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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, December 16, 1912, Image 1

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SAN FRANCISCO
93 miles pipe ff 1 Q sure fire pro
for high pres- **AO tection system,
100 fire cisterns, 2 fire boats and 2 reservoirs.
volume cyan.—NO. 16.
AMBASSADOR REID IS DEAD IN LONDON
Wreck From Horace Kearny 9 s Hydroplane Found Adrift by Fishermen
NO HOPE LEFT
TUT FLIERS
HAVE ESCAPED
WATERY GRAVE
Motor Boat Tows Into Santa
Monica Portion of Craft's
Pontoon—3o Hours' Search
Is Fruitless in Efforts to
Find Unfortunate Men;
Marten in Machine Re
turns After Hunt, Say-:
ing That He Is Confident
in Rough Waters of Ocean j
SEARCHLIGHTS STILL
PIERCE DARKNESS
Friends Still Maintain Be
lief That Fliers May
Have Gained Shore in
Isolated Place —Coast Is
Patrolled for Many Miles;
Sheriff With Posse De
parts to Maintain Watch
Along the Barren and
Rock Bound Malibu Range
ANGELES, t>ec. IS, —Resting
places on the bottom of the Pacific
✓ ->cean a few miies from land are he
-1 Meved. tonight to have been accorded
by fate to Horace Kearny, the young
Kansas City aviato- i passenger,
Chester Lawrence, a I/"s Ansrr-ies news
paper man, who started with him as
passenger yesterday <>nan attempted
flight in a hydro-aeroplane to San
Francisco.
After nearly r.o boors of searching,
in which another hydro-aeroplane,
power boats and automobiles were
used, hope was virtually abandoned,
although the searchlight of many craft
continued until a late hour tonight to
shoot their beams over the water and
the rocky coast north of Santa Monica.
AXOTHER PIA>E AIDS HINT
Throughout last night and today
friends of the young men and search
ers cherished the hope that they had
made a landing on the isolated shore
line where the barren Malibu range
meets the ocean and where It is impos
sible to take any sort of vehicle.
Horsemen' and volunteer searchers
patrolled the coast line, while over the
waters of the ocean which had been
lashed into an angry sea by a 30 mile
gale, Glenn H. Martin, a brother avia
tor, hovered close to the waves looking
for a trace of the ill fated Snookums
or Its passengers.
Martin himself and ' his passenger,
Frank S. Garbutt. secretary of the Los
Angeles Athletic club, narrowly es
caped death when they landed on the
waves off Point Mugu, to replenish
their fuel supply.
WRECK IDENTIFIED AS KEARNY'S
Faith in the proverbial luck of Avia
tor Kearny was shattered when a party
of fishermen arrived at Santa Monica
towing behind their motor boat a
hydro-aeroplane pontoon. It had been
picked up five miles southwest of Re
dondo beach.
Even the suggestive discovery of the
pontoon failed to dampen the ardor
of the searchers, but the last vestige
of hope vanished when Charles Day,
the builder of Snookums. positively
identified the pontoon as the one he
had constructed for Kearny's hydro
aeroplane.
Day expressed* the belief that the
men had landed on the water, probably
because of engine trouble, and the
heavy seas had wrenched off the pon
toon, causing the air and water craft
to lose its equilibrium and hurl the
men into the water.
There is little doubt that Kearny
brought down the machine soon after
he had passed out of sight beyond
Point Firm in at.1:30 o'clock yester
day afternoon.
SEARCHER TOWED INTO PORT
Leaving Newport beach at 9 o'clock
this morning Martin flew to San Pedro,
where he took aboard Garbutt, whose
power yacht was also used tn the
search. Martin guided his machine up
the coast-tor 40 miles to Point Mugu,
Oarbutt with binoculars scanning the
waters for pieces of wreckage that
would tell the fate of the airmen.
They knew that the hydro-aeroplane
itself would have sunk immediately
had It met with a mishap.
At Point Mugu Martin alighted on
the water to take fuel from the
boat imp. 'which convoyed the aircraft,
but after the gasoline tank had been
replenished it was found that It was
■ Continued on Page 4, Column 1
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
I "The People's Newspaper'
Miss Helen Miller Gould,
noted as ■ philanthropist,
who is to become Mrs.
F. J. Shepard. , %,
LITTLE BOY FAILS
TO RESCUE COUSIN
Makes Heroic Attempt to Save
Youth From Bronco, but Lat
ter Probably Injured Fatally
4
Special Dispatch to The Call
VALLEJO. Dec. 15.—A heroic at
tempt by 8 year old Tony Madrid to
lower his small cousin, James Driscoll,
from the back of a bucking broncho to
the ground and out of danger at the
White Sulphur springs here this after
noon failed of success, for. in the
process the Driscoll boy was kicked in
I
the forehead by the horse and is- not
expected to live. The two boys, who
are about the same age, were riding
the same horse around the yard of the
springs, when a passing automobile
frightened the animal.
NEGROES ROB LABORERS
Five DeKperadoeH Hold Ip nod Beat
Member* of i onatruction Crew
LIMA, Ohio, December 15.»-One man
Is believed to be dying and seven
others are in a critical condition as a
result of being beaten up by highway
men in South Lima early today.
Frank Holly of Graham, Va., the
most seriously injured, is said to be
fatally hurt.
Fifty men, members of a construc
tion crew, were lined up in their camp
by five negro desperadoes. With
drawn revolvers, the negroes forced
the laborers to give up'what money
had in their pockets, a total of
more than $400. Holly and seven
others who resisted were beaten by the
highwaymen, who escaped from the
camp on horseback.
"JAPPYLAND" STAR HURT
Miss Thelma Gilmore ts Injured in An
Automobile Collision
Miss Thelma Gilmore. soprano and
star of "Japp.vland," recently produced
in the Macdonough theater, Oakland,
is confined to her Madison park apart
ments suffering from injuries received
while returning from the theater.
An electric automobile collided with
the limousine In which the singer was
riding with her manager, Edward H.
Coates.
Miss Gilmore, was bruised about the
head and shoulders, while Coates* finger
was broken and his wrist cut. The
electric contained the flowers that had
been passed to Mis* Gilmore over the
footlights.
SAN FRANCISCO, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1912.—PAGES 1 TO 8,
HELEN GOULD TO
BE MARRIED TO
RAILROAD MAN
i Engagement of Heiress to
Finley J. Shepard Is An
nounced by Brother's
Family
DATE OF WEDDING
YET TO BE FIXED
No Woman in America Bet
ter Known for Her Bene
factions
i-AKEWOOn. S. J.. Dec. IS.— An
i nnuncement of the engagement of Miss
I Helen Miller Gould of New York to Fin
lay J. Shepard, a prominent railroad
man of St. Louis, was made this after
j noon at the residence of Mr. and Mrs.
George J. Gould here. Tt was said that
the announcement of the time and place
!of the wedding would h* withheld for
j the present.
Gould made known his sister's en-
I gag<>ment in a formal statement, which
Mr. and Mrs. George J. Gould an
nounce the engagement of their
sister. Miss Helen Miller Gould, to
Mr. Flnley J. Shepard of St. Louis.
IFORTISE TBEBLED
!"pon the death of her father, Jay
j Gould, In &«, Helen Gould, then 24
| years old. inherited a fortune of about
i $10,000,000. it has beea estimated that
', by investment she has trebled this for
tune and at the same time devoted fully
I half of her time to benefactions which
brought her into world prominence.
She began her benefactions during
i the Spanish-American war when she
: gave time and several hundred thou
j sand dollars to the relief of sick and
wounded soldiers, for which she re-
unseating of Brigham H. Roberts, con
gressman from Utah, as a demonstra
tion against polygamy. she be
came devoted to the interests of rail
road employes, and toward the estab
lishment of the Railroad Young Men's
Christian association she gave her per
sonal attention and upward of a mil
lion dollars. Several Railroad Y. M. C. A.
buildings, others for naval men and
several for the Young Women's Chris
tian association have been erected in
cities through her generosity.
ENTERTAINS CITY WAIFS
One of the unique forms of her char
ity has been the personal recept'ons
she has given to hundreds of city waifs
and self-supporting women at her es
tate near Tarrytown, N. V., which in
cludes a great playground especially
fitted up for these parties. She never
has been attracted by society.
Only last July, Miss Gould fig-tired in
a controversy with Rev. Elmer F.
Huffner of Grand Junction, Colo., when
he< dealt severely with "bachelor
maids" in a sermon, declaring spinsters
should be isolated.
Miss Gould was quoted as replying
that he did a great injustice to the
bachelor maids, particularly to those
who were devoting themselves to
ideals for the advancement of civil
ization. As to her own case, she said:
"If I had found a suitable helpmate
I might have spent my money in a
different way. and a way which might
not have done as much good as it has."
Since the denth of her parents Miss
Gould has been the intimate friend of
Mrs. Russell Sage, who has been one
of her advisers in business and phil
anthropy.
Ftance Minister's Son
ST. LOFTS, Dec. 15.—Finley J Shep
ard met Miss Gould soon after enter
ing the operating department of the
Missouri Pacific-Iron Mountain lines in
June, 1911. He accompanied Miss
Gould and her party last March over
the Denver and Rio Grande when she
made a tour of inspection of the rail
road's Y. M. C. A. buildings. ,A close
friendship sprang up from that trip.
Shepard is 45 years old and the son
of a Connecticut minister who died
recently. He has been in railroad
work since 1889. Before entering the
service of the Gould lines he was with
the Northern Pacific and the Santa Fe.
When B. F. Bush, president of the
Missouri Pacific-Iron Mountain lines,
was chosen president of the Denver
and Rio Grande in January, 1912,
Shepard was selected as his assistant,
and recently his appointment as assist
ant to President Bush on the Missouri
Pacific-Iron Mountain with jurisdiction
over all departments Was announced.
Since coming to St. Louis 18 months
ago. Shepard has been active socially.
He is known as a lover of books, a
Continued on Page 2, Column S
SANTA FE TRAIN
WAS ROBBED BY
MEMBER OF CREW
Confession Made by Express
Messenger, Who First Said
He Was Bound by
Bandits
THIEF'S BROTHER
IS HIS ACCOMPLICE
Bags Containing $20,145 in
Gold Coin Were Tossed
From Car
BAKERSFIELD, Dec. 15.—Marvin W.
Hamby, the 22 year old express mes
senger whose car on the. Sunset western
train of the Santa Fe railroad was
robbed of $20,145 in gold near here last
week, broke down today and confessed
that he had robbed the safe, with the
aid of his 16 year old brother, Melvin.
The money, which had been hidden by
the boys in a brickyard at Kern Junc
tion, was recovered, with the exception
of $300, which was found in Melvin's
room. Both, brothers are in jail.
After having made his confession
Hamby led officers to the place where
the money bad been buried, and the
brother, Melvin, was taken into cus
tody there.
The robbery occurred last Monday
night. After mumbling a disjointed
_ .
story of an attack by two bandits who]
had laid him unconscious with a blow
on the head, the young messenger was
taken to a hospital at Taft, where he
shammed injury so successfully that
not until yesterday was he seriously
suspected. Then he was brought back
here and today was subjected to a
"third degree" sweating for five hours
by railroad and express detectives.
HAMBY BREAKS DOWN
Breaking down finally, Hamby threw
fits hands over his head and, weeping,
sobbed out:
"Oh, I did it myself."
Then he told where the money was
burled, how he had conceived the plan
of the robbery and how he had carried
it out.
Shortly afterward, accompanied by
Special Agents Cain and Phillips of the
Santa Fe railroad and the Wells Fargo
Express company, he went to the brick
yard at Kern Junction, where Melvin
Hamby worked. At first Melvin
stoutly adhered t6 the holdup story
told by Marvin last Monday night. But
when assured by his brother that the
officers were to share in the spoils he
led the party to where the money,
amounting to nearly $20,000 in gold,
had been cached. He explained that
the missing $300 was in his room,
where he had hidden it, being afraid to
show he had so much money, for fear
of arousing suspicion.
In Iris confession Marvin shouldered
the entire responsibility for the theft,
declaring that although Melvin had
taken the bags of gold when he had
thrown them from the train and buried
them, the yc/unger lad did everything
under instructions.
BROTHER IS SHIELDED
"Melvin did not want to do It," said
Hamby, "but I made him do it."
Hamby then went on with his story.
- ~ .
Continued on Page 2, Column 4 I
\"Ati Independent Newspaper
Whitelaw Reid, the ambassador of the United States to the
court of St. ]ames t who died in London yesterday, and two
of his houses. He made his home when in London at Dor
chester house. At rare intervals he spent a short time at the
, residence he owned at Menlo Park, in this state.
ACTING CHIEF OF
POLICE IS SLAIN
BY SUBORDINATE
Superior Officer, Shot Three
Times in the Head,
Dies in a Few
Minutes
Special Dispatch to The Call
RIVERSIDE. Dec. 15.—John R. Baird,
acting chief of police, was shot and
killed early this morning by Policeman
Barrett.
Barrett had been drinking and was
reprimanded by Balrd, who had been
acting chief since the death of Chief
of Police P. M. Coburn one week ago
today.
Barrett was told by Balrd to remain
in the private office the remainder of
the night as a punishment. The two
men had no sooner entered this room
than Policeman William Lucas, who
had been with them on a case earlier
in the evening, heard three shots. He
found Barrett bending over his superior
officer and prevented him from firing
a fourth shot. Each shot took effect
in the victims head and he lived but a
few minutes after the first shot was
fired. Baird was 36 years old and is
survived by a widow. He had been em-
Continued on rage 2, Column 7
PRESIDENT ELECT
IS BACK HOME
Steamer Bermudian Bearing Wil
son and Party Arrives Off
Sandy Hook
' NEW YORK, Dec. 16.—The steam
ship Bermudian, bearing Governor
Wilson and party, arrived off Sandy
Hook shortly after 3 o'clock this
morning after a record trip from Ber
muda.
SAWTELLE HEAD RESIGNS
Colonel Cochrane, Governor of Soldiers'
Home, Quits as Inquiry End*
LOS ANGELES, Dec. 15.—Colonel T.J.
Cochrane, governor of the Sawtelle
soldiers' home, has forwarded his resig
nation to the board of managers of the
national soldiers" home.
Colonel Cochrane's management of
the home was recently the subject of a
senatorial investigation.
He said today that he had intended
resigning before the investigation be
cause of Illness, but because of the
action of the United States senate in
ordering an inquiry into the affairs at
Sawtelle he postponed his resignation
until the completion of the investiga
tion.
CROCKER AND WIFE BACK
Mr. and Mrs-. C. Templeton Crocker
returned from the east yesterday in
their private car, after a visit to Mrs.
Malcolm D. Whitman, formerly Jennie
Crocker. With the Crockers were Mr.
and Mrs. Walter S. Martin and Mr. and
Mrs. W. G. Irwin. They will continue
on to Honolulu.
JWe\THER FORECAST:
Fafr; moderate Matfcwe*! wind*.
i*!*CoST— November 8. vest pockPt loose loaf niemo
&**' raDdnm boot. Reward f»r return to C. K.
F OR sale—sloo: 1 chair shop; growing town. 40
miles from S. F.: living r.w.ms In rear aivl
SEE CLASSIFIED PAGES FOR CONTINUATION
OF THESE ADVERTISEMENTS
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
NOTED ENVOY
TO ST. JAMES
PASSES AWAY
AT HIS POST
End Came Peacefully at Dor
chester House Yesterday
Morning in Presence of
Wife and Daughter; Pa
tient Had Been Seriously
111 Two Weeks, Though
Health Had Been Failirg
for Several Months; Body
Will Be Brought Home
PULMONARY OEDEMA
IS CAUSE OF DEATH
Exhaustion Following Par
oxysms of Asthma Left
Distinguished Patient Un
conscious for Three Hours
Before He Expired; King
and Queen Are First to
Extend Their Condol
ences; Other High Officials
Offer Sympathy to Family
LONDON, Dec. 15.—Whltelaw Reld,
the American Ambassador to 'Great
Britain since 1905. died at his London
residence, Dorchester house, shortly
after noon today from pulmonary
oedema. The eryi was quiet and peace
ful. Mrs. Reld and their daughter,
Mrs. John Hubert Ward, were at the
bedside.
The ambassador had been uncon
scious since 9 o'clock in the morning,
and at intervals during the previous 24
hours he had been slightly delirious as
a result of the drugs administered to
induce sleep.
ASTHMA CAUSED EXHAUSTION'
Sir Thomas Barlow, physician to the
king, who was called in last week
when Reid's Illness became acute, and
his regular physician, Dr. "William
Hale "White, issued the following bul
letin as to the cause of death:
A fortnight ago the American
ambassador had a slight bronchial
attack similar to others which he
had suffered at considerable inter
vals. Wednesday last asthma su
pervened and the asthmatic par
oxysms become very severe, lead
ing to extreme exhaustion.
It was hoped that he might
rally, as no pneumonic symptoms
had appeared. "With difficulty, the
paroxysms of asthma were got
under control, but Sunday morn
ing the exhaustion became extreme
and he died from pulmonary
oedema at 12:10 p. m.
ROYAL FAMILJf CONDOLES
Hon. John Hubert "Ward, who, with
his wife, had been at Dorchester house
continually since the ambassador's con
dition became serious, notified the staff
of the embassy when the patient began
to sink, and when death came he sent
word to the king and queen at Buck
ingham palace, the queen mother Alex
andra In Sandringham and the officials
at the court.
Almost immediately the king sent
his equerry, Sir Harry Legge, to ex
press the condolences of himself and
the queen, purlng the afternoon mes
sages conveying the warmest sympathy
were received from the queen mother
Alexandra and from others of tho royal
family, from court officials, members of
the court and from various embassies
and legations, while many called at
the embassy.
A wireless message was sent to Og
den Reld, son of the ambassador, who'
left New York yesterday in the hope of
I ROYAL I
NESTOR
Original London & Cairo
Cigarettes
Edw.Wgi.f- Co.
JGI-167 CALIFORNIA ST.

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