Whole Nation
Madero and His Insurrecto Forces Are Winning Daily Victories
ARRIVAL OF FIRST UNITED STATES TROOPS AT THE BORDER FOLLOWING THE ORDER FOR MOBILIZATION.
Snapshots of the Fourth United States cavalry and machine gun battalion near El Paso just after they arrived there. These were the first of
the 20,000 troops ordered out for the mobilization manoeuvers to reach the Mexican border. They are in command of Colonel E. Z. Steever, who is
directing the patrol along the border between Noria, N. M., and Polvo, Tex. The Fourth came from Fort Meade, S. D., and Fort Snelling, Minn.
BANKERS INDICTED
FOR LAND FRAUDS
Nine Charged With Conspiracy
Involving Alaska Coal Depos=
its Worth $10,000,000
CHICAGO, March 16.—Nine men, in
cluding a former railroad president,
bankers, brokers ami financier's; were
Indicted by tho federal grand jury
today in the Matanuskn river coal land
cases. The. men ai" charged with con-lj
spiring to defraud t! states
government out of 10,fl of coal
lands valued at 110.000
Those Indicted
A. <'. Front, former presldi nt of the
Alaska Northern railway, farmer presi
dent and promoter of the-Chicago and
Milwaukee electric road and president
of A. C, Frost & Co,
for A. C. Frost A
Pierre <;. Bench, Chicago, former sec
retary of the Alaska Northern railway
and secretary-treasurer of the Krost
company.
rriink WaiKon. Spokane, v
George A. Ball, Muncie. TmJ , said to
be financial backer of Frost.
11iin<-nn M. Stewart, Reward, Alaska,
formerly manager of the Southern Bank
of Toronto, ■
Hnrry « . Onhorne, Toronto.
(i«ynne 1,. Franc!*, Toronto.
I'rnncU H. Stewart, Toronto.
The last three are hankprs and
brokers.
There ate two count! in the indict
ment, which is drawn under what is
known itAtute. The
penalty pr" Ot $10,000 or
imprisonment for two vnrs on all
counts.
The land which the men are charged
with having conspired to gain.is located
on the Matanuska. river, in Alaska,.ex
tending east from ,the Chickaloon. river
to Kings river. and land on the 'north
side of the Ma'tanuska river and In the
vicinity of Moose creek. There are two
separate tracts, known as the Watson
group of coal claims and the Matanuska
coal company group. •
MILLIONAIRE FRANK
WORK DEAD AT 92
He Was Father of Mrs. Burke*
Roche and Leaves $20,000,000
SEW ,'YORK, March 16.—Frank
Work, the - multimillionaire^ railroad
man and father of Mrs. Burke-Roche.
died at his home here today, of? pneu
monia. He was 32: years .1 ami it is
understood' leaves an'cstute amounting
to $20,000,000 -,- ; ;.:,,
PHELPS GETS HALF
OF WIFE’S INCOME
Remarkable Postnuptial Agree*
ment by Society Woman
, Revealed in Court
[Special Dispatch lo Tie Call] _
NEW YORK; Marches.—A remark
able post' nuptial '^agreement between
Charles" Harria Pli.plps,. of' New ' York
and Paris, and Mrs/Eleanor Pell Phelps.
a leader of Americkn'isociety in 'Paris,'
was ! filed today in the supremo court.
It discloses that Mrs, 1* Phelps, a mem
ber of the'famous family "of New
York,, and one of ■: the." richest heiresses
of this city at the time she wedded,*
contracted to pay her. husband half of
her largo i!<-ome ■.e'aeiiiyear in order to
patch up their marital disagreements
and assure- her the companionship of
Harris, Livingstone Phftlps, ■ her son.
The papers on tile in court here show
that Phelps is trying, to fore,, his wife
to pay him half of .her-$50,000' annual
income, which ;she, has held up since
their separation last July.
VALLEJO HAZERS TRICE
VICTIM TO TOMBSTONE
Sophomore Has Company of
Ghosts for Half an Hour
[Specia/ Ditpalch io The Call]
VALLEJO. March 16.—Mervin Far
mer, a sophomore of the Vallejo high
school, was kidnaped last night by
freshmen, taken to the Carquinez ceme
tery on the Benicia road and tied to a
tombstone. Farmer was rescued by his
.lussinates after about half an hour.
FAST TRAIN HURLS MAN
30 FEET WITHOUT INJURY
He Lights on Top of Swinging
Signboard
(7TXCA, X. V., March 16— Matthew
Bowers of Amsterdam was struck by
the Twentieth Century Limited here
shortly before midnight and escaped
with a scratch. The wagon in which
he was riding was demolished, but
Bowers landed lightly on top of a
swinging signboard 30 feet away.
FARMER, KICKED IN HEAD
WHILE HIDING $5,000, DIES
; - GLASGOW.Mont., March. 16.--Charles
W. Cole," a Princeton, 111,; farmer, died
in a local hospital today as a result of
being, kicked on the head by his horse
in a boxcar while trying to hide a
money belt containingl^ss,ooo,vbecause
he' thought robbers'were' after him. :. [
WORKLESS MEN MAKE FALSE
OATHS TO GET U. S. JOBS
•. The government's prosecution of men
who made false) affidavits before" the'
federal civil service in „an effort to'
obtain /^ork brought two j cases. of
pathetic interest to the notice of Judge
Dietrich : Jn-'"th't r Ukifte'd *States *• district
court yesterday' : \ *..
H. S. Wiliits, a -.former; soldier, who
applied' for a Job as 1 carpenter, 'told the
'court tHat lie A was the sole support of
an aged mother, although his wife;
might.be able, to, support herself if he
were .made, to servo S his *CO day' sen
..,„ : ■*■«„:. * 1 *••'•■ I' ■; "j „. . ■■.■■■■■■■ ;
HELLO GIRL, MORSE'S COUSIN,
GETS'S 100,000 AND QUITS
[Special Dispalch to The Call]
LOS ANGELES. March 16.'—Pretty,
May Morse, cousin "of Charles".W. "Morse,-,
former Ice king'of'New'York,-was a
telephone, girl at"the l>ankershim hotel
yesterday. Today she is. the possessor
of $100,000 and is on her way east: to
DEER CLOG S. P. WHEELS TILL
THEY ARE SHOO-ED OFF TRACK
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
WEED, March 16.—A herd of mule
tail deer held up the southbound
Klamath Palls express on the Southern
y yesterday afternoon.
The deer ran on the track ahead of
the train 20 miles south of Klamath
»6,000,000 SAVED BY
CHEAPER LIGHT BULBS
Government Suit Causes Reduc
tion of 33 1-3 Per Cent in Price
WASHINGTON. Marrh 16.—As the
first direct result of the government's
anti-trust suit against the socalled
"Electric Lamp Trust," the department
of justice has received intimations that
the prices of all electric light bulbs
will be reduced 33 1-3 per cent all over
the Vnited States. By such a cut in
present prices, people who buy the elec
tric tamps will save more than $6,000,
--000 a year.
FREIGHT ' STEAMER' ASHORE Vtlparaipo,
; ■ Chile' ARirrh 16.— British \ freight it«axni>r
Cacliiur Is I ashore ■; in s I.s j Uartija climmel In
;. < n<>tn Anctui t and v Puerto f Montr. ' r Hpr } posi
tion ;i« a dangerous one and assistance lias
OispatcUed. - ■ .
THE WEATHER
yESTERDAY — Highest temperature, 58;
/^ lowest Wednesday night, 48.
FORECAST FOR TOD AY—Fair, with
some fog; light south wind, changing to brisk
west.
tence.''; The . judge;:took his ■ case into
consideration,for .another day. .
• Charles* Clifford, a plumber, only 24
years old, with a wife and two babies,
the youngest five weeks old, said he
could not spin, admittance Into the
plumbers*--union on account j'of* its
charter being closed, . He was told by
a friend that he' could fill out the
blank. - > . » » . : , „ ■ -•
■ The United States, attorney's 1 office
was willing to'drop" the cases,,but the
government called for action. ■ .
claim the fortune, :On .leaving her
switchboard for .the day. Miss Morse
was Informed that th« had fallen heir
to" $100,000.- her 'share in "the estate of
Mrs.- Benjamin Morse t of -Bath,.* Me.,
which has,been* instigation for years.
She; promptly 'resigned. \
Falls. The engineer was forced to stop
the train.
The train crew drove the deer, from
the track. They, scrambled down the
grade and crossed a 'lake- near the
track single file. .
VANDERBILTS GIVI£ FIRST
AID TO INJURED WOMAN
Vestibule of Mansion Is Made
Into Hospital for Seamstress
NEW YORK. March 16 The vesti
bule of William K. Vanderbilt's Fifth
avenue residence was turned into a
temporary hospital last night for Mrb.
Mary Cunningham, a seamstress, who
had been knocked down and seriously
Injured by an automobile. One of the
Vanderbilt automobiles touk the woman
to a hospital.
• _—
BAIXINGEK NOT PEAKED—Si*ik«t)f> March
■ Hi.—Whan resolutions ' Indorsing - ih,. „-,,r , | "»>f
It. A.-liallingpr secretary «ifthp Interior
; were; lotrridnrcd at « mod ins :of tbe Spokane
htr asß'"- itition .last nitrbt * a % bcatci) diKeiijwioD
. ;ir<**. .which for a time threatened to fllsruDt
Hip »Ksociatlou. l"he re»olutiuu was not
. adopted. • • .
...■■■■■'■ i i ■ . ■ . „ . ■
PRICK FIVE CENTS.
MEXICO CITY
ONLY SPOT
UNSHAKEN
BY WAR
Strict Censorship by Diaz Keep?
the World in Ignorance of
Growth of Strife of
His Subjects
CAPITAL HELD IN CONTROL
BY IRON HAND OF TROOPS
Limantour Rushing Home With
Money Bags of Wall Street
to Put Down Rebels and
Guard Interests
"DEATH TO AMERICANS,"
SAYS CREEL'S TELEGRAM
Mexican War Status
Told in Brief Form
i|
All of Mexico rising against
Diaz. i
Strict ; censorship keep* • world In *
,- ignorance .. of Insnrrecto vic
tories. .; . ■ :„„■■■ . '--~-'i—'
Wall • street sends money to pot
' ilann rebellion. '
American ■ soldiers of : fortune to
be put to death;
Japan orders 1,500,000 ; ton*' of
coal.
Smallpox breaks out in Mexican
troop* In Lower California.
InHurrectoH -demand Diaz resign
as price of peace.'
mnntor drops from night after
report he has arranged armis
.' tice; his private car occupied by
.another.' - -
IRA E. BENNETT
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
WASHINGTON, March 16.—
Dispatches to the war de
partment from various
United States consuls in
Mexico indicate that the revolution is
spreading.
It is intimated that the Mexican au
thorities arc keeping from the out
side world the seriousness of the sit
uation. The revolutionists under Ma
dero are said to have won a number of
important engagements, the news of
which has been suppressed.
Arms and ammunition that are
being received by the revolutionists
are not all from the United States. It
has become known that German firms
are sending arms to Madero. delivery
being made at points along the coast.
Mexico City Alone Quiet
According to the recent advices, the
revolution is rampant all through
Mexico, with the exception of the cap
ital itself. The fact that that city is
quiet is beiiv? made the most of by
Diaz as proof that the insurrection is
not of a general character, ffhe bulk
oi the Mexican army is being main
tained in Mexico City.
The reported sudden return of
Finance Minister Limantour to Mex
ico is understood to have been at the
suggestion of a number of financiers
in New York who are heavily inter
ested in Mexican properties. It is
said that I,imantour will return to
hit own country with financial back
ing to aid in putting down the rev
olution. ,
Death for Americans
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
So that Americans tempted to cast
their lot with the revolutionists may
know that capture will be followed by
execution, the Mexican embassy today
gave notice of the suspension of con
stitutional guarantees in its country.
The Mexican officials take the posi
tion that American adventurers are
largely responsible for the continuance
of the hostilities.
Though the order issued by the. Mex
ican congress, by command of President
Diaz, is not considered retroactive, and,
therefore, will not apply to Blutt and
Converse and other Americans in cus
tody, no leniency will he shown to pris
oners taken from this time pnward.
Creel Sends Warning
The announcement of the Mexican*
iy is based on a telegram re
ceived today fror*. Knriaue C. Creel,

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