OCR Interpretation


The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 29, 1912, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1912-11-29/ed-2/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

4
GREAT SUM ASKED
FOR WATERWAYS
OF THE NATION
Rivers and Harbors Con
gress Head Expects a,
$50,000,000 Appro
priation
MEASURE MAY PASS
BEFORE NEW YEAR
Committee Chairmen Busy
in Capital Drafting Pub
lic Building Bills
WASHINGTON. Nov. 25.-~"We hope
• ongrose -will make the most liberal
annual appropriation for rivers and
harbors this year that has ever been
made," said Representative Ranedell,
senator elect from Ixtuisiana and presi
dent of the national rivers and har
bors congress today.
"The needs of the country are so
pressing that I believe the appropria
tions should not be less than $50,000,
--000: and we hope to have the river
and harbor bill passed by the Christ
mas holidays."
This announcement by Rafriedell is
expected to bringr out further strong
support for a big- appropriation bill
this year. The rivers and harbors con
gress meets here next week coinci
dent with the opening of congress,,
and, backed by favorable planks in the
democratic and republican platforms,
an effort will be made to induce the
democratic house to be unusually lib
eral with Sts appropriations for public
works.
(HAIRMEX ARE BUSY
Meantime committee chairmen were
working at the capitol today nt the
preliminary drafting of the rivers and
harbors and public building bills. Rep
resentative Rhephard of Texas, chair
man of the house committee on public
buildings, said his omnibus measure
probably would be completed in the
house in January, carrying more than
$20,000,000 and that the senate was
likely to pass it with several millions
added.
The house committee on rivers and
harbors will meet probably Saturday to
begin its work. The rivers and harbors
bills aggregated $41,000,000 In 1910
$24,000,000 in 19J1 and $31,000,000 last
year; and it was suggested by several
members of the house today that the
committee should etrike an average of
$32,000,000 for this year.
BIG SVX FOR MEMORIAL •
The public buildings measure may
carry this year $750,000 for a memo
rial amphitheater dedicated to the sol
dier dead at the national cemetery at
Arlington and funds for a- national hall
of archives at Washington. There are
upward of 750 bills pending for the
construction of individual public build
ing* and the general rule of the houee
■ to allow each member only one
building in his congressional district
.cf« r^ SUre iB bein « brought for an
. SKoO.OOO appropriation fOT a n*w pub
lic building in this <Sty for the use
of the interstate commerce commlision
ana for specific authority for the pri
vate construction of a subway and
maintenance of a railroad under the
postoffice at Park place, in New York
NAPA SLAYER IN HILLS
LIKELY TO GIVE FIGHT
PMmm Baffled in Search and Police Be-
Itere Carey Plans Battle for
Pnmuers
Special Dispatch to The Call
A. Nov. —Despite the search of
I>osses in Xapa and Solano counties
Christopher Carey, who shot and
killed Fred Neuenschwander after a
fist fight Tuesday, is still at large. Of
ficers believe he is i n the hills near
Suisun or Klmira. and as he is an ex
pert shot he will give battle before
being captured. It developed here to
day that early Wednesday morning
Carey drove to Napa and called at a
house in Union street, where he and
Ralph Markham lodged.
Carey said that he was in trouble
and that he was going away. He then
pot a rifle in East Napa and fled toward
the hills.
The inquest over the body of Neun
srhwander will be held Here tomorrow.
It is expected the widow will teetify.
DOCTOR FOILS HOLDUPS
Turns on Speed of Auto nad Bnndlta
Are Left Behind
Special Dispatch to The Call
CHICO, Nov. 28.~Dr. C. L,. Browning
routed two highwaymen thie morning
when they attempted to stop him in
his automobile speeding down Chestnut
street in response to an early morning
call.
The doctor at first thought come one
had run from a nearby house !n an en
deavor to get him to attend to a sick
person and he started to stop. He saw
the glimmer of a gun barrel and heard
the second command to halt, when he
turned on his high gear.
The machine literally sprang at the
holdup men, sending them on either
side of the street, while the doctor
sped to safety down town.
SPRINGS' FOUNDER DEAD
Jared V. Richardnon Die* at Age of
75 In Cairo
Sprf l»l Dispatch to The Call
<HICO, Nov. 28.—Jared V. Richard
son, one of the founders of the famous
Richardson Springs of this county and
a pioneer In California, having arrived
here in 1864 by ox team, died in his
home this morning aged 75 years. He
leaves a family of four grown children,
a widow and four brothers and two sis.
ters. The funeral will be held Satur
day. Ilichardson and his brothers
settled on the Richardson Spring? prop
erty in 1865, a year after arriving from
Indiana, where he was born. The prop
erty has remained in the family's pos
session since, though he retired from
the partnership.
YOUTH DIES AFTER RACE
Seattle I .ail Running Six Blocks .to
Game Drone at Oaten
SEATTLE, Nov. 28.—Marshall Peter
son, 17 years old, son of Marshall W.
Peterson, cashier of the Dexter Horton
National" bank, ran six blocks from the
streetcar to the university football field
this afternoon and dropped dead at the
gates\ The boy was eager to see the
college same, and raced because he was
late. He had suffered from a wiak
heart.
Oro~llle Orange and Olive Show
Visit OrovllJe'a biff exposition, De
cember 3 to 7, and ccc wh«r» Cali
fornia's earliest oranges and finest
olives grow. Ban Framleeo.duy, Satur
day, December 7. Special rates on all
railroads.—Advt.
WEDDING IS SET AGAIN
Girl Halted 1910 Ceremony

Berkeley Belle Who
if
Returned Presents,
Bride This Week
BERKELEY, Nov. 28—Although
Miss Claire Ferrin Is taking none of
her friends into her confidence, and
refuses to divulge any details of her
wedding except to her mother, her
marriage with Frank H. Thatcher of
Nome will take place this week.
It is often said the course of true
love never runs emooth* but in the
romance of Mise Ferrin and Thatcher
it has been more than ordinarily rough.
Once" before plans for their wedding
were perfected. Several hundred cards
were sent out for an elaborate church
ceremony. The wedding feast was or
dered and the trousseau completed.
Mies Ferrin was the most popular bride
elect of the season and entertained
widely both in Berkeley and Oakland,
where she fs a favorite.
A day pr two before the date for
the marriage the . presents wore re
turned, the wedding cards were re
called and. without giving any reason
for the change of plans. Miss Ferrin
began to devote herself to her music,
while the bridegroom elect returned to
Washington, r>. C. whence be had
crossed the continent to claim his bride.
It was told at the time that the
return of the gifts alone incurred an
expense of more than $500.
This was two years ago. The first
hint which friends received of the re
newed courtship was the taking out
of the marriage license by the young
couple. The ceremony will be per
formed quietly at the family home in
Forrest street in the presence of the
immediate families.
It is understood Thatcher and hie
bride will be absent on an extended
honeymoon, but that they plan to re
turn to Berkeley to make their per
manent home.
Miss Ferrin is the daughter of Mr.
and Mn. C. A. Ferrin. She is a gifted
musician and was one of the organizer*
of the Etude club, serving as its presi
dent for several years. She has been
popular in local society and is num
bered among the girls of the smart
set devoted to outdoor life.
Thatcher has large interests in
Alaska.
PATRICK FREE; "FIGHT
JUST BEGUN," HE SAYS
Special Diepatch to The Cell
NEW YORK. Nov. 28.—"The fight is
Just etarting." said Albert Patrick to
a keeper while preparing to leave Sing
Sing today. "I am too happy to cay
more. I am too happy to talk," he
continued, as he busied himself chang
ing from hia prison garb to street
clothes.
At exactly 5:22 p. m. a covered tour
ing car darter through West One Hun
dred and Twenty-fifth street from
Broadway and turned into Ciarejjaon*
av*enue. It drew up In front' of '*'the
Springfield apartments, the
corner, and two men jumper! out; fol
lowed by a third, clad in a long black
fur coat with a Persian lamb collar
turned well up over the ears, leaving
only a narrow margin between it and
the black hat. The muffled figure was
Albert T. Patrick.
Immediately the crowd that had
been waiting at the .corner swept
down on Patrick and the flashlights
of the camera squad began to boom.
Followed by a group of reporters, Pat
rick elbowed his way into the hallway.
Then he paused. W. J. Maotherwell,
the messenger from" the secretary of
state's office; Thomas Maher, a former
convict and cellmate, and James Bark
er, Maher's brother in law, who came
down in Maher's automobile from the
prison, called on a policeman to keep
the crowd in check.
CALLS FOR PRESS
Patrick motioned to the newspaper
men to step up.
"I am not prepared to make any
statement now," he said. "If ysnt will
see Judge Olcott, my personal counsel,
tomorrow at his office, he probably will
give you a statement, if any is to be
made. That is aIL"
Thie was overheard by those trying to
break down from the street, and the
crowd then ceared. Patrick exchanged
a few words with Maher .and Barker
and went straight to the reef of the
corridor and turned to the lefK. The
door opening In this apartment was
open a little way, and Mrs. PatUck, a
trifle pale but perfectly calm, stood just
inside the threshold.
MET BY M'IPB •
"Albert! ,, ehe cried. Patrick met her
with outstretched arms. A hallboy
closed the door,
Mr. and Mrs. Patrick were alone for
the first time since the lawyer entered
Sing Sing prison.
Patrick walked from the outer door
of Sing Hing. prison at 4:25 o'clock this
afternoon, pardoned and a free man,
after 12 years in prison. His loyal wife,
who has carried on with him his 10
year fight for freedom, had the privi
lege of being the one to give him the
first news of the pardon. She saw him
Wednesday afternoon and told him Gov
ernor Dix: would sign the pardon
Wednesday night as%d he would be freed
from prison thanksgiving day. Then
she returned to their home, where she
awaited his arrival today.
SAWTELLE INQUIRY TO
CAUSE BIG SHAKEUP
Tliree on Senate Committee Favor
Deponing Hoard* and Placing
Homes radff War Department
LOS ANGELES, N"ov. 28.—Unless
members of the senate investigating
committee 'change their tnind before the
inquiry is completed, the soldiers'
home at Sawtelle. as well at all other
similar institutions, will be placed
under the control and direction of the
war department.
As a result of testimony so far ad
duced regarding mismanagement and
ineompetency. Senator Chamberlain of
Oregon, one of the investigators, said
today he was strongly in favor of de
posing the national board of managers
for war department control. This
statement was indorsed by Senator
Chamberlains colleagues, Senators
Jones of Washington and Catron of
New Mexico.
All three senators said the testimony
of veterans and others fully justified
a recommendation by the committee
that congress pass a bill taking the
homes from the control of thle board of
managers.
FIREMAN COMMENDED— In a letter to th« flre
c-mmlsslon yesterday Chief of Police White
commended the heroic artloo of Captain En
jsvlke of eneioe 12 on Tuesday nijht when
Knffelfce capture! Roy Wllaon, a footpad, who
wae armed with a leaded revolver. Wilson
held up a p*deetrlan on the water front and
was runtdn* away when ttw flr* rapfatn pwr-
M:e<? ami aud turned Uiai over to Policeman
Gui Wei*
THE SAN- FRANCESCO CALL, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1912.
Mifs Claire Ferrin, who will Marty
this week ofter canceling wedding with
out explanation in 1910.
+ ! #.
NO FREE SCHOOL
BOOKS FOR YEAR
Legislative Acts Needed to
Supplement Amendment
Recently Passed
SACRAMENTO, Nov. 28.—Inquiries
are beginning to arrive at th« office of
Edward Hyatt, state superintendent of
public instruction, from school districts
of the state asking for information
about free textbooks. The state super
intendent is asked to explain why It is
nesecessary to buy book* when the con
stitutional amendment adopted at the
recent election provided immediately for
the free distribution of textbooks to
children of the elementary schools.
Hyatt is having trouble to explain
that free textbooks can not be fur
nished before next fall, and, perhaps,
later, depending entirely upon the legis
lative enactments at the coming session
to supplement the constitutional amend'
ment.
Dealers fearing the state win make
no provisions for refunds on uhso'ld
books are not anxious to lay in supplies
for the coming term. •
The day following the election at
which the textbook amendment »was
adopted, Hyatt wrote the attorney gen
eral, asking for an opinion on tile effect
of the amendment. The attorney gen
eral has not yet given an answer.
Hyatt doss not whether there Is
a state board of <pdu,catioi\ in existence
te. whtc|i; hl's troubHs can be refletred.
It is the general belief this body
passed out with the adoption of the
amendment.
Another feature of the; amendment
which is bothering Hyatt is whether
the amendment provides for supplying
the children of the elementary schools
with an entire new set of books or
whether it means merely to renew the
books as they are discarded. If every
child is entitled to new books, the cost
to the state will approximate $500,000,
figuring the value of the books in use
now as a basis of computation.
A renewal of the books as needed will
represent a disbursement of about
$250,000.
.Some school districts, appreciating the
position of the state superintendent and
also realizing it to be a physical im
possibility to equip the children of each
district with new books, are proceeding
to buy books absolutely necessary and
wait until the legislature provides ma
chinery to carry out the free textbook
idea.
JCnough books are now printed and
ready for distribution for carrying on
the work of the late winter and spring
terms. In some instances books have
been printed tor the children who enter
school next fall.
PASSERSBY INJURED,
PASSENGERS ESCAPE
Frying: Ulan* Cut* Two Men, Automo
bile* Smashed, Bat Occupant* tin
Unharmed in Accident
Two passersby were cut about the
heads by flying glass and two automo
biles were wrecked in a headon col
lision in the main drive of Golden Gate
park near the stadium yesterday shortly
before 1 o'clock, but the occupants* of
the machines escaped injury altogether.
The car driven by C. E. Charleston of
6647 Genoa street, Oakland, was racing
with another automobile and collided
with a machine driven by George W.
Miller of 230 Stanyan- street, who was
coming from the opposite direction and
was unable to get out of the way, al
though on the right side of the road.
Charleston and his companion, George
Fickert were both thrown out.
Charleston Was arrested on a charge
of battery.
Joseph K. Guzick of 1729 Telegraph
avenue, Oakland, and P. L. Peck, living
at the Oxford hotel, Oakland, who were
close by at the time, were cut by flying
glass from the' broken windshields.
They were treated at the park emer
gency hospital and later went to their
homes.
THREE NEGROES LYNCHED
Mob Take* Summary Revenße on Aβ-
Mβ! la lit of Deputy sheriff
SHREVEPOItT, La., Nov. 28.— Wood
Burke, Jim Heard and Silas Jimmerson,
three negroes who attacked and se
riously wounded Deputy Sheriff Ed
wards of Bossier parish several weeks
ago. were taken from three deputies
tonight and lynched.
Local Brevities
SALOON HELD TTP— Two masked men held up
the saloon of Morgan Brothers at TeiKli and
Foleoni strpett? at 10.-0 o'clock last night and
M-rurerl $31' from the cash register. One of
the men ordered John Horgan, who was at the
bar, to hold up his hand,-, while the : other
walkftl behind the bar and took the iflon.\r.
Three mt-ii who were jrtaving cards In the
room, Tom Bulk?; who lives upstairs, Torn
Sullivan of 264 Eleventh street and John Barry
of 1803 Folwirn street, were not searched.
SHEW FIRE ALARMS— The department of elec
tricity will install the following D?w fire alarm
boxee at n mar date: Bo.x'TSJS. Ttifr,te»nrli
• venue and.Kirkbnin street: box 738, Sitfeeatft
avenue and L«wtou street: box 748, NiticteeiUe
avenue and Quiatara street: box 827. University
and Bacon streets; bos 85S, Saa Jose avenue
and Ueblg street.
EUMMAGE SALE—Branch No. 2, Catholic La
di** , AM Kocietr. .will hold a rummage eale at
3321 Mission street beginning December 5.
Donations of clothing and other article* will
br *fwß«l.v eppreeb-.ted ami calb-d fei- upon ■noti
fying tine president, Mrs. M. Mnore, 34U3 Tweu
tr-flrst street, yhoae .Missloj "8714.
DEATH STRIKES
BALL PLAYER AT
HEIGHT OF GAME
Douglas Spires 6f Washburn
Team "Drops 'Dead in
Keen Match Against
* Infantry
Special Dispatch to Th* Call
SAN JOSE, Nov. 28.—At the end of
the first 10 minutes play in a match
at Armory hall between the basket ball
teams of the Washburn school and com
pany M of the Fifth California infantry,
Douglas Spires, a member of the Wash
burn team, dropped dead, presumably
from heart trouble caused by excite
ment and exertion.
He was seized with a fainting spell
during an exciting play. The game was
stopped and first aid methods were
employed. The lad was treated for
cramps, but lived only a few momenta.
Physicians were summoned and the
grief stricken parents were notified.
Young Spires was a senior classman
at Waehburn, an exclusive private pre
paratory school here, and would have
been 18 years old Saturday. He was
known well among his schoolmates as
an athlete and had been a member of
the school's basket ball team for sev
eral seasons. He lived with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. T. P. Spires in South
Tenth street and leaves besides them
a younger brother and stater. His
father is a well known local orchardist.
The inquest will be held tomorrow
and all those who participated in the
match will be summoned. Dr. D. A.
Beattie pronounced the case one of heart
failure after a superficial examination
and an autopsy will be performed to
morrow.
The body was taken to th« home of
his parents and later removed to a
local undertaking establishment.
The game was the third of a series
of five, the militiamen having won
the first two straight and excitement
was intense both among the players
and among the large crowd of specta
tor.?. , It was somp time before Spires'
teammates realized that he could not
be resuscitated.
MOOSE ARE FIGURING
ON 1916 CONVENTION
Special Dispatch to Tbe Call
CHICAGO, Nov. 28.—Delegratee to the
bull moose national convention in 1916
will nutnttot $12, 'the number being
based on the vote cast for Colonel
Roosevelt and Governor Johnson. Pro
gressive leaders tabluated the list of
delegates fdllowtaig the publication of
the total vot& cist art the presidential
election. Mtdill* A&KgUJrmlck said the
plan. of. selecting-';t;dei»gateß, which Is
expected to do. a%ay wifb- the "solid
south" feature ol m$ convention, where
delegates wfte #aie&ln large numbers,
although tUcy few re
publican votes. ■■"*' 5 *
The new progressive delegate appor
tionment will b«aiifelioMis:
STATE
! :
.•
K
«
**
f
!
Alabama ,.:..;....«., .„ ....:.
nArizona *r;i.v.f.j;J;;;
Arliunsiis ;..... '".'. V.7.V-?.;T«;i.
California I."?.'!;.*/.*j:V4;T.Jl"..
foloratly * J. .«'.":.". ?. 1 .*.; *. i;\ .;.
Connecticut .."...:.'. *»»..'.:...
Delaware Vl'l't .Vf.V.1 .. JTTrv;
Klorida r<* .'*:t; ri*.T.*.T.V;.'T?r.t^l
Georgia .•■*;*.-.- , :;vr.-.-'."r*. , r/."?TtT.". I
Malio .;.v...... .;.... a:.;,-.-.
Illinois ; :t ;".■■:■. f. ,
Indiana ; ..:.*;r.v. t ..;.*.;
Iewa .•;.-..
Kauir.% r.' , .;;-.': , :'". :vr-.'.v.* *^vrn
Kentucky ,: ;.;."..'..
I»ufslana ..'... .7*.','.V.'^.r.V^*..
Milne 7. v.'";'. V-r r.v.\ *. j .v;; v.^:
Maryland .<:.;".'..*.: ■■.*::-; tnv:T. .
Mniwaehrwtte ; .'..'... r/.TJ
Michigan»'... r. .".... .*... r.r.r;
Minnesota »-;*.". .v" 1 * :~. ?.".*rr.V; i
Mississippi ;
Missouri ;vv;lV." ;;;*.'i ;T4r77r?n !
Montana :. > ..vV r: ;.7-.'r:*":
Nebraska :vrv/J
Nevuiia k. . •', . * .v.v.'v r.T'.r; r;;
New Ilflinp-sliire v;r;:.n.;v:
New Jersey ; .-;■;*; ..',/. 5
New Mexico .......&
New ; York .v: a ....'..
North Carolina .-... .?zrr?rr.
North i Dakota :...........':.:.
; Ohio v-*r.w.' .-t;t.'. r;v."V:; ?.~:;
Oklahoma fsVV:T.".'.T.;'.Tfrr?T;
Oregon :: v , ; .■;-;.■;;. :™.v; n. j
Ppunnylvania ;iv...;;r;.;T.".^;
Rhofla Islaml .T.TM itttTSr:
South Oarnllna *i . J .T..;T..t»r.'?
Sotfth Dakota 5 * .-..T. * .>Vf.%>
Tenn«s6» ,.;x. .":;V:. r.Trr.rR
Texas Jfi J7/?STrmT!V7TT .T".'i
1'tah i: .t r.r.-.-.;v.\;...
Vermont »...".'."
Vireinia r....:.".'..
Wanhinjjton KTcrr;"rr;*rfSTr:
West Virginia r...... .-^THIt
Wlwoimln *.:..'. ;."TVrr: !
Wyoming •777TTSR.
District of ColnmblaffnTrrrn
Hawaii T/;-.'.tT*rrrTT?Tn;
Porto Rico -::.'.:.::. .V7".rT.
Philippines mTTTXZT!7T?i ..'...
Aiaaka>^^? i rri*t?yrT»'??y?j7l I
I
9
59

9
4
6
14
7
Tt>
H
."!2
26
Zf
10
12
14
30
M
27
10
27
I
17
S
• «
■21
4
78
17
T
44
20
9
*k
9
14
13
20
7
6
12
24
I
24
6
18
20
12
14
6
28

H
ro
'•• "■ :--.3.s,^

20
an
12
. Iβ
M
30
24
:
20
o<3
: t


(i

8
m>
20
10

%
10
24
B
5
a
10
Zfl-
tt
1
2
2
2
'y<
0
IS I
a'
•-■
McCormick aala there will be seated
at the 1916 convention one delegate and
one alternate for every 5,000 votes or
major fraction thereof cast for Roose
velt and Johnson, according to con
gressional districts, but each such dis
trict shall be entitled to one delegate at
large.
AMELIA SUe£ BRIDE
OF SAN FRANCISCAN
BERKELEY Nov. 28.—Miss Amelia
Saver became the bride of David J.
Curtin, a young: Sati Francisco business
man, at a nuptial mass ceremony this
morning in St. Ambrose church by Rev.
Robert Sampson. Two hundred friends
and relatives witnessed the marriage.
The bride was attended by Miss
Mary Curtin, a sister of the bride
groom, and Edward J. Laberge, a
schoolmate of Cuirtin, was beet man.
Miss Curtin was gowned in blue crepe
(le chine and carried a shower bouquet
of Cecil Breuner roses. The bride
wore an empire gjbwn of white crepe
de chine, a cornet of orange blossoms
and carried a shower of bridal roses.
The altar was decked with white
chysanthemums and palms. Miss Eva
Gruninger sang Gounod's "Aye Maria"
during the services.
The wedding -was followed by a
breakfast at the home of the bride's
mother, Mrs, Amelia Saver. This aft
ernoon the couple went south for a
honeymoon, after which they will live
■in Berkeley.
OAKLAND MAST IS RAZED
OAKLAND, Nov.; 28. —The towering
flagpole at Broadfray and Telegraph
avenue was raz%d today. The brass
eagle was the gift pf jHrJo*"&. A. Sher
man when the pole -Was erected in 189 ft.
The determination to remove the 150
foot pole wu reached by the olty au
thorities after plans had been mad*
to replace it with a granite fountain,
the gift of Milton and Edwin Latham.
The mast will be placed fcfpain in
[position tn "th« city $>ark ati Adams
j/Oint. \J , : ' ;
POLICE ARE SURE
WATT CASE WILL
BE CLEAR IN DAY
Rich Napa Land Owner Seen
in San Francisco in an
/ Automobile Last
Tuesday
From information gained yesterday
it 1* expected that the niystery sur
rounding the disappearance of William
Watt, the wealthy Napa landowner,
which was reported several .days ago,
will be cleared up within tfte n*xt 24
hours. Watt was seen Tuesday after
noon, the day his disappearance was
reported to the San Francisco and Oak
land police departments, by C. E. How
ard of Napa. Howard saw Watt at 3
o'clock in front of the San- Francisco
Young Men's Christian association.
Watt was seated in a seven pasenger
touring car. Two other men were in
the car.
Howard says he spoke to Wajtt and
asked him where his own automobile
was. Watt is quoted by Howard as
having said that he had left hie ma
chine in Oakland.
Tuesday evening , "Watt was reported
as missing by H. I. Middleton. a brother
in Jaw and partner. Despite the state
ment of Howard. WatFs relatives, in
cluding his mother. Mrs. Elisabeth
Watfc 36 Presidio avenue, his sister,
Mrs. Middleton, and Mrs. C. O. G. Mil
ler, the latter of this city, are con
tinuing their search. They authorized
a detective tpiyy yesterday to offer a
reward of $50<r for information that
would lead to the discovery of Watt's
whereabouts.
BOY IDENTIFIES AUTO
Watt was seen last Friday at 5
o'clock just after he had left the garage
of Don Lee in Twenty-second street,
Oakland, with his automobile, which
was found abandoned Sunday morning
at Broadway and First street by the
son of David Heagerty. a grocer. The
boy said he tossed a handbill in the
machine when Watt got out of it to
make tome adjustment. The handbill
was In the car when it wae found. The
boy told the police that this was the
only machine in which he had thrown
one of these handbills.
Watt was seen again Saturday morn
ing by J. W. Miller, 1637 Eleventh ave
nue, Oakland. Watt was standing near
the Southern Pacific station. First street
and proadway, He acknowledged Mil
ler's salutation. -eMiller says he know"!
Watt well, and is positive of his identi
fication.
STOCKTOX CLEW GIVEN
Further light was thrown on the case
by Jefferson Gage, a Southern Pacific
conductor, who says he saw a man an
swering Watt's description who got off
the train in Stockton.
Friday afternoon Watt sent the fol
lowing telegram to hi* wife in Napa:
'"Have been trying to phone you all
day. Very important I should be here
tomorrow."
With the hope of finding the red
touring car in which Watt was seen
Tuesday, Oakland and San Francisco
detectives, two detective agency oper
atives, Howard and Middleton last
night searched garages in this city. It
is thought that If this car is found
no difficulty will be experienced in
tracing Watt.
The police believe Watt is alive, but
they can not understand why he does
not explain his whereabouts, -About
two years ago Watt disappeared under
similar circumstances. He was found
then in San Luis Oblspo. The police
think Watt may be suffering from a
mental abberation.
CHAMBER BANQUpT IN
NEW OAKLAND HOTEL
Business Men Plan Dinner tor 500 Soon
After East Bar Structure
I* Completed
OAKLAND, Nov. 28.—Shortly after
the formal opening of the new Oakland
hotel next month the hostelry will be
the scene of an elaborate banquet of
the Oakland Chamber of Commerce.
President W. E. Gibson of the cham
ber has appointed the following com
mittee: F. A. Leach, chairman; H. K.
Jackson, Charles J. Heeseman, George
E. Randolph and R. W. Ayer. The com
mittee will meet soon to prepare, for
the banquet.
The proposal for the banquet was
made by F. A. Leach at a meeting of
the board of directors. It will be the
most Important affair held by the
chamber for some time, bringing to
gether, it is hoped, more than 600 rep
resentatives of commercial, industrial
and financial business interests' in the
community.
The function will also serve to cele
brate the acquisition of another high
class building? and hotel to the city.
UJDBESS BY A. W. SCOTT ».— A. W. Scoft
Jr. will dpllT«r the address et the Coifinion
wealth club luncheon to be held Saturday, So
vemtwr SO. at the Palace hotel at 12:30. Ills
Rtibjpct will he "Tacts and Figure* of the
Progress and Proepwte of the Exposition From
a BuniQCHR Standpoint."
TINA L'ERNER
£ B Famous Russian Pianist, Appearing Friday and
■ I Sunday Afternoons With San Francisco
\ f * Symphony Orchestra, Writes of tht
jt. Jfeim&if<nitluT
i>^ l^ PIANO
I fSJIj V fC'**" Messrs. Mason & Hamlin Company,
ta <? v Boston, Mass.
J Gentlemen:—For my third American tour I am using,
kM:M with greatest satisfaction, the Mason & Hamlin Pianos, which,
upon the occasions of my former concert tours in the United
States, have given me such superb support and such great pleasure.
To have fullest confidence in the vehicle of one's art means much, and when I say
I have chosen the Mason & Hamlin Piano because I believe it to be the best, the most
perfect piano the world has yet known, I feel that nothing* remains to be said.
Very sincerely yours,
(Signed) TINA LERNER.
Mason & Ham- £jis> J?¥'9mJ7*l~. wK jrf+^i
lin Pianos <Zfft&S/!i£2/<ZAjj<Z7iii£glC?&o
vsunoiis s^vies
may be seen VICTOR TALKING MACHINES—SHEET MUSIC
only at our two entrances.
warerooms. 135-153 Kearny and 217-225 Slitter Street
I. ' WILAIIB-4W TWBLPTH AJTD ISO* WASHINGTON
• ' SAW JOSE—.II 7 SOUTH FIRST §T.
BAKING
POWDER
Absolutely Pure
[From s series of elaborate chemical tests.]
Comparative digestibility of food
made with different baking powders:
An equal quantity of bread (biscuit)
was made with each of three differ
ent kinds of baking powder —cream
of tartar, phosphate, and alum —and
submitted separately to the action
of the digestive fluid, each for the
same length of time.
The percentage of the food digested
is shown as follows:
Bread made with Royal
Cream of Tartar Powder;
I Per Cent. Digested |
Bread made with
phosphate powder;
J 67 H P«T Cent. Dige«t«d |
Bread made wit!h
alum powder;
I 67 Pot Cent. Dife«t«d [
i
Royal Baking powder raised food
is shown to be of greatly superior
digestibility and healthfulness.
SAN DIEGO BELLE ILL
ON EVE OF HONOR FETE
Party Scheduled Tonight for
Miss Ruth Richards Is
Postponed
Mies Ruth Richards* a prominent so
cial belle of San Diego society. Is
seriously ill in a local hospital and the
party that was to have been given in
her honor this evening by her aunt. Miss
Lucy Bancroft, has been cancelled. Hfer
relatives and friends were shocked to
learn yesterday that the youngr woman
is suffering from an attack of double
pneumonia and that her life is de
spaired of.
Miss Richards made her debut in this
city two years ago. Her uncles—Paul
Bancroft, supervisor and real estate
operator, and Philip Bancroft, attorney
-—assisted Miss Bancroft in making
the coming out party of the beautiful
and accomplished young girl a note
worthy social success. H. H. Bancroft,
the California historian, was a grand
uncle of Miss Richards.
The party that was announced for
this evening was to have been a din
ner dance in the Bancroft home, Jack
son and Broderick streets, the old
■Huntlngton place. Great preparations
had been made to make It one of
the most elaborate fetes of the year.
JOHNSON REPRIEVES
BEMBELA TILL DEC. 13
Orange County Man Get* Stay Wfclle
Indian Slayer of Two Will Die
In San QuenUn
SACRAMENTO. Nov. 28. —Governpr
Johnson today Issued a reprieve until
December 13 to Manuel Bembela, sen
tenced to h« hanged in San Quentin
prison tomorrow for the murder of a
rival at a dance in Orange county last
March. •
Ed Williams, the halfbreed Indian
who murdered two women near Oro
ville, Butte county, will hang tomor
row for the crime he committed a
year ago.
There are three executions set for
December 0. Two are at Folsom —
those of Edward Delchento, a negro,
and Charles Carson, who has not
spoken for more than two years, and
that of Willie Luis, a Chinese, who will
be executed in San Quentln.
The Governor has Indicated that he
will not allow more than one execu
tion at a state prison on the same day,
and another stay is probable next
week.
Boys , Suits
for
Thanksgiving
Looking forward to the
Thanksgiving holidays, we
are specially prepared with
Boys' Suits for dress occa
sions.
Blue Serges and Cheviots,
in Norfolk and Double
Breasted Styles,
$5 to $15
Russian Suits
$5 to $12.50
Sailor Suits
$5 to $12.50
HASTINGS
CLOTHING CO.
Post and Grant Aye.

xml | txt