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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 17, 1912, Image 18

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1912-11-17/ed-1/seq-18/

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THE semi MONTHLY MAGAZINE SECTION
A Magazine for your Reading Table,
Contributing Editor's Page
Railroading in Romance
and Reality
Elbert Hubbard
HE MOST impor
tant business in the
world is farming.
Food is the primal
need.
We get our food
out of the soil. The
business of the
farmer is to tickle the soil so it will
laugh a harvest.
The second most important business
in the world is transportation.
Tilings have no value unless they arc
at a certain place at a certain time.
Food separated from human bodies
by an impassable gulf is absolutely
valueless.
I have seen corn selling in Kansas
for ten cents a bushel, and hogs at two
cents a pound, simply because there
was no available transportation for
these things from where they wei£
plentiful to where they were needed.
The railroad cancels distance and an
nihilates space. •
Railroads have only one thing to sell,
and that is transportation.
The unit of transportation is the
mile haul.
Railroads carry an adult human be
ing a mile for two cents; and they
carry a ton of freight a mile for a cent
or less.
To carry a ton of freight on a wagon
a mile, with average roads, costs thirty
cents.
To carry a man a mile on horseback,
or in a wagon, as was done in stage
coach times, costs ten cents.
Travel Economy
HP HE stagecoach fare from New York
to Philadelphia, say a hundred
miles, used to be ten dollars. If you
walked the distance, as my grandfather
did, it took three days, and the cost of
board and lodging along the road was
more than the railroad fare is today.
George Washington, in his diary,
tells of riding horseback from Phila
delphia to Boston in a week, and he
thought he was going some.
Now, the railroad carries you in two
hours from New York to Philadelphia,
and the fare, say, is two dollars, and
on the route you need neither board nor
lodging.
The railroad is the greatest factor in
civilization. America holds her proud
place among nations on account of her
railroads, because by the railroads the
world's markets are brought to the
CONTENTS
COVER DESIGN—A FRONTIER HONEYMOON . . EDWARD BOREIN
Page
RAILROADING IN ROMANCE AND REALlTY— Editorial
ELBERT HUBBARD 2
THE DRAMA OF MY LIFE IVAN NARODNY 3
I; THE TALK OF THE WALLS
Illustration from Photograph, Decorations bp Wilson Karcher
THE GHOST OF SHAFT 2 . . ARTHUR HAYWOOD 5
Illustrations bp Rollin Crampton
THE ANSWER CRITTENDEN MARRIOTT 6
Illustrations bp Frederick A. Duncan
WOMEN WHO COUNT . 7
Illustrations from Photographs
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 8
NEW WRINKLES 9
DE RETOUR ROBERT V. HOFFMAN 15
The patron saint of business men
Big Ben
RNOLD Bennett
says: "The atti
tude of the Amer
ican business man
towards his busi-
ness is pre-eminently the
attitude of an artist. He
loves his business."
Most American business
men know Big Ben. He
routs 'em out o' mornings
and starts 'em off with a
merry and irresistible
"Good luck to ye."
Big Ben loves his business.
Tbe study of Advertising Improves the power of expression.
He runs on time—he rings
on time—he stays on time.
He's clean-cut, cheerful,
right on the job—typical
of American determination
and grit.— The reason he
gets so much business is that
he minds his own so well.
Big Ben grands 7 Inches tall. He rings
just when you want and either way you want,
five straight minutes or every other half min
ute during ten minutes unless you flag him
off.—His keys are large, strong, pleasing to
wind —his voice deep, jolly, pleasing to hear.
Big Ben is sold by 18,000 jewelers. His
price is $2.50 anywhere.—lf you cannot find
him at your jeweler's, a money order sent
to Westclox, La Salle. Illinois, will bring him
to you attractively boxed and express paid.
doors of both producer and consumer.
The ogan<tft Railroad has done more
to civilize (lie Dark Continent than all
of the missionaries ever sent there.
"The Trans-Siberian Railroad," says
Ambassador BftTOI, "is the one big
factor that worked the evolution of
Japan, and is civilizing Russia as well."
Don't be a Villager
"EVIK lnek of travel a man is for ever
a villager.
People who live in one place and see
only a few people do not evolve, grow
and become. They get pot-bound.
The big people of the world are those
who travel.
They little know of England who
only England know.
You have got to get out of England,
perhaps out of America, in order to
get the perspective.
As you travel, you will always re
member the kindly, gracious people
you meet, the people who speed you on
your way.
There are railroad-conductors who.
as they pass through a coach taking up
tickets, spread an atmosphere of good
will and courtesy, and put the whole
car in good humor, not by what they
say, but by their kindly habit of mind.
When the passenger hands him a
ticket, the words, "Thank you," from
the conductor sort of liberates pent-up
love, and lubricates existence.
A railroad-man, above all individuals,
sbould be proud of his occupation.
Great responsibilities are resting on
him. When he forgets, dire distress
may follow. The lives and the treasure
and the happiness of a vast number of
people are in his keeping.
The Dignity of Service
"M"0 matter how menial his occupa
tion, he has an opportunity for
serving the public, which few peojfle
have, and within a few years the con
sciousness has come to humanity that
the highest ideal of every good man is
to be a public servant.
The president of a great railway
I system is a servant of the people, no
I less than a flagman.
Also, the flagman's duties just
as important, in their way, as are those
of the general passenger agent.
Nowadays, we are not trying to get
| out of work. We are not looking for
ease or pleasure, or a good time, or a
soft snap. The joys of life come from
doing our work; that is to say, getting
a job and holding it down, and at the
same time getting ready for a better
job.

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