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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, December 14, 1912, Image 13

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13
PUBLICITY GREAT AID FOR SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY
Call's Campaign for
Colonists Successful
Pictures .and Stories of Rich Country Have Brought Many!
New Comers From East and Aroused Old Residents
to Vast Possibilities of Their Part of State
STOCKTON. Dec. 13.—The season of
1 f>l2 will stand out as a banner year in
the industrial history of Stockton and
of San Joaquin valley. I
The bumper crops of barley, beans,
potatoes, celery, asparagus and veg
etables of all kinds, of fruits of every
variety, of grapes, hay and alfalfa,
been far and away beyond all
expectations and justify San Joaquin's
claim of being the richest agricultural
section in the state.
Real estate men. farmers, produce
men. manufacturers, transportation
companies and the merchants are con
gratulating themselves and each other
upon the returns from the season's
work.
The 250,000 acres or so of tillable
soil on the islands of the San Joaquin
river have yielded a richer harvest
than ever before, and more sales of
tracts of small acreage have been
made in the last year than during any
such period since reclamation began.
Prices have steadily advanced, though
even at that productive lands can be
bought today in San Joaquin valley at
rates as low as in any portion of the
state.
The increase in urban population and
a more diversified demand for farm
products are cogent reasons for "more
and better" yields per acre. Necessity
|_ forcing tiie United States to study
intensive methods to the end that a
family may now make a comfortable
living on 10 or 20 acres and even
acquire a competence.
But, as David Grayson puts it in
"The Friendly Road": "No country,
after all, produces any better crop than
its inhabitants." and to the honor of
San Joaquin valley, bo it said, no sec
tion of the country produces a more
thrifty, a more wideawake, enterpris
ing lot of citizens than are to be found
here.
VALUE OF ADVERTISING
In whatever line of business they
may engage, the people hereabouts are
fully alive to the value of advertising,
and their faith in the advantages of
publicity has been remarkable. During
the year now closing a large number
ot colonists have come here from the
middle west, the south and the east,
attracted to a great extent by The
Call's wrlteups of the industries of San
Joaquin valley and the accounts of the
favorable conditions for farming that
prevail here.
Scientific drainage and properly built
levees afford absolute security to the
island farmers. The irrigated farms of
the uplands have increased 250.7 per
cent in the last decade, and by April 1,
191.1, fully ?i>,ooo more acres will be
under irrigation in San Joaquin county
alone, while reservoirs and canals will
conserve and direct the flow of the
Stanislaus over a vast acreage of the
valley that will in a short time put
thousands of more acres of rich soil
under intensive cultivation.
GOOD ROADS AND PROGRESS
The good roads of the county serve
as a model for other parts of the state
and have been the means of putting the
entire outlying districts into close touch
with the city. In fact, every farm in
the county is annexed to Stockton, and
every road leading to the "metropolis
of the San Joaquin" is the scene of
-swift moving transportation.
Auto stages and motor trucks per
form the work of streetcars and de
livery wagons for the country dwellers,
MOVEMENT BEGUN TO
DEVELOP MARIN COUNTY
Resolutions and Mass Meet
ing to Start Big Campaign
for Scenic Suburbs .
On Tuesday, December 10, 1912, the
board of trustees of Mill Valley unan
imously adopted a resolution suggest
ing that all municipal and civic bodies
and all newspapers join in a movement
for the promotion of the welfare of
Marin county.
resolutions further recommended
that a muss meeting be held, prefer
ably in the town of Sausalito, for the
purpose of starting this movement and
.larly for the*purpose of stimu
-lati- n the part of the Sausa
lito i bebalf of the state high
tloo by the trustees lias
been followed by the Sausalito people
hav-q called a mass meeting for
iber 19, at which time Highway
Commissioner Lo-er will address the
lon of the Mill Valley board
if carried out upon the lines suggested
will nor only lend material assistance
to the state highway but will probably
lead to (he organization of a promo
tion movement, the need of which will
rf. manifest in a very short time
constCT-stloQ of the exposition
progresses and as completion and open
* The Panama canal draws near.
Wil natively slight but prop
erly directed efforts many internal Im-
H«ntfl can he made in Marin
county which will prove of immeasur
able value and present the county in
a becoming manner to the thousands
of strangers who will visit this scenic
on.
Many men of great understanding
and large wealth reside in Marin who
could be of tremendous assistance in
a movement of this kind if they will
• rate. It only needs the proper
zation intelligently directed to
ipHsb .splendid results.
Want a Farm?
10,20 and 40 Acre Tracls
New town on S. P. R. R., six
hours' ride from San Francisco,
on main State highway; district
growing rapidly; good neigh
bors; good school; 1,100 acres
.sold in small"tracts last month;
soil very fertile; land . level;
healthful climate; abundance of
irrigation water all the year.
Terms are easy.
Call or write today for full
particulars.
Co-Operative Land & Trust Co.
599 MARKET STREET,
SAN FRANCISCO.
while Stockton is also the focal point
of a splendid network of steam and
electric railroad lines. With the com
plement of the river craft of all kinds
the transportation facilities of the
"Netherlands" center are almost ideal.
Artisans and mechanics at* well as
farmers are drawn to California he
cause of the salubrious climate, and
many thousands of them find employ
ment here in Stockton's large industrial
plants. Her manufactured products go
around the world. Plows, harrows,
dredgers, harvesters, wagons, engines,
pumps and other implements of Stock
ton make can be found in South Amer
ica, in Africa, in India, on the steppes
of Russia and on our own deserts, as
well as in all the more civilized places
of the globe.
Information on all these subjects has
been widely disseminated through
articles printed in The Call during tiie
last four months.
Farming by electricity is the newest
phase in California life that gives
promise of ease and wealth to those
seeking a home here.
Away up Jn the mountains of Tuol
umne and Amador counties the torrent
has been harnessed to the dynamo, and
down through the valleys electricity,
the monarch of all power agencies, is
enlisted in the cause of development.
The inexhaustible power from the
'•everlasting hills" is carried to the
reclamation and irrigation pumps, to
the big dairies and to every useful con
trivance that needs power or light.
San Joaquin county is growing in
population, in resources, in wealth. It
offers unsurpassed opportunities for the
small farmer, and all its lands are
priced under actual values.
RECENT REALTY TRANSACTIONS
During the last week 111 deals in
real estate were closed by local agents,
showing that the fall boosting con
tinues active despite the waning of the
season.
At the "winter products exhibit,"
which opened Wednesday at Sacra
mento, Stockton and San Joaquin county
are well*represented by 165 specimens
in charge of J. E. Hall, superintendent
of the Stocktoj) Chamber of Commerce.
Next Wednesday will be Stockton
day. and local real estate men are plan
ning to visit the capital city in large
numbers in automobiles, by electric
and steam cars.
The publicity committee of the realty
board has representatives at the sifow
whose business it is to "boost Stockton
and San Joaquin county, first, last and
all the time."
The exhibit in charge of Hall in
cludes almost every known variety of
apples, beans, grapes, oranges, cab
bages, radishes, alfalfa seeds, grape
fruit, oyster plant, cress, artichokes,
kale, carrots, persimmons, broom corn,
sunflower seeds, Egyptian corn, straw
berries, Burbank cactus, pepper, onions,
peas, squash and other fruits and vege-
I tables too numerous to mention.
In a speech given here last Monday
evening at a mass meeting George H.
Maxwell of New Orleans urged his
hearers to get back of the Newlands
bill and continue their efforts until all
the water problems are solved by fed
eral aid.
In conclusion Maxwell said: "The
Newlands measure will be worth all
the money that Uncle Sam has ever
spent for his army and navy, but it
will be for the preservation of life and
happiness." PAULINE R. BIRD.
SAN FRANCISCO CASH
GOES INTO RICHMOND
Four Story Building Is Pro
jected—Women to Build
as Investment.
RICHMOND, Dec. 13.—San Francisco
parties are to erect another four story
building in this city, having purchased
from G. __. Messerle the corner at Mac
donald avenue and Tenth street, pay
ing $25,000 for a lot that could have
been had years ago for $3,500. They
will be&in building within 60 days, it
is announced.
Messerle, who came here from Eu
reka and made a comfortable fortune,
by realty investments, is building a 50
foot addition to hie apartment house at
Nevein avenue and Ninth street.
Mrs. A. W. Draper, a wealthy San
Francisco woman, will erect several
substantial homes here as an invest
ment. She has bought a large number
of lots, her most recent investment
being three lots in Eleventh, street, be
tween Macdonald and Bissell avenues,
Mrs. Ullian S. Berry of Berkeley being
the seller, at a good profit, consider
ing the short time she held the prop
erty.
The pool of local capitalists being
formed to purchase Richmond harbor
bonds will probably be able to bid on
at least the first issue of $440,000. It
is said that W. K. Cole, Mrs. Hetty
Green's representative, who recently
bought into the Bank of Richmond, is
interested with Ben H. Griffins of the
Mechanics bank, John H. Nicholl and
others in the proposition.
WHEN IN
STOCKTON STOP
AT THE
Imperial
Hotel
£__
________ £?___«_•*?___•__. _&s3§ «__
__-____________-£___---- * -~~B■ T '•'i_-—W—T wT
-"WIIP - BBpBP"^^S - « ~™*S - 1 5** : >: v
tiller "Xew Mnnageme-t
Sample Rooms
A. A. LYNCH, Prop.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912.
PHOTOGRAPHS SHOWING RIVER BOAT LANDING WHENCE PRODUCTS OF RICH VALLEY LAND FIND THEIR WAY
TO MARKET AND TYPE OF SCHOOLHOUSE IN RAPID CROWING SOUTH SAN JOAQUIN IRRIGATION DISTRICT.
CIVIC CLUBS WORKING
FOR THE BOND ISSUES
Indorsement Given to All
Measures Designed for
City's Betterment
For the bond election to be held De
cember 20 the indorsement of the Civic
League of Improvement clubs has been
given to all the proposed bond issues.
This took place at a meeting held
Thursday evening.
The league also nominated officers
for the ensuing term as follows: Pres
ident. R. A. Roos: first vice president,
J. M. Kepner; second vice president,
Dr. Julius Rosenstirn; third vice presi
dent, Alexander Russell; treasurer,
Gearge Skaller; secretary, Charles F.
Adams: financial secretary, T. P. Mar
tin. William K. Gutzkow was named
as the representative of the league on
the shade tree commission of the city.
A "get together" banquet was decided
on for the January meeting.
TWIN PEAKS ASSOCIATION
The Twin Peaks association of Im
provement clubs at its last meeting
indorsed all the bond issues to be voted
on December 20 and appointed a cam
paign committee composed of J. I_
Howe, L. H. Peterson. J. U Polito, H.
Becker and H. Braunagel to advocate
the purchase of the Sutro Heights
property, land for the aquatic park
and the Twin Peaks scenic park.
McKINLEY SQUARE
The McKinley Square Improvement
association is having considerable suc
cess in securing improvements for the
district, among which is the $60,000
Patrick Henry school. When the school
is completed it will be presented with
a large American flag by the associa
tion. The necessity for car service is
one which is occupying the attention
of the club.
NOE VALLEY PROMOTION
Through the efforts of the Noe Val
ley Promotion association, the paving
around the Not- Valley school is being
done, and by' the passing: Ot charter
amendments 19 and 20 the association
"* ** -nm^q/E m^^mmmm m wR mm '^ m ' m ' I J l^^|
1 7 ';
-•' • ■ Ask Anyone in V p
, 9 RICHMOND V h
• Where They'd Buy •
£/j Ask anyone who owns land in Richmond where U
1 j J they'd buy—They'll all tell you fIU
| NICHOLL-MACDONALD AVENUE i
■ Richmond r
1 Civic Center I
f - Ti.c Place for You to Buy. f^
18. / This is the finest investment on the Pacific Coast today. There V y
is not a lot for sale in any city in California at the same prices j£2gg
I asked for this Nicholl land that will ever make a* much money for B^s
the buyers as those in Richmond's Civic Center Tract. ||||
UW« When you hear of the big money made in Richmond prop- J0?
A 1 erties, bear in mind that it has been made in lands sold by us. gpl
B 1 c ar ° °^ erm § y° n now the biggest money maker of them all jjjjte
■yBI These are facts open for your investigation. mmm
gMj Come and See for Yourself SEN
I BURG BROS. inc. H
IH The Pioneer Richmond Real Estate Dealers Mn
MM 660 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO flg
Bl 23d and M_tcDonald Aye Please send me FREE colored maps ' >i
_ff__Pi _> 4 „_.-„,.«,* "' - n «l Tiew« of Richmond In general and BsA '
Hj XtlCnmona. Jficlioll Mac Donald A T e. Richmond Cirlc &&•_-**■
■j 2100 Shattuck Aye., Berkeley.
Iff 43513thst.,Oakland. „__L''!.!!!!!"'.. - .]'.!!'.!!!Z'"!" \ \
*----—IC—~' : _______ ===-^_~~~~-~-_______, I I '__-___-_ Im- g-n »_ t_ _ I i I _________■_ Ii i
*~~~~ M^M^^M^'»g***''y''ff'*^^'~-'*— *w——w_»g_—qJSi— _* r JjVfLj ____! _____rf__-
will soon commence an active cam
| paign to have the streets of Noe Val
i ley cut through and fixed. Plans are
being made to work for a playground
in the valley. The association Is try
ing to have the supervisors pave Chat
tanooga street with basalt blocks, as
it is the main artery to the valley.
On December 18 an open meeting will
be held at Willopi hall on bond elec
tions, the association having indorsed
all the proposed bond issues.
SUNSET IMPROVEMENT CLUB
This organization has elected officers
for the coming year as follows: Presi
dent, John R. Jones; vice president,
M. W. Moon; secretary, P. L. Brown;
treasurer, Herman Morris; executive
committee, D. & O'Brien, Phil J. Diez,
J. M. Gregory, George L. Allen, Dr. J.
G. Brady, George J. Steiger, O. F. Wil
liams. E. P. Connolly, Raymond Perry
and G. R. Sullivan.
OUTER MISSION ASSOCIATION
The Outer Mission Political Promo
tion association has been organized to
participate in civic matters, and will
work for permanent improvements as
well as along* political lines. Officers
will be elected in January.
NORTH BEACH PROMOTION
A meeting to discuss the proposed
bond issues will be held by the North
Beach Promotion "■- ■* • *
Wednesday evening in the Jean Parfetr
scbooi. _t_ayer A€ .
others will talk. The aquatic park will
be made a particular subject.
LARGE TRACTS SOLD
THROUGHOUT STATE
Sales of large tracts of land for sub
division and colonization are reported
from every quarter of the state. Seven
thousand acres were sold by the Dough
erty estate, Contra Costa county, !• the
Tessajara Land company for $1,000,000;
23,000 acres of the Hoxie-Shields ranch,
Shasta county, to C. C. Moore, president
of the Panama-Pacific international ex
position, for $1.5,000; a tract of 439
acres in Sutter county sold for $40,000;
trees and vines arc to be planted. Stine
& Kendrick have bought a 14,000 acre
tract of the Tubbs-Tuttle river lands
in Yolo and "Colusa counties and are
now subdividing it. It will be known
as the Riverside garden farms.
A syndicate has bought 10,000 acres in
Sutter county at $37.50 per acre for
reclamation and subdivision. Four sec
tions in the Coallnga field were sold at
$1,000,000 by A, L. Myterstein to J. D.
Martin.
It is said that 5,000 acres in northern
California will be put in rice next sea
son. From the 1,700 acres planted this
year the yield is estimated at 60,000
sacks. Hindus are buying rice land in
j Butte and Sutter counties. A Japanese
[ lease for five years at $50,000 was made
!on .100 acres for a hop ranch near Nico
laus, Sutter county.
A new lown is to be established on
I the Oakland-Sacramento line in Monte
l_.uma township, Solano county.
WILL GIVE A LOT FOR
AN APPROPRIATE NAME
Novel Plan Adopted by
Realty Firm in Laying
Out Subdivision
I Colonial Subdividers company of
ancisco has adopted a decidedly
means of securing a name for
nense and beautiful subdivision
o place on the market shortly
he first of the new year. They
>ffered some valuable prizes to
nner of the contest which they
aducting. The plan which they
ice calls for sending in a name
*iy one thinks would be appro
for a subdivision of this kind
privilege is given of suggesting
more names, either for the tract
streets and avenues. The Col-
Subdividers company is located
Market street, San Francisco,
laim their new subdivision has a
ter and individuality all its own,
eautiful shade trees and shrub
irer the entire tract.
The Colonial Subdividers company
believes -in advertising and therefore
takes this novel plan of giving one lot
for each street, avenue and boulevard
that their judges approve of and ac
cept.
|i ■■■ BUY HERE—I
Iknights addition
1 THE PATHWAY OF STOCKTON'S BEST GROWTH !
1 Lots 50x150—5200 to $250 I
S EASY TERMS
m NO INTEREST NO TAXES
I HIGH, DRY AND CLOSE IN I
I ONLY SEVEN MINUTES FROM THE COURTHOUSE I
8 The price *of these lots is so low that with the natural
SI growth of Stockton values will be doubled
H and quadrupled in a few years
jH .. I Come in today and get mora infor
§3 CLIP THIS COUPON -nation. Or fill out coupon and
_■ MOREY & TURNER mail - We wlll Bend you full P ar_
BJ 813 E. Weber Ay. tlculars. But come if possible.
mm Stockton, Cal.
■ £ara_.flfc MOREY & TURNER ■
Bfl Name Sltt-12-14 Call Bids., San Francisco
■Bj Address Stack-on Office. 313 Eut Weber At.
WU I I T. C. BUTLER. Manager
—. _E_S
RIPON, THE GATEWAY
TO OPPORTUNITY
ON DIRECT LINES' OF TRANSPORTATION FROM THE
SOUTH SAN JOAQUIN IRRIGATION DISTRICT
As South San Joaquin Irrigation District develops Ripon must
become center of intensely cultivated region. Soil richest and deep
est. Water in abundance. "The Land Owns the Water."
COME NOW or write for information to
* Board of Trade, Ripon, California
_-_-MH_---HM-_l
" The Way to Travel"
Stockton and Sacramento
116 Trains Daily
8 Each Way
Stockton and Lodi
82 Trains Daily
1. Each Way
BAGGAGE CARRIED
ON EVERY TRAIN
Depots In the Business
___, Center of These Cities.
•S™ Central (rt__sr
iV™ California ______
I I Traction Co.
LARGE SUMS LOANED
ON CITY REAL ESTATE
«
Savings Banks Advancing
Money Freely to Finance
Sales and Improvements
In spite of the approach of the holi
day season mortgages on city real es
tate keep up to a high figure. The
largest loan m%.de this week was by the
Hibernia bank to Mrs. Theresa A. Oel
rich. The sum was $755,000 on the
Fairmont hotel property at the rforth
east corner of California and Mason
streets. The mortgage is for one year
at 6 per cent.
A considerable number of loans were
made this week by the savings banks
in good sized sums to facilitate pur
chases and for improvement purposes,
among which are the following:
Tbe Savings Union bank made a bulldin-r loan
of $20,000 to Bert Schlesinger to erect brick
store*, and apartments at the southeast comer
of Clay and Powell streets, on a lot SSX-S.
The Humboldt Savings bank loaned $3.."i00 to
J. H. Johnson to build three fats in the oast
side of Ninth avenue, 175 feet south of C
street.
The German Savings bank made a renew.)!
loan of $30,000 to A. Petzold on properly at
the northwest corner of Jackson and Front
streets, on a lot -_x__7:.. . -*§,
The German Savings bank made a building
loan of $30,000 to the George Wagner company
to erect a three story class 0 apartment hoase
to cost $46,000 at th* northeast corner of Vnl
lejo stret and Van Ness avenue, on a lot f»4\!_*.
The Savings t'nlon bank loaned ffiO.ooo to
W. J. Yore to build a hotel at. the southwc>r
corner of O'Farrell and Jones streets, on a 1 >'
90x71. irregular.
The Italian-American bank made a build in r
loan of $10,000 to' O'Donnell & Stanley t
automobile stores In the north side of Pin
street. 12"> feet west of Van Ness avenue, on a
lot .7x13*7:6.
LEASES CLOSED RECENTLY
Kerner & Eisert announce the fol
lowing leases recently closed by them:
Estate of •!. W. Quirk to B. C. Van F.mon.
store and basement of brick building at 235
First street. for a term of Aye years at a total
rental of $fi,ooo.
Estate of J. TV Quick to Eugene Smith cmii
pany. two upper floors of brick building at 2"t
First street, for 30 months at a total rentaT of
$2._.-> O.
Lillie R. Henderson to A. Carle, store nt 2781
Mission street, for a term of five years at a tntul
rental of $4,800.
C. A. Zinkand to J. W. Wallace, apartment in
San Carlos apartment house. 177<> Pacific avenue,
for a term of one year at a total rental of $!W).
Charles Katz to S. %L Silver, store at 27* i*> Mi
sion street, for a term of five years at a total
rental of $4.500.
L. M. Mumfonl to Geller. Covell & Geller, dtore
at 1002 Buchanan street, three years' lease, total
rental ffloo.
John Hughes to S. Weissbluth .and J. Schlang
er. store at'lo2.l Fillmore street, for a term ot
five years at a total rental of $6,-0-.
Aut__iatic Vaudeville company to J. Kinnian
and H. Hegerich. store at 1744 Haight street, for
a term of three years at a total rental of $1,440.
Automatic Vaudeville company to EL Munticz.
store at 1702 Haight street, for a term of three
years at a total rental of $1,080.
18,500 CO
——
will handle 170 acres Island
Peat Land 8 miles from Stock
ton ; $12,000 mortgage to stand.
Now leased fojr $2,400. Figure
it out —interest, taxes and up
keep. You have 15% annual
net income on the cash invest
ment, and land that will ad
vance $5,000 in value in one
year. Can you beat it?
8...f*:-« jti -_l -. *• - i-.._""'"''TL
648 E. MAIN STREET,
Stockton, Cal.

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