OCR Interpretation


The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, October 16, 1911, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1911-10-16/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

The Call Has the Best 11 PI lIA
COMMERCIAL Hi 1111"
:eal estate 111 « Iflf \
THEATRICAL |« Iflf X
SPORTING If If II 1 1
-. SOCIETY ,:■:-;,,,-^v... 11 '11 If
MARINE 1 ■ fci ■ ■ %f
VOLUME CX.—NO. 138.
TAFT LEAVES WITH HAPPY MEMORIES OF VISIT
City Has Exposition, He; Says, Because* She Knows How
TRAINS KILL
SEVEN IN
WRECK
passenger and Freight on Mis-
souri Pacific Collide Near
Fort Crook
THREE ALAMEDANS ARE
AMONG THE INJURED
Accident Attributed to Misun-
derstanding of Orders by
Employes
DISABLED PASSENGERS
GO TO ARMY HOSPITAL
THE KILLED
F. W. PETRI>"G, Nebraska City.
MRS. FRED W. ROWTMANN.
Nebraska City. ]\
WISTERIAX ROWTMAXX, I
. years old. .daughter of Mrs.
i Rowtmann.
A. W. SPRAGIJE, St. ; Joseph,
' Mo. "* ' ■ :" .' -\ ■-' '-. .1; ;■"
MISS FRANCES MM.IAX K4\- 1
KA, Washington, ; Kan. • '
O. W. KKKI-KH. brakeman. At
• rhison. Kan. \
t'XIDEXTiFIED >EGRK»
THE INJURED
Fred W. : Rowtmain, banker,
Nebraska; his -..'.wife and child
among the killed.
Emma Harvey, negress, Kan
sas <'ity.
AY. G. Rirhnrtls, Maynard, Neb.
John Scott, passenger - en-;
' gineer. ' . ;'/:.. '- •' . - \
-Among the less; seriously. in
jured are: '■
Mr». Hope riimi, Alameda, •
<"al.. flesh wound-on leg. • -- -», ' •
Mis* .Iran <on way. Alameda,
('a)., ankle sprained, hands cut. ■*
Flo Conway, Alameda, Cal., cut
about-face. ' "' V* ,;
OMAHA, : Oct. 15.—Seven persons
were. killed and 21 injured,. four
of them seriously, in a collision
between Missouri Pacific pas
senger train No, : 105, northbound, en
.route for this city, and a fast freight
train. . v { _ ",:.."-,;:^-^^
The wreck, which occurred at Fort
Crook, 10 miles, south' of here, at 10
o'clock this, morning, is believed to
have been due to a misunderstanding
of orders on the part of the freight
crew.
* A passenger train scheduled to leave
this city for the south about .the time
of the accident was converted into a
* relief train arid sent to the scene of , the
accident and later returned here with
the uninjured and several of those who
were slightly. injured. All of these
were sent on their way. , .
The more seriously injure.! are 4 being
■cared for at the army hospital at Fort
. Crook.'-. ..'/ \ '-"-■ - . ■.-.-".,: ";■■. '
Work of Governor Gilchrist ' ;
Governor G.llchrist of Florida, who
was a passenger on the northbound
train, led rescuers in their work of re
covering the dead and aiding the in
jured. , ...
The governor was up and dressed
when the collision came and was one
of the first to reach the rear car, in
wblcfa the fatalities occurred. For an
hour he worked with the trainmen and
the hospital corps. Although he was
injured he refused aid until all the
victims were taken from the debris.
Afterward he submitted to an exami
nation and it was found that his in
juries were only minor bruls«s.
Passenger train No. 105, out of Kan
sas City, in charge of Conductor F. R.
Travers, was running late. Conductor
L. P. Green of the freight passed South
Omaha at S:3O. He had "signed off,"
hut evidently did not check the train
register as to the whereabouts of No.
105.
Collision Near Curve
At the po^t of collision the track
makes a sharp curve, shutting off the
view of the Fort Crook station. It was
at this point that Engineer Crawford
of the freight caught sight of No. 105,
which was coming at high speed. En
gineer Crawford, It is said, had no or
ders In regard to No. 105,, but he whis
tled and slackened speed. When the
passenger did not answer he concluded
that it was a train on the adjoining
Burlington tracks.
When within a few car lengths of
each other both engineers realized the
danger and reversed their engines.
lußfinurd on I'age 5, Column t»
PRESIDENT WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT AND HIS POLICE ESCORT ENTERING THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH YESTERDAY MORNING
CREW FAMISHES AS
SEA TOSSES SHIP
Sailors Rescued From Schooner
Nottingham After Eight
Days Without Water
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
ASTORIA, Oct. 15.—The schooner
William Nottingham, which left Asto
ria October 2, bound for Callao, Peru,
with a cargo of 1,000,000 feet of lum-
ber, was wrecked October 8 and was
towed into port today by the bar tug
Wallula. which, picked up the derelict
25 miles southwest of the Columbia
river, the crew having been takon off
by the British schooner David Evans.
The Nottingham ran into a south
east gale on October 5 that carried
away three of the masts, the foremast
alone standing. The gale also carried
away the deckload and the galley. The
vessel sprang a leak and was helpless
and unmanageable in the heavy sea
that was running.
The crew for five days subsisted on
canned vegetables and were without
water until the thirteenth, when the
David Evans came to the. rescue and
the Nottingham was abandoned. All
the Nottingham's boats were smashed
or swept over the side save the long
boat, and when the.David Evans hove
to for the purpose of rescue the seas
were running like moving mountains
and it was impossible for the English
captain to launch one to send to the
schooner.
Captain Sevensen, his officers and
men were determined to make an effort
to reach safety on the Evans with the
boat that had been spared them. This
was very adroitly managed by launch
ing the long boat to leeward, but be
fore it could be used it capsized, throw
ing thr'-e seamen into the ocean, from
which they were saved only by the
swift work of the men on the «hip.
The boat was righted and bailed out,
when it was again turned, and the
same desperate work had to be re
peated. The third time proved the
lucky turn and all hands entered the
small craft and pulled for the wait
ing Englishman ja. quarter of a mile to
leeward.
The schooner William Nottingham
was built at Ballard, Wash., in 1892,
and Ifx home port is Seattle. It had a
gross tonnage of 1,204, net 1,06"; length
211.7, beam 42.3. deptli 16.5 and comple
ment for a crew of 11.
THE San Francisco CALL
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, MONDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1911.
GERMANS TO BUILD
CANAL TO PACIFIC
Panama's Rival Will Utilize the
Deep Ravines in Costa Rica
' ■': \ : and Nicaragua 7 r V t :;
' * !
[Special Dispatch :to The Call] j , ," *.
V- NEW YORK, Oct. 15.—The World
says that ; German capitalists, presum
ably with the sympathetic secret back
ing: of -the/GermanJ" government, ; are
planning to dig a canal in a latitudi
nal line, from the course iof) the ;Sapoa
river in Costa Central America,
through.; Salinas bay, which opens on 1
the gulf of Rapapagayo in the Pacific
.oceanr 7.'^.'^-^'' ,' :-/"*:t If."'.v';".':..'''"'r:v\:' "''.•' A-'V:
The needed capital of $5,000,000 has
been subscribed. Negotiations with
the Costa. Kican government have been
smUed upon by President Jiminez. It
is said no difficulty is expected from
Nicaragua.
Route Is Shorter
The new canal will cost an infinitesi
mal part of the sum the United States
has already expended on the Panama
canal. It will be a shorter route,
more advantageous commercially to
tramp steamers and sailing vessels and
the tolls will he comparatively small.
It will accommodate only light draft
ships, cruisers and torpedo boat de
stroyers and will he absolutely neutral
in case of war.
It has been learned from reliable au
thority that the Washington govern
ment last spring sent a diplomatic
agent to Costa Rica to learn how far
negotiations had advanced and
whether German engineering parties
had done any work in the hills back of
the Sapoa river. Thig agent recently
returned, made his report and has been
sent to the coast to communicate the
facts in his possession, to President
Taft.
*
Original American Plan
Tli<^ plan of the Washington govern
ment, when contemplating the Nicar-
aqua- canal route, was that the water
»'-«--■■' : •-.>••-■- •;, ".••••-,"•',- *■-•■* „-;.j^
course should prin at San Juan del
Norte on the Atlantic ocean, follow
, „ o T ,
the course of the San Juan river to
T . v .,
Lake Nicaragua and by canal to Brito
*'"Vwi ri a^« "l«•'--•;'-"' %• - V ••
on the Pacific coast. ■ ,K-. .i~.
„,, '«>"<•;»;'-';n i- ,'■ *
The plan of the Berlin syndicate is
„■„ . , ,
said to be to take advantage of the
original waterway to Lake Nicaragua
and then use tho -course of the Sapoa
river to a point where th* latitudinal
rner to a point wnere the latitudinal
line which runs through Salinas isiand
and Salinas bay, also bisects the Sapoa
river. The distance between the Sapoa
„ , c,, w JZZ, \ ?.
river and Salinas bay at this point is.
about seven: miles. It is planned :
"I Shall Never Be
President," Says
Bryan to Farmers
[Special Dusatch to The Call]
ARAPAHOE, Neb., Oct. 15*$!!
— For what i-s believed the first
time in his career William J.
Bryan last night publicly ac-\;
knowledged that, he never would »;■•
be president of the United ,
States. . '
The statement was made fas
the climax and the close of* a
political speech Bryan made to j
the farmers of this county, say- !
ing:
"I shall nfver be president,
but I would rather go to my
grave with the consciousness
that I have done right, that I
have done all in my power, to
give my country the best pos
sible form of. government, than
to be president."
divert the flow of the Sapoa river at
this point by means of a dam through
an abandoned water course and a num
ber of ravines until eventually, by a
short canal, it will empty into Salinar
bay opposite Salinas island.
Plan Called Feasible
A. R. Porter tonight interviewed
Miguel Borges of San Jose, Costa Rica,
the proprietor of La Infortnacion, the
government organ there and other In
fluential journals in Costa Rica and
Nicaragua. When this plan was! laid
before him and Borgres asked If It wore
feasible he replied that ■ the Sapoa river
..,. -.--;--,"-,- „ - .. .ißia-^-v"
was navigable, and said: '■ .
"The clefts and ravines at the foot of
the hills are already so deep that it is
(■awiabm'j*'l-*-** 1.? ,-f ■'-■wi r • •■: -1 -%-.- j-» •.,. *-... -< •--r-vi.—■.■*■«
r wondersome one has not thought before
of this simple problem of solving the
interoceanic canal problem." .- -. *
Borges was then asked if It were true
that the German Influence j n Nicaragua
and Costa Rica was very strong, as re
i s ,»i,^ j-. ■;■; •'.■■:f'~y"' -i *-•»»-. t' ,„- ■ ..i ■v- .■ ■-■';■■
ported: .' : :;-;^.;.V r _.ii :^: i-; Tu^;i.*:-:/ t^ i V
GERMANS v ARE INFLLTIAI7: J V
««-_ szz-Au^stsvrz—neasv&^i
. "German capital- ls;very,,jheavily;-and
" Afj ." ,_ - - .J^Si^
dlve"«ly lnv«Bte° In troth Co.ta Rica
and Nicaragua," he rtplted. "An & re
»' .] „*,„„, „„,, X •
suit the political and business Influence
of Germans is unusually powerful, -J -,
. .-., , . ,-■(;■ :...»>^*ia.aij*,-i,»i,'.
"Last spring a German came to Sa.n
r ... ! mlt ,. ... .. • ' .
Jose with unlimited capital. Ido not
re c a n his name. There was a. great
dj«al:of conjecture concerning his mis
"!on- Ab tor the <>P«r*tiona of a Ger
man engineering party, it Is quite pos-
Blble . There ltfaa a greftt deal of tAJk
about it, and my whole country is mstir
with '.unrest, i We expect big things to
h»M>en shortly—an upheavaj that will
«n*k« my country groat politically and
financially. M*re tU»n.Uht I,can -not
ttMt.cH you at this time." Vr' "7. r' 7" ..V-' v
ELEANOR SEARS IN
TRIAL ENGAGEMENT
Harold Vanderbilt and Boston
Girl Will "Try Out"
for One Year
\Sptc'ia\ Diipatch to The Call]
• NEWPORT. Oct. 15.—Harold Sterling
Vanderbilt and Miss Eleanor Sears
have entered into a "trial engage
ment" to last for a period of one year.
This is the confidential announcement
made by Mrs. Frederick R. Sears .of
Boston, mother of the young woman
whom society looks^ on with animated
interest as having won the heart of
the younger son of William K. Vander
biit.
The terms of the "trial engagement."
says Mrs. Sears' confidant, will not ex
pire until next summer, so that a pub
lic announcement that the couple are
engaged is not considered likely before
the time is up. Should the young pair
conclude to call it off it may be there
never will be any public acknowledge
ment that there was an engagement.
When Miss Sears was in Newport
(his season she was constantly at
tended by young Vanderbilt, and to
gether they took part in motoring,
yachting, tennis playing and' other
sports. Miss Sears visited Vanderbilt's
mother, Mrs. O. H. P. Belmont, at Mar
ble hall. Vanderbilt's duties at the
Orand Central station, New York, keep
him fully occupied.
CANADIAN PACIFIC
STEAMER IS ASHORE
Passengers of the Princess
Beatrice Are* Transferred
WALJ^A WALLA, Wash., Oct. 15.—
According to a wlreles* message picked
up here tonight by Frank Moore, an
amateur wireless operator, the C. P. R.
steamer Princess Beatrice is ashore on
Noble Island off the Canadian coast and
will probably be a total loss. AH the
passengers are thought, to have been
saved.
Th~e message picked up by Moore on
his privat« apparatus at 7:41 p. m. read
as follows: "Triangle island, 7:40 p. m.
—Captain J. W. Troup, Victoria:
Princess Beatrice ashore on Noble is
land. Passengers transferred to Ven
tura. Uadly damaged-. Send lighter."
Captain Troup is the commodore of
the,C. P. R. fl>«t of steamers and is sta
tioned at Victoria, B. C.
The Princess Beatrice is a sister ship
of the Princess Victoria arid the Prince
Ropert of the Canadian Pacific Alaskan
fleet and>plys between Vancouver, Vic
toria and Skagway. It is $. modern
wooden -vessel of 2,1*0 tons gross reg
ister* built in Victoria, in 1903. The
Ventura is a Canadian owned steamer,
olying on the same route.
ISHI LOSES HEART
TO 'BLOND SQUAW'
Wild Man Regrets Inability to
Talk to Fair Visitor at
Reception
Ishi, the aborigine of-the wild Deer
creek country of Shasta county, held
an "at home" yesterday in the an
thropological museum of the Affiliated
Colleges under the social direction of
the University of California. True,
Ishi didn't serve pink tea and wafers
to his SOO guests during the afternoon,
but he did give a practical demonstra
tion of the primitive methods of weav
i ing a fishnet.
It was rather a long day for Ishi.
lie occasionally complained of being
tired. However, he stuck to his task
fairly well and by 5 o'clock the meshes
numbered enough at least to catch a
Deer creek minnow. At times Ishi
seemed to be embarrassed by the con
stant and incjuisltive gaze of the many
pretty women. He seemed to find re
lief by hanging his towseled head and
scratching one foot with the blgr
bronze, toe of the other, and, turning
his back, quietly pursue his fishnet
knitting.
During the afternoon but few grunts
wore exchanged between Ishi and Sam
Batwee, who officially interprets South
Yana into English. Finally Ishi's long
face lit up. A few more grunts were
exchanged and then Sam Batwee sent
for \V. G. Waterman of the department
of anthropology, who was receiving the
guests for the host.
Instructor Waterman came in a
hurry. He had Climbed three nights
of stairs and was out of breath. It
was worth while, for Ishi, for the first
time since being in captivity, had ex
pressed interest in the fairer sex. Or,
was it only her hat that Ishi had ad
mired?
. A big, tall blond was Leaning- over
the railing of the box stall in which
Ishi was confined. Others eager to see
the wild man from Shasta county had
been compelled to fall back so as to
make room for Hie blond woman's hat.
It seemed as if it were some feet In
diameter. Ishi's phlegmatic soul was
moved. Turning tQ Sam Batwee, he
grunted:
"Heap Hkee talk squaw big hat."
There was true regret, if not a note
of sadness, in his tone. He realized
his handicap. There was the one
woman he admired, but he might as
well have been removed by seas. He
couldn't talk English.
By the time Instructor Waterman
had learned from Bam Batwee what
Ishi wanted, the tall blond, discerning
she was the center of Ishi's admira
tion, had beat a hurried retreat. With
the disappearance of the big hat down
the broad stairway Ishi's first romance
since captured abruptly ended.
The public will be allowed to »cc
Ishi every Sunday afternoon-.
* r THE WEATHER
Highest temperature, 80;
lowest Saturday night, 56.
FORECAST FOR TODAY—Fair, quite
warm in morning, cooler at night, light north
wind changing lo moderate west.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
PEOPLE CRY
GOODBY,
RETURN
Chief Executive Sped on Part*
ing by Friendly Shouts as
He Makes Automobile
Tour
LAST DAY OF HIS STAY
PROVES MOST PLEASANI
Entertainment Includes Lunch
eon at Cliff House and Trip
Through Exposition
Grounds
WORK NOW BEGINS ON
CELEBRATION FOR CANAL
PRESIDENT WILLIAM HOW
ARD TAFT has left San Fran
cisco, but he has with him a
picture that will be with him
always throughout the remainder of
his countrywide "swing 'round the
circle."
It is a mental image, but a perfect
one—a picture of the Panama-Pacinc
International exposition site. The bay*
and the ocean form its background,
and grouped here and there on the
great canvas are- smiling San Fran
cisco faces. Sunshine, gathered along
the ocean beach, through Lincoln
park and along the Presidio boule
vards, suffuses the whole.
The colors are laid on with lavish
touch — sheen of sunlight an the
waters, bright hues' of flowers, strik
ing tones reflected from the military
display at the army reservation.
Friendly Shout "Come Back"
And in his ears linger the friendly
shouts of his hosts, who gave the pic
ture to him:
"Goodby, Bill. Come again soon!"
The president is on his way to Los
Angeles after a three days' vis^t
here, and his last day as the guest oi^
San Francisco was the brightest. It
smacked more of an outing, most df
it, than of official reception, and the
tired guest was more "smiling Bill
Taft" than on any other day of his
brief call.
And today San Franciscans, having
sped their parting guest, will take off
their silk hats and get out some thon"
sand replicas, in wood or iron, of the
silver spade with which the first work
of the world's' exposition was done
Yesterday was a holiday; today th<
whistle blows for three years of work"
Tour Through Park
Through Golden Gat<* park, past
where he started exposition construe*
tion Saturday, Taft was taken in \
bijg touring car. while behind him fol
lowed a retinue of machines carrying
the world's fair directorate. Along
the exposition site to the cliff he went
and then back and through Lincolfl
park, where his machine halted on the
heights while he^took in the horizon
bounded panorama of ocean, bay, city
roofs and distant hills.
Following the exposition plan, the
machines next passed through the
Presidio and out along Harbor View,
ending at the water front along East
street.
And. to complete the picture, Taft
last of all left the land and was taken
to the California, lying out in the
stream, where the fleets of the nations
Uill swing in the magic year 1915.
Tribute to San Francisco
"The exposition is. in San Fran
cisco,"' the president said with convic
tion, "because she knows how."
The Sabbath day was started with
divine service at the First Unitarian
church, where the president went after
a brief call at the Young Men's Chris
tian Association building. Then he
placed himself in the hands of his
hosts, and the day ended only at 8
in the evening, when he boarded his
special train at Third and Town&end
streets and started the next jump to
Lcfc As;geles. He had beenMn San

xml | txt