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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, October 28, 1912, Image 1

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SPORTS ITEMS in Yesterday's
CALL 78
Chronicle 57
Examiner 49
Both Quantity and Quality in The Call
VOLUME CXIL—NO. 150.
GOTHAM QUAILS
BEFORE WRATH
OF UNDERWORLD
Defiant Fist Shaken as After=
math of Becker Trial and
Residents Shudder
Court, Prosecutor and Police
Are Threatened; Reign of
Terror Is Feared
Aged Jurist Warned of Plot to
Kill Him; Special Deputies
Guard the Tombs
PATRICK GALLAGHER
Ik {Special Dispatch to The Call]
NEW YORK, Oct. 27.—Jhe largest,
greatest city in rae United
States faces a reign of terror
tonight. The hand of the under
world, angry, desperate, defiant, is
shaken in a clenched fist in the faces
of the responsible officers of the law.
The aftermath of the conviction of
Charles Becker, police lieutenant
"strong arm" chief, principal in the
conspiracy which murdered Herman
Rosenthal, informer for the district at
torney, is a shower of death threats
aimed at Justice Goff, District Attorney
Whitman, the prosecution witnesses
and the jury which doomed Becker to
death.
The officials named, the members of
the jury and the witnesses whose lib
erty was not temporarily forfeited by
complicity in the crime, are guarded
night and day by special deputies.
Greater Crime Brewing
A crime more atrocious even than
the killing of the gambler who was
willing to expose the "system," is
feared to be brewing. Citizens are
considering the formation of a vigil-
ance committee to clean out the under-
world. If harm befalls Goff or Whit
man drastic measures will unquestion-
ably be taken by the people of New
York, stung to the last pitch of indig
nation by the threats of the criminal
rings.
"Do not go to court Wednesday,"
Justice Goff was warned today. "If
you carry out your intention and
sentence Becker to the electric chair
♦ you will have sentenced yourself to a
sudden and horrible end."
Goff Shows No Fear
The white haired justice fixed
Wednesday for the solemn pronounce
ment of judgment of the people in the
case against the police lieutenant who
conspired against the people. Justice
Goff is unafraid. This is the ninth
threat which he has received since he
charged the jury, summing up the con
vincing chain of guilt, proving the case
against the accused.
Just before the jury returned to
court at midnight with Becker's death,
warrant written on their set, white
faces the venerable justice was called
Io the telephone in his private chamber.
He was told by some secret foe that a
verdict of "guilty** would mean certain
death to him. "You, have still time,"
warned this unknown voice. "Act
while there is time."
Threats Against Whitman
The judge was unmoved. Even when
the telephone warning was followed by
letters of a similar strain he opposed
the taking of precautions. He is being
guarded, nevertheless, and the domes
tics and members of his family have
been enjoined to watch all food care
fully lest poison be introduced.
Strangers who seek to be present at
the final scene in court will have to
submit to a thorough search Wednes
day. A corps of secret service men will
be on the lookout for bombs, dynamite
or concealed weapons. Army officers
prepared to shoot on the first sign of
danger will be stationed near the judge
& he enters and dons the black cap to
. ommit the body of Becker to the state
rxecutioner and his soul to the mercy
of an all merciful God.
Throughout the Becker trial Whit
man received numerous warnings.
These all hinged on the conviction of
Becker, deemed doubtful up to the last
moment, when the judge left but one
slight crack In the gloomy wall of ac
cepted, damning proof for a faipt ray
of hope to flicker through—the part
nership or nonpartnership of Schepps
in the ring of the accused.
As soon as the verdict was given
"Whitman was handed the "black bean."
He was jostled leaving the court room
end a hurriedly scribbled condemnation
thrust into his pocket. By next morn
ing his mail was thick with threats of
death. These have continued to reach
his office and his home in Madison ave
nue.
Dogged by Criminals
Known criminals dog every step he
takes, penetrating even to the corridors
of the central terminal. Their black
looks and ugly gestures tell the tales of
thugs made desperate.
"Jack Rose" and the other informers
Khake and shiver in their cells. They
%>ow that to leave the shelter of
the prison means certain death.
The innocent witnesses going about
their business are. even more terrified.
They are marked for the Retribution
of the gangs—bourbons of crime, who
Continued on Page 3, Column 7
Nineteen Gaze At
Electric Glare and
Are Stricken Blind
ANDERSON, Ind.. Oct. 27.—
Nineteen persons are reported
to have been stricken blind as
as a result of gazing at a light
caused by workmen welding
with an electrical process on a
trolley wire early today, accord
ing to local physicians who
were called to treat the cases.
Several who saw the light were
not stricken until a few hours
later.
Boy Stands on Head
On Rail 150 Feet
Above Awed Crowd
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
LOS ANGELES, Oct. 27.—His body
silhouetted against the clear sky as he
nonchalantly stood on his head on the
railing of a fire escape on the thir
teenth story of the Los Angeles In
vestment company building, Eighth
and Broadway, Herbert Loucke, 10
years old, held a thousand persons
spellbound with horror in the street,
150 feet below, until the police arrived
and took the boy into custody. Taken
to f*he police station for examination
as to his sanity, Loucke informed the
surgeons that he was merely doing
stunts to test his nerve. He was de
tained overnight.
LION GRABS QUARRY
UNDER HUNTER'S NOSE
Plucks Rabbit Before Gun of
Sportsman and Flees
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
HILLSBOROUGH, Oct. 27.—William
Knight, foreman of the Prince Poniat
owski place, in the foothills back of
Burlingame, brought home tales today
of wild experiences while shooting rab
bits near Crystal Springs lakes.
He said he saw a rabbit running
toward him around a bend in the trail,
and shot it, and the next instant a
large mountain lion, which had been
chasing the rabbit, appeared, seized
the quarry in its teeth and disap
peared in the brush.
Several cadets from St. Matthews
military academy, out for a Sunday
stroll, saw the tracks. This is the first
mountain lion that has been seen in
this vicinity for several years.
"BEEF AND" MEEHAN DIES
WORTH NEARLY $1,000,000
Proprietor of Famous Restaur-
ant Expires in Gotham
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
NEW YORK, Oct. 27. —John T. Mee
han, owner of Dolan's "beef and" es
tablishment, 33 Park row, died early
today in his home in the Bronx.
In his death New York loses one of
its characters. A few years ago when
Theodore Roosevelt was president
Johnny Meehan went to a White House
reception as his guest.
Although worth nearly $1,000,000 he
never stopped work and was always to
be found behind the worn counter.
Dolan's was for years the mecca of
politicians of prominence, newspaper
men and others.
CALIFORNIA GIRL LURES
RICH GOTHAM BACHELOR
Jackson Says Farewell to Wall
Street; on Way Here
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
NEW YORK, Oct. 27.—Fielding
Vaughan Jackson, bachelor beau, erst
while pitcher and first baseman for
Yale, has sold his seat on the stock
exchange, said farewell to Wall street
and packed his grip for southern Cali
fornia. Jackson is going to own and
manage a ranch. It is whispered that
there is possibly a California girl in
the case. Young Jackson Is handsome,
a noted cotillon leader and his defec
tion is a sad blow-to the society of
Gotham.
FREIGHTCARS CRASH
INTO PASSENGER TRAIN
Two Killed as Locomotive Is
Hurled on Tender
DILLON, Mont., Oct. 27.—Two run
away freight cars loaded with coal,
dashing down a 15 mile grade and at
taining a speed of approximately 50
miles an hdur, crashed into the. Oregon
Short Line's passenger train No. 4 at
Ki.M, 33 miles from here, this after
noon, killing Engineer William Purdy
and Fireman Eugene Bare. None of
the passengers were injured. The
shock of the collision threw the loco
motive on top of its tender.
GEN. CHARLES MORRIS
DIES AT HIS HOME
Presidio Under His Command at
Time of Fire
PORTLAND, Me., Oct. 27.—Brigadier
General Charles Morris, U. S. A., retired,
dierf at his home here today, aged 69
year*. He was in command of the Pre
sidio at San Francisco at the time of the
earthquake in 1906, and was second in
command to General Funston over the
troops stationed in the city after the
disaster.
THE CALL
Oakland Wins the Coast League Pennant
World Series Had Nothing on Final Fight
I ABBOTT SLIDING INTO THIRD BASE IN THE'THIRD INNING OF YESTERDAY AFTERNOON'S CAME. HE^
SCORED A MOMENT LATER WHEN CATCHER BOLLES THREW THE BALL AWAY. LEVEJIENZ IS SEEN REACHING |
FOR THE BALL, W+HCH GOT AWAY FROM HIM.
♦ ♦
Bill Malarkey, the veteran pitcher who clinched the pennant for Oakland
by shutting Los Angeles out.
STRONG OFFERS TO
SMITE THE TURKS
"Who Is He?" Asks Bulgarian
Minister—Well, Inquire
of May Yohe
[Special Cable io The Call]
LONDON, Oct. 27.—Major Putnam
Bradlee Strong, son of the late Mayor
Strong of New York and once the hus
band of May Yohe, the actress, would
like to help Czar Ferdinand smite the
Turks, according to a telegram from
Sofia received here today. Strong
cabled an offer to volunteer from Sin
gapore, lie is on his way to Europe.
The Bulgarian minister here asked a
newspaper friend:
"Who is Major Putnam Bradlee
Strong?"
The newspaper man replied:
'Better ask May Yohe."
"Is she a princess or a queen?"
queried the diplomat.
"No,'* said the scribe, "hut she once
was a queen of comic opera."
Strong, it was learned, has been help
ing the king of Siam run the wonder
ful kingdom of the fabled "white ele
phant." He had a clerical job in Bang
kok, where sunshine is cheap apd ice
an almost unknown luxury. He was
pointed by Rear Admiral •'Billy"
Byrne, commander In chief of the Siam
ese navy (and one "pot metal" cruiser),
who formerly stepped the quarterdeck
of a Hoboken ferry boat.
Strong heard about the war In the
Balkans and took the next packet
across to Singapore, where he managed
to secure passage to Europe. Under
the "family compact" following the
celebrated "champagne cruise" and the
Yohe divorce case, the former volunteer
officer and Spanish war veteran receives
$150 a month on condition that he re
frains from stepping on the soil of the
United States or seeking the blandish
ments of the bright lights of Broadway.
SAN FRANCISCO, MONDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1912.
KAISER LOADS GUN
FOR BALKAN WAR
Spurns Overtures lor Confer*
ence With Powers; Prep
arations On for Fight
MALCOLM M. CLARK
lible to The Call]
', Oct 27.—Germany Is arm
-14 greatest clash in the hls
e world. Tonight war fever
•ough every port of the cap
' is going to war; prepared
Every army corps, every
train is ready for the ex
tocol.
has determined to. settle the
testlon to suit himself. The
h.ancellor handed his majesty
patch from Sir Edward Grey
te necessity for immediate
of the powers to save chaos
ar east and the destruction
Itical equilibrium,
ser was In his study when
nann-Holweg and Klderlln
vere announced. The chan
ded imperial majesty the
al document,
hall I do with it?" asked the
rour pipe with it," said the
It Is known that the kaiser Is
furiously angry with Sir Edward Grey,
with M. Polncaire, with M. Sazanoff.
The repositors of the foreign policies
of England, France and Russia ignored
the kaiser purposely, he claims, in the
recent discussion of Balkan affairs.
They treated Germany with contempt.
Austria, too, is flouting Germany in
contemplated armed Intervention. It
Is announced tonight that Germany has
warned Austria that one Austrian sol
dier in the Balkans will mean eight
army corps on the road to Vienna "to
finish up the commencement made at
ALL FANS' HATS OFF
TO OUR SISTER Clf i
It's a Great Old Banner
For That Fine New
City Hall '
WILLIAM J. SLATTERY
The Pacific Coast league pennant for
the seas«n of 1912 will float on top of
the Oakland flagpole.
Oakland's fighting club earned this
highly prized trophy yesterday by ad
ministering a double defeat to the
Los Angeles team. A slip in either
would have meant a pennant for
Vernon, because the southern team
carried off a double headed victory
against Portland on the Los Angeles
diamond.
Oakland wing the pennant by a full
gam», or four points. It was the
closest race ever known in the Pacific
Coast league and one of the closest
that organized baseball ever experi
enced.
San Francisco never knew such a
baseball day. Her fans threw preju
dice and partisan feeling aside and
turned out to roqt for Oakland. The
home team, unfortunate, downtrodden
and disconsolate, was playing up in
Sacramento —but who cared? It was
Oakland with the majority of the fans.
The others were still loyal to Vernon
because Happy Hogan is such a good
fellow.
Hats Off to Oakland!
Now that it's all done and over witn,
the fans of the league should doff their
hats to the Oaklanders and give them
the credit that is coming their way.
They won the pennant on the level.
They played the winning brand of ball
and showed their pluck and their
fighting ability in the pinches. They
had their ups and downs, and they
triumphed in the end. More power to
them!
The sympathy of the populace must
be doled out to Hogan and his Vil
lagers. For the second time in two
years, he and his were nosed out of
the pennant within their grasp. Port
land beat them last year, with the aid
of Oakland. They forgot all about
that humiliation and came back this
Continued on Page 9, Column 1
GIFT OF EMPEROR
IS LOST IN SEWER
Mrs. Nellie Grant Sartoris Jones
Loses Gem Valued at
$100,000
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
NEW YORK, Oct. 27.—A secret care
fully guarded for six months was dls
co\'ered today when it became known
that Mrs. Nellie Grant Sartorls Jones,
daughter of General U. S. Grant, lost
last May a historic emerald ring given
to her father by the emperor of Japan.
The ring, the intrinsic value of which
is $25,000, was dropped down a waste
pipe in the Hotel Renaissance, where
Mrs. Sartorls was living before her
marriage last July to Frank H. Jones,
a Chicago banker and assistant post
master general in President Cleveland's
second administration. The historical
and sentimental value of the gem only
can be guessed at, but an authority said
it was worth $100,000. /
When Mrs. Sartorls inherited the
Jewel she Insured it for $5,000, and the
full amount was paid after the company
conducted a search such as never had
been made -in this city. The company
caused the city sewer running from
Fifth to Seventh avenues in Forty
third street to be cleaned of every par
ticle of residue.
AfttEWEATHER
S YESTERDAY— temperature, 58;
TOD A V—Cloudy;
moderate* 'Stufhwesi winds.
For Details of the Weather See Pay© 13
t
No Such Struggle In
League's Histor
; The 1912 world's series was
; thrilling, but it had no edge on
the windup of our own Coast
! league season. A slip yesterday
; would have cost Oakland the
; pennant — for the Vernon Tigers,
» like the Oaks, won both their.
I games. Our iransbay cousins
I didnt slip, however, and here is
j the full score of their "amen
! game" — a fine one to wind
', up on.
| 108 ANGELES
TelMl g»rae— AB. R. BH. PO. A. E.
! Page, 2b 4 0 0 3 3 0
| Berger, ss 4 0 0 3 0 0
J Daley, c. f 4 0 0 1 0 0
! Moore, lb 4 0 2 6 0 0
I Driscoll. r. f 4 0 0 0 0 0
; Metzger. 3b a 0 0 2 1 0
; Lober, 1. f 3 0 0 1 0 0
| Boles, c 3 0 0 8 1,1
! Perritt, p 0 0 0 0 0 0
J Leverenz, p 2 0 0 0 3 0
Total 30 0 2 24 8 1
OAKLAND
; AB. K. BH. PO. A, E.
; Leard, 2b 2 0 0 3 3 0
' Abbott, 1. f 3 1 1 2 0 1
I Zacher, c. f 3 1 1 4 0 0
I Coy, r. f 4 1 1 1 0 0
J'Hetling. 8b 4 2 2 2 4 0
! Cook, ss 3 0 0 0 0 0
I Tiedemann, lb 3 0 0 9 0 0
J Mitze, c 3 1 2 6 0 0
! Malarkey, p 2 0 0 0 2 0
; Total 27 6. 7 27 9 1
; BUNS AND HITS BY INNINGS
• Los Angeles.O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—o
| Basehits.-.O 10 10 0 0 0 o—2
I Oakland ....3 0110010 x— 6
> Basehits. ..3 0 12 0 0 10 x—7
! SUMMARY
[ Pitcher's record—3 runs and 3 hits off
' Perritt in one inning; charge defeat to
i Perritt. Home runs—Coy, Hetling. Two
J base hits—Abbott, Mitze. Sacrifice hits
> —Cook, Leard. Sacrifice fly—Abbott
i Stolen bases—Moore. Leard. First base
I on called balls—Off Malarkey 1, off Lev
} erenz 2. Struck out—By Perritt 1. by
» Malarkey 6, by Leverenz 7. Hit by
t pitched ball—Malarkey, Leverenz, Time
[ of game—l hour and 85 minutes. Urn
' pires—Hildebrand and McCarthy,
FAMOUS JESUIT
PRELATE MISSING
Coast to Coast Search Is Being
Made for Father Bernard
Vaughan
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
CHICAGO, Oct. 27.—Father Bernard
Vaughan, the famous English Jesuit
exhorter, is missing. For 12 hours the
entiro society of Jesuits in America and
Roman Catholic circles generally have
been pouring telegrams from coast to
coast and to many Intermediate points,
trying to find the distinguished prel
ate.
No definite word has been had of
him since a week ago last night.
Father Vaughan disappointed a large
audience to which he was to lecture
at the Illinois theater here tonight, the
assemblage being sent home at the last
minute without explanations.
Father D. M. Johnson of St. Ignatius
church, under whose auspices the lec
ture was to have been given, said to
night that he had received a message
from Vancouver, B. C, last Saturday,
saying that Father Vaughan was ill.
Doctor Johnson understood, however,
that leather Vaughan had started, east.
It Is feared the churchman has been
taken seriously ill on the way east or
that possibly his mind has given way
under the strain of his American tour..
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
TURKS FLEE
IN PANIC
BEFORE
ALLIES
JBulgars Occupy Islam Strong*
hold in Macedonia Without
Resistance as Sultan's
Troops Withdraw
QUANTITIES OF RIFLES
AND STORES CAPTURED
Montenegrins Bombard Scutari
From Three Points While
Balkan Forces Sweep
On to Adrianople
MUSSULMANS SUFFER
DEFEAT EVERYWHERE
Summary of Yesterday's
Important War Events
Bulbars occupy Turkish town
of Isttp, the Adrlanoplc of Mace
donia, without oppositioni also
Eski-Baba, Important stronghold
between Adrianople and Constan
tinople, together with all vil
lages on left bank of Arda river.
Allies open general bombard
ment upon Scutari, while troops
take strongly fortified heights of
Rosal.
Montenegrins Join Servian
forces after remarkable forward
movent*-"!.
Famine and torrential rains
spread pestilence among Turkish
troops penned up In Scutari and
Adrianople.
Scutari expected to fall today
or tomorrow.
Turkey Is massing huge army
In Eskl-Baba for last stand
against Balkan allies outside of
Constantinople.
BULLETIN
PARIS, Oct. 27.—A special Rome dis
patch says advices were received there
tonight that Scutari had capitulated.
SOFIA, Bulgaria. Oct. 27.—The
Bulgarians today occupied the
Turkish town of Istip. in Mace
donia, which lies 45 miles south
east of Uskup.
It is said the Turks evacuated Istip
without offering the slightest resist
ance. After a battle near Kotchin,
14 miles to the north, the Turks ap
parently were completely disorgan
ized and left a large quantity of rifles
and stores along the road between
the two towns. The Bulgarians were
elated and astonished at the easy
capture of Istip. which they expected
to take only after a severe struggle.
Istlp is known as the Adrianople
of Macedonia. It occupies a strong
natural position In the mountains.
The Bulgarian forces have captured
Eski-Baba, an important point be
tween Adrianople and Constantinople.
They have penetrated 20 miles into
the Arda river district, and taken all
the villages on the left bank, including
the town of Pashmakll.
Scutari Bombarded; in Flames
RJ.EKA, Montenegro, Oct. 27.—A gen
eral bombardment of Scutari began at
10 o'clock this morning. The town was
subjected to a crossfire from the Mon
tenegrin batteries to the north, south
and west and also from the island of
Vranjina, on the lake. From this point
of vantage King Nicholas watched the
action.
After an hour a thick smoke was
seen issuing from the eastern quarter
of the town. The bombardment con
tinues.
The troops under General Vukotltch
today took the strongly fortified
I ROYAL I
NESTOR
Original London & Cairo
Gi^rettes
lOform*
Edw.Womjf Co.
*T>iSTftißu rests.
161 167 CALIFORNfA ST.

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