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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 30, 1912, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1912-11-30/ed-1/seq-5/

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ads, wit!, letters from the cured, that all begin with an expressed desire to
add my testimonial to those already in your possession, and relate how the
writer suffered from a chronic cough for 30 years, havingjiad two brothers
die of galloping consumption in early youth,' and the doctors held out no
hope of recovery; but after three bottles of your cough alleviator and con
sum was entirely aired. Scores of letters like these. One
rather dif?e*nt is appealing.
In Jaynes' almanac for 1857 i- a testimonial from \Y. T.. Somerwel! of
Tulip, Ark., one of whose slave women was afflicted with rheumatism until
the remedy was tried. In gratitude, Mr. SomerweH wrote from Tulip: "She
.has fully recovered and, although she was worthless to me for over a year
because of this rheumatism, she is now strong as ever, and I sold her yes
terday for $300."
Tn Cincinnati an anti-slavery society published an almanac that preached
emancipation and published annually a list of the enlightened who had freed
slaves during the year. Colonel Monroe Edwards of Ibervillc. La., was a
humane gentleman who freed 163 the year that John Adamson of Culpepper,
Va.. had the freedom of 51 to his credit. Contributors' essays include, "Shall
We Pray for the Slave?"—with reasons why "we" should.
The humor is sad. Depressing to consider since only 80 years agr> grand
fathers were laughing over it. It is scattered, through the waste of informa
tion, sudden oases of refreshing wit. But the truth is, the wit of 1827 seems
n painful commentary in 1912 on the intelligence of 1827. Very 1992
the wit of 1912 will expose to posterity the rudimentary humor of its forbears.
This makes consideration of the wit of 1827 doubly depressing. Even latfr
it is bad enough. In 1864 they laughed at this:
"How d'ye do, Mr. Smith?"
"Do what?"
"How do you find yourself?"
"I never lose myself."
To repeat, it is depressing.
There will ho an interesting army
wedding , this afternoon at 4 o'clock at
the residence of Lieutenant and Mrs.
Maxwell Murray at Fort Mason, when
Miss Laura de Bussy Berry will be
come the bride of Lieutenant Harold
Boyd Nichols, U. S. A. The ceremony
trill be marked by simplicity and will
be attended only by the relatives and
rlosest friends of the couple. There
will be no attendants for either bride
~>r bridegroom. After the ceremony an
Informal reception for the friends of
the couple will be held at the quarters
of Lieutenant and Mrs. Murray. The
couple "will pro to Honolulu, where they
will establish their home at Port
Ruger, where Lieutenant Nichols is
stationed. *
* * *
Mr?. Clarence Oary, who is at* the
Fairmont, has just returned after a
visit in Los Angeles, Santa Barbara
and the- southern part of the state.
Phe will be informally entertained dur
ing , her stay here.
* * » Yβ A W\ O'Farreil nr. Powell
All /I /Ak Pbone Kearny 2. •
flLVilLAll Home Phone C 4453. j
Matinee Today and Tomorrow!
liAST TWO MGHTS
ORRIN JOHNSON and
MARGUERITE LESLIE
Leading the ALCAZAR COMPANY In
THE GAMBLERS
PRICES—Night. 23c to fl: Mat.. 25c to 50c.
Nest Week—Mß. JOHNSON and MISS LESLTE In
"THE WITCHING HOUR. ,,
MAT THURSDAY. EATUBDAT. SUNDAY.
TVe plh> ii.ii eixl iiuon si^.
M ATI \KK TODAY
I.BMt Time Stindnj- Msht.
DUSTIN FARNUAI
In thp <ireat War I»rama.
•THE LITTLEST REBEL ,,
( ommenolne XEXT MOMIVV
Miiwtf 1 Hit <>f Threo CoaUnenta
SEATS READY
Fr*Tiing« unci Saturday Mat!n<»r. $C to 2.V.
Wedat-sday Matinep. 20c to 51.30.
M c Alll t c r
kaS3MriodH Chas. Muehlmann. M?r.
MATINEES TODAY AND SUNDAY
EVERY MGHT
THIRD BIG WEEK
KOLB and DILL
With HAUDE LILLIAN BERRI
And Big Company, Present
"IN DUTCH"
By AARON HOFFMAN.
Prices—2sc to Jl.OO.
SEATS FOR FOf'KTH WKEK \OW
ETVftJtvttW. %«x**OCv k Tou-&- rovffAfr
P»f*>st «n<l Most Magnificent Tlieater in America.
MATINEK TODAY AJTD EVERY DAY "
The Hlgheat Standard of Vaudeville
ETHEL GKKKX. Vaudeville's Daintiest Come-
A r-nof. SYDNEY AYRES. Supported by Hl* Own
< oiupany. in Hi* One Act Play. "A Call For the
■ itdis week only.: HARRY GILFOH* In
Hi.- Original Character. '•Baron Sands"; GEOROK
FELIX. Assisted \,y tbf BARRY GIRLS, in "The
Boy Nest Door"; AI. RAYNO'S PERFORMING
IU : LI.r)OGS: JAMES -T. MORTON; SCHICHTL'S
!, MARIONETTES; NEW DAYLIGHT MO
TION PICTURES. La*t We*)t. Jesec L. Lasky'e
"CALIFORNIA," an American Operetta, with
Leslie Lef«h. Harry Griffith ami Austen Sfuart.
Even. Prices—lo<\ 2.") c. 50c, 75c; Box Seats. $1.
Mat. Prices (excepf Sundays and Holidays)—loc,
' 'hones —Douglas 70, Heme C 1570.
LURLINE
BISH AND I.AKKI.V STREETS
OCEAN WATER BATHS
Swimming and Tub Bathe
Bait water direct from the ocean. <:pen ;
day ami evening, including Sundays
and holidays, from 7 a. no. to 10 p. m. Spec
tators Kullfrv fr<>e. -
THE SANITARY BATHS I
Natatorium reeerred Tuesday and Friday
mornings from 9 o'clock to noon for women
only.
"FILTERED OCEAK WATER PLUNGE" ,
COMFORTABLY HEATED. CONSTANTLY
CIRCULATING AND FILTERING.
Hot Air Hair Dryers. Electric Curling Iron*
and Shampoo Room for Women Bather* Free.
BRANCH TUB BATHS, 2161 GEARY ST. |
NEAR DEVIBADEBO-
The
Smart
Set
INSTEAD of old china, a San Fran
cisco matron has collected almanacs.
The idea came to her with almanacs
inherited from her aunt in the cast.
They were in the library left to her.
The treasures of a deceased uncle with
a sens* of humor. The San Francisco
matron brought them home with an
inspiration to add to the collection.
There are almanacs for most of the
years since 1820, and they certainly do
prove that the world moves and people
progress. There are patent medicine
Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Thomas an
nounce the marriage of their daugh
ter. Miss Ethel Lillian Thomas, and Dr.
EL Melvin Johnston. The ceremony
took place Wednesday at their home jn
this city. Only relatives were present
at the interesting ceremony, and an in
formal reception followed for a small
group of friends. After a brief wed
ding trip through the southern part of
the state Doctor and Mrs. Johnston
will reside at San Luis Obispo. The
bridegroom is a graduate of Vanderbilt
university in Xashville, Term., and is a
member of the Kappa Sigma and Psi
Omega fraternities. Doctor and Mrs.
Johnston have a large circle of friends
in the bay cities.
* * *
Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron will
entertain at an elaborate dinner party
to be given Friday evening. December
if. when the feted guest of the occa
sion will be Miss Dorothy Deanc the
debutante cousin of the hostess. ' The
young folk who have b«pn bidden to
this affair will later attend the holiday
ball of the 'Bachelors and Benedicks."
* * #
Mrs. Eleanor Hyde Smith will sail
today on the Mongolia for Tlonolilu
and will pass the holiday?; with rela
tives and friends on tho island. '
* # *
The second darvr of tlio Xeijrhhors"
club will take place this evenins at
AMJJSEM EN TS
11 oerville-reache]
COXTRALTO . •
SCOTTISH RITE AUDITORIUM
VAN NESS AND SUTTEE.
TOMORROW AFT. AT 2:30
and NEXT SI\DAV AFT., Doc. Sth
Tickets— f2. $1 .Vi. fl. on sale at Sher
man, Clay &. Co.'s :nd Kohler ft Chase's.
(OMIXG-MAID mhoLL \ SolluiM
STKINWAV PIANO
! "Z
FRANCISCO -
ORCHESTRA
HenryHadley-Conductm
FOVIITH POPIUR CONCERT
CORT THEATER
Sunday Afternoon. IJoc. 1. 3: IS
soloist TINA LERNER pianist
Program Mondelssivin Ovortun*.
"Rut Bins"'; Grieg. ■ - H*"nrl Wounds -, nn<]
"L**t Spring"; Tsebaikowsk.r Concerto for
Piano nod Orchestra: I.lszt, "L.u-hfstraum":
RlchVnl Straus*. Ton* Pots, "I'eath tad
Transfiguration."
Prlces—SSc to |1.00.
rTji ■■ i LEADING THEATE&
■ jfliFP Ellis aond Marx.x
A ■ MrC Iα Phone—Sutler 2460.
LAST 2 TIMES
MATINEE TODAY—TONIGHT
Prlc*», 50c to $1.50
A BUTTERFLY \ WHEEL
Wltli \/>xn\% Wallfr's Kngllsh Company.
Tomorrow Mjfht— Spats SOW
VALESKA SUR^TT
Io the N. 1". Casino Melody Maetwplee*.'
"THE KISS WALTZ"
PRICES—SOc to $_». WfdnMxiay Mat. |1.50.
Original Production. Enlarged Orchestra.
Extra—Special—Extra
WEEK BE«. SUNDAY, DEC. 1.
THE FAMOUS LIGHTWEIGHT,
JOE RIVERS
CONQUEROR OF MAKDOT,
In an Exhibition of Physical Culture mnd
Scientific Boxing.
PANTAGES THEATER
CONCERTS, SKATING, ETC.
St. Francis Hotel—Nov. 30
I Colonial Boom at 8:30 p. m.—Last Time ■
BURR McINTOSH?^ 1 / I
On the Wonders and Beauties of fl
rALIFORNIA Axnoun l
LALirUnniA ( OUNTRY I
For the Benefit of the ■
SIMSHIXK * FLOWER LE*fil E I
Tteketa au<l ftescs, Hotel News Stand I
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1912.
ENTRE NOUS COTILLON ENTERTAINS AT FAIRMONT
Handsome White and Gold Ballroom Is Scene of Brilliant Social Gathering
the Century club and will be a delight-,
ful affair, enjoyed by more than 200
' I guests. There will be a rouzid of ln
-1 j formal dinner parties before the dance
• that will be attended by the older
members of the club as well as by the
debutantes. The two remaining
dances for this club will take place
December 28 and January 29. The
1 patronesses for the club this season
■ are:
Mr«. .1. K. Wilson Mrs. E. t>. Bullard
Mrs. n. H. Postle-IMre. Andrew Carrtgan
tuwaite iMrs. Alphcus Bull
* * #
Mrs. John Darling will entertain at
an Informal tea to be given tomorrow
at her home In Clay street, when she
will entertain for Mrs. Selden S.
Wright.
* * *
Mr. and Mri. A. S. Carman enter
; tamed at one of the elaborate dinner
parties of the week to celebrate the
! thirty-sixth stnniversary of their wed
ding. , The affair was given at the fam
ily home in Piedmont, but was attended
by a large number of guests from this
side of the bay. The decorations were
in the red and green favored of the
holiday season.
Miss Mary Kallmann left yesterday
for Palo Alto, •rtaere she will visit for
several days as the guest of Mrs. Curtis
Hillyer.
* * *
Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Relrhaw have
taken apartments at the St. Francis for
the winter and will be in town during
the entire season.
* * *
The second dance of the Saturday
' Evening assembly, will take place this
evening and more'than 100 young peo
ple will en.ioy the affair. The patron
! esses this season ;tro:
1 MM. Frank H. Kerrigan jMrs. Btnrart gfeXca
Mrs .lara.r. I.anagsn Sfra, Alton L. G«Wi
Mrs. William H. Mana-jMrs. Dudley D. Sales
ton I
* * *
The boys and girls who took part in
the recent production of "Campus
Mouser" for the benefit of the Armitage
i orphanage enjoyed a reunion last even
ing at the Savoy theater at a party,
and later went to one of the cafes for
• supper. It was Originally intended to
ij have a dancing party, but. the plans i
'I were changed this week in favor of |
the dinner and theater reunion. The
young folk who took*the principal roles
j in the play with the members of the
chorus met for the final party last
evening, and the success of the occa
sion was due to the efforts of the fol
lowing committee who arranged the
: affair:
j Captain Harry Hovrland William Bryan
! I Allan Hamilton Wfli.e Coyne
j T>iiano H«pk»ns< "'hilip Wiseins
Kdrrnnl f/miax <lmeon Mill*
Omrtney Ford Austin Bperry
i l.i'vitonant Wood [Walter Martin
I Harry Brott |H. Payee
: Jerri SiilliTan jstuart
j Lieutenant Bagby
WOMEN ENJOY A
VARIED PROGRAM
Daughters of California Pioneers
Auxiliary Holds Meeting
For their regular monthly meeting:
the members of the woman's auxiliary
of the Daughters of California Pioneers
met yesterday in Pioneer hall, the pro
gram of the day being in charge of
Mrs. William Ttomaine.
Zoeth S. Eldridge read a chapter of
hie book. 'The Coming of the Argo
nauts." dealing with the earlier days
of San Francisco's history. The fol
lowing program was given:
Fan and tambourine dance, Miss
Grace Selfino and Miss Tomeea Fosta;
mandolin and guitar duet. Miss
Sherwood and Miss Theresa Sherwood;
Spanish dance, "Santiago, ,, Miss Ruth
Renwick; Spanish dance, "El Capitan,"
Miss Mildred Koenlg; mandolin and
guitar duet, the Misses Sherwood.
SUCCESS DEPENDS
ON KIND OF WIFE
University of Illinois Professor So
Tells Teachers
CHICAGO, Nov. 29.—Prof. William C.
Bagley of the University of Illinois
believe* that a man's selection of a
wife plays an Important part in Jiis
success or failure in his chosen voca
tion.
Speaking before the Central Associ
ation of Science and Mathematics
teachers. Professor Bagiey said today:
"If a boy were consulting me about
what occupation to take up, I would
not make my inquiry by applying
physical or mental tests. I should ask
him if he bad selected a prospective
partner for life's joys and sorrows. I
should then request a few minutes' in
terview with her."
Some of the social favorites who attended the assembly) of the Entre Nous
Cotillon club last night.
WOMEN DISCUSS
PLAYWRIGHT'S ART
Club Hears Interesting Lecture
by J. D. Barry
Discussion of the drama in Its man
ifold features filled tl.e afternoon yes
terday for the members of the Corona
club.
John D. Barry told of "The Relation
of the Drama to Life," saying the ac
tualities of existence are portrayed
much ninre faithfully by means of plays,
than In books of fiction. On the stage
life is shown actually as it is, shorn of
tlif extraneous matter introduced in
its printed presentation.
French dramatists are -writing now,
hf said, of life as it is without apolo
gies, while American playwrights are
more cowardly and gloss over some of
the uglier facts.
Discussion took place as to whether
a play was more enjoyable before or
after it or the book from which it had
been dramatized, had been read.
Mrs. Annie Little Barry. Mrs. John
Bullock. Miss Jennie Partridge and
others spoke and the general opinion
seemed to be that the changes of de
tails or plot, the lack of the plement
of anticipation, suspense or climax and
other features of like nature, made it
better to see the play, than to read it.
Mrs. <'. S. Middloton sang , a group
of Hawaiian songs, accompanying her
self on the ukelele.
It was announced that the Christmas
jinks will be held December i>.
One of the Secrets of
Happiness
in which a riot of exquisitely tinted scarfs, delectable
fabrics, magnificently fragile laces and voluptuous furs
■was displayed, when I heard the above remark. It was
uttered in a voice" so thoroughly happy and full of
pleasure that I instinctively turned to look at the speaker.
I saw a middle aged woman with a sweet, refined
face and very shabby clothes. Her hat I reckoned to
have been made in 1910 and retrimmed in 1911. Her
gray suit dated back to the days of pleated skirts and"
three-quarter coats. Her gloves were much worn, and
she had absolutely none of the accessories in the way
of furs and laces and scarfs at which she was gazing.
And yet her voice was so full of pleasure that it had attracted my atten
tion, and her face was ecstatic as her voice.
Lucky woman! What if she has none of the lovely things which it is
plain she appreciates so fully. She has something infinitely more valuable;
she possesses one of the most potent of all the keys to happiness—the ability
to enjoy beauty without possessing it.
The world is full of beautiful things; to look at beauty is one of the most
natural and most healthy sources pf happiness. And yet there are a great
many people so built that they can not really enjoy anything, however beauti
ful, unless it belongs to them.
The desire for possession is one of the most deep rooted and enduring
of human passions. From the baby who reaches out his hand for the
bright object that attracts him and cries when he can not have it, to the old
man who schemes by an ingenious will to keep his hold on his possessions
even beyond the grave, we are all more or less its slaves.
It takes a. philosopher to break the chains and to realize that true con
tent does not necessarily lie in possession. And this woman was evidently
a philosopher. Think of all the infinite riches that are hers. Wealthy people
are often discontented because even their wealth has a limit. Hers has none;
all that she sees is hers to enjoy because she can enjoy it without possessing.
"It nwkes me perfectly miserable to have to be with Rosamond," a
rather plain girl said to me once, "because she is so beautiful and I am,
unhappy because I never can look like that."
You see she was an abject slave of the desire for possession.
How much happier is the state of mind of another woman who says,
"I think I enjoy a beautiful woman as much as a man does. You see I
love beauty for itself, and whether I find it in a man or a woman, a ship or
a sky or a flower, I take pleasure in it."
Lucky the man or woman who can teach himself or herself to enjoy
beauty without forever coveting it, for the world is full of beauty and hence
full of happiness for such a one. z
MIKADO HIGHLY
HONORS WOMAN
Decorates Miss Mabel Board
man, Secretary of Red Cross
*
WASHINGTON, Nov. 29—Miss Mabel
Boardman, secretary of the American
Red Cross, today received from the
White House the Insignia of the Fifth
Order of Crown, conferred upon her by
the Japanese emperor for distinguished
service.
So far as officials here know today,
it is the first time an American woman
has been so honored by Japan. *The
order conferred upon Miss Boardman
was specially established to recognize
meritorious services done by women.
The insignia was sent to President
Taft, president of the American Red
Cross, by Marquis Matsukati, head of
the Japanese Red Cross. President
Taft has written to the marquis and to
the Japanese emperor, thanking them
for the honor paid Miss Boardman.
G. A. R. LADIES PLAN BAZAAR
OAKLAND, Nov. 29.—A bazaar will
he given Friday evening. December 6,
in Lincoln hall by Colonel John B.
Wyman circle No. 22, Ladies of the
Q. A. R. Arrangements for the affair
have been completed. Mrs. Jannett
Lott is chairman of the executive com
mittee and women who will have
charge of booths are Mrs. Hattie E.
Clifford. Mrs. Christine Levey, Miss
Klale McMath and Mrs. Josephine E
Gearhard.
Ruth Cameron
I RUTH CAMERON '
BEAUTY, POWER
AND MODERATION
IN LERNER SOLO
Dainty Russian Pianiste at
Hadley Concert Re
veals Star
WALTER ANTHONY
A musical personality of unique
charm and extraordinary importance
was revealed yesterday afternoon In
the person of Tina Lerner, -who was
the soloist at the fourth symphony con
cert given by the San Francisco orches
tra under Henry Hadley's direction.
She comes from the land that pro
duced Rubenstein. Her modest manner
before her audience gay» little evidence
of the boldness of her playing. Her
singularly beautiful countenance, as
feminine as that of a Mona Lisa, gave
equally slight evidence of her deter
mination or of the wrists of steel
that were to force the grand piano
into a tumult of sonorous sound as
soon as the orchestra had intoned the
opening measures of Tschaikowsky's B
flat minor concerto.
Her impassive attitude at the key
board and her unobtrusive Individual
ity, scorning affectation, gave still less
inkling into the depths of the young
pianist's musical training and the vigor
of temperament.
NO WEARINESS AT CLOSE
That so slight and apparently fragile
a person could complete the first—and
longest—movement of the concerto and
finish with fire and fervor was itself
remarkable, and few there were who
suspected the reserve force that was
reacting like steel springs through the
tender andante to crowd her fine In
strument to the limit of its musical
powers in the allegro con fuoco move
ment and still remain triumphantly
fresh for the spirited allegro vivo
movement. This, with Its thundering
and amazingly rapid octave passages
at the end, preceded by a two hand
grasping of chords while the full or
chestra of strings and wood and brass
was playing with her. but beneath her,
was the inspiring exhibition of vir
tuosity. Power was applied to beauty,
strength was touched with moderation
and controlled by spirit—in short, a
genius was evident.
Hadley had little difficulty in keeping
his big orchestra with the player. For
one thing—and the principal reason it
Is, too —Miss Lerner, unlike most of her
countrymen at the piano, is not arbi
trary in her rhythms. She is almost
metronomic in her accuracy, so that
even the different syncopated measures
of the second movement were clearly
outlined by the pianist, whose accent
was infallible.
PASSION NOT RAMPANT
Unlike most of her countrymen, too,
passion is not rampant in her playing,
though thla fact follows the circum
stance of her rhythmic sanity as a mat
ter of course. She plays with much
poetle feeling and with an individuality
of her own, but she does not even take
Tschaikowsky to the verge of hysteria.
A clear note of intellectuality sounds
through her stormiest moods—aa in the
third movement —and although she de
mands of her piano all the- tone it has to
give, she does not belabor it.
It is with pleasure I have to an
nounce that she plays again with the
symphony orchestra tomorrow after
noon, and that as soon as her engage
ments in Portland and Seattle will per
mit. Manager Frank Healey will bring
her back to play a concert in this city.
No pianist can afford to miss this little
star from the Nevs.
FIFTH SYMPHONY IMPROVED
Hadley's presentation of the Bee
thoven fifth symphony was an improve
ment on the first interpretation in the
Greek theater. It is not clear, how
ever, that Hadley's forte lies in the
classics of Beethoven, whose genius in
the development of thematic material
into the web of mighty music is not too
comprehensible to this young, modern
composer. Hadley seems to see in
Beethoven not much* else but the for
mality of his beauty, and misses the
spirit stirring beneath the great, yet
simple, themes.
Wagner's "Tannhauser" overture
completed the program and was played
with abundant spirit by the instru
mentalists.
RABBI KLEIV TO M. Klein,
representing the Rabbi Isaac Ekhanan Theo
logical aemicary of Now York city will lec
ture today at 3 p. m. in the Congregation Wil
liam Wolff, 14T1 Geary street near OctaTla
The public is invited.
KERVHANTS , SECRETAB.Y LECTTTB,EB—Oak
land. Nov. 29.— Wilbtir Walker, secretary of
the Merchant*' exchange, lectured on "The City
Brau'tifnl" before the Vernon Heights aujl Lake
Shore Improrement club this eveultig.
Original Figures
Introduced by
5.0. Lewald
The white and gold ballroom of the
Fairmont hotel Was the scene of a
brilliant gathering last evening when
the members of the Entre Nous Cotil
lon club held their second winter as
sembly. The handsome ballroom was
elaborately decorated for the occasion
with a profusion of evergreens and cut
flowers. Palms and potted plants
banked the walls and formed an ef
fective background for the display of
poinsettias and roses, with which the
room was otherwise adorned.
The dances were exceptionally pretty
and four original and attractive figures
of the cotillon were introduced under
the direction of Sanford Q. liewald.
NEXT AFFAIR SEW YEAR'S EVE
The next affair to be given by this
club will take place New Year's eve in
the Palace hotel.
,On the reception committee were the
following members of the board of
directors.
.Vfre. Guy Hayne Mil* I Samuel M. Tat*
Miss Marguerite Cava- Lawrence J. Waterman
nagh 'Herbert 0. Alden
Mine Mellie Z. Luding-jMark Lennon
house 'Adolph J. Becker
MiM Abby D. Sanborn ;F. Arthur Gawthorne
Mlsa Kefugto de Cor- Albert H. Ants
dona Walter H. Robinson
Edgar M. Brown Sanford <i. Lewald
Alan W. Maglnis Earl B. Southard
James C. Hayburn •
some: who attended ball
Some of those who attended last
evening's function are:
Dr. and Mrs. Guy Hayne Mlae Helen Eisenlen
Mlze Mln Bortlia RadoTlch
Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Mis* Uenevleve Watson
Vandenburgh Mlae Alice Monnlc
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. MIM Edna Goeggel
Murray Mlaa Amalda Thumler
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mlae Haxel Thumler
J. Pearce Howard E. Burnett
Mr. and Mrt. Adolph J. Harry F. Gtttings Jr.
Becker Bert 0. Steet
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. George J. Kern
Holber E. Marion Brown
Mr. and Mr*. Banford Herbert O. Alden
O. Lewald Dr. Merton M. Hall
Mr. and Mrs. A. S. William E. Brodersen
Wieater John England
Mr. and Mr*. George C. Charles L. Bell
Snelder Richard A. Edwards
Dr. and Mr*. Adolph Glen W. «*•*
Berg Daniel O'Day
Mr. and Mr*. Jamee C. Dr. John .T. Beegan
Haybnrn Louie S. Moon*
Mr. and Mr*. Philip B. Paul G. Delsol
Croc* F. M. Cornell
Dr. and Mre. Joseph F. Edwin E. Lunstedt
Sigwart Earl B. Southard
Mies Violet S. Alden Walter H. Neunaber
Mis* Mary Redmond Dr. Herbert E. Lonjr
Mies Alberta M. Eng- Harrison L. Hammond
land George W. Pracy
Miss Ursula Dietrich Harry F. de Turk
Miss Marguerite E. Al- Dr. Edmund H. Brassel
per* Allen M. Ollnger
Mfs=s Jessie E. Swift Alan W. Maglnie
Miss Era M. Gibbon* Walter B. Towl*
Mies Befugio de Car- Albert H. Antz
dona i F. C. Jordan
Mire Helen W. Alkalay Walter S. Wetenhall
Mies Alice M. Beegan Ralph Height
Mlsa May McLean J. C. Ogden
Mies Letitla E. Flana- Louis P. Selby
gan Stanley E. Behneman
Miss Eleanor HaUaban Everett L. Moore
Mies Alice B. Clause E. B. Relnegcr
Mies Henrietta F. Krum- C. O. Mayhood
hole Albert F. Smith
Miss Rcse E. Clause Alfred If. Hartter
Miss Edith Brownlee Lawrence J. Waterman
Mies Bessie Culley Cecil J. Huff
Mlse Adele Herrmann Dr. J. Y. Bartholomeny
Miss Florence \c Olair James A. Keller
Miss Alice Landers Henry Klrscbmann Jr.
Mlse Irene Delsol Frederick A. King
Miss Edith A. Jones A. J. Jones
Miss Anita V. Wilson W. P. Clarke
Mis* Blanche M. Wiley Raymond P. Center
Miss Alice refprsnn C. O. Clausen
Miss Bernice Moore C. J. Haintjen*
Miss Edna N. Wilson Elmo Warner
Miss Ethyl Stelrake Otto H. Behrns
Mis* Mabel D. Mlr.e Dr. C. J. Nlcolai
Miss Blanche le Clalr Charles A. Peters
Miss Gretch<»n Cordsen Frederick W. McXulty
Miss Cfara L. Wttten- Louts S. Bran
hall Harrison If. Tuektr
Miss Erma Lundstedt Victor O. Luod
Miss Pauline F. T.otiln Clarence A. Bullwlnkel
Miss Nella C. Wilson Thoo O. Harte
Miss Julie P. Bran Harvey M. Huff
Miss Beatrice Coons Bernard Foe*
Miss Mellie Z. Ludtng- Dr. Walter A. Nicholson
house Leonard A. Bowhuy
Mies Frances M. Clark David A. Aronson
Miss Grace A. Luke Benjamin H. McPhnn
Miss Jola Moore Mark Lennon
Miss Lilt.an B. O'Con- Charles E. Lackeman
nor A. R. Ahlgren
Miss Marie A. Fevrter Joseph A. Therlen
Miss Maude Charlotte Paul Woods
Wag'taff K. F. Ehrhart
Miss May Lswton Henry C. Lester
Miss Emma de Velaso*) Dr. G. S. Bachman
Miss Ir»>ne G. Sulllran F. Arthur Gawthorne
Miss Lillian Hnrtzlg Lonl* P. Holm
Mis* Florpnc* M. CleTe Henry A. Haake
Miss Heleu Einselen Bert C. Pollak
Miss Helen Hlne* Walter H. Robinson
Miss Anita Junck George St. Germalu
Miss Rose B. Vender- Samuel M. Tat*
bnrgh N'eal Dunn
Miss Mac A. Charleston Charles C. Bradley
Miss Dream Ranbe iFrank C. O*born
Mies Florence Law Alex Glynn
Miss Sadie M. Cottrell iG. E. Cole
1 Miss Adele F. Gagan {Jesse W. Trask
I Mies Edna C. Ford Joseph Eb#r
Miss Mabel E. Wolter* Jame* A. Mage*
Miss Adeline M. Worth- J. M. Hab»rfeld«
lngton J. L. Howe
Miss Erminla Guinasao Frederick H. Hack* Jr.
Miss Erma Weidenthal H. Ray<» GWson
Miss Aria Tietjren Lewis Adelsdorffer
Miss Vtctorlne Zelllg D. A. Reade
Miss Kathrrn Tucker George H. Sandy
I Miss Elizabeth Gleeson R. L. Webb
Mft» Lnura Gleeson lAlbertG. Agnew
«■ By iTHttne saiu
WB) We are showing
i this season, the new
jju "Marie Antoinette"
gl! pattern of sterling sil
wfe vef.
HI A new design in
W Alvin Silver that will
appeal to the artistic
Wi and discriminating buy
m We have a full
HSJ line and cordially in
ly vite inspectioa.
mmjk RADKE
. * . 3 Doom
\S-.'. "%■/ Above
v ' Grant Ay.
TEA SPOON

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