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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 10, 1911, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1911-11-10/ed-1/seq-5/

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McNAMARA JURY
WARNED NOT TO
DISCUSS CASE
Judge Bordwell Asks That Any
Attempted Tampering Be
> Reported to Him
Action Follows a Talk With
Darrow, but Significance
Is Denied
- LOS ANGELES, Nov. 9.Possible ef
forts, intentional or otherwise, to dis
cuss-the McNamara murder case with
prospective talesmen received cog
nizance from Judge Walter Bordwell,
speaking from the bench late today.
Heretofore this subject has not been
discussed.
Speaking to the three Jurors and
three accepted talesmen In the trial
of James B. McNamara, the Judge ad
monished .them, under the law, not to
discuss the case among themselves or
to mention it in any way. Then he
spoke at some length as to outsiders.
"The court particularly admonishes
you not to talk with any outside per
son, or to allow any outside person to
talk to you about this case," he said.
"Should such attempt .be made you
must instantly rebuke the person
speaking to you. If you can anticipate
it. it is your duty to warn him in
advance, and it is your duty to report
to the court any such attempt, which
may have grave consequences to the
maker."
WARNING CALLED GENERAL
Because of a conference between the
court and Attorney Clarence S. Darrow,
chief counsel for the defense, immedi
ately preceding this instruction, sig
nificant possibilities' were seen in it
by some, but after court it was stated
that no knowledge of such attempt had
come to the ears of the court or coun
sel and that the warning was general
in its intent. 77'-
The dolorous proceedings of examin
ing talesmen were interrupted today
only by occasional jesting matches
among counsel.
"Do you know District Attorney
Fredericks?" asked Assistant District
Attorney G. Ray Horton of John S.
Redfern, a laundry solicitor.
"No," said Redfern. "except that he
once made an address before a men's
club in our church."
Attorney Lecompte Davis of the de
fense, who had been leaning back in
his chair, straightened up with alac
rity.
ANSWER SURPRISES
"What's that?" he cried. "Fredericks
in church?" . 77:7 ;y7;,-???7
Horton paid no attention* to the
laughter which followed.
"Did you ever see Attorney Davis at
your church?" he asked Redfern. and
laughed in his turn at the talesman's
negative answer. 7
Clark McLain, a Pasadena banker,
was added today to Brewster C- Ken
yon, a reputed capitalist, as a talesman
accepted by both sides as to cause, and
J. •B. Sexton, a retired farmer, made
the third. Jurors Robert Bain, F. D
Green and Byron Lisk, already sworn,
appeared in court only at the begin
ning and end of each, session, being
allowed to remain the rest of the time
in the jury room, where they played
card games and read magazines.
CALIFORNIA GRAPES SENT
EAST FOR EXPERIMENT
Growers Wish to Compete With
Spanish Product
WASHINGTON, Nov. 9.California
grape growers, with the co-operation
of the 'department of agriculture, are
experimenting to determine whether
they can compete successfully in New
York and other eastern markets with
the Spanish product. \ Several carloads
of Tokay grapes already have been
shipped east and placed in cold storage
to see how they will keep, and a car
load of the emperor variety arrived
in New York today.
Packed and shipped under the direc
tion of an expert from the pomologlcal
division of the department of agri
culture, every effort has been made to
preserve the grapes in such prime con
dition that they will find a market
by the side of the Spanish Malagas,
Which, it is hoped, they may in time
largely replace on the eastern market:
This important commercial expert-,
ment, tried this year for the first time,
is. the result of five years' investiga
tions of grape packing methods. After
all sorts of substances had been tried,
including cornmeal, bran, shirred paper
and various kinds of sawdust, it was
found that California redwood sawdust
was an even better material in which
to pack grapes than the cork used by
the- Spanish growers.
Efforts also will be made by the
agricultural department to get Cali
fornia - grape growers to raise some
varieties of grapes which keep longer
than those they now produce.
EDWIN ABBEY'S WILL
LEAVES ESTATE TO WIFE
NEW YORK, Nov. 9.—The will of
Edwin Austin Abbey, the artist, who
died in London August 1, as filed here,
leaves all his property, both in this
country and England, to his widow,
Mary Gertrude Abbey. The value is not
mentioned, but it is said to exceed
$1,000,000. The will provides that in
the» event of the prior death of hjs
wife, the estate shall go to the; Royal
Academy Arts in London, the"Metro
politan museum of art in New York
and other art institutions.'
RUBBER IN ORANGES;
MAY STRETCH PRICE
LAWRENCE, Kan., Nov. 9.—Experi
ments made.by; Prof. H. W. Emerson
and C. L. Reese, a fellow in chemistry
at the University of Kansas; have dem
onstrated that the y common ?7 Osage
orange contains the elements of rub
ber. Professor Emerson said: 7 "The
material ,we are experimenting with
may, entirely displace rubber or it may
be mixed with rubber to improve the
quality." * ■ - *^.-*7* '7- .* ■
BOY TRIFLES WITH GUN,
PLAYMATES ARE KILLED
NOWAK, Okla., Nov.? 9—Fred Stan
dard, 12 years old, playfully; pointed a
shotgun at his three girl - companions.
all :aged 7, at the home of .his father
near - here,, when the boy unintention
ally pulled the trigger, Bergie Nicholas
Madge Stevens:fell-dead?wlthUheir
heads shot away, and i Edith" Fisher re
ceived wounds from 7 which .she 7 will
.die/^y 7-? y '7 X '' '- \
. A plunge in comfortably heated ocean
tali water at tbe Lurline Baths before
breakfast makes th *.' day's work easy.
Baths open at ; 7 a. m. and until 10
p. m. 7 Bush and I^arJfcla. stxaets, . "-7-7
t^cDoiW Copyrlghtea by Kohler * Cha~ ,•*—"* « A Li U°OJ>^
_r^«P ■ i iß[ T _lI f\ YtX \__/ V-^^ *mr TT *•' _r The Co'°Perative Bonus Platt
* w ■'■ ''^^^^^n^^^W%m\i jBHI WT^ 1 h A -mf I ■ 1 ____^ still further lessens the prices.
T<sx__y 7;W(B lap y®Us Sill! lllfi)®Mit th® y^o} 3)W.
Pkini© §©!<_ to ctaib [email protected][email protected]' f®r $277—
<_ These Go-Operative Club Pianos are worth fully ( —■™«^m^^b.^____« . y v _^__^___^_ ——-^—— ————^.
**J These Co-Operative Club Pianos are worth fully j "
$350, yet by the power of this huge Co-.Operative Specification of the $350 Piano Sold to
purchase the Kohier & chase Co-Operative Club Co-Operative Club Members fors 27 7.50
price is $277.50. $5 Cash and $6 per Month
F *P wsn anaso per moiun
-.•J These instruments have been sold in San Francisco ,sounding board: Constructed
and Alameda Counties for years and years at $350. 1 [ piece by piece * the toest, sel^d
_ ,•• . . - ii-i_ •".-..' ____^_____ gram, spruce—thoroughly kiln dried.
Hundreds are being sold every month all over the > y/\ ■" w/V\ :-^p^-:"-..^'. ■ h>>itj"-- \ r The excellence of this sound board ac- '
United States at $350, because they are fully V/ / ',// ' y^- 'N^ counts in a large measure for the beauty,
_.__. -_***__»_-_ t->i -11 i ii _ tf"?_-A • yui. ■/// // v! / ■ ■// /s^\ of tone and durability of the piano.
worth $350. They will be sold at $350 again the </\ // / / // /^ waot «\ :; ,7 ■ nf 'Htmm'" '
-. „x x-xAty a* , . -1 . _* j " ---__ /,r // // '—-* BACK: Selected-spruce of straight,
moment this great Co-Operative purchase is exhausted. ~~V * ' //- v / //•> even gram—strbngf lasting and^reso^. '
«J The Kohler & Chase Co-OperatiVe Club /price is .-; V Q;/ : # / RIBS: ' Scientifically graded, glued and
$277*50. That price includes everything. There V A ■/ // x V doweled on back of soundboard while
are- no extras of any kind—nothing to be added for • I I>l N I/AY/ 1 : V I the latter still retains the heat of dry,
■ f' . , 7 7. • 7-7*7- . * *? .-.;...•.<-. , 7 kiln, a process similar to that used in
drayage, freight,? StOOl— aDSOlUtely HO eXtraS— yA Lg •--•- ; ■ jJ the making of famous violins.
•a. £ . - ..-•.•*:- D Fig.l . t ■ 7 i ..^ . .
no interest tor one year. Figure 1. Above (1) illustrates the frame, ribs and back of sound board
*1 You don't even have to pay a penny extra for the and wrestplank. Sound board (a), ribs (b), skeletontome (c).
insurance ?feature, whereby, in the event of a club bridge: ;is of selected rock maple, guaranteed Hf)^ni/n^ffi^fft
member dyina before his contract is complete a receipt ■ not to warp or <*«*• This beautifully built bridge ;Ml ' )[ j ' ll ,^r3
•■• _ ii ' - :^ ' 'i_- £ -'.'.■:---i'.'-:-' __.___-__. • i is a splendid feature of the piano: Figure 3 lllus- JjJ j | i |hi ll 7 a aa
in full is sent to his family, removing every risk. trates a reduced cross sec tion showing the carefully , l|j ,; | f
'" - - selected, harmoniously grained rock maple. ; Fill 1! If ]|| ( ) [|jr , • -
_#_ht „fl_____f ■ tASM IP dffl^ PER. ' STRINGS: Finest iVmericah Piano Wire, guaranteed of even thickness and
'MF* 1 W vAdll Ar^ HAfSteTU STRINGS: Finest American Piano Wire, guaranteed of even thickness and
m*.. IK/I_l__^M -^B^ JBr - .'JWV/iN I rl. ,-,■..:.,.., -:, y : - t^_ — temper; will not stretch or break under four
P WHILN aH lni_-^_ NO / —--j] times the strain placed upon them by
■ # I V/U W H |^pT>WF r^m*l TUNING PINS: Tem Pered stee1 ' g^aran
-I*^mW JOIN YEAR. li^l^^ffiHriHn^nH" PLATE: 11 Reinforced (1), exceptionally 'fl
, : • .■'■'■ v-..*:'\ ---■:'■"■■ ■- iSMb^mjHH^l " Firt *? ■ strong and solid fall board—latest type of
q The terms are easy-$5 cash when ': * • ißrflNhfl i ' r,-B-^ • Boston Fall." *
he. terms ,are? : e
yOU JOin- then $6 per month. •''"'■ ACTION: Double .repeating type, .7 : - ,
r * 7 3 r:-..«..:. . specially regulated for Pacific coast L—^^^^ '
' The piano is delivered immediately. You do not have to wait y conditions. . i *
until the Co-Operative Club is filled. You get your piano when r^ HAMMERS: Compound felt of the \^f ~^/~^—^ ~^^3
- - _i ' ... ..u «__ _v j Y ff r,7^ ro\ best quality. Of good weight,- and ■■■■ \\ . $/ A /o<_^^^
you join—the moment you pay the $5-the remainder ($272:50) y; carefully voiced. g°°d ™^ " *** *■ %"' * lff%^\j^^^\
is payable monthly—s6. per month. Club members do not .7PEDALS:' Three, the center one for '^^^ / J^/^^^
have to more than $6 per month. This gives them forty- softening the tone for practice. %II M^*/M^'
six months to complete the payments for their piano, and still get KEYS: Good quality Genuine Ivory. \fi /^^^|©/^AII
it at the Co-Operative Club Price Of $277.50. MUSIC REST: Full' extension— }A M J^Pl Full
§ Every instrument is guaranteed outright. .-case-;:i)ou^^ crossbanded mahog- '■'■'ih^^^^^^m- Guar - •
ThAHA s)i«A no "its" Or "hutS " It is iust a >% oak ' or walnut veneer, finished A < jL^^^^^^\l "; anteed
nere are no? Ira Or OUIS> ii id JUSt a with six coats of the best yvarn^ sh j&szfm^f^O\ ;
straightforward guarantee, as firm as we thoroughly hand rubbed v .;• fc= ; ; o^w^ '^1. •;^;.;,
know how to make it. Figure 1, at right hand, shows the plate and front view of bridges.
The other instruments in the Kohler ®> Chase Co-Operative Club are:
r > THE $375 ; UPRIGHT PIANO ris an artistic piano of l the very highest musical merit—modern down to tne minutest detail. It : '-'•'#,*. ■-..--. - ■"■■;- -„•.-.!, ; . «^
' ,7 7is in mahogany, walnut and oak. It is a celebrated make, used and indorsed by the leading pianists and singers. It is a piano that is -re „ . „
D_i« A'■ Tl-l __? .selling, daily over the land for. **7S' The? Co-Operative price is $375. ' x , ** AxA- A. T,Qe j COmI"
: Kvdvl 1 5 JilS ■•'■ ' THE BABY GRAND is a make of international reputation—a household word among musicians—the culmination of 50 years' ■• try CUt tnlS OUt and mail
? ?,: * experience. It retails , regularly at $750. But by making this very large Co-Operative purchase and placing the order months ahead, -itto .
TVi ro-onprntiv#» f"1 X this,beautiful:■ Baby Grand is sold to* Co-Operative Club Members at 9585. v .
-1 ne 7 L,o-operauve L.IUD 7.THE'PLAYER-PIANO is designed and built by the most experienced player-piano organization in the world—an organization 7: Kohler & ChaSO A 7
prices can • not be increased, that controls 300 patents. Here again, by making one of the largest player-piano purchases ever made, instead of paying the regular nc Cl, Parr oil Of
but they can be materially viPrice^W^ * sold to Co-Operative Club Members only for f 485^. «> " 4„plnLn
lessened by taking advan- Membership .Books Are Now Open and the Pianos [and Player °dn * rancisco
tage of the Club Bonus. / Pianos Are on View at Our San Francisco and Oakland Stores c-S^laenm^ai?^^ S
- •'" "' . Every time a member - , •- ''-"'• ': "- • ■■' I ' l ,'' <- ■> '\- .. v operative ciub to
makes an extra payment , 'Tl 77/^Xl^^ i£* X { "UtSTTH /^fl^ °»k,and M 7.
\T^TJ^IZ 26 OFarr... Street Wfft) \\\\}dl&^ V B,c« ■*. am St
credited to that member's Open Saturday A\\__V PIANOS Ip* .- Open Evenings
account J Evenings Until 10 |\>^^ . AND PLAYER - PIANOS L "Until " 1 1
-________J U l^ AND PLAYER-PIANOS /^ I •""; ;••-•-- J
jpcpQfp^f General Distributing -Agents tor Weber, Knabe, Kohler A Chase, Fischer, and Andrew Kohler Pianos; also for, Stelnway, Steck, X^CQfEk^
fikVfl^f Wheelock, Stuyvesant Pianola Pianos and the Standard Weber Pianola Piano X\\lP2l
"-■ ~'"? ■■■"■■ -.'"-^■.■-v —-—,yv;yy~-r, _„ . ..,;:y,,:,-....... „,,. „,-... „■. —r —: :~i^xA~^—r~xr'- r*—~~ , -. • ~~X -~ , ~ *"7'*"''"""TT; ~r" " -~ - ; ~r- —— -. . _.. , • \ ■
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1911.
5

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