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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 13, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1912-04-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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• ISdlStedS -ffi^f fclfe(g:,llfe^. : mxsl @[email protected] <§¥ "tfite ©ipasa% Son<^^l
THE BOYS AND CIRLS OF THE CRATN SCHOOL WHO EDITED THE JUNIOR CALL TODAY
STATE INDUSTRIES
TO BE FEATURED
California's Products to Ap
pear on Films of Moving
Picture Screens
HAZBI. 1.. \\i:il.
•Moving pictures have done a great
deal toward instructing people of one
continent in the habits and customs of
people of another and ?the proposed
; photographing 'i of California's . indus
tries (along '>, this line would-be, a great
help Jo the state.'l^,The raisin and grape
industry around" Fresno would' show .the
, area of the vineyards. "* The lumbering
in Mendoclno and .other northern coun
ties would make most interesting pic
tures. The redwoods of California al
ways; attract easterners.l Petaluma has
some of the largest poultry farms to be
found anywhere and < these would make
attractive subjects for moving pictures,
tracing the entire process of chicken
raising as it is carried on. ■-:>/ '
>?; At agricultural fairs here and in the
east, such moving pictures would show
farmers the wonderful advantages Cal
ifornia haa to offer in all lines of mr
dustry. i- In :■«* the V northern i; part of 4 the
state ..things;! adapted "to % a ,temp«rate
climate, grow > best. ,'i In the southern
part fruit "raising and other activities
suitable to '* a ? semi-tropical climate do
well. If i the people :of * the middle west
could i know and ,see t the California ~* in
dustries ? many !.i would '.be;: willing to
come S here ad i settle on 1? farms, v " ,^
--; In -'southern iCalifornia;. the i climate
permits of the "! raising of ostriches and
alligators. The -* ostrich farm in South
Pasadena is most interesting to .visit,
and is one of; the largest in the United
States. s Some >of , the - alligators ;■ are
trained, and their > tricks ; are , amusing
to ; watch.;-_ Luther \ Burbank has ■ given
many valuable \ species iof " fruits, flow
ers', . plants ; and i trees ?. to ;thes world. His
improved : potato and the spineless cac
, tvs have brought s him and California
, worldwide l fame. ■> The •,;- cactus t r makes
possible cattle raising on.arid.and des
ert portions of the * state, vbecause, it
furnishes a food and water to the : cat-
tie.
All these things and many more
could be depicted in moving pictures.
Our Next President and Why
I , AAHOX M.^SARCJENT,
{Theodore— Roosevelt expects to be
elected-president- of the United 'States,
although - most ;of the population . la
against him. * ,If /a lion 'had*.swallowed
him in $ Africa he' would have * died a
great man. ;;'.;" ■-■ •, ' '_'*"' *. -. .
- Since\ many of the people think lie
will hardly get the nomination in the
primary election, it is almost "certain
Taft will get-it. .;; , *.y s: = „ \ v
; For a while Roosevelt said he would
not."accept; a • third term, and later sajd
that -he would 'accept, a third term if
asked* to run. Now, he expects :to be
elected i and will, be greatly surprised
find himself defeated. » . ,
: BesidesiTaft^havlng the. best chance',
it is the duty;of every ; Californian to
vote for] him, • for he ; gave us the expo
sition, enforced = the Sherman law, en
couraged interstate .-commerce and ' gave
us the postal savings-bank.-- I think
it -is a very poor "cl tizen*. who will * not
vote for a man who save our-state s.i
much and who has "made such a good
president. - ■ _ ,
THE San Francisco CALL
SAN CAU, BATUKUAY, APRIL 13, 1912.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor in Chief ....IFRKDRITCHIE
■'AiwwiiiteVr.V/.'r.'. 1;...... TKUItY iiolbbrton ;
Associate. 1;............;:..".. MARY O'CONNOR
News editor. ;■;...;...,\ ItKINKI.KY AIVKR.SON
Assistant news editor..... UIORUHRT . KAWSON
.Society edit0r............ KATHARINK NRVIN
Assistant Hoelety edit0r.;......'. .KSTHlMt'mil.r,
Athletic editor .............. STUART BKVANS
TODAY'S
PROGRAM
The Junior Call's Second
Story Telling Party
MISSION TURN- VEREIN HALL
Eighteenth Street, Between Guerrero
And Valencia Srteets, April
13, at 2:30 P. M.
1— Old Pipes and the Dryad.. Eetold from F. R. Stockton
MRS. ERIC K. OLSEN
t
2—Piano Solo Balancolle
STEFAN VUCOSAVLIEVICH
3—The Five Chinese Brothers . . Retold Chinese Fables
MRS. ERIC K. OLSEN
4—Drawings of Alonzo and the Pup
ARTIST JAMES NAVONI
s—Mikkel, Norwegian Story . Retold from H. H. Boyesen
MRS. ERIC K. OLSEN
Artist r. JOHN [!. lIKSS
Arrl-l ;....:.;.............. I'im.ll" WISHER
'•." ' RKPOHTOHIAI. STAKI'
• ':i Robert Carßon, ~\ IMtm Weils. Elisalietlii >KeHam.*
Rlelianli'- !#<■, : Haze! -■;Weil, * Percy VElliott, •: I'uiil
Claiupett,Harris Carrlgan.-.MlldreU* Howe, riuu
ces v T.diiliiiHOii, l.uiira I'rHlt, & Ruskpll ' Poetic
thwaUe, Scott Smitb, Jack C'tiitinberlin. ■
GRANT
DENOUNCES EVILS
OF HIGH TARIFF
Grant Pupil Declares That
Lower Tariff Would Be
Beneficial to Country
I; I I/ A B NTII X BMiAV
A protective tariff is a duty placed on
all t lie goods which come into our
country from foreign lands. It pro
tects our home industries and erives our
government a source from Which to de
rive an income. This system is one of
the various ways in which our country
is supported and, 1 think, it is one of
the best.
In some countries the government is
supported by a tax laid on the income
of their citizens, and even in our own
country the incomes of all large cor
porations are taxed. A tax is also laid
on the money one inherits. This is
called an inheritance tax.
The protective tariff ia adjusted in
the following 1 manner: As tea is not
grown in our own country the tariff
placed on that article is low, but wool
or wheat brought from other lands is
rated at a high value because we raise
such quantities In the United States.
The inflated price of food and cloth
ing' at the present time is claimed to
be due to the high rate of protective
tariff in this way. Competition fixes
the price of food. Take for an example
orangres. If It is a good year many
crops are raised and oranges are plenti
ful. Therefore the markets are full.
The price of them is low. If a heavy
frost occurs many crops are lost. The
lucky farmers who have managed to
save theirs are rewarded by getting a
fine price because of the scarcity of
them in the markets.
Again, If the protective tariff is so
high that foreign lands can not afford
to send many of their exports to us the
price of the same article in our coun
try is kept high, as we have a monop
oly on the goods. Thus at the present
time many things in our country are
constantly kept at artificial values be
cause of the high protective tariff.
If the tariff were lowered our mar
kets would be always full of these ar
ticles and prices would be reasonable.
At the same time our government
would be supported, our home inilus-.
tries protected and the prices of tilings
would not be so artificially valued.
A Possible War
BDWIN HARRIS CARRICiAN
The people of the United States or
at least a great many of them, don't
seem to think much about the re
bellion in Mexico, but it Is of vital
Importance to the United States.
The government went well with Diaz,
but since then the country has been in
a constant state of rebellion. Isn't
this rebellion K<>ins to weaken Mexi<<>
so that a foreign country could .step
in and take or control if.'
This would mean the violation of the
Monroe doctrine and trouble —possibly
war —the Kpanlsh-American war over
again or v worse one. Why should
not the United States be interested?

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