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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 29, 1912, Image 11

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WINGED O RUNNER WINS TEN MILE RAGE
Olympic Star, Millard. Given Close Rub by Sailor Maudlin, U. S. N.,for First Honors—Wins by 151 Seconds
TALE OF VICTORY
IN LONE ORDEAL
Sailor, However, Is a Close
Contender at All Times
Throughout the
Ten Miles - i
YOUNGSTER OF 56 IS
A LIVELY STEPPER
Event Easily the Best of Its
Kind Ever Pulled Off
Locally
WILLIAM UNMACK
'"ondition, coupled with a great fln
fphing sprint, together with "class"
and splendid generalship, won the an- j
nna! Pa<Mfl> association cross country ]
champ'onshlp for Oliver Millard of the j
Olyntpic club. A. T.. Maudlin, tho Ifflor
from Uncle Pam's warship South Da
kota, proved the dark horse of the net ;
nnd made a wonderful fight with Mil- [
lard for the honors of the - day. Millard.
however, had too much up his sleeve
at the finish and won one of the great
est ten mile races seen In local cross j
country circles by 15 4-5 seconds from
the sailor. The race was run through
Golden Gate park from the stadium
to the Cliff house and return.
The Visitacion Valley Athletic asso
ciation took the "team" honors with 65
point?:, defeating the Pastime club men.
who tallied 57 points. The method of
deciding the winning team was by
awarding points to the men according
to their finishing: positions. The first
five men to finish for the Visitacion
team and their positions were: Gorse',
third: Ghiorso. tenth; Reinhard.
eleventh: Rossi, sixteenth, and Paulson
seventeenth. Yesterday's victory makes '
the third successive year that the Vis-
I'acion athletes have won this classic
race as a team.
The Pastime club had the misfortune
to lose the team prize through an er
ror on the part of Pickler, who finished
twenty-third. Before the start Referee
Tohn Elliott gave the runners full in
structions and notified them that in
the last circle of the stadium the men
were to keep along the cycle track and
then on the next turn to finish on
the cinder path. Sickler forgot these
instructions and came down the cinder
track. Had he kept to the cycle track
he would have finished up in seventh
place and thereby given his team the
honor of taking the team prize.
BKST B.4CE HELD HERB
The race was easily the best of its
*k*ind ever run in this vicinity, and it
wag a case where "class" told. The
real class was evident in the first six
men to finish, only 2 minutes 43 3-5
seconds separating this half dozen men
at the end of the long ten mile grind.
From thp gun the race was between ;
Millard. Maudlin. Corse. Stout and
Phillipson, this quintet setting a hot
pace and pulling away from the field
in great style.
The time made by Millard was Sfi j
minutes 44 4-5 seconds, and. considering j
the hard roads, was partirularty fast. J
All through the race Millard kept up j
a steady, even pace and showed gener
alship in every stride. He let the other
men go their way, figured out his own ;
rnce and Judged the pace of the oppo- j
sition to a nicety. He ran the first
half of the race in 29 minutes and --'>
of a second.
<*A?r.OR A GREAT RUWER
Maudlin of thje South Pakota ran a j
splendid race and showed all the ear
marks of a finished long distance man.
He and Stout easily had the best style
of the 35 men who started. His easy,
swinging gait kept up throughout the |
•jvhole distance, and he never faltered, j
On the last two miles of the race he
seemed in perfect condition, while Mil
lard, who was running with him. ap- j
parently was "all in." This, however, \
Ifl a peculiarity of the Olympic club j
boy near the finish of a long race,
though he has at all times plenty of
condition to finish on. Stout of the
Olympic club placed fourth, and ft is
his own fault that he did not show
higher up in the finishing line. No ath- >
lete on a ten mile grind can afford to !
adopt grandstand play, running back
ward or doing skipping rope stunts,
and this is what killed Stout.
Gorse of the Visitacion Valley club
finished third and made a plucky re
covery of ground lost in the last few
miles. At one time he was far in the
rear, but kept plugging along with
such success that he .ran into third
place, a few seconds behind Maudlin.
THE GRAND OLD MAX
One of the notable starters of the
race was Isaac Day of Bolinas Bay.
Old Isaac is "66 years young." and cov
ered the 10 miles in 70 minutes 50 4-5
seconds. He showed a good deal more
stamina than most of the other young
sters in the race, but lack of pace told
its tale. He finished fresh and walked
to the dressing room satisfied with his
performance and more satisfied with
the time he had made.
From the start Isaac Day Jumped
into the lead and paced the big field
around the stadium circle. Coming out
of the stadium, he was replaced by sev
eral men, Millard being the first out
into the park proper, leading Maudlin
of the Dakota and Phillipson of thp
Pastime. The other men werl stretched
out at various Intervals, the rear man
! elng 300 yards away.
Millard, Phillipson, Maudlin, Gorse
and Stout at once set the pace, and
this sextet reached the bridge at the
Great highway together. Sirkler of
the Pastimes was 50 yards in the rear.
Millard was the first to turn the stake
at the Cliff house, with the other five
at hie* heels.
»*I!.OR GETS IX LEAD
Coming into the North drive Maudlin
opened up a lead of 50 yards on Gorse
and Mlllard, with Phillipson and Stout
another 25 yards behind Gorse. On
leaving the stadium for the la*t half
of the race Branner of Stanford had
picked up considerable ground and was
running well. Maudlin led at the Great
highway on the second time under the
bridge by 50 yards over Millard, the
others having dropped behind.
When the hill leading up to the Cliff
house was reached Maudlin had in
creased his lead over Mlllard to 100
yards, but it was on the steep incline
that the Olympic club lad pulled up
the lost ground. He came down the
hill with a rush and got Maudlin half
way down. From that point on these
two kept together for the balance of
the race.
Millard was the first to enter the
SNAPPED AT THE CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPIONSHIP RACE OF THE PACIFIC ASSOCIATION HELD ON STADIUM AND BEACH ROADS YESTERDAY.
The upper picture the men have just left the starting line and are on their way around the Golden Gate park stadium for the first leg of the 10 mile course. The lower picture is Oliver Millard
» of the Olympic club, the winner.
stadium for the finishing mile, with
Maudlin right on hie heels. Gorse was |
300 yards in the rear, with Stout still
farther behind and Phillipson a few
yards behind Stout. Then the final race
started. Millard kept his eye on the
sailor and let him make the pace for
the first half mile, then Millard piled
on a little more pace. Maudlin stuck
•to him gamely, but when Millard
"opened np" in the last quarter the
sailor could not hold his great finish
ing: burst. a"nd Millard won a great
race by fU 4-5 seconds.
All of the arrangements were made
by the Pastime club, under whose
auspices the affair was run off. Every
thing was carried out in good style
and the officials all handled the race
in a businesslike manner. Thirty-five
men started in the race and thirty-one
finished. The result and finishing time
of each man are as follows:
l_O!!re MMlnrd. Olympic eltih 56:44 4-5
2—A. L. Maudlin. V. S. S. South I>a
knta 57:OO 3-5
S— .41 Korsp. V. V. A C 37:27
4—E. V. Stmit. O. C S7:««
R— J. rhillinson. Pastime club »:S
«—Oporfp Rranner. Stanford !»:» 2-.-> j
r-JW. O. .T<*n«*>n. n.-V. V. M: C. A..« 2:17 3-*
R—T.. 11. Par. 8. F. Y. M. C- A 62:44 4-5
ft—E. W. Furren, I'a«tim<? club 63
W—A. Ohforso. V. V. A. C f»:17 2-5
11—ii Pelnl'-rd vmtoc'ni VjtHer clvV63:lß
12—Genrjre R. Wrlpbt. Oakland Y. M.
C. A »B:SS
13—V. V.. N>!«mi. Pastime clnb fi4:l7 4-.">
14— F. Mnnsrelsdorf. unattached ft4:.*e 3-5
! I.V—P. ORTisran. Pastime Hub f.".:in
j Iβ—V. Rns«l. Vlßlti>cion Valler H",:2.".
17 —a. Ptuilsen. Vtsitacinn Valley club. fiS :34 4-5
! I«_n. W. Larsen. unattached *W:T
i lft—A. Rehrendt. Y. M. H. A efi:2O 2-5
I ?O—M. Purser. tinsttßched 66:43
21— C. Huntpr. Tnm»lp«U club fW:4ft 1-5
I 22— F. Praclflw<«ld. Tnmnlpais club C 7:22 2-S
i 23—TT P SicklfT. Pi«time club RS:ft 1-5
j -_'4— W. R. Pitts. S. F. V M. C. A R!>:lß
! 2r—B. Ranhapt. Tamalnals club 6ft:27
2ft—T. Caffery. TamalpaN club C,U:'\
27—Ed Aitkin. nmttsched «5:."7 2-5
2R—.T. F. Bnrke. Pastime club 70:24 4-."5
29—Isanc Dar. unattached 70:50 4-5
j r^ft— .T. Reht.er~. VisUaHon Valley , club.7l :*>4 4-5
I ;}i_w. B. Gilbert. S. F. Y. M. C. A.73:08 3-5
Morton Wins San Jose Race
Special Dispatch to ThP Call
SAN JOSE, Nov. 28.—Running in a
I pungent wake of burning easoline and
! a choking cloud of dust kicked up by a
flock of automobiles, rqotor cycles, rigs
and bicycles, Morton, the schoolboy
i runner of Mountain View, covered the
j distance between Alviso and San Jose
| today in 39 minutes and 44 seconds and
S finished first in a cross country run
which attracted 30 starters. Loucks.
I also of Mountain View, finished second
jin 44:26. McNeil, San Jose, was third:
i Dermody, Mountain View, fourth, and
j Williams, San Jose, fifth.
BIG INTERSCHOLASTIC RUN
PH'LADELPHIA. Nor. 2S.—Wens of N>w
| RncheHe. N. V.. won the American intor-
I scholastic cross country run here today. The
Imm Vjs maflp over a course of four miles and
! 200 yard-!. Wfn« made the distance In 23 mln
' utps 3!) 2-5 seconds. McComb of the Central hleh
school of Philadelphia vra* wcopd. The event
wi< held m<Vr the auspices of the University
of PeongrlTSD^f.
Reuther Pitches in
Big League Style
Reuther pitched an excellent game
for the Rai-Nuts yesterday, holding the
' Shreves to two hits in nine innings.
;On the other hand, the victors ftound
I Cullen and Harrison to be easy pick
! ing. They slammed their twisters to
various corners of the lot. The Shreves
scored their only run in the sixth as
the result of a hit. The Rai-Nuts
bunched their hits in the fourth frame
i and also in the sixth. Score:
RAINUTS
Reonnd game— AB. R. BH. PO. A. E.
Gnldenson. .$b 3 2 I 0 0 1
Brtin. 2b 5 1 1 4 1 1
Favor, 1. f 5 0 1 1 0 0
Raby, (w 3 'i 1 0 :5 OJ
Stnneider, c. f 1 0 0 0 0 0
Britt lb .2 1 1 8 0 ii j
Worth, r. f. 3 0 2 1 0 0
Reltrmann, c 3 0 1 12 1 0
Reuiher. p 4 0 ] o ,1 ]
Culver, c. f 3 2 2 1 0 0
Total 32 6 11 27 8 3J
SHREVES f f
AB. R. BH. PO. A. E.
HeMrom, 3b 3 0 0 2 B 0
Bankboiid. 2b. 4 0 0 2 2 0
Kenaedy. se. 4 (> 0 3 1 1
Koeter, c. f 4 0 0 1 0 1
Swanton, lb 4 0 0 11 2 0
Cullen. 1. f. and p 3, o I o 3 0
Rt»b«rK, r. f. and 1. f 'Z o c> l J 0
Crosewaite. c £ <> •• 6 4 X
Harrison, p 1 0 0 0 0 o
Menslng, r. f 1 1 1 1 0 0
Total 28 1 2 27 18 3
RIXS AND HITS BX UNIXGS
Ralnuts I 0 l 2 t l l on—c
Basebits 1 0 1 3 0 4 2 « I—ll
I ShreTPH 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 o—l
Baeebits 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0-2
SCMMARY
Two rone, 3 bite off Harrison in 3 13 innincs;
two on base* when takfi out. Two buse hit —
Britt. Sacrtflcp hit—Worth. Stolen bae^e—
Goiapnson (»>. Faror. Hoistrom. Risl>erg. Sacrl
flee fl.v —Holetroni. First base on called ball*—■
Off Harrison 3, off Collen -. off Reutbfr 2.
Snrurk out—By Harrlwon B,< by Rpntlier 8, by
Cullen li. Hit by pitched boll Britt. by Harri
coo; CrosewattP Double playe—HolsiU-oa) to
B«nkbead to Kennedy; Reuther to Reltt-nnann to
Britt. l'asse<} ball* Ore—w<ll< (2). Wild pitch
—Harrleon. Time of game—l hour ami 07 inln
uten. Umpire-—dullivau »
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1912.
SLOW TRACK BUT BRAKE
THRONG FOR OPENING
Army "Guns" of Two Lands
at Christening of the
Juarez Meet
Special Dispatch to The Call
EL PASO. Tex., Nov. 28.—A perfect
day, but a slow, dopey track ushered in J
the 100 days' race meeting at the Juarez
track this afternoon. The rains of last
week, together with heavy mists, have
prevented the track from drying , out
properly, and the going was heavy as J
mud.
The crowd was one of the finest peen j
at the races in four years. General j
Tracy Aubert, commander of the Mexi
can garrison, attended with hie staff
and occupied boxes. General Steevers'
sfaff from Fort Bliss also occupied
boxes and were taking a leading part |
in the odds laying in the betting ring, j
Small fields and slow time marked all
of the rac«s. . The summary:
FIRST RACK—Fire and a half furlongs
Ofldß. Horse. WPisbt. Jockey. St. Str. Fin.
7-30— Fleleti Rarbee. 112 (Loftud). . 2 114
100-I—F<*,la. 105 <W. Gargan) 4 2 25
ie,">—Kootetiay. inr, <<;ro«H) 1 S .Th
Time. 1:0S 3-5. Barbp* J-4 place, out show;
Reda .TO pl«ce. 10 nhow; Kootenay 1-4 show.
CI. M. Miller and Lady Panchita also ran.
Scratched—T'nristht.
SKCOvn RAOF.—Six furlongs:
Oddn. Hor«e. Weight Jorfcpy. Rt. Str. Fin.
5-2—Sepnlreda. 112 (Sleloffi 5 2 1 *i
U-s—Rob Lynch. 11l (Mulligan) 4 12 1
10! -El Pato. 104 Olottx) 3 4 3 %
Time. 1:17 1-5. S*»pu'.T»>da 4-5 place. 2-r> sbow:
Lynch 4-5 plao*. 2-5 uliow; Pato 8-5 show. Doo
Enriqtip. Brevltp, Ixrtta Creed, albo ran.
THIRD RACK—fhie mile:
Odds. Hofee. Weight. Jockey. St. Str. Fin.
R-s—Little Marchmwrt. tOB 3 2 1?
12-I—Bohhr Cook. 108 a.Oayenport I 112 2
3-4—t-oYedaj , . IC3 (Gross) 4 3 36
Time 1:46 2-5. Marclimont 2-5 place, out
•how; Cook -">-2 place. 7-l<> «how; Loveday out
*how. Beatrice Soule also ran. Scratched—
The Pepr.
FOIRTH RACE—Six furlongs; Juare* handi
cap: $2,000:
Odd«. Horse. Weight. Jock*»y. St. Str. Fin.
8-s—Bwkborn. 118 (LofMa) 2 1 1 M,
20-I—i:prl«rht. 9.5 (Callahan) 4 3 21
6-s—Meridian, 127 (Steele) 3 2 33
Time. 1:16 1-5. .Bneknorn 3-5 place, 1-4 show;
T'priielit 6 place. 5-2 nhow. Meridian 1-4 show.
Closer, Irish Gentleman. Jim Basey, Enfleld.
also ran. Scratched —Just Red, Daddy Ulp, Eye
White.
FIFTH RACE—Five fnrlonge:
Odds. Horse, Weight. Jockey. St. fitr. Fin.
2-I—Sidney Petere, 113 (Fnrsythe) 2 1 1 h
23-I—P. Henderson. 102 (Callahan I. 4 2 2 ne
6-s—Sir Alreeoot. 110 (Steele) 8 3 3 4
Thiip. 1:04. Peters 7-10 place. 1-3 chow; Percy
Henderson 8 place, 3 show; Alvfeseot 1-4 show.
Acumen. Quid Nnnc. Lescar. The Fad, Kfran,
Dan Norton. Serenade Highland Chief, also ran.
SIXTH RACE—Six furlongs:
Odde. Horse, Wetrht. Jockey. St.~Str. Fin.
S-s—Feather Lhjßter, 111 (Dreyer). 1116
15-»—Frazzle. 104 (Molesworthk 2 3 '2 2
15-I—Hatterai. 108 (Wilson).." 6 6 3 1
Time. l:t7 4-5. Duster. 7-10 place, 1-3 chow;
Frazzle c plac«>, n show: Hattera* 3 show. En
graver, Parlor Boy, Judge Walton, Shooting
Bpray. also ran.
Weather fine; track slow.
Call Handicap
JOE MURPHY
FIRST RACE —Five furlongs; selling:
Index. Horse. Wt.
590» JAMVS 96
1567 CnGHLAKD CHIEF 113
JJB2& COMPTON us
46fS Teddy Bear no
IBM Oaletie Gale 110
«387 Kitty W 98
3492 Luke Vaneandt 93
Jamil* won last r*ps and ohown the best.
Highland Chief works fast. Comptoii tlie clause
on his best last season's form and will agqjp
eport Carman's colors.
SKCOND RACE—Five furlongs; selling:
Influx. Horse. • X^t.
I.V.- C. W. KINNON no
13f7 DA2C NOKTON 113
5T8.1 LADY YOT/NO 105
1820 f'arnell Girl 105
1379 Kof* Worth HO
12C3 Originator 113
1537 Auto Girl 105
C. W. Klunon lest a good (Woond ami
warrants tabbing. Dan Norton was undoubtedly
short jeeterday. Lady Young a consistent east
ern performer.
THIRD RACE— Klre furlongs; purse:
Index. Horee. w»
1547 PRETTY DALE 112
t«S7 BWIFTSIJ&E 102
IWU HUBEK 102
6721 Kid Nelson 105
00 I See It 107
.. Sharper Knight 107
f>363 Kir* 102
Pretty Dal?, if you throw out last rare, looks
to be the spot. Swiftnure laat races good. Huber
works fact, from reports.
FOURTH RACE—Six furlongs; selling; mares
and fillies:
Index. Hbrsw. wt
«179 ELIZABETH HAS WOOD 10S
6421 CaOSSOVEB
6201 THE HAGtTE , *1M
0074 Muff ...1 104
.... A ragone*e IQ7
K)izßt«tb Hirwiiod, another one of Carman*
sprinters, will take the lee* and show a clean
pair of heeU. Crossover will be closing fast
from The Hagne. .
FIFTH RACE—FiTβ furlongs; selling:
Index. Hone. • wt
15«7-SIDNEY PETERS 113
Hfi-ILTTOILLE ALLEN no,
t>T2J! DOMIMICA no
1?8S Dwrfoot no
1491 Canteoi ....110
Miner Jitumle 105
1538 Arthur Hy nut n no
I.YiO SMITHge '. 110
(hi hix race of yesterday Sidney Peters will
again prove the contender. Lucille Allen ran
n good race the last time out. Dominica is
game and consistent on eastern form.
SIXTH RACK—One mile; selling:
Index. HnrM. Wt.
r>42l BLACK MATE lta
•ill!) ROSE O'NEIL 100
1373 EON ENRIQUE ...105
1280 McAlan 100
ISM Flyrni 107
V2W Li'lr Paxton .' K'ft
1525 Reporter M
On do;>e figures Muck Mate should win this
racp easily, Ro«e O'Nell did well. Doa Enrique
will find the distance right.
BEST BETS—PRETTt DALE. BLACK MATE
J. Bull Wins First
Tennis Contests
MELBOURNE, Aus., Nov. 23.—England
has drawn first blood in the contest for
the Dwight F. Davis International lawn
tennis trophy. Members of the English
team today won the first two of the sin
grles matches. Scores:
J. C. Parke (England) defeated the world fa-
mous Nor in en Brookes (Australasia) by B—6,
6—:{, 5—7. « -2.
ChorleH P Dixon (England) beat R. W. Heath
(Australasia) by 5—7. <>—4, c— i. 6—4.
Brookes' defeat was unexpected. It is con
sidered here that -the Englishman's victory bus
seriously damaged Australia's chances of re
taining the trophy. English spectators argue
that should Australasia lose the matches the
United States surely will send Its be#t team to
England to compete foe the cup next year.
The matches were played on turf courts. The
games will be continued tomorrow and Saturday.
CLARIONS 7, FRASER PHOTOS 2
The Clarions captured a one sided
game from the Fraser Photos by a
score of 7 to 2. Loose fielding r«y the
photo boys caused their undoing. In
the third frame the Clarions scored
four runs as the result of a hit and
errors. Wihr and. Cooney pitched for
the Clarions and twirled masterly ball.
They allowed but two hits fn nine in
nings. Score:'
CLARIONS
First K>nu> — AB- R- BH. PO. A. K.
Kemp-on, 2b 5 10 12 0
Glaser. 3b, + 0 0 0 2 0
Ilynes, 1. t ". 3 0 l> 0 0 0
Welters, r. f •• » 2 1 i 0 0
O'Hair. c 3 118 3 2
QuilfHt, c. f * 1 '- 2 0 0
Sweeney. us : 3 1 1 8 3 0
Wwiinls, lb 3 0 1 7 2 0
Wihr. p 1 1 <> 0 1 Oi
Cooney, p 1 0 0 0 0 0
Total 32 7 6 27 13 2
PHASER PHOTOS
AB. R BH. PO. A. E.
Caveney. **. 2b 4 0 1 5 1 I ,
Croll. 2b, ne 3 0 0 0 4 0
Harper fc t * 0 1 1 0 0
Lagorio. r f 3 1 0 o 0 0
McUrath. 1. f 3 0 0 0 2 0
Hell man. Sb 3 0 0 4 11
Laird, lb • ■ A ° ° 5 2 3
Murray, c i 2 0 0 10 , 2 1
Pox, p 0 0 0 0 2 1
Dolan. p 1 1 0 0 0 0
Tyler, lb 1 0 0 2 O 0
Total 25 2 2 27 19 T
RUNS AND HCrS BY INNINGS
Clarions 0 1 4 0 1 1 0 0 o—7
Basehlts 0 1 1 O 1 2 1 0 O-β
Fraeer Pliotos 0 0 0 0 O 0 1 1 o—2
Baeehlts 1 00 0 0 0 0 1 o—2
SUMMARY
Five nine end 2 hits (Of Fox In 2 2-3 Innings; !
no run* and 1 hit off Wihr in 4 Inning*. Two
bane hits—Qutlfelt (21. Walter*, O'Hair. Sacri
fice bite— OlMpr. Stolen base*—Kempoon, Hynes,
Walters. O'Hair, Sweeney, Wihr. First base on
called bells —Oβ Fox 5, off Dolan 3. off Wlbr 1
off Cooney 4. Struck out—By Fox 2, by Wlbr 3,"
by Dolan 8, by Cooney & Hit by pitched ball—
Laird and (Toll toy Wibr; Sweeney by Dolan;
Mc<»ratb and I.agorJo by Cooney. Doable plare—
Edwards to Kempaon; O'Hair to Sweeney. Passed
beJV— Murray. , O'Hair. Wild pftcbee— Fox 2,
Cooney 3. Time of game—2 hour* and & minute*.
Umpire—Sullivan. ,
PENNSY WINS, ALTHOUGH
CORNELL OUTPLAYS HER
Ithacans PUt Up a Better
Brand of Football Than
the Quakers
.Speetai Dispatch to The Call
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 28.—Although
Pennsylvania won today's game from
Cornell by 7 to 2, many are strong in
: the opinion that the Ithaca eleven was
, the better one. The Quaker victory
I was fortunate, as it was the result of a
. fumble, whereas Cornell made its two
points by means of a block kick, which
was recovered for- a safety. In short,
the Cornell eleven outplayed Pennsyl
vania at all points of the game. Cor
nell's superiority was not apparent In
the kicking game. The Cornell ends
were far superior to Pennsylvania's in
covering punts, although Butler had
nothing on Minds in so far as distance
was concerned.
The condition of the field prohibited
end running. In the play of the line
both teams were strong on the defense,
Cornell apparently having , the better
of it by reason of the hard tackling of
the Ithaca forwards.
It was rarely necessary for the sec
ondary defense to be drawn In to help
out, whereas the Quakers used their
backs In this connection, especially
Harrington, who was seldom utilized In
carrying the ball, although he proved
the best ground gainer of the day.
Football Results
MINERS WIN BY LAMPLIGHT
RAPID CITY. S. D.. Not. 28.—Playing the
last quarter on a fleld lighted by automobile
lamps distributed about tbe gridiron, the School
of Mines defeated the Brooklns Agricultural col
lege. 23 to 13. In the semi-darkness the Miners
executed the forward pass with remarkable pre
cision.
' DENVER V. 20, COLORADO COLLEGE 3
COLORADO SPRINGS. Colo.. Nov. 28.—Sensa
tional punting and end running *>y Denver uni
versity player* were the feature In the game of
the conference season here this afternoon, with
Colorado college, the score standing 20 to 3, in
favor of the former squad.
N. M. M. I. 17, N. M. AGGIES 6
ROSWEI.L. N. M.. Nov. 28—New Mexico Mili
tary Institute won the state football champion
ship today by defeating the State Agrlcultml col
lege, 17 to 6. —
WASHINGTON V. CHAMPS AGAIN
SEATTLE. Nov. 2S.—For the fifth successive
season the I'nlversity of Washington was pro
claimed football champion of tbe Pacific north
west today, when the State university team de
feated the team of Washington State college
(Pullman t, 19 to 0. By winning today's game,
Washington also attains the distinction of bavins;
gone five years without losing a game.
UTAH 7, UTAH AGGIES 7
SALT LAKE CITY. Utah, Nov. 28.—The Uni
versity of Utah football team was given the
hardest battle of the season here this afternoon
by the Utah Agricultural college, and the game
ended with the score tied, 7 to 7.
MULTNOMAH 20. OREGON 7
PORTLAND, Nov. 28.—Multnomah Amateur
Athletic club defeated the University of Oregon
football eleven, 20 to 7, here today. The battle
was a combination of old style smashing foot
bail and the modern lorward passing game.
WILLAMETTE 30, MONTANA 9
SALEM, Ore., Not. 28 —The Willamette univer
sity eleven defeated Montana university today by
score of 30 to 9. The game was a stubbornly
El Sirod has all the mellow
mildness of the Havana.
None of th« "kick" of the
usual strong black cigar.
"3(&tf&}ui. Lewi* Uvt,
S. BACHMAN & CO.,
Iftc
DMrOmtor* SAN FRANCISCO.
fought contest throughout, but Montana, many
of th»ir players In weakened condition, proved
no match for the Salem boye.
IDAHO 13, WHITMAN 6
WAW.A WALT,A. Wash.. Nov. 28.—Scoring
two. tmiehdowus and kicking one goal in the last
quarter, the Tt\aho university eleven defeated the
Whitman college team h«re today, the score being
13 to 6.
HOQTTIAM WINS CHAMPIONSHIP
nOQTIAXf. Wash., Nov. 28.—8y defeating
Aberdeen high kcliool this afternoonn, 6 to 0. on
The local field, the Hoquiam high school football
team cinched the southwestern Washington high
scheol championship.
*TIE, FOR CHAMPIONSHIP
EVERETT. TCash., Nov. 28.—The football
teame of Everett high school and Queen Anne
high school. Seattle, battled to a tie, 3 to 3,
this afternoon in the frame to decide the stete
high school championship.
COLORADO 14, OKLAHOMA 12
DENVER. Nov. 28—The University of Colo
rado defeated the University of Oklahoma foot
ball team here this afternoon by a score of 14
t» 12.
ALL STARS 34, BEAVERS 7
MINNEAPOLIS. Nov. 28.—Using both the
old and new style football effectively, the All
Stare, former heroes of the gridiron both in
the east and west, today proved they could
"come back" and defeated the Beaver*, a profes
sional team here today by a score of 34 to 7.
INDIANS 32, BROWNS 0
PROVIDENCE. U. 1.. Nov. 28.—Brown univer
sity and the Carlisle Indians played their annual
football game *n Andrew , field today. Snow
was falling when the game was called. Neither
team scored in the first period. Jn the second
Carlisle scored two touchdowns, one being made
by Captain Jim Thorpe and the other by Aracsa.
Neither goal was kicked. In ttie third period
Thorpe scored another touchdown and kicked
the goal. In the last period the Indians scored
twice, making the final figures 32 to 0.
Stocktonians Lose
To Breakaways
Special Dispatch to The Call
STOCKTON, Nov. 23.— The Stockton
Athletic association Rugby football team
was defeated here today by the Stanford
Breakaway fifteen by the score of 22 to
0. The Stockton boys were outclassed at
every stage of the game.
Here is a special shoe— JqS
GOTHAM MODEL
—made particularly for the \
particular man who wants \ \VL# $ \.
style of the custom-made $ \w
variety, but doesn't want to \ JJr -J ]r\
pay the penalty of corns. ]mjj I g
It breathes aristberacy, fj >f
yet has a slight, almost con- J 8%/ jf j
cealed, "swing" which JSg)/ jf
favors the little toe. The fpg) f /4sjk I
front is fairly high, which rnSh! J
favors all the toes. The /
heel is medium. = Jor
GOTHAM looks ' / If
as though Style / "' if
alone had built ll Black Smooth King
it v«»t fVkmfnrf II Calf »nd Tan Ruaeia
"» yei v*oniion x Ml *% ** m • t
' _ / jfik Calf, Plain Lace with
ana Common- / j@m etout single sole; or
sense are its / B lack King Calf
real arrhitprtQ / Blucher with
reai arcnitects, j SgMr heavier Sole.
and they used a &A aa
exceptionally \ $4.00
good building
material. ,
R.EGALS
REGAL SHOE COMPANY Si
m Phelan Bldg., 772 Market St. <4
•\\jßk SAN FRANCISCO [I*
IP ' O, " Me "» row »« B «■* Chlldre* \l
I'&i** STORE IS OPEN SATURDAY EVENINGS
CLOSE POLO HAS
CROWD GUESSING
AT EL CERRITO
Stockmen Nose Out the Bul
gars by Scanty Margin
of Half a Point;
Score 6 1-2 to 6
SAN MATEO. Nov. 28.—An exceptlon
-ally large crowd watched the Stock
men, one of the three teams of the San
Mateo Polo club, take a speedy same
from the Bulbars of the same club, yes
terday afternoon on El Cerrito field.
The final score was to 6. The win
ners scored 7 points, but were penal
ized a half point because of safeties
on 'Howard and Drlscoll tti the eighth
chukkur.
No accidents marred the game and
everybody pronounced it a fine example
of polo. This is the second game the
Stockmen have won in the club's se
ries and everything points to a third
victory, which will give them the
championship.
The lineups, showing the point
gainers, follow:
Stockmen —Chrietlan de Qurgne, No.
I 1; Will Tevis. No. 2; Tom Driseoll, No.
jS, Si points; E. W. Howard, back, 2
points.
Bulbars —W. E. Devereaux, No. 1, 3
points; Paul Verdier, No. 2; W. G. Hol
loway, No. 3, 1 point; Walter Hobart,
back, 2* points.
Santa Cruz Grads
Defeat Undergrads
Special Dispatch to The Call
SANTA CRUZ, Nov. 28.—The local hifrh
school Rugby fifteen played their annual
grarne with the alumni team today, and
the old "grads'" proved their ability to
come back by winning a 3 to 0 victory,
outplaying their opponents in all parts
of the game except in dribbling and
work in the scrum. The alumni were by
far the heavier team. They did their
only scoring in the first half. The larg
est football crowd of the season was in
attendance.
LOWELL BOWS TO MODESTO
MODESTO. Not. 28.—The Modeeto high school
track team defeated the Lowell high school
team of San Francisco here today, 102 to 35.
The San Francisco boys were completely out
classed, their only points being won In the
dashes. The time in all events was slow.
NEW BUSH LEAGUE PROJECT
OROVILLE. Nov. 28.—C. H. James of Stock
ton was here today talking up a baseball league
for next season, to embrace clubs from Stockton.
Lodl. Woodland, Colusa, Marysville, Oroville and
Chlco.
FOLLOW THE CROWDS
To the Grand
OPENING MEET
world'slhampionsdip
MOTORCYCLE
! RACES
DEC. 1
EMERYVILLE
RACE TRACK
tVorld-Renowned Star* Entered
EIGHT TBRILUNG EVENTS
Pon't Mlm It—lt'*
SPEEDY, SPECTACULAR SPORT
Admission 50c. Grandstand Free.
Race* atart promptly at 2i30 p. m.
Music by Call**h»n's Concert Band.
11

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