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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, October 29, 1912, Image 13

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IN WOMAN'S WORLD
friendship, will do what he can for Sir Thomas. Mrs. Crimmins, who was
Margaret Cole of San Francisco, will be a hostess in his honor. He's a
famous- dinner guest. Tells countless stories with an Irish wit and the hint
of a brogue that would make any dining event a success.
The note of Sir Thomas as a raconteur is only second to his note as a
sportsman. A great yachtsman and a great story teller. Like all raconteurs,
he is a victim of repetitions. Never repeats himself in the same place. But
finds that his stories precede him. One told in London is sent to New York,
to be quoted in clubs and passed on to the press. It is printed that "Sir
Thomas Lipton recently said, when asked, etc." So by the time Sir' Thomas
Lipton gets to New York and some one happily asks him a question that
provokes this story, he tells it, to find it's passe; stale, familiar and, in the
vernacular, a chestnut. It is the same with the east and San Francisco.
Stories told possibly at the Crimmins home on Long island have crossed the
continent before him. When Sir Thomas Lipton tells at Mrs. Martin's, for
example:
"The story of two men who had dined unwisely, but well. They were on
their way home, not at all sure of themselves. When the house of one was
reached, he invited encouragement from the other before 'entering. "How
would you say I looked, old man?' he asked, two paces ahead. The other
svas critical enough. 'All right, Bob/ he said, "all right; but who's the
horrible looking chap with you?'"
Also the story of his fir,st office boy, whose sadly worn clothes appealed
to his purse. A not very full purse then. But Sir Thomas bought a suit for
the boy, who failed to come back the following day. The mother was found.
Johnny, she said, had looked so fine in his good new clothes she'd sent him
to look for another place. m
Sir Thomas will find they've been told.
_. _. _ * * *
tertained at the Palace for a trio of
buds who will be introduced this win
ter. The three girls who shared the
honors of the occasion were Miss Helen
Wright, Mis=s Louise Janin and Miss
Henrlette Blanding. The decorations
were yellow chrysanthemums and the
candelabra shaded In the same color
gave a pretty effect to the scene.
Among those who were bidden to meet
the debutantes were:
Miss Sophie Beylard Miss Dorothy Page
Miss Harriet Poinercy _tis» Caroline Murray
Ursa I/>uls« Boyd Miss Dora Winn
Mi«s Olive Craiz Miss Gertrude Thomas
Mips Janet Coleman Hlsi Nell Grant
Misses Ott« Miss Margaret Nichols
Misses Cunningham
Mrs. "William Mayo Newhall has re
turned to town after a weekend visit
WV»JtMl.\_ wxWOCWCMp *_____>
THE HIGHEST STANARD OF VATTDETTLLE.
MATINEE TODAY AND EVERY DAY.
Th 1 •Istintrui'bed Actress,
MISS AMELIA BINGHAM
In Her Original Idea. "Big Moments From Great ,
Plsts": NELLIE NICHOLS. Dainty Singer of i
Lilting Songs; FRANK MOBRELL. "The CaMfor- |
nia Fsov": '-SLIVERS. - * the Famons Clown, in •
*Ils Original Pantomime. "The Ball Garc<»":
AI.BERTINA RASCH'S "LE BALLET CLAS- j
SIQUE ": MELVILLE and HIGGINS: THE i
HREAT ASAHI and CO.; NEW DAYLIGHT MO
TION PICTURES. Last Week of JOSEPH JEF
FERSON and FELICE MORRIS. "In 1986."
Etp. Prices. 10c. 2,">c. 60c. 75c; Box Seats, fl.
Mat Prices (except Sundays and 10c,
25c. 50c. Phones—Douglas 70. Home C 1570.
—_■——■_■__■_■———■—»^——■——i——■—■|
S[^sE__l^i"'
[ -8 Home J2522 I
k—aasSi mSmm Ch_s. H. Muehlmann. Manager.
TONIGHT! TONIGHT!
TWO WEEKS ONLY
KOLB & DILL
With MAXTD LILLIAN BERBI
And Big Compay In
LONESOME TOWN
MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY.
Prices 25c to $1.00.
MARKET ST., OPPOSITE MASON.
I MYSTERIES ™
OF THE DOPE
A Sensational and No-el Production.
SCHTpFS comedy circds
And OTHER BIG ACTS |
Daily at ,2:30: Nights at 7:15-8:15.
HUN. AND I Matinees at 1:30 and 3:30.
HOLIDAYS j Nigiits Continuous from 0:30.
Pricea—lOe, -Oc and 30c
T7u RLINEI
HI«H AND LARKIX STREETS
OCEAN WATER BATHS
Swimming aad Tub Baths
Ss-K water direct from tbe ocan. Open
every day and evening, including Sundays
and holidays, fmin 6 a. m. to 10 p. m. Spec
tators' gallery free.
April 1 to October, inclusive, baths open
Nstatorium reserved Tuesday and Friday
mornings from 9 o'clock to coon for women
ofllv. _. „.
"Filtered Oceaa Water Plunge»
COMFORTABLY HEATED
Constantly Circulating.
Hot Air Hair Dryers. Electric Curling Iron*
and Shampoo Room for Women Bathers Eree,
BRANCH TUB BATHS. 2181 GEARY ST.
88-U*--. DEVISADERO
CONCERT^^KATINO^
BAKEb'aIVD OAK STREETS
THREE SESSIONS DAILY.
XfALLOWEEN SKATING PARTY THURSDAY,
OCTOBER 81. SPOOKY MUSIC, NOVEL
XdniUaion 30 C«at» Ladle- Free'
The Smart Set
THE arrival of Sir Thomas Lipton
will be a thrilling event of the
week. There are always piquant
possibilities in the visit of a title.
Also the distinction of entertaining this
time a friend of kings. ,Undoubtedly
he'll dine with Mrs. Martin. Most of
the titles do, and Sir Thomas is bring
ing letters from the Crimmins, the
John D.'s of New York, who are old
friends of the Martins. Also Captain
Martin Crimmins of the Presidio,
whose name is evidence of the old
One of the benefit parties of the
month that will attract a society audi
ence is the play, • "Cupid at vassar,"
to be given this evening at Golden
Gate Commandery hall. The perform
ance will be given by the Queens of
Avilion of All Saints' parish, and the
proceeds of the evening will be do
nated to the fund for the Episcopal
Old Ladies' home. The work of the
society has been, during the several
years of their existence, to keep the
rooms of the old ladies of the home
in good condition and to contribute in
many details to the happiness of the
inmates. The members of the Young
People's auxiliary are as follows:
Mrs. R. B. Sanchez IMlss Bessie Murks
Miss Georgia Mcl [Mrs. F. W. Simpson
The members of the Queens of
Avilion are:
Miss Margaret Potter Miss Marlon Miller
Miss Ruth Vernon Miss Mattie Kmeraon
Miss Gladys Haielrigg Miss Etlith Euler
Miss VIT-ian Hilmer Miss Erellne Bridgett
Miss Amy C Dick
*- * *
Mrs. Julius C. Reis will entertain at
i reception to be given Wednesday,
November 6, at her home in Sacramento
street, when the honored guest will
Mrs. Benjamin B. Selby, who was
'orcnerly Miss May Reis.
Mrs. Lucy Ord Mason. widow of
Lieutenant John Mason. U. S. A., is the
?uest of her daughter, Mrs. K. S. Greg
>ry, wife of Lieutenant Gregory, U. S.
A., at the Presidio. Mrs. Mason has a
large circle of friends here. Her
father was the late General E. O. C.
___A^f VSEM ENTS
(MSP* WL\ the
"MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY
A SWEEPING VICTORY
By Star Company and Play.
A. H. WOODS Presents the Famous
JULIAN =
ELTINGE
In the Elaborate Musical Comedy Production,
| FASCINATING WIDOW
By the authors of "MADAME SHERRY."
a ■ f% i l| t Bfe O'Farrell nr. Powell
All Asf BK Phone Kearny 3.
**I_i V* *_-_-*_. 1 % Home Phone C445J.
ANOTHER ALCAZAR HIT!
MAUDE FEALY
JAMES DURKIN
And the ALCAZAR COMPANY in
"The Man From Home"
The Play With Many Punches.
PBICES— Nijrht. 25c to $1: Matinee. 2Sr to 50e.
MAT. THURSDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY.
NEXT WEEK:
"WHEN KNIGHTHOOD WAS IN rLOWEB.''
Mis* Fealy. Mr. Durkin and Full Company.
_r_t_<__W_ _■__[ LEADING THEATER
I AUrT Ellis end Market
m. m fif ■_» Pbone—Butter 2400.
A UIT!
This Week & Next—Night & gat.Mat..soc to $1.30
Rat ire Lower Floor SI at Wed. Mats.
The Paul Armstrong Company Presents
Holbrook Blinn
And a Company of 80 in
The Dramatic Sensation of the Century,
"A ROMANCE OF
THE UNDERWORLD"
By PAUL ARMSTRONG
From the Winteryarten, Berlin—The Viraoimu
VERONA SEXTETTE
Europe's Greatest Lady Bicyclists
DAINTY! DARLNQ!! DASHING!!!
BIG SPECIAL FEATURE
"THE WALTZ DREAM"
With the Noted Star,
Ml.lt:. VEHOSICA COX WELL A CO.
BARE DANCES! Entrancing Hawaiian Music!
kOHEHT HILDR^TM&CO.
The Great Protean Star Presents
"A FOUR LEAF CLOVER"
Season's Biggest"-. 4 C. Vaude-ille Bill
7—ACTS—-7 1 PHICKfi—IQe. aOc. BOe
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1912
Social Season Is Opened
With Dance by Sorority
Two of the women who attended the dance held al the home of D. B.
Macdonald in -Laurel park-
Ord, who comanded the department of
California in 1860 and was a pioneer.
He came to California In 1543. Among
the family connections here are the
Holladays, Huieß and Thompsons,
* * *
Barbour Lathrop, who is at Coronado,
entertained at one of the recent din- |
ncr parties given for half a dozen )
friends. After dinner there was an I
informal concert at which Dr. H. J. '
Stewart was the pianist. '
* * *
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Spain Wood
ward are at Coronado on their honey
moon trip and are being informally
entertained by their friends in the
south. Mrs. Woodward was Miss Hazel
Cook before her marriage early in the
month.
Miss Sophie Beylard, the debutante
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. # Duplessis
Beylard, will entertain at an informal
luncheon to be given Thursday at the
Town and Country club for a score of
the buds who will be presented this
winter.
Mrs. Peter McG. Mcßean was hostess
at an enjoyable luncheon given yester
day at the Fairmont, when the feted
fruest at the affair was Miss Henriette
Blanding, one of the debutantes who is
being entertained at a series of in
formal affairs this month.
•* * *
Mr. and Mrs. Francisco de Ojeda will
entertain at a dancing party November
15 at their home in Lake Btreet, when
they will introduce their-daughter, Miss
Nadine de Ojeda, a*, one of the first
debutante parties of the season. More
than 100 young people have been in
vited.
* # *
Mrs. John Murtagh, with her two
children, who has been visiting her
mother, Mrs. J. de Barth Shorb. at the
family home in Broadway, will leave
next week for Fort Leavenworth,
where Doctor Murtagh is stationed.
* » *
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Jadwln have
decided to pass the winter in town and
have given up their house in San Ra
fael. Mrs. Jadwin is convalescent after
her recent illness.
# # #
Miss Marie Hathaway, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Hathaway, will be
hostess at an informal dancing party
to he given Thursday evening, No
vember 21, at the Fairmont, when the
members of the younger set wil be
entertained.
# * *
Mr*. I-ovell "White has returned to
her home in Sacramento street after a
motor trip to San Jose over the week
end.
INCIPIENT FIRE
IN WOMEN'S CLUB
Country members —there must be
such—of the Town and Country club
had a metropolitan experience yester
day noon when the San Francisco fire
department drew up hurriedly before
Its neat, white painted entrance at
Stockton street and Union Square ave
nue and asked graciously for permis
sion to put out the fire which had been
blazing in the club chimney. The Town
and Country club is the feminine gen
der of clubs like the Bohemian and
Pacific Union, and as the Bohemian
club has had several fires in Its history,
the Town and Country thought it could
dp the same.
Members of the club were enjoying
the lunch or literature which the club
serves in its dining room and library
respectively, at 1:20 o'clock yesterday
afternoon, and there was a lively fire
in the club grate. A guest at the St.
Frantis hotel across Union square saw
that the Are was so lively that it had
set the chimney ablaze. He turned in
an alarm.
The first that the club members knew
of their pseudo jeopardy was when
Chief Murphr -nd an aggregation of
handpainted hook and ladder trucks and
hose wagons and engines as highly
polished as the club coffee urn congre
gated in Stockton street. The chimney
fire had burned itself out before the de
partment arrived, so no water had to
be spilled.
The club Is located on the second and
third floors of the Robertson building.
Serious damage would have been caused
to the bookstore on the first floor if it
ha_ been necessary to turn on water.
WIDOW GIVES RECORD
PREMIUM FOR BONDS
[Special Dispatch io The Call]
MARTINEZ, Oct. 28.—The Rodeo
district school bonds recently voted
in the sum of $16,000 were sold
here today to Mrs. Charlotte Fer
nandez of Pinole, who offered a pre
mium of $665, the largest ever offered
for school bonds in this county, the
bonds being 16 year at 5 per cent. The
board of supervisors offered a premium
of $525. Mrs. Fernandez is the widow
of the late Bernardo Fernandez, the
millionaire bond bvjyer of Pinole.
HEART ATTACK KILLS
STANFORD GIRL GRAD
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SACRAMENTO, Oct. 28.— Evelyn
Briggs, daughter of Dr. W. A. Briggs,
died today following an attack of heart
failure Saturday. She was a graduate
of Stanford university, where her
brother, * Prof. William Briggs, is a
member of the faculty. She suffered
& heart attack while packing books.
Sigma Gamma Phi
Give Party In
Evening
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SAN MATEO. Oct. 28.—The winter so
cial season was opened Saturday even
ing by a dancing party given by the
young women of the Sigma Gamma Phi
sorority. The home Of D. B. Macdon
ald in Laurel Park was the scene of
the dance.
Huge yellow chrysanthemums were
used exclusively in decorating the
rooms given over to the evening's en
tertainment. Following a long program
of dances a buffet supper was served.
Among those present were:
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Miss Oarmeiita Mac-
Sulllvan donald
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Coll Harry Pollock
Miss Grace Turner Sam Shillings—orth
Miss Dottle Brown George Bererhouse
Miss Erelyn Curran Stan Dniry
Miss Hazel Haggett Del Wesrott
Miss Marlon Hall Brooks Hannessy
Miss Irene Cuneo Bud Noeberg
Miss Muriel Hall J. E. MeCurfly
Miss Alma McCormick James Lea
Miss Viva Hall Edward Burns
Miss Eula McCurdy Martin Detels
Miss Mac Lee Leo Hary
Miss Viola I.a Porte Edroood btfFf
Miss Ethel McCormick Leo Yon Tempsky
Miss Alice Keating Alfred Roekwood
Miss E. Cbevellere Romon Macdonald
Miss Cora Biggs Richard Roberts
Miss Elodie Macdonald iCornelius Kelly
Miss Anita Shea- !W. A. Macdonald
Miss Florence Alton Dr. R, R. Sibley
Miss Estelle Lovelace IDr. Don D. Weaver
PHILOMATH CLUB
HEARS ADDRESS
A business meeting was the first im
portant session yesterday of the Phil
omath club at the clubrooms In Sutter
street. After the affairs of the club
were settled there was an informal talk
given by Dr. John M. Jackson, who
spoke In behalf of the Anti-Racetrack
league. His speech against the evils
of the racetrack was heartily indorsed
by the members of the club who at
tended the lecture. The reports of In
terest to the club at the business meet
ing were read by Mr?. Henry Sahlein
and Mrs. Julius Kahn. There was a
large attendance at the meeting and
the appeal to the clubwomen to assist
In the suppression of the racetrack met
with an enthusiastic response. There
was an informal hour over the teacups
after the business of the day had been
dismissed.
THREE DIE OF POISON
IN STAR GAZER'S FAMILY
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
CHICAGO. Oct. 28.—From three to
four grains of arsenic—enough to
cause death—were found in the body
of Arthur Lindloff, the 15 year rd son
of Mrs. Louise Lindloff, crystal gazer
and spiritualist, who is on trial before
Judge Windes for the murder of her
son.
This testimony was given at the trial
today *by Dr. Walter S. Haines, Rush
medical college expert.
He said he also found from two to
three grains of arsenic In the body of
Mrs. Lindloff'B husband. William Lind
loff, and in the body of Alma Lindloff,
her daughter.
ALLEGED WIFE SLAYER
HELD AS COUNTERFEITER
NEW YORK, Oct. 28.—Allison M. Mc-
Farland, recently tried for wife murder
In Newark. N. J., and acquitted, was
arraigned before United States Com
missioner Shields today, charged with
counterfeiting. He was arrested under
the name of Allison Mason. When
asked to plead, he said: "If I committed
any offense, I did it without intent. I
was experimenting with a process for
duplicating medals or Jewelry for com
mercial purposes. I had no intention
of making or passing counterfeit
money." MeFarland's examination was
postponed until November 1L
FAIR SCRIBES
MEET
Press Assocfation
Elects Members
At the meeting of the Pacific Coast
Women's Press association yesterday
afternoon, Mrs. Laura T. Pinney pre
sided in the absence of the president,
Mrs. I. Lowenberg, who was confined io
her home by illness.
Business occupied the first part of
the afternoon and Mrs. W. C. Morrow
and Mrs- Jeanne Francoeur were elect
ed delegates to the district convention
of women's clubs to be held next week
in Santa Cruz.
Three new members were elected as
follows: Mrs. Fall Pettie, Mrs. Lucia
Smith and Miss Anna Zoe Arland, the
latter being an Australian writer who
has recently arrived here.
Two short stories, with the names of
the authors unannounced, were read by
Mrs. Herman Whitaker and discussed
and criticised by the club at large.
Mrs. Mary E. Hart, who has recently
returned from Alaska, gave an inter
esting talk on her travels there this
year, which were even more extensive
than usual.
An impromptu discussion of current
events centered for the time being upon
the Panama canal.
WOMAN TO PLAY
MASTERS OF OLD
OAKLAND, Oct. 28.^—Echoes of mel
ody from the dim past will be heard
Wednesday afternoon in Mills college
at a novel musical entertainment.
The program will comprise harpsi
chord and song numbers of the seven
teenth and eighteenth centuries by
Bach, Handel and Scarlatti. The harpsi
chord, predecessor of the modern piano,
will be played by Frances Pelton-Jones.
who has charmed many audiences with
her unique performances.
She will be assisted by Mrs. M. E.
Blanehard of San Francisco of the mu
sical department of Mills college, who
will sing. The concert will be held
in Lisser hall, beginning at 3:30 o'clock.
The program combines the early classic
with the modern schools, the first part
being devoted to old music and the
second to later works. It will dem
onstrate the contrast between the two
schools of composition and the evolu
tion of the* pianoforte. The atmosphere
will be further enhanced with appro
priate costumes of the Louis XVI
period.
The following are patronesses: Mrs.
H. C. Capwell, Mrs. F. M. Smith, Miss
Janet Haight and Miss Persls Cole
man.
BOOK EXHIBITION
BY CLUB WOMEN
OAKLAND, Oct. 28.—The Home club
will hold a week's exhibition of the
books of the year, beginning Thurs
day evening, November 7. Besides
books, the exhibit will embrace Christ
mas cards, book covers and book plates.
No sales will be made, but *the women
believe such an affair will stimulate
interest in the best things found In
book atores on either side of the bay.
Many will find valuable assistance In
making up their list of Christmas gifts.
Among the publishers who will be rep
resented are Paul Elder, Sunset Maga
zine company. Pacific Rural Press com
pany. Scientific Press, Mining Press;
Whitaker, Ray, Wiggin company; the
Aegis of the Oakland high school;
Zoeth, Skinner & Eldridge, Hopkins
Art institute, and the California School
of Arts and Crafts. Among the book
sellers will be Smith Brothers, Paul
Elder, the Kakara studio, the White
House book department, Zoeth, Skinner
&. Eldridge, and John Howell.
SOCIETY DRILLS
FOR BIG PAGEANT
OAKLAND, Oct. 2S.—Society is giv
ing its attention to the elaborate
pageant for Friday evening, November
15, in Idora Park theater under the
auspices of the Young Women's Chris
tian association.
For several weeks rehearsals have
been held for what promises to be
the most unique entertainment pre
sented in several seasons on this side
the bay. Forty gifted amateurs are
in the cast for the four act drama
which will conclude with a chorus of
100 voices under direction of E. D.
Crahdall.
Miss Julia Leigh is general chairman.
Mrs. H. C. Cap well Is business manager.
Miss Grace Fisher is president of the
association.
SCHOOL DIRECTORS ARE
PURGED OF CORRUPTION
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
VALLEJO, Oct. 28.—Superior Judge
A. J. Buckles of Fairfield this morning
handed down his opinion in the
case of Armstrong vs. the Vallejo
board of education in favor of the
school directors. While the court
held the directors responsible for
some violation of the law, it stated
that there was no corruption or mis
appropriation of public funds; that all
the money spent by the board of edu
cation was used for school purposes
and that the so called "slush fund" was
introduced a number of years ago on
the advice of a former district attorney.
In closing the court stated that the suit
was actuated by spltework on the part
of former Superintendent of Schools
Albert M. Armstrong.
PIONEER WOMAN DIES
AT HOME IN PETALUMA
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
PETALUMA, Oct. 28.—Mrs. Rachael
Ann Gossage, one of Petaluma's pio
neer women, is dead at the family
residence here. Mrs. Gossage was born
In Uniontown, Pa, in 1831. Surviving
her are- the following children: Mrs.
E. R. Healy, Berkeley; Mrs. E. E. Drees,
Petaluma; Mrs. F. W. Stratton, San
Francis, and Dr. H. S. Gossage, Peta
luma. The funeral will take place
Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from
the home of E. E. Drees. Rev. E. Bel
den Hart will officiate.
DO NOT MISS IT
"Opportunity" is gently rapping at
your door. Read the free watch offer
in lower right hand corner ot the first
want page in this paper.—Ad vt.
A Word to Fathers
and Mothers
(< TT IS truejthat I am an alien.
I But my son—my son is Themistocles."—Euterpe.
A mother came to me the other day complaining
bitterly about her IS year old daughter.
It seems that when the mother was a little girl she
loved books and study and dreamed as her most precious
dream that some day she would go to college. Some day
never came. Instead, she had to give up even finishing
her high school course. It was a very bitter disappoint
ment, and naturally made her prize education even more
highly, as we always do the good things we miss.
And so it was that when this woman went into a home
of her own and one day they laid her baby girl in her
arms, her first tkought was, "she shall have the finest
education in the land." And so the mother began to dream
her dream of college all over again, for this precious new incarnation of
herself.
Of cou/se. you know the rest. After 18 years of saving and planning and,
dreaming on the mother's part, the girl does not want to go to college. To her
it is unjust and unreasonable that her mother should insist on tying her down
to four more years of the study she hates. To the mother it is* the most bitter
trial of her life; she sees her daughter throwing away what to her is an
unspeakable precious opportunity, and she endures the disappointment of her
dreams a second time.
Only those who have had some such experience In their lives can know
how much tragedy is wrapped up in that simple story.
The extent to which fathers and mothers enter into their children's, lives
is both beautiful and terrible.
It is truly wonderful to see how much personal pride, how much renewed
ambition they feel in these reincarnations of themselves.
There is a woman who lives near me whose little daughter has a very
fine musical talent. I enjoy hearing the little girl play, but I enjoy even more
watching the mother's face fairly glow with happiness as she sits and rocks
and listens. The mother has had many losses and disappointments. She was
bred to a life of culture, luxury and ease. She is living a painfully narrow
and toilsome existence. And yet, as she sits there rocking and listening to
the second generation fulfilling her own dreams of musical accomplishment,
she looks perfectly happy. I would give much to be able to paint her por
trait then.
Young people, you can not realize too keenly how much It means to the
older folks to have you fulfill their dreams.
But you older folks, you also can not realize too well that young people
have their own lives to live. They are a part of you, you say. Ah, yes, but
remember that they are partly—and the bigger part—themselves.
Grant that they may be willing and' able to fulfill those unfulfilled dreams
and ambitions of yours.
But grant also that you may have forbearance and patience and under
standing when that is not possible.
3_rl Hmri itl?_s
1 ST. REGIS 1
11 NEW YORK i I
— | Rfth Avenue and Fifty Fifth Street. |h^
= | NEW YORK'S FAR FAMED HOTEL .|j=
~ N Lbcated on one of the g ZZ
0 world's famous avenues I """
____: N near Central Park, away H ____
~ H f/ic notse of street B ■ =cai *
_—' B car* ana* traffic, yet E ,«___
B easily accessible to the B ■"—
~*— 0 theatre and shopping B ZZ
ZZZZ H Single Rooms without Bath $3.00 and B
HZ B $4.00 per day; with Bath $5.00, $6,00 E ~
~ B and $8.00; and for two people $6.00, B .___.
~ U $8.00 and $10.00 per day. B ~
Jgr fcj Suites consisting of Parlor, Bedroom H gg
-31 S and Bath, $10.00 upward; larger Suites H ,2__t
H|P ,SO in proportion. All outside rooms. & Sfcx
Tangles\ The Red Lane
by \ by
Margaret Cameron \ Holman Day
Author 0/ "The Pretender \ Author of "King Spruce," "The
Person" "The Involun- \ Ramrodders," etc.
tarv Chaperon," etc. \
\ Vibrant with human passions, Mr.
There is a wealth of humor in \ Day' 3 new story pictures with vivid
this new collection ot stories— \ realism the life of the settlers along
the kind of humor that starts a \ the Maine-Canadian border. Neither
chuckle at the beginning and leaves \ Stevenson nor Crockett has writ
you breathless at the end. Mar- \ ten anything finer in similar vein,
garet Cameron has never written \lt is Hke a page from the best
a dry line. Her books all teem \of Sir Gilbert Parker's romances
with life and motion. \of the French half-breed.
In this new one she has conceived \ None other than a writer who
a series of humorous situations so \ has sojourned among these sim
complicated that there seems no \ pie-hearted and clean-faithed
possible way out. Audacity, however, \ folks, who has learned their
is the sword that cuts the Gordian \ ways, their nobleness, and their
knot in all of them. \ frailties, their reverence for au-
It is impossible to leave any one of \ thority, their loves, hates and
these tales unfinished, for the author is a \ passions, could have so ade
na.ura, bora s.ory-teMer. -,_ a uai„u, \ < SsX& t S££X&
talent for inventing the most laughable \ unite Jn making a volume
of plots. A corking book for curing the \ which the is loth
blues. I to lay aside.
Illustrated. \ Illustrated.
Post 6vo. Cloth, $1.30 net. \ Cloth, rtef.
s_msm_m________«--__-_ HARPEE & BBOTHEBS mmsmmßmmmammmsms^
Ruth Cameron
I RUTH CAMERON I

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