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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, June 24, 1911, Image 11

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CHURCH BUND TO GREATEST OPPORTUNITY
“WE GO TOO FAR AFIELD,” SAYS A SPEAKER
The Boys and Girls of North
: America Are Called ;
'.■-'■■■ Chief Problem
Bishop Hughes Scores Curse of Child
Labor and Urges a National
■ . ' Law to Protect I hem
"We are going to drive the curse
of child labor from our land. We will
have toon in Washington a congress
as -willing to protect the real Infants
as it is now to protect the alleged in-
fant Industries." declared Bishop Ed
win H. Hughes of San Francisco, bishop
Of the Methodist Episcopal church, be
fore the international Sunday school
convention yesterday afternoon, at the
Coliseum.
The general subject of discussion was
the relation of the Sunday school to
the adolescent pupil, and the Meth
odist "bishop spoke eloquently on his
topic, "Relation of the Church to the
"Teen Age."
"We. must, in the church." he con
tinued, "fix the intellectual task to the
.period of the child. We have heard
advertised the child evangelist. I once
■aw, in Boston, a 13 year old child
eangellst. We have no right to intro
duce child labor into America—even
In. the labor of evangelism. A child
should not be tratted around the coun
try by pious hypocrites. The bible is
full of children, but they all do child
ish things. Aany man who tries to
fasten a man's work on a child is an
enemy of religion."
tOMSF.t M HAS NEW MEANING
The day was filled with interesting
discussions of the problem of the child
In the Sunday school, In the morning
the-elementary session was conducted
and-the cradle roll, the beginners, the
' primary and the junior departments of
Sunday school work were considered.
A. H. Mills «of Decatur. 111., chairman
of the elementary department commit
tee, presided.. : .
The session opened, as usual, with a
song service, led by Prof. E. O. Excel].
Rev. # W. K. Guthrie, pastor of the First
Presbyterian church of this city, led
the prayer.
A new connotation of the meeting
place, the Coliseum, was given by Miss
° c Meme Brockway of Los Angeles, ele
mentary superintendent for southern
■California. Miss Brockway said, In
opening" her Interesting remarks:
'The word 'Coliseum' has a new
meaning for met oday. Heretofore the
word has always been associated In my
mind with the Coliseum at Rome, where
Nero practiced his cruelties on the
Christian martyrs. But now It has a
new meaning for me—for even Nero
never .ordered the maiden martyrs to
make ■ Coliseum audience hear them."
"WORKER IX FAR FIELDS ".;.'■
The first speaker was Mrs. Mary Fos
ter Bryner of Chicago, superintendent
of the International elementary depart
ment. She presented her report on the
work of her department. *
In her report she said:
"By far the larger number of our
,"workers, 34. give voluntary service
. without other remuneration than the
blessing which comes frftm helping
others, and they want to help more.
'i Their only expressed regret is that
< they can not get into the field to meet
the country workers. Their vision is
„ greater than their opportunity. Nearly
all could go If their expenses could be
assured. Most of thef are supplied
with stationery,-postage and a limited
* -quantity of leaflets for distribution;
others have paid their own expenses.
'.'The work is growing In more re
mote portions of our field... As a re
" .suit of the tours of Mr. Lucas, ele
mentary superintendents have been ap
*, pointed in Barbados, Costa Rica, Cuba,
Honduras. Panama and Trinidad. With
" all of these I am In correspondence.
-Their opportunities for promoting the
•• work are few and they are busy peo
ple. *
STANDARDS OF WORK
. * The following 10 point standard of
' , excellence has. furnished a definite aim.
* which some have attained, and toward
which others are driving: - ■
• • "l. A cradle roll (birth to three).
"' "2. Beginners' department (or class),
children 3. 4 and 5. • * '
"3. Primary department (or class)
children 6, 7 and S.
"Ah Junior ' department (or class);
« children 9, 10. 11 and 12.
.'.. - Separate room or separation by
curtains or screens for each depart
ment.
. *"«' Blackboard, or substitute, used In
' all-three departments. *
"7. Beginners' lessons .for children
under *>. • :.-:■.> .
''%. Graded lessons (or supplemental
with the uniform lessons) for the pri
-1 man*. * i '<* r\.
■'. "9. Graded lessons ("or supplemental
with the uniform lessons for the
Jnnior.
I "10. Ea.bc teacher a graduate or stu
dent of a training course, or a member
. of a reading circle or graded union."
•*. Mrs. Maud Junkin Baldwin of Phil
• adelphia, elementary superintendent
for Pennsylvania, spoke on "Progress
> In .Organization." She said that in her
work the children under 13 years of
*age- were divided Into ; three depart
• ments: that the classes were separated
by curtains, special supplemental les
sons assigned, special beginners' les
" sons taught, and teachers given special
courses of training*. t .'
GRADED LESSONS SUCCESS
"Progress in Graded Instruc Instruc
tion", was the subject of the address of
Mrs. IJ.| W. Barnes of.Newark," N. J.,
member of the International elementary
committee. In giving the -history of
special graded lessons she stated that
In 1872, when uniform t lessons were
• adopted, a minority wanted graded les
sons, for .children,- but did not accom-
pllsh what they desired until 1908, at
the last triennial convention. In 1894
•8,000: teachers' sent an appeal to have
graded lessons prepared for children,
"but the appeal was not then heeded.
"We recognize - now that we have
what will never change," declared Mrs.
'Barnes, i
* Miss Meme , Rrockway. elementary
superintendent for Southern California,
spoke, on progress "in graded unions.
She said: <S^SB6ffißEWftSSß^fflßsfilS
i"There must still be'practice in les
son teaching. Our work Is not merely
„ theory giving. Would any state main
tain that" It had!. introduced/ a., series
of text books so perfect, so complete,
that the practice work of the normal
schools . could "■ now be - discontinued?
• There Is great gain In hearing other
* teachers actually - teach the , lessons
which we are, using." _,-- * »
' INCOME "OF," ASSOCIATION ;{.*
Prof. : H. M.Hamlil presented the : re
port of .the special committee on scope
snd work of the International' Sunday
schoolassoclatlon. •** The committee con
, listed of Professor Hamill, E. K." War
ren, Dr. A. Henry, •■ Dr. G. B. Menlll,
©r.iE. Y. Mullins. W. =N. Hartshorn, -J.
J. Maclaren, W. A. Endaly."^." »,
The report stated that on ' January
81. 1909. * the International Sunday
i ichool association-was Incorporated.
I The report stated: •- - * '
, ."By the term; of S, organized Sunday
ichool Is meant only the organized €0
-0 tperation of .Protestant Sunday school
"■■ . Workers 4 of * North /America. - .It 18 an
, Interdenominational * Sunday" school: or
ganization with an intensely denomi
national spirit."
The income of the international as
sociation was reported at almost $50,
--000 per annum during the last three
years. This money was received in
annual gifts pledged at state conven
tions h%- auxiliary state and provincial
associations; by'the gifts of individual
Sunday school classes: by gifts of in
dividuals and by special life member
ships at $1,000 each.
... ** '
LESSONS [GIVEN PRAISE
A, high tribute was paid to the work
of the lesson committee which has
been in session during this convention. \
Distribution of. .lessons:
"These lessons go into the hands of
174,000 North American Sunday schools
and 15,000,000 students around • the
world." ...
When Dr. .1. Wilbur Chapman spoke
on "Soul Winning During, Childhood,"
he called upon-the-audience to rise In
detachments in the order of the period
of life In which) each had* come to
Christ. -' >. . .-- . - ',:-', „
There were 4,200 present. Of these
a tenth attested.that they had become
converted before they were 10 years of
age; a seventh between the ,ages of 10
and 12: a fifth between the ages of ,12
and 14; a third between the-ages of
14 and 16, half between' the ages of 16
and 20; about 25 persons, between: the
ages of 20 and 30 and about the same
number after '30 years",of age. Of the
ministers present 40 had come to Chris
tianity between" the , ages of 16 and 20,
and 15 after they had reached" the age
of 20. '"".*■
INTERESTING THE (Hill)
..Miss Helen '„Palk, elementary super-;
intendent for Manitoba, spoke on "Im
pression Translated to Expression." ■ In
part she said:
"We still are in danger laying too
much* stress upon sense impressions.
We keep pouring in, prodding on, and
pilling up all possible Information, and
do-not give our, children a day or an
hour to grasp, ■ to assimilate or trans
late these Impressions-Into life_-*.The
emphasis has, too long, been placed
upon -the value,. of . knowledge, rather
than upon* the unfolding life of ** the
child. ..-■',- : ".-' ::-..:;.' .
"In planning a session program the
teacher keeps ever before her, as a
folding : star, the truth she * wishes to
mpress. All -contributory exercises,
though * they - may < not have a direct re
lation-to the lesson truth, must not, by
their character,, detract from It. •
• "When the Impression ' has been made
the teacher, realizing; that", the truth
dies that Is not 'lived* out in practice,*
and. that inactivity can boast of no vic
tories, will • seek to lead 'her t little fol
lowers to translate the impression -into
life. - *.■•-•' *. <**>/♦' ■-.:..*•. ■■■■
PICTURES; WD MUSIC,,;.; ,„,i -.* . ; , „.•
"It is at this point-, that * the -teacher
uses the "story -.to^emphasize s the,** im
pression and to interpret the k truth in
terms *of ; the' child's t experience.: Pic.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL; SATURDAY; JUNE 24, 1911;
Men and scenes in the great bible parade that featured the International
Sunday school convention yesterday afternoon. In the upper picture are
shown Captain Robert W. Dollar (standing) and George W. Dickie (sit
ting), both well known San Franciscans, who occupied seats in an auto in
the parade. The large picture shows men of the Texas and Arkansas dele
gations as they stood near Union square. The lower view depicts the dis
tribution of bibles to the, men in line.
tures are also employed by the earlier
of children, to ..make word presenta
tions more vivid and to correct false
Impressions. . ' -""
I "In music ;. the child's inner and
deeper nature finds free and delight
ful expression." .
"A Teacher's Parable" was the theme
of '• Mrs., Phebe A. Curtiss' : discussion."
Mrs. Curtiss Is elementary superin
tendent for Ohio. She told of the ap
plication * of the * story of - the dedica
tion of Samuel \to God' by "his mother,
and of Christ blessing little children.
LOVE WINS CHILD - • -v. /-.."■,;
• Mrs. A. -A.- Lamoreaux of Chicago,,
spoke on , "What Elementary Grades
Contribute, to Character Building." ,'
"Love." • she said, "Is -the .*'. greatest
thing In the.; world," because what I
love I learn to grow like. The greatest
thing of all is loving. How many boys
and girls are passionately fond of ; what
you teach them? I feel sure that many
children "have; gone* out of the,- ele
mentary grades without ■■■ loving • God
and his son, Jesus Christ, because some
teacher?- was tactless In .;; introducing
him to'them. God's rule of life is the
thing .that I love.,is' the tiling want
to do something for." . < - . . .
;* The ;. morning, _ session *. closed ..with
prayer and benediction by Rev. C. B.
Dalton, pastor of the' Methodist Episco
pal church. In Oakland. .;*
•':' Intermediate « and > senior -branches of
Sunday/.. school 'work furnished"' the
topics* for discussion and addresses at
the • afternoon .session at the Coliseum
yesterday^and "the", first address^was . a
report of the; committee of 'those two
departments,. made by Edgar H. Nichols
of : Chicago?; the "-chairman.*; Frank L.
Brown of Brooklyn presided. ."
BOYS ANOTHER PROBLEM
These two departments are ', combined
under the name 'of 'the' advanced % dl
vision, but iit > was explained *«*" that the
two f departments are! quite '^separate' in
the Sunday schools of the land. - ,*'--";;',./
The * speaker said that the division
was ."comparatively,'*- new, having been
formed' about, two?years; ago,";and this
was *. the^flrst report made bef ore an in
ternational convention. "Flow to more
thoroughly interest the boys and girls
of. the teen age' in the Sunday -school
I is the great problem, and it Is generally
| admitted." the speaker said, "that the
losses from the senior department are
I the heaviest."
** It was further conceded, ,he ', said,
that the greatest need in dealing with
the problem was a wider knowledge of
this peculiar age.' Organization of an
advanced division has* been effected in
39 states and, provinces; :,7 have ap
pointed superintendents, one employed
for full time, nine for party, time and
27 render voluntary, service. Twenty
states and provinces reporting have
counties organized. .Nebraska leads
with 90,: every county organized,* with
a superintendent in charge. Inland em
pire, comprising eastern Washington
and ; northern Idaho, has 13 of the* 17
counties organized, and Colorado, Min
nesota and Kentucky more than half.
CHURCH TOO- FAR AFIELD ]
"The 'Teen Years an. Asset and an
Opportunity", was the subject- of the
talk by Rev. Edgar Blake, D. D., Chi
cago, assistant corresponding secretary
board .of g Sunday schools, Methodist
Episcopal church, and he began by call
ing attention to the fact that during
the year; 1910 the six leading evangel-
churches of America had ras net
gain of- only" 2.2 per cent. * Should any
business corporation do business with
so small a margin of gain they would
feel:*that:.they , were facing business
failure, he said. - The speaker/declared
that it was • all very well to sing -lus
tily that, "hell's „ foundations quiver,* '
but ;, that ■ the foundations . were - in *no
danger in America at- present. The
cause of this he believes to be" because
the churches have t been doing work too
far afield and overlooking the oppor
tunities near sat > hand. V . .
In the Protestant Sunday schools of
North America there are, he declared,
between .12,000.000; and; 13,000,000 govs
and girls under 18 years of age. »Here
Is the great evangelistic opportunity of
the-church,: but the -church has been'
blind to ; its ripest and .whitest field for
harvest,*he'said.'- , - - . *i, .t«'
V".' Some * interesting **sidelightsi on ■ boys
were given yesterday, afternoon by Miss
Margaret Slattery of Boston, supervisor
off {teacher"; training; Congregational'
Sunday, school «and Publishing:society/
when she spoke on "Why Are the
'Teen Years Critical?",; ;•
BISHOP ON CHILD WORKERS
With many '-anecdotes'* of **. her ■'■ work
among boys, with a ' deep . knowledge
and 'the'" essentially humane-touch < ex
pressed In her talks oh girl nature. Miss
Slattery explained that the~teen years
were replete with dagger because. filled
with; a ; vital ' force, destructive when
not controlled. She compared the force*
of .youth .wlajt fire, ah: agency, for good
when rightly.- directed, . but * a terrible '
power for evil when left!to run riot.
She brought la; message of hope for
future generations, however, If, at.* she
said,' "the tremendous faith ,of adoles
cence ; can be yoked ; up ; with >. the ' great
power of,the church.*' .*.'..-,'-'-,;,'„•. ...■■.,.\
r .Bishop Hughes' Interesting and /elo
quent talk on the relation of the church
to * the 'teen age 'was * followed closely
by... the delegates 'and vigorously ap
plauded. "**:*;, ;; '„;"*.";' *"•;.'i .' ; \; v■■** ."" * •'■•.*
In speaking on that subject,. he 'said:
"It Sls ; never anything less /than 'a
tragedy to fasten men's religious du
ties on children. The bible 4 makes no "
such blunder.' ; It's children ade not lit-
V tie "old' men and little old women. They
SIXTEEN ENGINES
REDUCED TO JUNK
Santa Fe Property, Bums, In
\ volving Loss Estimated
!' at $400,000 "',;.
BARSTQW, June 23-The.big; frame
building housing the- Santa Fe round
house, storehouse and foreman's office,
burned* at '4 . o'clock this ' afternoon.
Sixteen locomotives were reduced prac
tically to Junk and the loss Is estimated
at^s4oo,ooo '..•"";.; * ;
Six of the locomotives were passenger
engines. The new railroad power
house and the oil and water supplies
were saved.
It. P. ; Cheney, master mechanic of
the"-, railroad, catne • here on a special
train as soon as word of,the. Are was
wired to him at Needles. \ Two hun
dred ' men -were ■ formed into - shifts *to
fight the .flames, the origin of which
so *****. far- has not " been definitely ; de
termined.-, ' *; *2 —■" ' - *
All trains are. moving on time with
borrowed locomotives., • .
"■" Railroad officials state ' that large
fireproof ;roundhouses and shops, long
in i contemplation, will be built .i*™:,
mediately.
DHY GOODS KEN BANKBTTFT— City.
Mo.. June 23.—Petitions' in TOluntsry bank
■ ■ ruptcy were filed In the United States district
court here today* by Lawrence 'M. Jones and
: 3. Logan Jones, ; former heads .. of the Jones
dry goods company of this city. Their liabili-
I ties are estimated; at $T30,000, and their as
sets are about $20,000.
are just children, and they serve only
as children: may serve naturally. $ The
maid in Naaman'g household does a
service in a child's way. The little
sister that. saved Moses' - life played
along the river's banks and ceased not
to be a child even when she became a
shrewd heroine. , . . ,-- '•-.1 *, ->'
NO PRIGS IN HILE .
'The boy that picked up the arrows
and made answer to Jonathan helped
to preserve the life of David, the com
ing king: but he served in the-fashion
of a boy. The lad that handed his
lunch basket to Christ and became a
partner in the most dramatic of our
Lord's miracles did all his work after
the manner of a generous and Impul
sive" boy.l Paul's nephew saved the
great apostle's life, as you will read
in the Acts; but he never assumed his
uncle's duties. It is good and suggest
ive to note that' Moses and David, the
greatest figures in the Old : Testament,
and Paul, the greatest human figure in
the New Testament, were saved to their
work by children who served better
than they knew and vet served only^ln
the .ways ; of childhood. The bible
knows no childish 'prigs,' but it does
know childish tasks.«,
BOY SCOUTS AND GIRLS . -
I ""Boys', brigades, boy scouts, boy mes
sengers,- boy pages, kings' * daughters,
girl dress makers, girl jelly deliverers,
girl flower carriers, - girl tea -. pourers—
all these orders and duties are good If
they keep the teen, age employed in
Christ's name.", -.-*■*, ■ ■.;*.*>"*;.'
tin ? speaking*.on* "Soul Winning , and
Christian Service," :in closing the serv
ices' for the afternoon. Doctor Chapman
took up; the same -question, he- had
spoken .upon" at**the'morning session;
the question of .the necessity for active
church" work among; the children. .""">
LOS * GATOS BANK APPLICATION—Wa*hing
;. ton. V. (*.. June 23.—The comptroller -of the
currency has receded the application of Zedd
.8. Ripfs, N. <;. ;Rogem. F. W. .Knowles.i C.
fl H. Caldwell and'W.Darneal to organize * the
First national bank of Los Gatog, with a cap
' ital of: 123,000,*, ;:-.r,-:? ;..*'-• •-• , >"*'
WARRANTS OUT ' FOR * LYNCHERS—Cameron.
■Tex., June . 23.—Warrants ; have been Issued
- - for four persons ' suspected "of ' having, partici
pated in the lynching of a Mexican boy at
,' Thorndale, near here, several days ago. Store
.;- warrants are . probable. ■ '„»>•: ... ... & .-...■ -
TECHAUJAVERN
Will '.' Distribute ,a. Dainty Souvenir .to
'" Lad Patrons Today, Between
■.:. ■ J*. ■*,'•... .'3i3o and .5, p. m. ' .:'.:*-■"''. '
The favorable s impressiono madei' by
Wm. ■ B. 'Hiker; & i Son- Co.'s -; Violet
Cerate, presented to our lady, patrons
recently ■ in souvenir * -form,* *.*• and 'the
many., compliments : : paid. to j the .man
agement of the Teohau Tavern :as ;to
the quality ■ of same, suggests a -con
tinuance of this mode of* advertising.'
The« Techau s Tavern; will i present today
Wm. ;B...Biker*&t Son Co.'s Improved
Cold- Cream in -dainty souvenir form.
;. The three :i minute luncheon which
will be served c today;- price *60 •■ cents,
will consist of the following: „ ;..- »* .
i.'J. Shredded Chicken; a la " King, with
Pimentos.
Scrambled Eggs. *..*',;. ..,,. *'.';, „'..',.. ;Y*
*: . New* Potatoes. 'Rissole. '•*■ ■
*** *. Hot Vienna ; Rolls. . ;
Vanilla Eclair.
Small Black Coffee. ,'
The vocal and - instrumental -concerts,
which, begin with the ; dinner hour and
continue /-.uninterruptedly.;! throughout
the entire evening,! are growingl in
popular .* favor. j j -"• ** . '" "
■ ■- ... -...*». _ . ,*.- *■ t ■ —..
VALLEJO MAYOR FAVORS
NEW CITY HALL AND JAIL
Bond Propositions to Be First
Business Discussed
[Special Dispatch to The Call] ; .',.
VALLEJO. June 23.—That the old
city hall soon will be inadequate for
business to "be ■ transacted .there by the
new commission and other city officials,
is the declaration-made by Mayor elect
W. J. Tormey. ' *-'
One of the first steps to be discussed :
by the new administration will be the i
calling of the bond election in Septem
ber for, a vote for the $75,000 bonding
proposition to build a new joint city
hall and county jail. ,-.;.-- „-"".-■
;: It is also stated,that Mayor elect W.
J. I Tormey I and his commissioners will
call for "a;bond issue during the month
of September for l a municipal electric
light plant. ,'-* .** "-\ *•. '
CABINS OF TWO MINERS
I BLOWN UP AND BURNED
[Special Dispatch' to The Call]
| GRASS - VALLEY.* jgj June ; 23—The
cabins of C. Walters and,H. W. Smith.
miners, at Moore's Flat, were blown up
and .'. burned ;• Wednesday. The '. cabins
stood close together and were destroyed
while the owners were atwwortk t In the
mine.;"., >- .~. .
A man, apparently Insane, has been
seen In-, that vicinity lately, and It Is
thought that' he Is responsible.
, Miners in .t^at section are consider
ably agitated, some of them refusing
to "sleep In their w cabins for fear of
being blown up. .
BIG TREE
Ib <^b «9b §\m
DEDICATION
EXCURSION
Wednesday, June 28
1911 =
See the California Big Trees, Santa Cruz and"
Watsonville in the Heart of the Great Pajaro
Apple Valley.
An All Day Outing Amid the Sun-Kissed
California Hills and Valleys.
ft^Wi rttfV The -
•L&8 JUS - Qajg tarn *
-^== Trip
Purchase Your Ticket Now~From Any Agent.
SOUTHERN PACIFIC
,'"*. :^7 /.:;. TICKET OFFICESt
. Flood BaUdlng , Palace Hotel
Market Street Ferry Depot ,: !
Third and Tovrnsend Sta. Depot '"- * *i I
* Broadway and Thirteenth St., Oakland '. *." 1
—Jfl —
■ j.. .- gj V ""
Columbia Records
are Double
0
- ■.;'"" . -FY*'*' ; '":'
_____ ■„..■ 5 PISCS
Wi
Columbia Double Disc Records
have music on both sides, a differ
ent selection,on each side, and they
may-be played on any disc machine
of i any make. - - <,' -•.
Kohler & Chase
;/.. -26 O'Farrcll St." ,' ""' '•'." I
Vacation? •;
:'• If you are planning a vacation, don't miss read
' ing July' Sunset, the special vacation number.
The feature article is •
Sunshine & Seabreeze, Inc.
Purveyors of Cool Summers
CAP AND CHARLIE _. * LOS ANGELES BEACHES
Local-Agents- ; California
£j> PETER & KYNE
f.* This story is beautifully illustrated in four
colors an4 reading it will solve the vacation problem
for many.
Many stories and articles of interest.
: JULY SUNSET
get IT today
IB CENTS A COPY. $1.50 PER YEAR.
11
FORTUNE IN PERIL
BY GIRL CAROUSAL
Heir May Lose $ 7,000 Estate
for Returning to Way
ward Habits
[Special Dispatch to The, Call]
OROVILLE, June 23.—Less than a
week after ' Charles A. "Meng was
awarded the fortune left by his father,
amounting to more than 117,000, for
having abandoned his reckless and dis
solute habits' and having become a use
... .... . . "
ful member of society, he was arrested
today upon a charge of having plied
two girls of Chlco, bolh under 18 years
old, with liquor.
Meng's arrest followed that of Ethel
Sykes and Grace" Houghton, who *. were
found In the streets otf Chlco after an
mmm^-*-aa. im-.m... . - b i. .a^. mm**. - -Sfcj
all night carousal. In court they made
a confession. -
Meng obtained his inheritance upon
a statement signed by the principal
businessmen in Chloo certifying to the
thorough character of his reform. If
he is found guilty it Is predicted that
the court will rule that It was Imposed
upon and deceived and Meng lose his
fortune.
THE CALL'S
BRANCH OFFICES
!| Subscriptions and advertise
ments will be received in
San Francisco at the follow
,■ ing offices:
1657 FILLMORE STREET
St. Clare McKelvey •
Open Until 10 o'clock Every
Night
i«Tn 'and Mission sts.
Miller's Stationery Store
1108 VALENCIA STREET
Blake's Bazaar
8107 MTH ST. Nr. VALENCIA
■ •.-,, Regal Stationery Co.
' 1103 POLK STREET. Nr. BUSH
. Shapro's, Inc.
S2O VAN NESS AVENUE -
Parent's Stationery Store
2200 FILLMORE STREET
Tremayne'e Branch
', 16TH AND MARKET , STREETS
Jackson's Branch *'..*.■
«74 VALENCIA: STREET
i, Halliday's Stationery Store
892 DOLORES STREET
Mass' Bazaar. Tel. Mission 22JJ
OAKLAND OFFICEI
»B2 BROADWAY .
Tela. Oakland 1083: Home A-2375
ALAMEDA OEFTCEi
MSB PARK STREET -
Schneider's Bookstore
Tel. Alameda 559
BERKELEY OFEICEt
S.W. COR. CENTER A OXFORD
Tel. Berkeley 77; Home : 2077 .
*„.* » «■■»»»■■«■■■■«»■■ » » « i
WEEKLY CALL, $1 PER YEA

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