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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 29, 1912, Image 1

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Hfslievt Temperature Yesterday, 58; Lowest Wednes
day Meht, 50.
FOR A \ The Call will find GIVE
■RrY!7R"Rf one for you if you TTTTTM
OR ( Classified "Ads" J^
' FLAT?) ° f tbis P1 - TRIAL
VOLUME CXn.—NO. 182.
SERVIA THROWS DOWN GAUNTLET TO AUSTRIA
King Peter, Backed by Russia, Occupies Adriatic Port of Durazzo With Troops
M'CLOUD PLAN
REVIVED TO HALT
PARK PROJECT
Reopening of Entire Discus
sion on River Water Sup
ply Due at Today's Session
—Move Is Surprise to San
Francisco Representatives
BOOSTERS ARE SURE
THEY'LL ROUT FOES
Irrigation Men Also Object
—Engineers Busy on Data
to Disprove Claims and
Show Hetch Hetchy Is
the Only Practical Source
IRA E. BENNETT
Special Dispatch to Tbe Call
WASHINGTON, Nov. 28.—A reopen
ing , of the entire discussion of the
McCloud river water supply as a sub
stitute for the Hetch Hetchy will be
requested by A, L. Shlnn, attorney for
the interests proposing , this solution
of San Francisco's water needs when
the hearing into the Hetch Hetchy
project is reconvened by Secretary
Fisher of the interior department to
morrow.
It (s probable that Secretary Fisher
will agree to the request because of
the lack of data on the McCloud site.
This will mean that the hearings , will
be thrown over into next week, al
though the San Francisco advocates
will probably be permitted to fight the
answer to Attorney Shinn's contention
In a brief mailed from the coast.
Irrigation Men Turn
Aae-thei dgvctotnnent waw tho*eh«rag«'
front on the part of the representa
tives of the irrigation districts, who
were thought to be content merely to
safeguard the rights already accorded
them, but who now say that all the
water from Hetch Hetchy is neces
sary for irrigation purposes. Opposi
tion to San Francisco's petition is to
be made on that ground.
J. H. Dockweiler,, the engineer who
inquired Into this phase of the mat
ter on behalf of the city of San Fran
cisco, and George T. Prince, who made
an additional examination on behalf
of Consulting Engineer Freeman, said
toniglft that they had no fear of this
new obstaeJe.
The data compiled is said to show
that 400,000,000 gallons of water can be
diverted every day from the Hetch
Hetchy to San Francisco without de
priving irrigation or agricultural in
terests of their supply.
McCloud Fight Vigorous
Nevertheless the San Francisco en
gineers are busy preparing data to meet
the two new obstacles. They had been
convinced that the McCloud project had
been eliminated in view of the adverse
opinion of tjje United States hydro
graphic survey and the material sup
plied by Consulting Engineer Freeman.
Marsden Manson, who was to complete
the investigation, is ill, and the San
Francisco representatives are some
what hampered by a lack of data, but
they believe they have sufllcient ma
terial on hand to disprove the conten
tions Qf Shinn.
It will be shown that McCloud, aside
from being Impractical, would require
a tremendous expenditure of money be
cause of the necessity of providing fil
tration, pumping, tunneling rock forma
tion and Installing a long stretch of
submerged pipe across San Francisco
Continued on Page 2, Column 6
INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS
Page.
Accountants—Certified Pnbllc 12
Agents Wanted 12
Allen. Wiley B *
Amusements "
Apartments 13 I
Architect* 13
Assayers 14
Astrology 12
Attorneys 12
Auctions 13
Automobiles 12
Baby Carriages 13
Barbers ana Supplies - 12
Berkeley Houses to i*t (Purnlftbed) 13
Burlingame Real Estate 13
Business chance* 13
Business Colleges 12
Business personals 12
Buftone and Pleating 12
Carpet Cleaning 12
Catarrh and De&fneee 12
Children's Chair* 13
City Real Estate 13
Clothing Wanted 12
Country Real Estate 13
Peafness and Catarrb 12
Dentist* 12
Dog and Cat Hospitals 12
Doll Carriages .**- 13
Drew Making 12
Educational 12
Employment Offices 1 12
Employment Wanted (Female) 12
Knjployment Wanted )Male) 12
Female Help Wanted 12
Files Recut 13
Financial ; 34, 15
Flats for Sale (Furnished) 13
Flats to Let 13
Flats to Let (Furnished) , 13
For Sale—Miscellaneous 12 ]
Fredericks & Co TJ
Furnished Apartments , Irt :■
Furniture for Sale IB I
Kur« 12!
Oerman Savings Bank •. •"> |
Crodeau. Juiius S 14 |
Hatr Goods 12 j
Hale Brothers Jβ]
H astlngfi Clothing 4
Hay for Ssle L|J
Harness, Wagons 131
THE CALL
"An Independent Newspaper ,,
BLANCHE BATES
LED TO ALTAR BY
DENVER OFFICIAL
Blanche Bates Creel.
Wedding Ceremony Is Witnessed
by Many Theatrical and
Literary Folk
Special Dispatch to The Call
NEW YORK, Nov. 28.—Blanche L.yon
Bates, the Belasco star, was married
tonight at her country home, the Ira
Bailey farm, Ossining, N. V., to George
Creel, author, politician, dramatic
critic, editor and reform police com
missioner of Denver.
The list of names of the guests who
attended the simple ceremony In the
old farm house, which preceded an
elaborate celebration in Delmonicoe. in
cluded many celebrities in theaterdom,
literature and art. Judge Ben B. Llnd
sey of**f)enver and Harvey J. O'Hig
gins acted as ushers. Wylie Creel,
brother of the bridegroom,' was the
best man.
The bride had only one attendant,
Mrs. Rupert Hughes, wife of the play
wright and author. Both wore white
gowns. The bride carried lilies of the
valley and bride roses. Rev. A. N. Peter
son, pastor of the Scarborough Pres
byterian church, performed the cere
mony at 6:30 o'clock. Two of the last
guests to arrive were Cunis F. Dean,
a Belasco manager in Baltimore, and
Brand Whitlock, the reform mayor of
Toledo, 0., and socialist author.
It is expected the couple will start
tomorrow on a honeymoon trip in the
south before going to their new home
in Denver, the site of which, on a knob
known as "Inspiration Point," near
Golden, Colorado's first capital, was se
lected by the actress on a visit there
last summer.
It was denied positively tonight that
Miss Bates intends to leave the stage,
as had been announced. Creel said:
I would no more ask my wife to
retire from the stage because we
are married than I would expect
her to ask me to give up my work.
My wife has a mind of her own and
a right to use it.
CENTENARIAN IS SHAVED
It's Hie Firtit One and He Submits to
It I nder Protest
. Special Dispatch to The Call
HUNTINGTON, Ind., Nov. 28.—Jacob
Souers, the town's oldest citizen, who
will celebrate his one hundredth birth
day anniversary December 14, submit
ted to his first shave today. He did so
under protest, his daughter summon
ing a barber to the home. She wished
to prepare her father for a photograph
to be taken in anticipation of his com
ing celebration.
• • Page.
Hotels 13
Houses to Lease 13
Information Bureau 13
Insects Exterminated 12
Invalid Chairs 12
Investments 14
Kelleher & Browne \ '.'.,.'.'.'.. 8
Lake County Lands , 13
Legal and Ofßclal 14
Lodging Houses for Sale 13
Lost and Found 12
Lumber for Rale 13
Male Help Wanted 12
Matrimonial J2
Meetings— Lodges ............I 12
Miscellaneous Wants J2
Money to Loan ....". 14
Money Wanted—Real Estate !!!!!!!! 14
Mußlcal Instruments 12
Oakland Housekeeping Rooms I!.!!!. 13
Oakland Houses to Let (Unfurnished) 13
Oakland Real Estate 13
O'Connor Mollatt & Co " " " " \%
Offices acd Stores to Let 13
Patent Attorneys "12
Physical Culture " 12
Physicians " je
Railroad Time Tables "...."...*!.'.'!."." 14
Real Estate to Exchange 18
Redwood City Real Estate 18
Richmond Real Estate . ]8
Richmond Real Estate Wanted IS
Room* for Housekeeping 13
Rooms to Let (Furnished or Unf urniehed)... IS
Roos Bros 3
Salesmen and Solicitors 12
San Mateo Real Kutate " .. 13
Santa Cruz Real Estate 13
Sewing Machines 12
Sherman. Clay & Co ...:..,. 8
Sloan* & Co g
Something for Something—To Exchange... 12-13
Sonoma County Lands , 13
Spirttuallam 12
Stammering .........'., 12
Steamshln* , 13
Storage end Moving Vans .', 12
Trusses , j 12
Typewriters and Supplies... !..... 12
VaHurp Robert 2
Windoiv Sharirs 13
Wood Baskets 13
SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1912—PAGES 1 TO 8.
RUNAWAY HOSE
BOWLS OVER 100
AT$40,000 FIRE
High Pressure Streams Hard
to Handle at Blaze Which
Ruins Fillmore Street
Block
TWO SPECTATORS AND
FIREMAN ARE HURT
Wooden Structure Erected;
After 1906 Disaster Is Al
most Totally Destroyed
Duty Calls 300 Firemen
From Turkey Dinners
How won id yon like to jump up •
.In tbe middle of your Thanks- '
Klvinjr dluner, just a> the big: •
bird was coming on the table and '
denh away- to flgrht a lire In your •
.holiday cloth**? ]
That was what 300 firemen did •
of their own free will when the [
gong* In their home* sounded •
the third alarm for the $40,000 '
fire at CI Us and FHlmore streets •
yesterday afternoon. ,
And there were other* who '
had been thinking all day, as [
they etood around company head- «
quartern, of the white meat and ,
dark meat and cranberry sauce '
that nai awaiting them at home. ,
Their dreama ,of the bia; feast j
alao were shattered when the ;
Sons; aonnded the call to duty. <
Enjoying a day off were 47 ;
men. 'fheee were forced to drop ■
knivfa and forka end hurry •
away to take »j» the neeale and '
ax. Nineteen ' companies were [
called to the Are and lft others <
"covered In ,, from outalde dla- \
trlcte to protect the localities <
vacated by the fire tighten. All \
these would have eaten turkey, '
but the flaming piano store kept ;
them awar from the flaming •
plum puaoing.
To add Insult to injury, there •
was no time to change clothes. ■
Suits that graced the festive '
board were drenched and burned '
and smoked at the fire. Who '
says the firemen are not en- ',
titled to 12 hours reat out of 34 f '
If it had not been for the \
prompt response of the "off '
duty , * men tbe high pressure aye- ]
tern eottld not bare been called '
Into play with such rapidity. ,
Fire virtually destroyed the one story
frame building and loft at the north
west corner of Ellis and Flllmore
streets yesterday afternoon. The flre
lasted two hours and took the com
bined effort of 11 engrne companies and
four high pressure streams to subdue
the flames.
Considerable trouble was experienced
in handling the high pressure streams,
as the firemen did not have reduction
nozzles. The hose on one of the hy
drants got away from the firemen in
Ellis street and knocked down 100 men
and women.
Two persons were treated for slight
Injuries In the ambulance sent from the
central emergency hospital. Henry
Brand, 622 Waller street, was hit In
the head by a flying nozzle which cut
a deep gash. George White, 51 Lucy
street, was knocked unconscious and
severely bruised. Robert Burke, en
glneman of No. 7 engine, was knocked
down by contact with a live wire and
was just regaining consciousness when
found by fellow firemen.
Three Alarms Turned In
The flre was discovered at 4:45 o'clock
by Patrolman Fogerty In Keables Piano
company's store, 1423 Fillmore street
The flames made rapid headway in the
wooden building and It was not until
three alarms had been turned In that
the flames seemed under control. Much
difficulty was met in fighting the flames
on account of their being no partition
in the loft of the building. This al
lowed the flames to sweep through the
structure.
On the Flllmore street side, starting
from Ellis street, the burned stores In
the building follow:
Heskins Clothing company, No Per
centage Drug company, A. S. Pencovic, !
manager; City of Fuchau (woman's
goods), Y. J. Choy, proprietor; Keablee
Piano company; Brockton Shoe com
pany, Carter and Warnock, proprietors,
and the Golden Gate Millinery com
pany.
Flat Residents Flee
In the adjoining building, Hong
Kong company (women's goods), 1435
Fillmore street, goods were ruined by
water and smoke. Many persons liv
ing in the Adon apartments, 1443 Fill
more street, ran out with their be-
Continued on Pace 2, Column S
SCENES AND FIGURES IN THE BALKAN WAR AND EUROPEAN CRISIS
When the Bulgarians n>ere driving the Turks back on Tchatalja, the Moslem inhabitants of Pcra, the residential
section of Constantinople, prepared to flee. The picture shorvs them embarking household goods on boats. The por
traits are of two of tkt leading men of the allied Balkan states and the German emperor's adviser.
SUFFRAGETTES IN
LONDON TARRING
MAIL IN BOXES
Drop Window Smashing to
Throw Black,, Sticky
Fluids Into Letter
Receptacles
LONDON, Nov. 28.—The ingenuity of
the militant suffragette party has
broken out in a new direction and in
a manner likely to cause inconvenience
and loss to thousands of persons.
It took the form tonight of an
organized raid on the pillar letter
boxes throughout the city of Lon
don, in the west end and many of
the suburbs, and also in several pro
vincial towns, including Birmingham
and Nottingham.
When the postmen went on their
evening rounds to collect the letters
they discovered in the boxes acids and
black, sticky fluids, and in some cases
inflammable material such as rags
soaked in parffln.
Aβ a result the addresses on the let
ters in many cases were partly or
wholly obliterated.
The outrages were carefully organ
ized. The method .generally 'employed
was to thrust into the box long, un
sealed envelopes containing an open,
bottle of fluid. Another method was
to pour acids and varnishes into the
boxes by means of India rubber tubing.
In a few cases the contents of the
pillar boxes were set on fire.
Not a single arrest has been made,
but police have been detailed to watch
all boxes.
RICH MAN'S DAUGHTERS
STOLEN FROM SCHOOL
i . ■■
Woman Relative Suspected of Abduct
ing Two Little Girl* In Gal-vestonj
California Police In Search
Special Dispatch to The Call
GALVESTON Tex., Nov. 28.—The Los
Angeles police were asked to aid in an
international search for the two young
daughters of P. O. Saunders, a wealthy
mine and ranch owner of Mexico who
has been living in Galveston.
His children, Consuelo, aged 13, and
Esperanza, aged 11, disappeared two
days ago and Saunders believes they
are held for ransom, although he haa
received no threats. Hβ also says .it
is possible a woman relative stole
them. Warrants were issued for her
arrest
While th% sisters were at school a
telephone cell advised their teacher
that Mrs. Saunders was dying and
urged that the children be sent home.
They \ were seen no more. ~^<
"AN the News All the Time' , \
CONCERT IS GIVEN
FOR DOOMED FELON
Prison Band Plays for Women's
Slayer on Eve of
Hanging
Special Dispatch to The Call
SAN QUENTIN, Nov. 28.—As the light
from a clear California winter's moon
filtered in through the bars of the con
demned prisoners' row at the state's
prison here tonight the consoling notes
of religious hymns and "Just Before
the Battle, Mother," "Break the News
to Mother" and the "Wearing of the
Green" drifted out over the prison yard.
It was the last request of a prisoner
who would die on the gallows at 10:30
o'clock tomorrow morning:. He is Ed
ward Williams of Butte county, con
victed of killing two women.
Williams asked Warden Hoyle if
the prison orchestra could play. As in
all cases where a prisoner is- to be
hanged, the request was immediately
granted.
From 9 o'clock tonight until mid
night, three hours, the music was
played. The prison was wrapped in
deathlike stillness as the notes of the
orchestra floated through the longv
dark corridors. Not one of the sev
eral thousand felons even raised a
whimper. All knew it was the last
request of a fellow convict who would
meet his death on the morrow.
YOUNGEST FLYER SETS
NEW PASSENGER RECORD
Gilpatrfe Reaches 5,008 Feet Height}
Remains In Air One Hour
and Six Minute*
Special Dispatch to The Call
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 28.—John Guy
Gilp&tric, youngest aviator in the
world, smashed the world's passenger
carrying record for altitude today at
Domingue* field by driving his 60
horsepower Dupperdusln monoplane to
a height of 5,008 feet. Gilpatrie was
In the air one hour and six minutes.
The former passenger carrying record
for altitude was 3,400 feet, established
by Graham E. White, the English avi
ator, in New York city September 30,
1911, and though other aviators have
tried for it severaj times, they failed.
WEATHER FORECAST.
Pair, except togmr In morulas; light northwest wfme"
For Details of the Weather See Page 15.
JACK } CALL
J The noted writer
T /YNTHONf contributes a story U ATIR ,,
IA/IN ±AAL> I for next Sunday's J\JJi5
SCall. It is the
pap«. PULLERS
WILSON ARRANGES
FOR CONFERENCE
WITH W. J. BRYAN
Writes to Commoner From
Bermuda Inviting Him to
Meeting on Return
to United States
HAMILTON, Bermuda, Nov. 28.—
Woodrow Wilson has written a letter
to William Jennings Bryan inviting , him
to a conference after Wilson returns
from Bermuda. .
The president elect wishes to consult
with Bryan as one of the leaders of the
democratic party, but he will take
counsel with several other democratic
leaders also.
It is definitely announced that Bryan
is not coming to Bermuda and that he
has not be«n Invited to do so.
After the Thanksgiving dinner today
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson went driving and
In the evening attended an amateur
performance of "Our Mutual Friend."
Being president elect of the United
States ahfi being merely Woodrow Wil-
son, an American citizen in search of
the rest of a British colony in mid
ocean do not differ in the slightest de
gree. Governor Wilson was recalling
his previous vacations In the Bermudas,
when, as president of Princeton uni
versity, he sought rest and quiet here.
"It's not a bit different," he said, as
he stood on the veranda of his home.
"Everything is the same as before.
Many more people have called, to be
sure, but I am having Just the kind of
vacation I wanted, with plenty of rest
and exercise."
The president elect has no fixed pro
gram on any day. He varies his vaca
tion pleasures with the days as they
come. Often he sleeps long, and rainy
arfternoons he takes an additional nap.
His correspondence is negligible. His
secretaries at home were instructed to
send mail only of the most urgent
character, and to date they have , not
sent a single letter.
The governor says he feels greatly
improved in health and as distant from
the whirl of the campaign as if it
closed three years ago instead of two
weeks.
Perhaps one of the greatest pleasures
his vacation has given him is in re
gaining the privacy of the family
circle.
Bermuda has brought back the do
mestic side of life to the governor, and j
the best proof o£ its enjoyment is a
glimpse of the cozy parlors of the
Wilson home, where each night, in an
atmosphere of books and companion
ship, the family group may be seen.
The absence of newspapers makes
the island a particular delight for
Governor Wilson*
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
TURKO-BALKAN
CRISIS PALES
BEFORE ACUTE
COMPLICATION
Belgrade Government Ig
nores the Proclamation of
Albanian Independence
and Hurls Defiance at
Franz Josef by Seizing
Forbidden Territory —
War Spirit Runs High in
Vienna and Preparations
for Strife Are Active
SITUATION KEEPS
EUROPE AGITATED
Great Powers, to Avert Up
heaval, Exchange Pro
posals for the Assembling
of a General Conference
to Settle All Specific
and Conjunctive Misun
derstandings Growing Out
of Struggle in the Levant
That Has Led to Tchatalja
BULLETIN
DURAIZO, Albania, No\>. 28.—*
The Servian troops occupied Durazzo
today. No resistance Dfas offered.
The Austrian-Lloyd steamer Graf
Wurmbrand left immediately n>ith a
number of refugees.
Durazzo is the port on the Adriatic
rvhieh Servia desires to retain and which
Austria is determined Servia shall not
hold.
Bt'LIJSTIIf
LONDON , . Nov. 29 "We hare bow
occupied Duraczo for perpetuity," is
the telegram which General Jankotitch,
the Servian commander, haa aent to
the Belgrade government. The fact
that the Belgrade government has made
public thin telegram, aaya the Vienna
correspondent of the Daily Telegraph,
In regarded am proving Servta's irre
concillable attitude.
LONDON, Nov. 28.—The Servians,
ignoring the proclamation of Albanian
independence, have occupied the port
of Durazzo without resistance. Thife
information comes'in a direct dispatch
from that {own tonight
Thus the conflict is raised In acute
form between Austria and Servta, and
it remains to be seen whether the
Austrian government will take any
direct action or will be content to
leave the question for the after the
war settlement.
Anxiety Great in Europe
The Servian action, coupled with the
eminently warlike feeling prevailing
In Vienna, is likely to keep Europe in
a continued state of anxiety. On the
other hand, the fact that the negotia
tions are progressing at Baghtche and
that there is no sign of the beginning
of operations on the. Tchatalja lines,
while the great powers are exchang
ing proposals for the assembling of
i European conference, all make for a
peaceful settlement
Should the proposed conference ma
terialize —for apparently Austria ha*
not yet consented to participate—lt
would be considered as preparatory to
a later full conference, which would
Include the Balkan states and Turkey,
for a final settlement of all questions.
Nothing has been decided as to where
the conference will be held or precisely
what question will be discussed.
Secrecy Is Preserved
The project appears to have arisen
out of a general sense of Irritation
at the Inevitable delays necessitated by
the constant telegraphic interchange*
of views.
Great secrecy Is preserved regarding
the conference at Baghtche and It la
not known whether the plenipotenti
aries are discussing the terms of an
armistice or basis for the conclusion of
peace.
It is reported from Rome that a
provisional Albanian government has
been constituted in Valona , (Avalona)
[by 80 Albanian delegates.
The Turkish fleet, with the exception
of the cruiser Hamidieh, is reported
by special correspondents in Constan
tinople to be ready to go out and fight.
It. is doubtful, however, whether the
Ottoman military authorities will agree
to allow its use against the Qreejf
fleet, despite the reported intention <£

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