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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, October 26, 1912, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1912-10-26/ed-1/seq-3/

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THE SAM FRANCISCO CALL, SATI ['HAY. j M i< >BER A., IMA T! IK JUNIOR CALL.
Get a Denman Pennant
How many of the Denman
girls arc hustlers?
From the splendid appearance
of the Denman edition today it
would seem almost safe to predict
that all of its girl students arc the
real hustling variety of American
girls.
On pages 4 and 5 of The Junior
today the hustling girls of the
Denman school will find some
thing which will no doubt prove
of great interest to them.
Every girl, to be a good school
citizen, must love her school and
loci a loyal interest in its prog
ress. Therefore, anything which
touches upon tiiat phase of her
fife must prove doubly attractive.
The Junior, knowing that the
average girl is desirous of pos
sessing* her own school pennant,
has made arrangements whereby
witli very little labor any girl
may win one.
The pennants for the Denman
school are made of a fine grade
of felt in the light blue and'gold
of the school colors. They are
12 inches wide and 24 inches
long.
One subscription of three
months will win a pennant, but
the subscription must come from
some one who is not a present
subscriber of The Call .
Look for further details on
pages four and five.
Denman Has No Penmen
Adelaide Elrick
"Now dot your I's and cross your T'a
And mind jour P's and Q's;
In a penman here at Denman
No errors they'll excuse."
The pupil quickly answered,
As she made more lines and curls,
"There are no penmen here at Denman,
We only have pen girls."
ANSWER THESE PICTURE PUZZLES-THREE BOOKS TO BE AWARDED
JJUNIORS NOTICE)
These puzzles are for
Juniors from 10 to 16
years only and ARE
NOT for grownups.
Juniors must write
name, address, age and
school on postal bearing
their solutions, other
wise they WILL NOT
be considered.
What arti'-le»of furniture
The girls are fond of outdoor sports.
What part of a flower?
What dairy product?
•*■ ~ I—
What instrument of restraint?
What kind of public speech"
Halloween and Its Fun
Dorcas Dreypolcher
Halloween Is the evening- of October
"J, so called as being the v\>* of all
hallows or all saints.
It is associated in the popular imag
ination with the prevalence of super
natural influence.
Fairies are supposed to dance, ghosts
are abroad and witches in power.
Charms and spells are invoked to read
the veiled future, and the yoiins people
come under the influence of the creeps
as the ghostly hour advances, for every
thing |a carried out in a wierd and
thrilling manner. Nevertheless fun
reigns supreme. for the halloween
ghosts are cheerful minded creatures,
as they say in Scotland, the home of
halloween.
'Halloween parties are kept as secret
as possible, even the invitations being
given secretly.
The rooms are decorated with pump
kin lanterns, having grinning faces,
with witches and black cats, and to add
to the awesomeness of the occasion
everything is spoken in whispers.
Tableaus of "the three witches of
Macbeth," "Hamlet and tbe ghost,"
"Witches riding broomsticks and accom
panied by huge black cats," are given
with thrilling effects.
Such games as roasting nuts, duck
ing for apples, paring apples, etc.. are
indulged in. The apple must be pared
so that the skin is unbroken, then this
is spun three times around the head
over the left shoulder and dropped be
hind the person, who says: "By this
parting I wish to discover the letter of
the name of my true lover." The imag
inary initial is sure to be found on the
ground.
Another Interesting game is ducking
into a pie made of flour for a ring
that has been hidden therein. This
must be taken out by the mouth, no
hand touching It. The one finding it
Is to be married within a year. Of
course, some reward is offered the most
successful contestant, and besides he
is crowned with apple parings.
In addition to the merry games, for
tunes are told by melting solder and
pouring it Into cold water. • The fertile
imagination can read tbe different for
mations and prophesy good or evil for
the eager onlookers.
Besides teacup grounds are read, and
blood curdling ghost stories usually
wind up the evening.
Ocir Sewing
Ethel Lang
Our sewing Is very interesting,
We like it, I'm sure, we all do;
But sometimes it's somewhat perplexing
To get the blue true to the blue.
But, of course, we must all agree sweetly
In sewing our little checked bags,
For it*s_better to do little neatly
Than big things that look like dishraga.
WINNERS OF
PUZZLE PRIZES
The answers to the puzzles in <
The Junior of Saturday, October ,
19, are as follows: \
1, Philip; 2, Battle; 3, Bolt; 4, ]
Wilson; S, Bandit; 6, Crazy. «
The Juniors to whom prizes |
were awarded are:
M. Adele Dalton, 1465 Signal
street, San Pedro.
Frank Gracia, 132 Hamilton \
avenue, San Francisco. ;
Viola McCrelHs, 980 Hayes I
street, San Francisco. !
What part of a flower?
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