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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 29, 1912, Image 5

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MULCREVY SAVES
MUSICAL FIASCO
Brass Band Tries to Cut In
on Artistic Endeavors of
Fair Soprano and Is
Halted
"WHO'S RUNNING THIS
SHOW? ,, SAYS CLERK
School Children and Fond
Parents Scent Trouble at
Flag Presentation
"Hey professor? Who the—who's
running this show, anyway?"
County Clerk Harry I. Mulcrevy di
rected this almost rude query at Di
rector John A. Keogh of the Munic
ipal band during the flag presentation
exercises in Duboce park yesterday
afternoon.
To say that Keogh *waa fueeed, and
Mulrrevy peeved, would be putting It
mildly, but their agitation wae as noth
ing compared to that of Supervisor J.
Emmett Hayden, who had given an
order to the band leader which
aroused the ire and Irleh of Mulcrevy.
This order was to play something- soft
and patriotic—like "Everybody's Doin ,
It" and had been gi% en under the im
pression that the soloist had finished.
As for that, Hayden isn't exactly of
French extraction himself. Things
looked ominous despite the presence of
800 little children and 800 proud and
glowing parents.
To say that Mulcrevy's voice was
raucous when he (to quote a Pierce \
street resident) "bawled the professor
out" might be an exaggeration in
fluenced by the fact that Mise Marie
A. Rose, described on the program as
the California Rose and a prima donna
soprano, had just finished one song,
revealing an unusually sweet voice.
Anyway, Mulcrevy's voice, sounding
like the judicious use of a file on his
larynx, would have helped a lot to
wards soothing the ruffled feathers of
the dove of county political peace.
To continue the action of the play,
however—"Professor" Keogh bowed
fto conceal the big dent he had bitten j
in his lip); Hayden talked fast and
pleasantly; Mulcrevy continued to
bristle and 300 little children, who
thought that they were the big part
of the "show," wondered, even as they
giggled, what it was all about.
Finally, Mulcrevy said: "Let the
lady finish her song." And accordingly
the band played and. she sang. Evi
dently Mulcrevy had answered his own
question.
FELON WHO AIDED POOR
CHILDREN TO BE FREED
Montana* Noted Convict Charity
Worker Get* Commutation for
Slaying- Sweetheart
fTBtflMfA; -Mont.,--Ntnrr-MC—Altwrf J.
t Beokman, known as "Montana's Jean'
Valjean," serving- a life sentence for
the murder of his sweetheart, Helen
Kelly, In Butte. In 1903, was given to
day a commutation sentence to 15 years
by acting Governor Leighton.
Beckntan's case has arouaed Interest
all over the country. Since his confine
ment he has sent money regularly to
charitable organizations and worthy
sufferers throughout the country. He
showed special interest in crippled
children and searched the papers for
news of those who needed assistance.
For several years no one except the
warden knew from whom the sifts
came. never applied for par
don or. commutation of sentence.
Brooklyns Defeat
J}UVatlejos7toO
Special Dispatch to The Call
VALLEJO, Nov. 28.—The All Vallejos
met with their first defeat of the sea
son here this afternoon In a game
with the Brocrjslyne of San Francisco
>>>• a score of 7 to 0. Luck was with
the visitors throughout the game, al
though the Vailejo boys can blame
themselves for their defeat owing to
their poor handling- of punt*. Neither
eleven was able to score in the first or
second quarters, and the ball was kept
near the center of the field -moat of
the time.
NAPA SS, COOSWEIX-LICK 0
Special Dispatch to The Call
NATA. Nov. 28.—The Napa high school Rugby
footbaH team won nn exciting content today from
a team eo«npo«wd nt the twHit of the Cogswell and
Lick flfreetM of Ban Francisco. The score was
23 to a Tbe Napa players won by timely paw
ing rnebee. Napa made foar tries and three goals
In the first half and one try and one goal in the
second half.
DUTTY STARS S, SOLDIERS 4
Tb« Duffy A4l Star* ..ook a game from Com
pany F. Sixteenth infantry at the Loboe aqnare
grouade yeaterday afternoon. 6cort:
R. H. E.
Puffy All |Mr« o 7 0
Company F, Sixteenth infantry 4 6 0
Rnttefl**— LyU*u and Paymuller; Healbrue and
Windier.
HAMMER-BRAY 6, £ZrDEPE2fI)£XTB 4
The Haramer-Bray nine won a c%%» Terdict
over the Independents at the Loboe Square
prounds yesterday morning. Score: R. H. E.
H«riiiner-Braj- Co 3 8 1
Irwiependf-nta 4 5 2
Satterie*—Cueeidy and Phillips; Ryan and
Whelan.
KEW ERAS 6, ROSTOKS 8
The H«rton Star* Buffered defeat at the hands
of the Sew Brae at tee park yesterday more
in&. Score: R. h. E.
New Era* 5 » 1
Horton Stars 2 7 2
Batteries—Pratt and Snyder: Hampton and
Cutler.
MARSHALLS 7, OUTLAWS 4
Tbe Marshall* lambasted Ihe Outlaws at the
N«rth Beach playgrounds yesterday nftcrueon.
B<*ere: R. H. E.
Marshalln 7 n (i
N. B. Oatlawe , 4 « 3
Batteric-s— D. Fiilipo and Bacijfalapi; Cosde
and Quciroi'.-
SAN LEAHDRO 10, RUBBERS 4
SAN LEANDBO, Xor. 28.—The locale defeated
tin- American Ruhb«r company nine of
this afternoon. The score: R. H. E.
Sao Lcaudro 1» 15 •
American Itubber Co. 4 7 6
BettwlcK—Arlett and Christlanson; Koigbt anU
Puurroy.
OWLS 3, DEVISADERO MERCHANTS 2
Tbe Owl Drtur company 'Jefeated tbe Dtrt'isadero
Strt-ct Merchants' at the park yeeterday after
noon. Score: R. 11. E.
owl Krujt to 3 7 I.
Merchant* , 2 f> 2
Kattcriee—Cempii/i! aud IluglM-a; Newton and
Kerns.
SUNSETS 11, SHYDERS 1
Tbe Snn«et Slerchante defeated toe Snyder
•'ompany at the i»ark yesterday Hfternooif.
R. H. E.
-.( Merchants ..11 11 1
■>■■ Shoe en 1 4 2
Batteries— Bonnlsoa *od Olson; Nk>stn and
Black.
ALBERS BROS. 5, MERCHANTS 0
The AU»era Brotbcru applied the kalsomine
brush to the Thirteei.'th Art-nae Merchants at
the Lakeside grounds tisie afternoon. Score:
K. !I. E.
Aljicrs Rro< B l> it
ilm-imnts ■. , (i 1 2
Butteries— Fns» aud Colliu*, Keith aitU Alorioa.
EDWIN BONNELL DIES
Pioneer of Good Old Days
Retired Banker, 76, Is
Stricken While in
Bathroom
Edwin Bonnell. a retired banker,
identified for nearly 40 years with !
financial interests of San Francisco, and ■
a prominent member of the Sons of •
the American Revolution and of the j
Society of California Pioneers, died
yesterday morning of heart disease at
hie home. 1709 Qough street. He is
survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary»
Bonnell, and a son and - daughter. Alii- :
eon C. Bonnell find Mrs. Edith Dunne,
wife of Judge F. H. Dunne of the su
perior court. Hβ leaves also a brother,
Henry Bonnefl, and a sister, Mrs. J.
T. Coohran.
While he steadfastly declined to ex- :
liibit hie paintings, he was known
among his intimate friends for hie
ability as an artist in oil. A close
friend of the late William Keith, ho
studied for some time under that noted
painter,* and several of Bunnell's can-,
vases of California scenes show the in- j
fluence of Keith's teaching.
Bonnell was th« «on of the late Al- '
;ison C. Bonnell, who cam* to this ;
state from Ohio in the gold rush of !
fB4B. Kdwln and Henry Bonneli fol- !
lowed their father here Jn X 852, pro
ceeding Immediately to Oregon, where
they stayed for several year*.
In 1856 both brother* were back in
San Francisco. Although never taking
part in polities or other phases of pub
lic life, Edwin Bonnell soon became an
influence in the life of the city's early
daye.
For 35 years he was connected with
the Savings and Loan Society, the first
savings bank established here. He was
secretary of the organization for the
larger part of the time, but for the last
six years of his association with the
company he was cashier. Hβ retired
from banking about three years ago
when the Savings and Loan society
was amalgamated with the Savings
Union, the second savings bank estab
lished "here.
Although retired from the commer
cial world, Bonnell took a keen inter
est in matters around him and to the
time of his death was secretary of the
San Francisco branch of the Sons of
the American Revolution, the Sons of
the California Pioneers and of the Ohio
society. Hβ also was a member of the
California Pioneers and was an officer
of the Unitarian club.
Bonnell's death came suddenly, shortly
after he had risen from bed. He re
tired feeling in hie customary health
and had planned to enter heartily into
the spirit of Thanksgiving day with his
wife and other members of his family
circle. While he was taking a bath
death seised him. Alarmed by the still
ness, Henry Bonnell entered the bath
room, to find hia brother dead in the tub.
While no definite decision has been
reached in regard to the funeral, it wae
announced that services proba.bly will
be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock
from the Bonnell residence. Rev. Brad
ford Leavitt, pastor of the Unitarian
church, will officiate. Bonnell, who was
attended during hie last years by Dr.
Robert Patek, was 7« years old, a na
tive of Ohio.
Death in Jfrsenic On
Football Gridiron
DENVER, Nov. 28.—Prof. George W.
Schneider of the Colorado School of
Mines, Golden, will insist upon an
analysis of the dirt on the college foot
ball field, to see whether it contains
arsenic in sufficient quantities to have
caused the death of his son. Lee
Schneider, yesterday. Young Schneider,
a player on the mines team, suffered a
slight abrasion of the left ankle in
practice several days ago. Septicemia
followed, causing death.
The tragedy recalls the fact that nu
merous students have suffered severely
from slight wounds received on the
football field. Professor Schneider was
himself a famous football player in the
early nineties, and eaye that even then
slight scratches received on the foot
ball field caused ulcers and intense
pain.
"It has long been suspected," Pro
fessor Schneider said today, "that some
ch#mical, presumably arsenic. Is pres
ent in the dirt on the football field.
An analysis will be made, and if ar
senic is found the trustees of the school
will be asked to provide 4 new athletic
field. -.
BAYSIDES 6, UNITED WISE WORKS 1
ALAMEDA, Nov. 2S.—-The BavMde Mannfactur
Ing company defeated the United Wire work*
team thrs afternoon at the Clement Btreet
grounds. Score: It. It. E.
Bayelde Manufacturing Co 6 9 1
United Wire Works 1 5 2
Betteri**—Windier and Rose; Bridges and
Penning*.
PIRATES 6. HUMBOLTB I
The Pirates end the HmnbnHs engaged in a:
lirriy battle at the park ground* yesterday after
noon, the former team romping eway en tlw>
long end. Score: R. H. K.
Pirates ". 9 2
Humbotts . 2 7 1
Butteries—Humphreys and Hall; Crowe tod
Lund.
WARDROBES 11, FARX JUNIORS 7
The Wardrobes and the I'ark Juniors met id a
batting duel at the park yeeterday afternoon.
The Wardrobes finally finished on tbe long end.
Score: R, H. E.
Wardrobe* li 12 1
Park Joniocs , 7 10 2
Batteries —Thompson and Hall; Sfftbtrt and
Drant.
HOXAJLCHB T, BXVXJUC PARK S
OAKLAND. No*. 28.—Toe Rait Oakland M«n
srcbs defeated the Beelah Park nine this after
noon at the latter , e home ground*. Bcnttt:
It. H. E.
Monarch* 7 11 1
Beiilab Park 8 9 *
Batteries— Maurer and Williams; Shilling find
O'Conneil.
OOlWt ». DTMOHDS 8
FRUITVALE. Nor. 23—The Rows trimmed
tbe Dimond Grocer* oil their own battlefield tbla
afternoon. Score: , R. H. E.
Down s7 3 7 l
IMttiond Grocers 2 r> 2
Batteries —Hutiter and Lee; Foster and Ken
nedy.
BEBVSTEXKS 11, PIERCES 7
OAKLAND, Nov. 28. —The Bernstein* bunched
bits in the ehttb inning of today* game with
the Pierce Hardware Bine, eiucbiuK the same.
Score: R. tt. E.
Bernstein* 11 l.'l 2
Pierce Hardware T S a
Batteries—Crosby and Haydtn; Lyinau and
Beach.
BAITERS 8. MAXWTXXS 4
The Bauer Barrel lads trounced the Maxwell
HaWlware nine at the Jackson Street ftquan- yes
terday afternoon. Score: R. n. K.
Bacer Barrel company S I<> 1
Maxwell Hardware company 4 » 2
Batteriea —Calrna aud O'Nefl; Bridgeport and
Hauler.
BILLIARDS 11, PICKED KIKE 3
The Ideal BlHiardx gave a netere druhbinit to
a nicked team at the park ye*terdajr afternoon.
Score: R. H. E.
Ideal Billiard Parlof 11 12 1
Picked team .i B ::
Batteries —Baxter and Lopez; Brown, Larspu
and Dugan.
PIEDHONfIT 5, SWETT S
PIEDMONT. Nov. 28.—-Tfce Piedmont Junior*
captured a well jilafed gain* from Hie SwMt
school nh»c at tbe I'leiUnfWt ground* 4hie after
nwn. Score: R. H. B.
Piedmonf Junior* a s (
Swett School :! 4 .»
Batteries —Detnpeey and Dolan; Bowdon and
Graham.
• ■
POLICE KEEK HEIB*— Oakland. Nov. 2S.—The
police were a«ked today to *i<! 1* the vareh
of Mm. John ReeUler. formerly Miss Ef6* V.
Mereditl) of Berkeley, Hml Bert K. Merrflith.
wiio arc beirs to an eptnte In Illinois. They
ere wnntcil to ciitnfnUnicatP witU Dr. J. T.
McrediHi of oilnrvillc, ('til., aa uiH.lt, wfav
li«« bten ankeU to locate ttaem. I
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1912,
Edr»in 'Bonnell, retired banker, who
died suddenly.
IN SAVES BUILDING
FROM FIRE; ARRESTED
Complicated Situation Arises
When Cook Burns Papers
in Rooms at Midnight
OAKLAND, Nov. 28.—Max Schult*.
cook In a lodging house at 678 Grove
street, home this morning , , and, It
Iβ charged, set flre to a bundle of
newspapers and magazines in hie room.
A few minutes later H. C. Todd, a medi
cal student, whose room adjoins
Schultz , , scented the smelte.
Todd, who had retired, clipped from
his bed, and arming himself with a
revolver, went looking for the flre.
Hβ tried Schults' door and entered to
see the occupant dafelng about the flre.
When Schultz saw Todd standing in the
doorway he made a ruth at him, ac
cording to Todd, and Todd beat him
down with the revolver. In the en
counter the weapon wae exploded, the
bullet entering: the floor.
Todd, having disposed of Schultx,
then beat out the flre, which wae
spreading rapidly. The shot had at
tracted other boarders, and when the
police arrived Schultz and Todd were
placed under arrest. Schults on a
charge of drunkenness and Todd for
shooting oft* firearms within the city
limits.
Schultz was treated at the receiving:
hospital for a scalp wound. Todd
does not feel much like a hero and says
that he will hesitate a second time to
nave a building from burning to the
ground it he is to be arrested for the
work.
HEIRESS DISAPPEARS;
KIDNAPING SUSPECTED
Millionaire Piano Manufacture* Offer*
Large Sam for Return of Niece
In MyMerioim Case
Special Dlapatch to The fail
NEW YORK, Nov. 28.—Fifteen year
old Marion Ege, the favorite niece of
Jacob Doll, the millionaire piano man
ufacturer, has vanished from her home
and relatives believe she was kid
naped by a man , eeen following her in
the streets for several days.
The greatest efforts have been made
to keep the disappearance secret.
Relatives did not go to the police tor
aid until tonight, when they had prac
tically exhausted all other sources and
•ent out a "confidential alarm."
It is said that Doll will spend thou
sands of dollars to find his niece.
OROZCO INDICTMENTS
RETURNED IN TEXAS
Mexican Ageitt* Await Document* fa
I.oe Ana-el?*; Rebel Leader Htdln£
on (ataitna Island $
Br Fedfral Wireless
LOB ANGELKS, Nov. 28.—Secret serv
ice agents of the Mexican government
in Lio* Angeles are awaiting the arrival
ef indictments against General Pascual
Qrozco, leader of the Mexican revolu
tion. The Indictments, it Iβ said, were
returned in El Paso and charge viola
tion of the neutrality laws. Oroaco Iβ
believed to be concealed on CatftHna
island, the mountains? of which afford
excellent cover. The Island boats are
being watched.
OX TO WASHINGTON I
"Pa, what is a rara avis?"
"A democrat, my son, who doesn't
think he's going to get some sort of
Job soon."—Birmingham Age-Herald.
Orange* nod Q lJven at Oroville
Take in the big Agricultural, Mining
and Poultry Show, December 3 to 7.
Hedueed rates via Southern Pacific
Tickets on sale December 2 to 8; final
return limit, December 9.-^-Advt.
CASTOR I-A
For Infante and Children.
The Kind Yoo Have Always Bttgtt
Bears the s~rf
Signature of <-*iaS7ZT<€UcJfat
VARSITY DRINKING
NATION WIDE ISSUE
Oberlin Denies in California
Students' Paper That De
bauchery Exists There
Cornell Also Cited as Failing
to Exclude Liquor From
Institution
BERKELEY. Nov. 28.~Aesertion in
an editorial in the Dally Californlan,
the University of California students'
newspaper, that despite strict rules for
temperance informal gatherings at Cor
nell and Oberlin colleges are "notorious
for debauchery," ha* brought a tele
graphic denial from Oberlin officials.
The Californian editorial, written by
Editor John L. Simpson, was In de
fense of C. M. Torrey, president of the
associated students, who refused to call
an election on an amendment to enforce
temperance. Torrey held that sobriety
should be developed as a matter of
honor In the student body, and Simpson,
arguing editorially for this view, cited
Cornell and Oberlln as universities
where strict temperance rules were
evaded.
"At Cornell and Oberlin," the edi
torial said, "strict laws on the serving
of liquor at banquets exists. "The uni
versities are notorious for the de
bauchery of their informal gatherings."
This comment was wired to Oberlin
by an alumnus, Ira D. Vayhinger of
2226 Durant avenue, attending the Uni
versity of California. Vayhinger re
ceived fc ln reply the following:
Oberlin always has maintained
strict regulations against the use of
liquor by students. No debauchery
now and never has been at student
gatherings. Drinking in private
very rare. In our judgment, the
editorial may be denied absolutely. •
H. C. KING, President.
C. N. COLE, Dean.
E. A, MILLER. Dean of Men.
the argument which Simpson made
in the Californian editorial was that
strict prohibition rules were evaded by
students. If such a rule were applied
to California, he held, students would
have their formal university gather
ings "dry," but would make sport of
the rule in, Informal affairs. He and
university officials asserted that private
drinking was less frequent at the Uni
versity of California than at any other
college in the country, simply because
under the honor system students volun
tarily had ceased drinking. Fraternities
and campus clubs have for several
years kept liquor off their tables.
I IP ranii|iii|!|i|iii|!,e| hi iijiiiii I
I 111 CU t \!/11 IVJ "' B
Bβ ■^^^^^■■^^ -,— ■ ■■1 Br s I Ilil
is caused by the |M
action of JH
This is the deliberate opinion of no less an mM^Sm^M
authority than Philip Dreesbach, German w/k .f' U 1
expert and scientist in the Wahl-Henius Insti- IIU ' Jil«H
tute of Fermentology. He says: fltt i'IImB
"Beer acted upon by light soon takes up the very disagreeable, flHllf ' iwES&^^l
so-called 'light taste, , and also a repulsive skunk-like odor. Beer ~|
so affected Is offensive to the palate of most consumers, and r In" f^MUmi
there is probably nothing that will influence them more against |W IBJJjR
any brand of bottled beer than to have once tasted beer possess- vhi/ZMMii. IF jjfflfl
Ing this 'light taste" to a marked degree. The presence of this WMG!£jPIjMrV I
defect, however, Is not always the bottler's fault, as the con- WS^yfmmjfrjFw I
eumer himself very often lets the beer stand in the light. But Egr * A
the consequences must usually be borne by the bottler." K£*4^Sft*i<fi!^se
Schlitz is sold in Brown Bottles to protect its purity
from the brewery to your glass. iBBBI UMI'I llfl|
In our brewery we spend more in purity—in time, mR| |^Mij;|He
in skill and in money—than any other cost. \& W
Why don't you, too, demand the pure beer—
Schlitz in BrowiT Bottles ?
B Q See that crown or cork
Mm jLM Mm Phones \ Kearny ll»
Mm rnones iHome j-ne
m\ mmw Sherwood &. Sherwood
Beer
That Made Milwaukee Famous
Man Fights Hour for
Life Wife Angry Deer
BOVLDSIt, Cafe* If*, *a—Fβ*
Bβ minute* E, Jβ. Smith, nupertn
tendent of Chantauqun park,
fought barehanded with aa en
raged back eeer this morale*
aad wfta naved from death by
the nrrtral of park attendants*
who heard hie cries. Smith Trent
to the ladoDtirc on tain moraine
feeding round, when th* back
dashed at him. Th* naperln
tendeat fought for almost an
hour by banging- to the deer , *
aatlcra. The fnrloue buck to«n»ed
him Into the air and dashed the
man to the ground time and
aarain, breaking- four rlba and
bin left arm.
4 KILLED, 40 HURT, IN
PENNSYLVANIA WRECK
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 28.—Four per
sons are known to have been killed
ancf more than two score were Injured,
some probably fatally when the Cin
cinnati express on the Pennsylvania
railroad which letf here at 10:48 o'clock
last night wes derailed at Glen
about 25 miles west of Philadelphia,
shortly before midnight. One day
coach and three sleeping: cars fell 20
feet down an embankment onto a train
of coal cars on the freight line which
at this point runs parallel to the
passenger tracks.
The dead:
W. L. Baldwin, New. York, Pullman
conductor.
v> i■' Jones, Pullman conductor.
£. D. Flndley, paaeenger, of Pitts
bury..
Unidentified paseengrer.
Among the injured are:
Mies Jane Kelly. Chicago, suffering
from chock.
Mrs, Mary Hudnut. New York, two
fractured ribs.
Stephen Fenence, East Brownsville,
Pa., concussion of the brain.
Victor Fallene, Philadelphia, scalp
wound and contusions of hip.
Bert Ransbush, HarrSsburgr, badly
bruised.
Rev. H. G. Wilson of Indiana county,
Pa., sprained back.
Mrs. H. C. Miller. Alteon*. Pa., right
side and hip injured.
Elizabeth Sarede, Young'stown, 0.,
cuts on face and contusions , ,on hip.
J. A. Marquis, Cedar Rapids, la., con
tusion of head, not serious.
Mrs. Elizabeth Santrtly, face cut.
Miss Ruth Hudnot, New York, ekull
fractured.
DEATH TO SNAKES
"Never see any more sea serpents
around here?"
"No," replied the coast dweller.
"What do you suppose killed 'em off?"
"I dunno. But I have my suspicion
It was local option."—Washington Star.
LIGHT TURNED ON
IN HOTEL OAKLAND
Great Building Illuminated
From Roof to Basement
First Time in History
' Independent Electric System
Supplies Lamps and All
Necessary Power
Nov. 23.—James P. Edoff,
to whose efforts the early completion
of the new Hotel Oakland largely is
due, this evening turned on the entire
lighting system of the establishment.
This was the first time that the lights
have been on. and they were kept
burning from 8 to 9 o'clock. There are
more than 6,000 lamps used in illum
inating the building, and the entire
current for light and power is gener
ated on the premises. Tungsten burn
ers have been installed throughout.
Two 100 kilowatt motor driven gen
erators are used in generating the cur
rent, and there is a reserve Curtis gen
erator of 125 kilowatt*, turbine driven,
to be used when either of the other
generators is not in use. The light
ing systems of each floor are divided
Into three sections and all of the pub
lic rooms have separate switchboard
panels. The lights are of 110 volts, and
are wired by the D-C three wire sys
tem.
The illumination on the exterior of
the building Include marquis lights,
electroliers, wall brackets and electro
liers surmounting the arcade and ,
around the roof garden over the lounge,
or lobby. The two towers flanking the !
loggia also are illuminated.
A current of 4,000 volts is required I
to drive the generator motors, and this ■
is the first time that such a high cur-1
rent tension line has been taken Into i
a public building. The wires are I
brought in through concrete ducts and i
every precaution taken to guard
against fire. A special permit was
necessary and the work was installed
under the supervision of the fire under
writers.
Edoff. who turned on the lighting
system this evening, has been In charge
of financing the undertaking, which
has resulted in e> 12,000,000 hotel build
ing being erected by popular subscrip
tion.
MRS. LILLIE ALLEN DIES
OAKI*AND. Nov. 28.—Mrs. Lillie B*ll
Allen, mother of Qeorgre Allen, assist
ant treasurer at the Oakland Orpheum,
and Walter Allen, a local business man
Is dead at her home, 2737 Myrtle street,
after a lingering illness. Besides her
sons she Is survived by her husband,
W. E. Allen Sγ., and three sisters; Mrs.
John S. Lee and Mrs. George Lee of
Elgin and Mrs. M. L. Hatton of Aurora,
111.
Natural .
I Alkaline Q
Water JR
Not Genuine Hi . '
nilhoßl the word H~3'-;'
li 4 delightful table
iwfer wifft highly
medicinal qualities
Aek your Physician .
(ritENCH itEFUBUC PROPKItTY) I
l_ VICHY
Tttey Will Agree
with you—and help you to keep
your stomach and other organs
in the proper condition on which
your good health must depend
BEECHAM'S
PILLS
I A Perfect Seasoning I
I It satisfies the most fastid- 1
I ious taste.
ILEA * PERRINS (
I SAUCE I
I tmc omaiNU wo»cHTU»Ki«t m
ft It delieiously flarori more dishes than 1
■ any other table sauce in use. j2
m An Appetiser »
I Johw T>v*CAV't Sow*. Agents, N.Y. M
iLfTpli' Kidney trouble preys
DlXiX> upon the mind, dlacour-
Awn ages and lessens ambi
—_~i-_.«_ "on; beauty, vigor and
WuMKN cheerfulness soon dlaap
" *"»**** pear when the kidneys
are out of order or diseased. For jßood
results use Dr. Kilmer's Swamp-Root,
the vreat kidney remedy. At druggists , .
Sample bottle by mail free, also pamph
let. Address Dr. Kilmer & Co.. Bing
hamton. N. Y.
r the
GERMAN SAVINGS
and LOAN SOCItIY
(The Germiia Bank)
526 California Street
NOTICE TO DEPOSITORS
THE HAIGHT STREET BRANCH
Will be located in its new
building, corner
Haight and Belvedere Sts.,
On and after
Monday, Nov. 18, 1912 j
— ■■■ 9- ■ '■•
WT , WE*flCi (Of Harris 4k Hens.
. X. Jtl-EjOD Attorneys) .
NOTARY PUBLIC
R»«m 700. HEARST BfTILDING
Phone Kearny 232 ■
Residence Phone West 9489
Most Sanitary
Baths in
The World
\lurline
BATHS
Bash mod tmrkla Sts.
mad 2151 G—ry St.
Porcelain tubs »Uh HOT
and COLD FRESH and
SALT WATER. Thee
baths are mosi beneficial
f«r ncxvoiantu* rheumatism
end insomnia.
OPEN BVBtmOS
. Spectators Free- J
vwt DR. JORDAN'S***"
MUSEUM OF ANATOMY
<<M»EATe« THAN CVMt! *>
tWceluMM or m*r •ontnttmi fam
poetUvety curm<3 \*y *« eW«»t
■pici.lirt oa A* CMMt. BrtaMwfcU
fifty yeww.
DISEASES OF MEN
CmmluDn trmm **4 tnetiy pitwtm.
Tr—tm«ot permmdb mby fetter. A
positive Cutm Iβ «r«rr case •»-
Write far h-k. PMILOSOPMY
Or MAf*Rl*G£, mM hm -U
•aliaiU* book *•*««.>
88. JOHIIAH. ypr S.F..CAL
IA Call Want Ad
Will Attend to
Business for You
You mas hope important
business matters that occupy
your time and rvill not permit
giving much attention io the
details of securing good help
for the office or home.
A little want ad in The
Call vill bring you quick re
turns.
5

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