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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 09, 1912, Image 14

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RIPON IS THE MOST PROGRESSIVE TOWN OF SOUTH SAN JOAQUIN IRRIGATION DISTRICT
VALLEY TOWN IS
WELL SITUATED
Ripon Is on State Highway in
Center of Large Irriga
tion District
Offers Great Opportunities to
Home Seekers and Is Good
Field for iManufacturers
RIPON, Aug. I.—Some Hue California
morning, almost any day of the year—
you have plenty to pick from —as there
are 200 days of sunshine, pet into an
automobile at Stockton and start south.
Go east along: the old toll road, which
Is now a free and magnificent highway,
as level and well kept as a city street.
Follow this boulevard in the direc
tion indicated for about five miles until
you reach French Camp on the South
ern Pacific railroad.
At this point the highway enters
the newly formed South San Joaquin
Irrigation district, one of the most
fertile regions of California, and des
tined to be one of the greatest pro
ducers of any section of the entire
state.
Following the same general direction
the roadway leads on through fields of
alfalfa, orchard* of peach, apricot,
cherry and almond, past heavy pro
ducing fields of melons and vegetables.
All manner of small farm, dairy and
pastoral scenes constantly unfold a3
you reach each turn of the road.
Passing Manteca on the Southern
Pacific, and a live and prosperous town
it is. you head directly southeast and
plungp at once into the fields of grapes
that have made California famous the
world over. Emerging from this laby
rinth of vine and fruit you are again
confronted with the small farm, which
is destined to roll untold millions of
dollars into the avenues of California
commerce.
You have now traveled 20 miles, but
you have been so completely occupied
that you hardly realize you have cov
ered half the distance.
You now "nave arrived at Ripon, on
the north bank of the beautiful Stan
islaus river. That's where I intended
you should stop when I started you
out from Stockton in this article.
OI,D ESTABLISHED TOWN
Ripon has been on the map for a
good many years; in fact there has
been a grain warehouse and shipping ,
station at this point ever since the
Southern Pacific built through from
Pan Francisco up the San Joaquin val
ley to the south. But. like most towns
of this section, in that day, when the
San Joaquin valley was a vast grain
field, Ripon lay dormant.
The diversified farming required to
build an agricultural city was lacking.
but now all is changed. You know a
town can not be built on safe and sane
principles unless the country back of S
it keeps pace with or is just a bit
ahead of the town in point of develop
ment.
Basing my calculations on the point
above mentioned, I am safe in predict
ing for the city of Ripon a fi«e and
healthy growth in the next five years.
The reasons? They are as follows:
Ripon is surrounded by the richest ag
ricultural region under the shining
sun; a country capable of the greatest
diversity; soil that is rich and deep
and lasting; climatic conditions second
to none in all the land; a vast area,
covering more than 70,000 acres that is
rapidly being settled by the only class
of farmers that a region of this nature
appeals to—the highest class.
This is the man who wants some
thing worth while, who is looking for
the best place obtainable to build for
the future welfare of his family, the
man who knows an opportunity when
it appears above the surface and
grasps it.
Another great stimulus that is re
sponsible for turning the tide of human
activity in the direction of Ripon Is
the fact that the region round about
the city is to have water in abundance
lor irrigation.
The South San Joaquin irrigation
system now under construction and
nearlng completion is the most modern
gravity system in the state. The last
■word in engineering has been said in
this project. The immense dam across
the Stanislaus river will be completed
prior to January 1 next. And the main
canals will be ready to bring the water
ii the district by the first day of
April. 1913.
The bringing of water to this fertile
region is ail that is required other
than the natural thrift and energy of
the people who are rapidly settling on
the lands to make Ripon one of the
best agricultural cities of the district.
OX STATE HIGHWAY
The city Is fortunate in being lo
cated on the main line of the Southern
Pacific railway. The San Joaquin Val
ley Electric is building direct from
Stockton to Ripon, and one of the fin
est highways on earth passes directly
througli the city. This highway is the
main artery from Stockton south to
Lios Angeles, and is part of the system
being built by the state from the pro
ceeds of the sale of the $1-8,000.000
bond issue, recently authorized. Hun
dreds of automobiles pass over this
highway each day, and motor trucks
use it to compete with the railroad for
th« freight traffic between Ripon, Mo
desto and Stockton.
GOOD STORES IX RirOX
The residents of Ripon and surround
ing country are supplied with the
necessities and luxuries Of life bjr up
to date merchants and tradesmen, al
most all linos being represented.
The Ripon Lumber company carries
in stock in its yards a complete sup
ply of lumber. ea*lj*e and doors, and a
general line of building material.
Thompson Brother?, dealers in gen
eral merchandise, carry a stock of
goods that would do credit to a city
much larger than Ripon, but the de
mand seems to equal the supply.
I notice the blacksmith and general
wagon repair business being looked
after by "William Lemoine and as
sistants, and from the sounds issuing
from the shops I should judge they
had but little time to spare.
Kewell'a confectionery supplies the
candies and cold drinks—other kinds
of drinks are not despensed in Ripon.
A. r\ Kyer has just opened an up to
date drug store. Dr. J. O. Chiapella
looks after the health of the residents
of the city, and he seems to have more
leisure, time than any man in town.
An attractive hardware and furniture
store, under th<* able management of
A. R. Masrud'er, i 3 one of the features
of the city's merchandise houses. A
stock of harness has lately been added.
Yaple & Co. have been responsible for
n great deal of the development of the
territory surrounding- Ripon. I under
stand they are shortly to engage in the
livestock business on a large scale,
turning their attention-to the breeding
•■••" thoroughbred Guernsey cattle.
McKf & Reynolds carry an immense
utock of general merchandise in a
large brick structure in the center of
town. Looking over their stock I
decided they were able to supply the
TV JEWS OF RIPON'S BUSINESS BUILDINGS, A REPRESENTATIVE RESIDENCE AND SPECIMEN OF A FLOURISHING YOUNG ORCHARD THAT IN A
DICATES THE GREAT AGRICULTURAL POSSIBILITIES OF THE DISTRICT. ' I
♦-.- » , _». _____~ , , n , — <
needs of a community with anything
from a needle to a steam shovel.
The Ripon Record is a wideawake
newspaper, with an eye single to the
interests'of Ripon and vicinity. J. A.
Show, the editor, is a hustler every
minute, fully alive to the situation,
and deserving of the support and pa
tronage of the entire district.
The Ripon Meat company are abreast
of the times, and the experience of the
management is a source of satisfaction
to the meat eaters of the city.
The Bank of Ripon does a general
banking business; the capital stock is
$25,000. J. S. Moulton is president, H. L.
Dickey, cashier, and Karl A. Gotsholl,
assistant cashier.
Lindblom & Johnson have lately
opened with a complete and carefully
selected stock of dry goods and notions.
The City bakery (and his name is
Baker) supplies the hungry with the
staff of life; it is his own making, and
we respect his art.
W. G. Kenedy. now engaged in the
general merchandise line. Is soon to
build and occupy a modern store build
ing. The plans are drawn and the
work of construction is to begin at
once. New buildings are the order of
the day at Ripon.
I. A. Goodwin conducts the garage.
It occupies a fireproof structure of
modern design. Mr. Goodwin is the
high court of appeal in case of a "blow
out," and on account of his location on
the highway, he is the good Samaritan
for many a stranded automobile party.
The San Joaquin Valley Creamery
Cos station located at Ripon, runs two
cream trucks, making daily "pickups."
Ripon has two large warehouses con
veniently located as to transportation.
The Ripon Nursery company supplies
the district with young trees and vines
of the most scientific culture. It Is
an industry that is highly appreciated
by the fruit growers.
The churches of Ripon have kept
pace with the building of the town and
the schools are the pride of the dis
trict.
The California Land Security com
pany has lately entered the field of
activity at Ripon. It is soon, to build
an attractive home office on its new
addition just opposite the Southern Pa
cific depot.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR FACTORIES
Ripon by virtue of its location should
become a manufacturing town of no
mean pretensions. The products of the
district must be taken care of, and the
proper place to turn out the finished
article is on the ground where it is
produced. Now is the time to establish
a canning factory. No section of the
country produces finer tomatoes.
Peaches are raised in great quanti
ties and the quality cannot be sur
passed.
Ripon being in the center of a great
alfalfa raising section, there can be no
doubt of the necessity of an alfalfa
meal mill, and such an enterprise
should be made a paying industry.
Transportation facilities are all that
could be desired, the market is at hand
and there is every good reason for the
establishment of industries.
Ripon invites capital, invites indus
try and extends a hearty welcome to
the man who wants to better his con
dition.
A Board of Trade made up of thirty
odd hustlers awaits your desires. You
can do no better than to write them at
once. H. L. HENDERSON.
SALES REPORTED BY
LIPMAN & HIRSCHLER
IJpman & Hirschler, Inc.. of 321
Bush street report the following late
sales:
John n. Meinbardt to Martin A. Hanley, lot
in the east line, of Forty-sixth avenue, 175 feet
south of Cebrlllo street, 25x120.
F. J. Halpln to D. Rlmlinger. lot in the weet
line of Forty-sixth avenue, 125 feet north of
Fulton street, north 25x120.
A. W. Br.vson to Albert Meyer, lot in the east
lino "f Forty-fourth avenue, 130 feet south of
Balboa street, south 40x120.
K. P. Adams to Albert Meyer. lot in th* west
line of Forty-flfth avenue. 175 feet south of
Cabrillo street, south 25x120.
For Albert Meyer the following property wae
sold:
To P. A. Alden, lot in the west lln« of Forty
fifth avenue. 150 feet north of Fulton street,
north 25x125.
To Robert Bmlth, lot in the east line of Fif
teenth avenue. 175 feet north of Judah street,
north 25x127:6.
To 8. M. Fearn. lot in the east line of
I Eleventh avenue. 175 feet north of Noriega
6treet, north 25x120.
To Robert E. I.indsey. lot in the south line of
Irriog street, 82:6 feet eaet of Talrtieth avenue.
east 50x100.
To P. Tack, lot In the west line of Forty Of th
av»nue. 175 feet soatb of Cabrillo street, south
"Jot U'O.
To Alli'<* ML Ijfleeias. lot in the eaet line of
Twentv-nTst avenue. 100 feet north of Kirkham
street, north 25i120.
To Jennie I. Keller, lot In the south line of
Ortega street, f>7 :f$ feet east of Eleventh ave
nu*. oust 25x100.
To Otto T. Kramer, lot In the west line of
Fifteenth avenue, 120 feet north of Judah street,
north 20x127:6.
To J. Magnolia, lot in th* east line of Six
teenth avenue, GO feet north of Judab street,
north 20x100.
RIPON, THE GATEWAY
TO OPPORTUNITY
ON DIRECT LINES OF TRANSPORTATION FROM THE
SOUTH SAN JOAQUIN IRRIGATION DISTRICT
As South San Joaquin Irrigation District develops Ripon must
become center of intensely cultivated region. Soil richest and deep
est. Water in abundance. "The Land Owns the Water."
COME NOW or write for information to
Board of Trade, Ripon, California
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL. SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 9, 1912.
BIG SALES MADE
IN RICHMOND CITY
RICHMOND. Nov. R.—Some land
sales of considerable Importance and
quits a large amount of new buildings
projected have served to keep interest
in realty stirred up here this week and
have marked the usual progress of the
city.
D. H. Wulzen, the retired San Fran
cisco druggist, has gold hie 40 acres
facing: the Inner harbor site for $2,000
an acre. The harbor frontage runs
from Twen,ty-flfth to Thirty-first street.
San Francisco capitalists have secured
the land.
The Barber tract of 106 acres near
Grand Canyon park has been bought by
A. C. Kerley for Berkeley parties for
$100,000.
The Knights of Pythiae lodge has
begun work on the store and office
building in Fifth street below Mac
donald avenue.
B. Meserle has ordered plans for a
new three story apartment house he
will erect next to the one already
owned by him at Nevin avenue and
Ninth street. W. Stultz is having
plans drawn for an apartment house of
similar size in Blssell avenue, near
Tenth street.
The Presbyterian church board has
perfected all details and is ready to
begin the new church edifice at once.
1L A. Johnston, owner, has sold the
corner of Second street and Macdonald
avenue to Mrs. C Rudte of San Fran
cisco, who will put up a business build
ing.
Negotiations are being made, it Is
said, for the purchase of the 50 feet
at Macdonald avenue and Sixth street
owned by Mrs. Dorothy Tucker, the
price being $25,000. If the gale Is
made a fine building will be erected
there. This is one of the corners that
sold for $260 for 25 feet eight or nine
years ago.
KNIGHT'S AOOffi]
THE PATHWAY OF STOCKTON'S BEST GROWTH I
Lots 50x150—5200 to $250 I
EASY TERMS R
NO INTEREST NO TAXES B
HIGH, DRY AND CLOSE IN I
ONLY SEVEN MINUTES FROM THE COURTHOUSE ' I
The price of these lots is so low that with the natural B
growth of Stockton values will be doubled B
and quadrupled in a few years B|
■ i Come in today and get more infor- ■■
CLIP THIS COUPON matlon. Or flu out coupon and
MOREY & TURNER mall> We wlll send you f" l * P** , " B
313 E. Weber Ay. ticulare. But come if possible. Eg
m Stockton, Cal. Bβ
B Send full information about lIA DP V 0 I
I Name 810-IS. 14 Can Bid*- San Franrlico B
■ Address • * B * ockten Office, 313 East Weber Ay. IB
■ « ' 'f. C. BUTLER. Manager B
FINANCIAL WORLD
DEPRECATES HASTE
Continued From Page 9
erally by those vitally interested in
companies whose stocks are bein af
fected by democratic success.
Among financial men who are able
to get away from the sound of the
stock markets however, a different view
seems to be held. The opinion is ad
vanced that a determination on Wil
son's part to call a special session to
take up tariff changes would show a
spirit of haste to slash at the present
rates just for the sake of lopping them
off. It Is just such a spirit that the
financial world is hoping Wilson does
not possess. And they believe it bet
ter that stocks should tremble a while
longer under fear of drastic tariff ac
tion than that the country be put tor
four years under the dominance of a
tariff hastily decided upon, while the
fury of the campaign is still ringing
In the ears of the tariff framers.
There is no more reason for a special
session to take up the tariff, it Is
stated, than a special session to pass
laws for regulating corporations. Both
policies were prominently set forth In
the campaign, and both demand the
careful thought and investigation that
a special session hurriedly called to
gether might be thought to lack. A
special session is an emergency meet-
Ing, and, after all. the country has
proceeded safely, at least, under the
present tariff. A change in the order
of things is a step worthy of the most
serious deliberation of the nation's law
making body.
* * «•
UNITED RAILROADS XOTES
The United Railroads of San Fran
cisco made application to the state
railroad commission yesterday for per
mission to Issue $2,350,000 of five year,
6 per cent serial gold notes, the pro
ceeds from the sale of which will be
used, together with money now in the
company's sinking: fund, to redeem
$3,000,000 Market street cable first
mortgage 6s'and $350,000 Park and Cliff
House Railway first mortgage 6s. These
two Issues will fall due aJnuary 1, 1913.
The financial world Is interested In
the fact that this will leave the Mar
ket Street Railway Consolidated 6 per
cent bonds a first mortgage on approxi
mately 110 miles of track, or 44 per cent
of the entire- mileage of the system.
In addition they will be a first mort
gage, subject to $2,000,000 Omnibus
Cable Railway first mortgage 6s, $650.
--ono Ferries and Cliff House Railway
first mortgage 6s and $250,000 Park and
Ocean Railroad company first mortgage
65—52,900,000 in all —on 67 miles of
track. Thus they will be secured by
177 miles of track, or 70 per cent of
tIM entire mortgage, subject only to
the $2,900,000 of underlying issues on
67 miles.
The Market Street Railway Consoli
dated 5s are selling at about $9" on
the stock and bond exchange. They
are due in 1924, and none of the fran
chises on which they are a first mort
gage expires until 1929. The franchise
on the most important line, that on
Market street, does not expire until
1932, eight years after the maturity of
the bonds. Among the lines composing
the 110 miles on which the Market
Street 5s are a direct first mortgage
are such as Market street. Mission,
Valencia, Castro, Folsom, Sixth, Eighth,
Kearny, Sansomc, Turk, Page, McAl
lister, Hayes, Haight, Brannan, O'Far
rell, Stanyan, Parnassus, Sixteenth,
Fillmore and Devisadero. Among those
on which they are a first mortgage,
subject to the $2,900,000 of underlying
issues, are such lines as Howard street,
Second. Third, Tenth, L#eavenworth,
Post, Ellis and ocean. Powell, Mason
and bay, Sacramento, Washington and
Jackson.
•* * *
The United Railroads reports the
follovwing earnings for the fiscal year
ending September 30, 1912:
Sept. 30, Sept. r.O,
1012. 1011.
Gross $5,350,870.75 $7,800,860.40
Oper. cxp.. includinc
taxps. ni.iint. and
rent of leased lines.
equip, and deprec. .".274.707.f>7 5..°>0". 187.0.1
■Net earnings $3,079,082.08 $2,003,702.37
fixed charges, includ.
bond int. and int.
on floating debt 1,932,151.83 1,^59.275.00
Surplus $1,126,800.43 $604,427.37
I.e*s int. on Market
st. cable bonds and
park and Cliff house
bonds to foe retired
Jan. 1. 1913 201.000.00 201.000.00
Surp. avail, /or int.
on $2,350,000 « r*"
cent notes to be is- .
sued Nov. 1. IBIS. .$1,327,890.43 $$."5,427.37
Int. on $2,350,000 6
per cent notes to be
issued 141.500.00 141.500.00
Balance $1.186,300.43 $(503,927.37
40 ACRES
2 Miles from Ripon
on first class county highway.
In the South San Joaquin Irri
gation District, with main ditch
touching the land. Irrigation
system to be completed April
1 next. Owners must sell
quick. Good four room house,
fair barn on the property.
PRICE $120 PER ACRE.
648 E. MAIN STREET,
Stockton, Cal.
Ask for List i
1
; We are equipped with ex- «
; ceptional investments in San 1
; Joaquin County lands at j
; owners' ground floor prices, j
; Best of references.
Oullahan=Litt!ehale Co. {
REAL ESTATE '.
Representing , Mies Weber, heir to <
the estate of the founder of <
i Stockton and other extensive i
property Interests. j
323 East Weber Avenue
STOCKTON, CAL. |i
t
Wβ Have Secured Control of
400 Acres of General
Farming Land
located 1 mile from Clement*. In tbe north
eastern part of Sen Joatjuin county. Soil is a
BILTY BANDY tOAM. well adapted to the
growth of GEAIN, FHinT OB ALFAUA.
There are 250 acre* of bottom land, and all
but 30 acres in pasture covered witti trees
can bo cultivated.
PRICE SOO.OO PER ACRE
WILLIAMSON REALTY CO.
17 So. San Joaquln St.
: Stockton, Calif. j
MADERA COUNTY
IS SETTLING UP
Cheap Land for Alfalfa Attract*
ing Farmers Who Are Going
' Into Dairy Business
FAIRMKAP. Nov. B.—Madera county,
which has for many years been one
of the principal wheat producing coun
ties of the state, is making , rapid prog
ress in irrigation ;md alfalfa produc
tion. The large expanse of land, fer
tile acres in this part of the Pan
Joaquln valley, formerly owned by pri
vate estates, Iβ now being subdivided
ami sold in small tracts.
With its vast, extent of land, suitable
to alfalfa, yet unsown, with open win
tors, abundance of green feed at a
time when eastern fields are covered
with ice and snow, without the neces
sity of tight, expensive J>uildings for
stock at any time of the year, Madera
certainly has especial advantages as
a dairy county, and these are rapidly
being appreciated and taken advan
tage of.
The Co-operative Land and Trust
company of San Francisco, which is
the owner of 14,000 acres in the north
ern part of Madera. known as Fair
mead colony, reports that during the
month of October they sold more
1,100 acres of unimproved land in email
tracts, most of which will be improved
within the year. The superior quality
of this soil, together with adequate
water for irrigation, its splendid ship
ping facilities and proximity to San
Francisco markets, is attracting the
attention of progressive agriculturists
throughout the state. Tn the history
of the state there never was a more
general desire for good, cheap farm
land than at the present time.
O. Garlinghouse. an old time settler
in what is now known as Fairmeafl
colony, after having sold his farm of
1,040 acres to the Co-operative Land
and Trust company, looked all over the
state for a locality in which to reinvoet
his money. Having completed his In
vestigation, he returned to Madura
county and bought back at an ad
vanced 175 acres of the land
which he originally owned.
SALES OF REALTY IN
RICHMOND DISTRICT
Kerner & Eisert announce the fol
lowing recent sales:
Fernando Nelson to r. I.erey. improre'lMnt*
nnd lot in the east line of Seventeenth a reou*
between (Jcary and Clement streets; $«.".' 0.
Fernando Nelson to A. Jenkins, lot, 25i f5, ir
the south side of Clement street, comra ecing
-'> feet west of Seventeenth avenue; $3,000.
Fernando Nelson to J. C. Anderson, lot, 1.5X3 - 11
In rlie west line of Twenty-second avenue, com
niencing 175 feet south of California attvet
?2,000.
A new ordinance regulating the con
struction of concrete curbs in certain
districts throughout the city is being
carefully examined by the city en
gineer.
WHEN IN
STOCKTON STOP
AT THE
Imperial
Hotel^
Voder >cw Manatemeit
Sample Room*
A. A. LYNCH, Prop.
Stockton and Sacramento
116 Trains Daily
S Each Way
Stockton and Lodi
32 Trains Daily
16 Each "Way
BAGGAGE CARRIED
OX EVERY TRAIN
1 rains Depart and Aγ
rl Vβ From the Cen
aOei t«r of These Oitlea.
jf\c™ Central nnss:
itXCOM rvi • Trame ,toM9er
Pγ^ 1 California I
I I Traction Co.
fairmead m{
14,000 Fertile Acres in the !
San Joaquin Valley in
10, 20 and 40 Acre Tracts
Easy Terms
On main line of Southern I
Pacific Railroad; plenty of
water for irrigation NOW '
and all the time. Call or i
; write for full particulars.
CO-OPERATIVE LAND AND
TRUST COMPANY
595 MARKET STREET J
■Alt FRANCISCO. CAL.

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