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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 10, 1913, Image 11

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KNOCKOUT BROWN BADLY WANTED HERE
Bright Chance for
Fast New Yorker
Griffin Would Put Him on With Bud
Anderson Next Month
WILLIAM J. SLATTERY
A sudden calm has set in after the recent series of pugilistic storms, and
more the promoters and the fans are looking for action. There is plenty
■' it right here in San Francisco, provided that the pugs care to take advan-j
t it, but the same old story is being told over again. Whenever there
i e work for the men of the gloves they either boost their prices to the limit
or else they slip quietly away and leave the promoters to depend upon the'r
wits to carr}' them by. This is the condition of affairs which prevails right
now, though it is to be hoped that something will happen to relieve the j
monotony within a few days - .
That 10,000 purse which former lightweight champion Ad Wolgast held
out for barred him in San Francisco
for some time. He departed for Port
land late on Wednesday evening,
leaving Promoter Jim Off roth in no
sweet frame of mind. Coffroth was
counting upon Wolgast as an opponent
for Harlem Tommy Murphy, but when
the former champ made that $10,000
talk, the promoter bade him a chilly
goodnight.
Now Jim Griffin is coming to the
front. He has been handed the job of
making a match for the Humboldt club
for next month. It looks as though the
Humboldt outfit will have the field all
to itself, and the outlook Is bright
enough if Griffin can only get a fighter.
He doesn't care whether this fighter is
big or small. All he wants is his con
pent to go on.
GMormnv wants browx
Bud Anderson, the lightweight cham
pion of the northwest, and touted as
one of the comers in the pugilis
tic pa me, is in town and ready to take
pn any of them. Griffin has closed
with Anderson, but tinfortunately up
to the present time he has failed to
•efure a man to meet him. Murphy
is hound up to Coffroth. and, therefore.
Griffin does not want to jump on the
toe* <if bis friend.
Believing that Knockout Brown
►uld ]o«">m up as a bis card for the
local fans. Griffin yesterday afternoon
fhot a wire to the Gotham idol, offer
- him a liberal guarantee to meet
Anderson in a 26 round mixup here
month. Up to a late hQur last
g the auburn haired director :
neral had not heard from the New
k<*r nor his manager, but he still
hopes of doing some good.
Brown rrrtainly ought to prove a big
action in San Francisco. For the
last two years he has been basking
in the sunshine of favorable criticism.
110 fought "Wolgast off his feet a couple
of in New York, and although
he made a few bad starts with indif
forrnt performers in the meantime, still
hr has the reputation and this goes
ng way in the fighting game.
A Los Angeles report says he has
n signed with Rivers there, but
this is not official.
The New Yorker never has gone
more than the 10 round distance, but
any fighter with his experience in the
* larger cities of the east ought to be
able to tack on an additional 10 and
{Tf>t away with it easily enough. He
can travel 10 rounds at a terrific pace,
according to all accounts, and they say
that bis chief stock in trade Is rush
ing the other fellow bo that he can
not get set.
ANDERSON* IS WILLING
The knockout hero has long been
clamoring for a chance at the light
weight title. If he is sincere In his
desire, this is his chance. All he has
to do is to come to San Francisco,
knock Anderson out; then beat some
body else and the whole country will
be clamoring for a match between him
and Ritchie or Wolgast,
But Brown never will become a
<hampion while he stalls around New
York. He may pick up a lot of easy
money, but he never will be regarded
as the class till he takes a trip to
the coast and travels over the long
route. He was a star around Gotham
wh<m Ritchie was only a bush per
former in the four rounds. Now Ritchie
is the lightweight champion of the
world, while Brown stands in the very
same spot where he stood two years
ago when Ritchie was unknown.
'Will you fight Brown?" asked Griffin
of Anderson and his manager. Dick
1 ionaid, in the Continental hotel yester
day afternoon.
"We will fight any lightweight in
world over the 10 round route or
■t.her," cut in manager and fighter
in unison. *
"That's good enough for roe," replied
Griffin. "I will try to get you Brown,
and if I can't, then I'll try to get an
other good one for you."
There is a chance that Willie Hoppe,
the terror of the four round light
weights, may be induced to take on
Anderson. Hoppe has been laying off
several weeks past, but they siy
it he is about ready to don the mitts
.-■grain. He is an active kid, and when
i- is a chance for action he gen
erally starts.
MILLIE HOPPE MAY START
Hoppe has been a big money maker
i in thp four round game, and for this
reason he may not care to take a flyer
over the distance. But it is only a
question of time when he must go 20
rounds if he hopes to remain on top.
Ritchie. Burns, Hogan and the rest of
them were eventually forced out of the
four round ranks, so it would appear as
.though Hoppe will shortly have to
make the same move as the others did.
The Butchertown lad always has
n a great card around this city.
Tn fact, he is the ruling sensation.
They all fall for him. Up to the pres
ent time none of them has been able
to put anything over on the lad. He
is not clever, nor is he a careful
lighter, but he has a rushing style
which nobody else ever thought of, and
he has made good with it from the
outset. This is why he has been such
a hit
If he fails to get a couple of good
lightweights. Griffin is talking about
starting Gunboat Smith and some other
big fellow. This may sound all right
and look all right on paper, but when
it comes to a showdown it is doubtful
if the fans will fall for such an attrac
tion. The last start which the Gur.
boat made here did not boost his stock
at all. In fact, he went back in the
betting , .
Griffin will find it a difficult task,
indeed, to pick up a suitable opponent
for the gunner at that. Good heavy
weights are about as scarce as police
lr.pri in the fog belt right now. M<.-
Carty is in vaudeville. Palzer has gone
back to the ranks, Willard won't come
to the coast, and the rest of them are
not worth worrying about, so the heavy
weight situation is therefore a critical
I one, indeed.
NEW SHOOTING MARK
APri.KTON. \Vi«.. Jan. ft. —In a shooling
■ >'-ih Sergeant Irwiu GniDdeman of Com
pany • ; '■staMii'hcfl ■ caller? roord for tlie Wis
consin national jruarrf. He made 44Q bullse.ves
<«it of 450 hbote. shooiing from the stautiiiij aud
kncfliui; iicsitious.
SNOW DISAPPEARS AND
FAVORITES COME HOME
Kiva, Setback and Parlor
Boy Run True and Re
ward Their Backers
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
EL. PASO, Jan. 9.—The weather
cleared at Juarez today and racing
was resumed. Half of the card was
captured by favorites. Kiva, Parlor
Boy and Setback being the ones that
rewarded their backers. Setback's
racing- in the final event on the card
was an excellent effort, as the Gaylor
entry stepped the mile in 1:39 3-5.
Acumen and Lily Paxton, 10 to 1 shots,
upset the dope. Jockey Burlingame's
finishes on Acumen and Setback were
nirp efforts. Summary:
FIRST RACE—Six furlong:
Odrls. Horise. W>ig":f JFock*y. St. Str. Fin.
12 I—Lily Paxton. 110 (Molesworth) 7 1 1 -i;
7-2— Gift. KK> (Hoffman) 9 2 2 8
i> 1 — (1)BTT88. 107 (Carroll) 5 5 33
Time. 1:15 1-5. Paxton 4 place, 2 chow; Gift
8-5 place, 1 show: Buse 1 show. (2)Pedro, Tal
low Dip. Crex. Baden Zinkand, (3) Originator,
Dehnas, The Peer. Virginia Ldndsey, also ran.
Scratched —Helen Scott, John Patterson, Nada
Mas.
BSCOND RACE—Fire and a half furlongs:
Odds. Horse, Weight, Jockey. St. Str. Fin.
W-10—(l)KIVA. 104 (Steele* 1 1 12
33-1 —King Stalwart, 100 (McCabe) 2 .", 2 'i
.".-1— (2)HOOSTEB,, 112 (Henry*.. 4 4 I %
Titnf. l:0T2-."i. KWa 9-20 place, out phow;
K'ng 7-2 place. 6-5 show; Rooster 3-5 slktw.
(3)Kenneib, Camia. Don Ramou. also ran.
THIRD RACE—One mile:
Odds. Horse, Weight. Jockey. St. Str. Fin.
5-I—(DL.MARCHiIONT, 110 (On) 1 3 1 n
8-I—Flying, 100 <J. MacDonaldl.. 4 123
10-I—(3)LEHIGH, 103 (Burlingame) 2 2 G 3
Time. 1:41. Uttle Marebmont 8-?> place, 7-10
show; Flying 3 place 1 show; Lenigh 6-r> show.
Ben Uncas. Ah Moon, (»)Lotta Creed, Jim
Cafferata, Aftermath, also ran.
FOURTH RACE—Six furlongs:
Odds. Horse. Weight, Jockey. St. Str. Fin.
10-I—Acumen. 112 (Burlingame)... 5 2 12
7-I—(S)JTJST RED, 109 (Miller)... 4 12 1
fi-1— Venetian. 110 (Henry) 3 3 8n
Time, 1:13 3-5. Acumen 4 place. 2 show. Red
3 nlacp. 3-2 show; Venetian 1 show. (l)Ch*n
ticler. Emily. Loe Harrison II Lady
Young. Minnolette, Highland Chief. Edmon'd
Adams, also ran. Scratched—Billy Myer.
FIFTH RACE—Si* furlongs:
Odds. Horse, Weight. Jockey. St. Srr. Fin
1-I—(I)PARLOH BOY, 110 (Bust) .T 1 1 2
1.'.-l—Golden Agnes. 98 (Halseyi... 5 2 2 1
7-I—(3)A. INTEEEST, 106 (Gross; 2 3 3 h
Time, 1:14. Boy 2-5 place. 1-5 show; Agnes
5 place. 2 Annual Interest 1 show. Or
peith. Quid Sfaae. (2)Bob Lynch, S. V. Hough,
Leecar, also ran.
SIXTH RACK—One mile:
Odds. Horse. \\>ighr. Jockey. St. Ptr. Fin.
»-10— (I)SETBACK. 108 (Burlinjrm) 4 2 13
12-.V-(2>ZOROASTEH, 105 (Drever) 112 3
13-1 —(3)MISS KORN. 103 (Gross».. 5 4 a 4
Time. 1:39 2-5. Setback 1-3 place, out show;
Zoroaster 1-2 plar-e. 1-4 show; Horn 6-5 show.
Shorty Northeut and Rose O'Netl also ran.
Weather cold and cloudy; track fast.
! The Call's Selections
For the Juarez Races |
JOE MURPHY
Following are The Call's selections for the
races at .Tuarez today:
FIRST RACE—Three furlongs; 2 year olds:
Index. Hunt, Wt
17»>7 DICK BODIE 112
1755 ALABAMA BAM 109
GALAS 112
1767 BreTtty ...: 100
174.1 Tip Dowdell I<>9
1767 Old Gotch 109
Miiton Robles 109
.... Korfhage 108
.... Meritorious 109
lonjury 1O»
.... Benedict 112
1767 Shadract 112
.... Manganese 112
Dick Bodie a nire coR and will be hard to beat.
Sri'OND RACE—Five and a half furlongs:
Index. Horse. Wt
1826 INQUIETA v 10."i
1756 TOM G .' no
1071 PAMPINA x>o
17.M Mother Ketcham 105
1071 Madeline B 100
1426 .Too Busher 102
17."1 BrßMt II 102
]7.~>e Green Cloth 105
17K.-. Sprifthly Miss no
KWi Moller 110
17.">» Quick 107
17."*-i Ixivlng Mose 107
1731 Jolly Tar 105
Top <>e« is Kpeedy and looks to be in a nice
spot. Tom G has sbowu good form.
THIRD RACE—Six furlongs:
Index. Horse. \y r
174.i BALRONIA 106
176y SANEL MS
1710 ORBA SMILE 100
17.;<> Crania Krnma ick{
17<">:; Miss Jean 103
1747 Cantem iQg
1777 LmccT in
1707 El Pato 100
17.13 Hob Farley iofi
17":; Tallow Dip 10s
1747 Pipe Vision 106
.... I,avender Lass 103
Balronln has the class: is good now and should
win. Next two figure ahont even.
FOURTH RACE—Seven furlongs; handicap:
Inil<'x. Horse. vr*
1668 HELEN BARBEE 118
1740 JIM BASEY
17t>« LACKROSE ...Y.'.VN
1770 Crnekrr Hox gg
1752 Joe Dlebold 107
1742 Bio Brazos 02
Helen Barbee has been freshened up. She
'■nn handle weight, and distance suits. Jim
Basey is at hie best. Laekrose is consistent.
FIFTH RACE—Six furlongs:
Influx. Hor«e. \yt
IT<;.". ELIZABETH HARWOOD 103
1718 FEATHER DUSTER ]iO3
17C6 LOVE DAY m s
lti*<7 I>addy Gip 105
17.-" Suffragiwt ]()«
17.">4 I'aU'thumpian ioj>
1772 Sterlin 105
Klizateth Harwood Iβ good and will fjnd dis
tance an<l track to her liking. Feather Dueter
appear* to be the contender.
SIXTH RACJEtMJm and a sixteenth miles:
Index. Horsp. wt
me MELTON STKEET mj
;t*s balcliff He
174S SISTER FLORENCE ". 95
ITee Peck los
IT4J Hanly ]]:•
Melton Street hm the class of this bunch end
should romp. BalclifT the contender.
BEST BETS—BALB.ONTA, HELEN BABBEE j
»
McARDLE SIGNS UP
Rot McArdlc in the flret mMnber of the Seal*
to sijtn a contract. He affixed bis signature
TPgtrrdav. and J. Cal Ewlng exppcts that the
other members of tbe «-lisb will be leendlnjr In
their contracts from now f>n. XcAxdle has been
takins the be*t of care of himself. It is the ]
first time in yearn that lt*> has gone through j
tiif winter without phivinjj (.all. H* >-ar* he Is
uy and is anxious to bu l>ack in
liaroets.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10. 1913.
Two of the speediest feather Weights in the four round game,
who will perform for the benefit of the fans at Pavilion rink
this evening in first short distance show of the new yiear.
FANS SMOKING UP OVER
POWELL-WATSON BATTLE
Lightweights Head a Slash-'
ing Card at the Pavilion
Rink This Evening
The initial four round show of the
year will be staged at Pavilion rink
tonight when Promoter Fred Hawes ot
the American club will put on his card
of ten bouts. The chief attraction Is
the meeting of Lew Powell, the local
lightweight, and "Red" "Watson, the Los
Angeles scrapper.
Powell has been out of the game for
some time, but the fans figure that he
will be able to step four rounds as fast
as ever, as they have made him an even
choice with Watson in the betting.
There was lively wagering yesterday
on the result of the mill and the paste
boards that were handed out showed
that the fans considered the men to be
evenly matched.
The local boy has been showing up
well in his work and his admirers be
lieve that he will be aDle to step the
four rounds as fast as ever. Lew Is
confident that he will be able to outbox
Watson and he is advising his friends
to have a. bet down.
If Powell boxes in his oldtime form
the fans should witness a good battle.
Both s< rappers are clean cut perform
ers who have mastered the finer points
of the game, and as.they are both ag
gressive there should be but little stall
ing during the four rounds of the
battle. Watson is ambitious and his
manager, Al Young, is desirous of send
ing him to the front.
Quite a delegation of Stockton sports
are coming down from the Slough City
to root for their favorite. Ad Zotte,
who boxes Marty Kane, the fighting
bellboy. Zotte is a fast lad, while
Kane is a slambang, dashing boxer
who is always making the pace. The
boys meet at 124 pounds and it is the
first time they have been matched.
Lem Kegg, the Montana lightweight,
will make his debut before a local fight
rrowd tonight when he will clash with
Lee Johnson, the speedy little 128
pounder. Kegg made a deep impres
sion witfl the fans by the clever man
ner iii which he handled himself in
his sparring exhibitions. with Willie
Ritchie when the latter trained for
his bout with Ad Wolgast. Johnson is
well known to the local followers.
Willie Robinson and Frank Edwards,
a pair of shifty lightweights, are
scheduled to box four roiinds. Willie
Meehan. the fighting newsboy, will op
pose Young Joe Walcott, a oolored
middle weight. The other bouts on
the card are as follows:
Freddy Couture vs. Young Abe At
tell, 128 pounders; Ed Kennedy vs.
Jack Vuccinichi, heavy weights; Young
Lanum vs. Walter Scott, 128 pounds;
Stanley Dean vs. Joe Herrick, 158
pounds?; Young Mann vs. Joe Ketchel,
133 pounds.
Harry Foley will referee the con
tests and there will be no judges.
Fair Stanford Athletes Get
Into the Game
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
STANFORD UNIVERSITY, Jan. 9.—
Stanford women are preparing for an
active season in basket ball, tennis and
crew. At a meeting of the Women's
Athletic association held today, it wa«
decided to adopt the system of student
coaching committees which has been
found successful in male athletics.
President Ruth Seeley has appointed
coaching committees composed of ex
perienced athletic women as follows:
Basket ball—Miss Isabel Rowell, Miss
Blanche Whelan and Miss L.. Hoovan.
Crew—Miss Mary Gard, Miss Margaret
Duryea, Miss Ruth Seeley. Tennis—
Miss Laura Herron, Miss Beatrice Bing
ham. Miss Helen Batcheller.
A new $200 pair shell will be pur
chased this semester for the feminine
rowing enthusiasts. A report of the
treasurer of the athletic association
shows that the women are carrying pn
their finances in a capable manner. A
balance of more than J6OO is now in the
treasury, although more than $400 was
spent last semester.
MOOHE VS, THOMAS
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
NEW YORK. Jan. i>. —Harry Thoma«, the
F.iiKlteh liKbtwiight. and Pal Moore of Phila
delphia have been matched to meet in a 10
rnuml bout at a show at tbe New York A. C. on
Saturday evening. January Jβ.
NEW ICE EECOBD
TORONTO. Jan. ft.—Royal Orattan. owned br
J. E. (irar and driven hr Net Ray. won thp
first heat of itv 2:90 pace for the Diifferin han
dicap today in 2:13*4, rfflncing the world's rec
ord for a mil' , in a race ou ice ou a two lap
track by &.$| seconds.
RIVAL HIGH SCHOOLS
CALL OFF RUGBY GAME
Porterville and Palo Alto
Bury Hatchet Because of
Lateness of Season
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
PALO ALTO, Jan. 3.—Plans for an
other game between the Rugby teams
of the Porterville and Palo Alto high
schools are off, as the athletic man
agers were unable to come to terms,
owing to the lateness of the season.
With the * football season over, the
Palo Alto students are looking forward
to the opening of spring athletics.
Captain McGilvray -will call a meeting
of the baseball players In a few days,
when practice will begin and a sched
ule of preliminary games will be ar
ranged.
Weeks, the young southpaw, will be
back in the box and all of last year's
infielders will have returned to school.
The only serious loss is the absence of
Risling, who was on the receiving end
of the battery last season. The
vacancy will be filled probably by
Stevens, who formerly played in the
shortstop position. McGilvray will
cover the initial sack and the other two
bases will be contended for by Gibson,
Herdman, Stanley and Card. Unless
some new recruit looms up. Stevens
will go behind the bat and Card will
be sent to short.
The graduation of Green and the ab
sence of Clark leaves the outer garden
open for some spirited contests.
The track team has lost a number of
its best members via the graduation
route, and Captain Perch has not an
nounced as yet if he intends to return.
Perch's stronghold is in the weights,
and his running mate in these events
is Wallace, who also figures in the
broad jump and low hurdles. Owen and
Olaine are also in the weight division.
With Lachmund and Davidson in the
quarter and Clark in the half mile,
Palo Alto is strong in the middle dis
tances. The sprints will be taken care
of by Mills, who has been on the team
for the last three years. Hight has an
injured arm at present, but will be
back in school for the mile run, as also
will Swain.
The pole vault and high jump seem
to be the only events in which Palo
Alto shows weakness, but there is
plenty of raw material upon which to
work.
Collegians and Frasers
Meet Next Sunday
The St. Ignatius baseball team will
play the Fraser Photos, late of the City
league, at St. Ignatius grounds next
Sunday, at 2:30. This game should
prove interesting, as the collegians will
use Carl Zamlock, star pitcher, of the
Union association, who has signed to
play with the Detroit team next sea
son. Joe Giannini, under contract with
the Boston Americans, will do the re
ceiving. Nearly the entire lineup of
tlie college team has had offers to play
professional ball. The photographers
will use Healon. Benham or Dolan to
pitch, while Bart Burke will do the
twirling.
Cogswell Is Strong for
Basket Ball Game
Cogswell basket bailers are going
to take an active part in the coming
Pacific association championship, and
yesterday it was announced that at
least four teams would compete in the
tournament in various weight divisions.
The 110 pound team, the 120 pound
team, the 130 pounders and the 145
pound outfit will all be in the series.
Last year Cogswell started with three
teams and managed to annex one of
the state championships with the 120
pounders, which proved to be one of
the fastest teams of the year.
•—
Many Changes Proposed
In Wrestling Rules
CHICAGO. Jan- 9-—Radical changes
are shown in the new rules governing:
■wrestling championships in the Na
tional Amatecr Athletic union issued
today. Preliminary bouts hereafter will
bo terminated by a fall and may not go
o\fr 10 minutes. Final, bouts will be
limited to 15 minutes. Under the old
rulea preliminaries and finals were hl
lowed tn go nnly six minutes. The new
mlpp put a premium on endurance and
will necessitate changes in training
methods.
WOMEN GOLFERS
BRAVE IN TEETH
OF HEAVY GALE
Mrs. Clark Checks Winning
Streak of Mrs. Ford and
Qualifies for the Final
Struggle
H. McDONALD SPENCER
With numbed fingers and lips blue
with cold, .the ladles continued their
golf matches in a blinding snow storm
at the Claremont links yesterday.
I must hand it to them, however, for
maintaining an imperturbable good
humor in face of the most adyerse
weather conditions through which &j
California tournament has ever been
played. Were the same number of
men engaged In these circumstances
the air, as well as the noses, would
have been blue, and loud would have
been the lamentations and many the
excuses for missed shots under condi
tions which, after all, were common to
all performers.
The most important match of the day
was naturally the only semifinals con
tested in the first flight, as in the lower
half Mrs. McNear secures her place as
a finalist through the double fault of
the day before.
MRS. CLARK A WINNER
Mrs. Ford, who has been playing in
consistently good form throughout the !
tournament and winning her matches
with all comers, met her Waterloo to
day in her contest with Mrs. J. R.
Clark of San Francisco in one of the
most closely contested and exciting
events of the tournament. Neither
party could obtain any decided ad
vantage at any stage of the game, two
holes being the greatest distance that
separated either sid*\
Mrs. Clark turned one up and won
the long tenth through the mistakes
of her opponent in the long game and
came to the green with plenty to
spare. The eleventh was divided in
uneventful fours, both players being
short on their tee shots and landing
nicely on their seconds.
Playing the twelfth, both ladies evi
dently felt the strain and were topping
their brassies, reaching the green in
four. Mrs. Ford not quite on, but holed
out her short approach for a win. Mrs.
Ford sliced her tee shot at the thir
teenth behind the trees, but made an
excellent recovery and divided the
honors.
LOSER PLAYS GAMELY
The fourteenth was won by Mrs.
Ford through Mrs. Clark's weakness on
the green, and the match was there
fore squared, but at the fifteenth the
former hooked into the creek twice
and had no chance thereafter.
The situation was reversed on the
sixteenth, where Mrs. Clark's ball
found the creek bed, but even at that
she had an opportunity of halving the
hole, as her opponent made a couple
of costly mistakes on the way, but
from within 10 yards of the green Mrs.
Clark took four strokes before sink
ing her putt. Again square, the sev
enteenth was divided in four, neither
player reaching the green on the drive,
but at the eighteentli Mrs. Ford failed
to clear the bunker and, falling di
rectly behind it, lost a stroke in get
ting out.
Mrs. Clark, who was short, used the
midiron with good effect and judg
ment, duplicating Mrs. McNear's per
formance of yesterday, and a nice
fourth landed her on the edge of the
green where she had two strokes to
spare; an excellent approach and a putt
laid dead made it easy to receive con
gratulations from her friends; there
fore Mrs. Clark meets Mrs. McXear to
morrow in the finals. Mrs. Ford is also
to be congratulated, however, on her
showing, as she is comparatively a
new comer to the game and had the
hardest end of the draw.
MISS STOKE IN FORM
The finals in the second flight had in
one respect a similar termination to
the McNear-Postlethwaite match of
yesterday. Miss Jane Hotaling had
Mrs. H. Law Dormy at the eighteenth,
and the latter was obliged to hole a
10 foot putt for a win; this she suc
cessfully negotiated. Going to the nine
teenth, Mrs. Law cleared the bunker
nicely, but Miss Hotaling, with a
slightly topped ball, was shy a bare
12 inches and dropped back, taking !
three strokes to get out. She played !
four more than her opponent when the j
latter addressed the ball for her sec
ond shot, but even at that Mrs. Law
barely won out.
In the defeated eighth flight Miss
Stone and Miss Dunning, two very at
tractive young ladies, who will be
heard from in championship tourna
ments in the future, met in the semi
finals. Miss Stone winning by five and
four, while Mrs. Wingate defeated MlSs
Whitney in the other half, three and
one.
The consolation event for a prize of
a set of golf clubs -and a bag donated
by Miss Reilly and Bradley was won
by Miss Postlethwaite with a score of
107 less 5, 102 net. I am sure there
could be no more popular victory, as
the winner is conceded to be one of
the most agreeable antagonists on the
links and her defeat of the day be
fore, after being dormy three is the
most disappointing situation in golf.
Mrs. Postlethwaite remarked to me aft
erward that she wanted to win the con
solation prize anyway, which shows she
is a game sport. Summary of events:
First flight, semifinals —Mrs. Clark beat Mrs.
Ford I up: MYs. MeNear won by default.
Second Sight, finals—Mr*. H. Law beat Miss
Jaue Hotallng on the niueteentb.
Defeated eight—Mrs. Wingate beat Miss Violet
Whitney ;'. ami 1: Miss Marion Stone beat Miss
Helen Dunning 5 and 4.
Consolation handicap—Mrs. R. H. Poetl*
thwaite won 107 less 5, 102. ■
lather on Way to Visit
Stricken Father
Emil Zacher, the crack outfielder of
the champion Oaks, stopped over In
this city for a few hours yesterday oi,
his way to Buffalo, where he has been
called to the bedside of his father,
who is very ill and will have to go on
the operating table. Zacher. with
Mrs. Zacher and their daughter, ar
rived in town yesterday morning and
took the first train east. Zacher was
not informed of the nature of his
fathers illness, but is losing no time
to get to his bedside.
While in the city he dropped in at
the offices of the club and attached his
signature to a contract with the Oak
land team for another season. Zachei
was playing with the fast Standard
Oil aggregation at Taft when he re
ceived the telegram which called him
east.
The big blonde made a hit in the
south, as his team has not lost a gamti
since he bfcame Sis manager at the
close of the Coast league season.
Zacher stated that he will be on hand
again when the boys break for the
tiaining camp.
PLEA OF SACRED
HEART WILL BE
UP TO OFFICIALS
Suspended Catholic College
Anxious to Return to
the Fold of the Aca
demic League
A special meeting of the San Fran
cisco sublease will be held at the
Cogswell polytechnic school next Mon
day afternoon. The meeting has been
called specially to consider the case
of the Heart college, which de
sires to regain membership in the
league after an absence of more than
a year and a half.
Sacred Heart college baseball play
ers in 1911 were haled before the Aca
demic leagne, of which the San Fran
cisco subleague is a branch body, and
charged with playing Sunday profes
sional ball, which the laws of the
league do not permit. The Academic
league ruled at the time that if high
school players desired to play Sunday
ball the league had no objections to
make, but that it could not, being an
amateur organization, permit such
players to take part in ball games
played by the various high schools.
The Sacred Heart players were found
guilty of having participated in games
with the San Mateo nine, and a signed
statement by the manager of the team
showed that two boys had been paid
for their services. The two boys were
struck off the eligible list of the Aca
demife league register and not allowed
to participate in further games that
the Sacred Heart school team was to
take part in. and the games played by
the team for the semifinal of the
league championship declared forfeited.
PLEA BY SACRED HEART
At this decision the Sacred Heart
college took umbrage and would not
participate further in any of the local
Rubleague activities. Exception was
taken to both rulings of the commit
tee on the standing of the two players
who were disqualified and also to the
ruling which forfeited the games in
the league championship.
From that date until last Wednes
day nothing further was heard from
Sacred Heart in the Pan Francisco sub
league, notwithstanding the fact that
regular notices were duly sent to that
school to attend meetings, etc. At the
end of last year the officials of the
league considered that Sacred Heart
had given over the membership and
the school was struck from the list of
members. No communication of any
sort has been received from Sacred
Heart by the league officials, since
their—presumably—voluntary with
drawal.
On Wednesday representatives of the
college attended the meeting of the
basket ball managers of the local sub
league that was held at Polytechnic
high school and 'asked that the college
be given its full rights in the sub
league.
QUICK ACTION EXPECTED
The Sacred Heart delegates con
tended that their institution had never
withdrawn or resigned from the sub
league and that it was willing to re
sume active membership. Temporarily
the school was placed on the basket
ball schedule by the high school man
agers, though their action was unof
ficial and will have to be ratified by
the board of governors of the sub
league.
The special meeting next Monday
will be attended by the full board of
governors and this body will take of
ficial action for the renewal of the
Sacred Heart membership. The col
lege is anxious to return to the sub
league fold and take part in the basket
ball tournament, which is scheduled to
begin next week. If readmitted the
school will once more take its place in
all the various activities of the league.
Hunter Puts the Crusher
On Veteran Travis
PINEHURST, N. C. Jan. 9.—"Walter
J. Travis, Garden City, was eliminated
as a championship aspirant today in
the second round of match play of the
PinehurPt tenth annual midwinter golf
tournament, Robert Hunter of Wee
burn defeated Travis. 2 up and 1 to
play. Harold Slater, Foxhills. won the
closest match of the day from T. B.
Bf-yd. Algronquin. A four to five on the
twenty-second green decided the con
test.
Most Sanitary
Baths in
The World
\lurline
BATHS
Bush and Larkin Sts.
and 2151 Geary St.
Porcelain tubs n>ith HOT
and COLD FRESH and
SALT WATER. These
baths are most beneficial
for nervousness, rheumatism
and insomnia.
OPEN EVENINGS
. Spectators Free
I I ro> is
I 1 AmO* , *
GLASGOW 2H in. BELMONT 2H in.
- MEDORA2:iin.
Arrow
JKofcft COLLARS
m Get the hack of the NOTCH*
15c. cach-2 for 25c
duett. Peabody A Co.. M*k»n
BECOME A "CALL" A6ENCY
•Dd earn a commission on Subscriptions an<!
Classified Adi. List your store with qs.
Kearny Sβ. Circulation Departmeßt
BRANCH OFFICES OF THE CALL
IN SAX FRANCISCO
Snb«M*tlpt!one end adwrtinements fo* Th* Call
will be received at the following city offices:
WESTERN ADDITION AGENCIES
[ HAM k ORWBUn
-1667 Fillmore street (open until 10 o'eleelr
every night).
TREMAYNE'S—
2200 Fillmere street
R. REGER'S—■
1318 Fillmore street.
I EATON'S BAZAAR—
298 Divisadero street, corner Par*
; ADLER'S CJOAR STAND—
1501 Divisadero street.
IJ. H. STORY —
1702 Divisadero street.
THE S.MOKKRIE—
1200 Divisadero street.
SHAPROS. INC.—
1303 Polk itreet. near Bush.
BLACK CAT STORE (STATIONERY) —
2216 Polk street.
PARENT'S STATIONERY STORR—
829 Van Ness avenue.
L. IIILL—
1415 Jackson street, near Hyde.
MRS. I. SANDERS—
Tnrk street and Van Ness avenue.
J. A. PAXTON —
Cslifornia and Divisadero streets.
RIOHTWAY BAZAAR- *
422 Presidio avenue.
W. T. CART
3813 Sacramento street.
PRESIDIO CIGAR STAND—
Presidio and Sacramento street.
S. LESSOR—
Sacramento and Walnut streets.
HAMILTON SQUARE BOOK STORE—
21C3 Geary street.
BRANSFORD—
1986 Butter street, at Tfllmore.
SOCTHWFLL—
269 ElUs street.
G. M. HI'NKEN—
1165 Ellis street
P. H. MEDLEY—
458 Height street.
MRS. S. WHITEMAN—
213 Octavia street.
MISSION AGENCIES
J. n. FIREHAMMER—
1963 Mission street, near Sixteenth street.
(OpeD UDtll 10 o'clock every night)
SULLIVAN STATIONERY CO.—
3011 Sixteenth street.
BLAKE'S BAZAAR —
1108 Valencia street.
HALLIDAYS STATIONERY STORE—
974 Valencia street.
MAAS" BRANCH—
392 Dolores street.
COSMOPOLITAN BOOK STORE—
3294 Mission street.
I DOLORES rHARMACY—
Corner Twenty-ninth and Dolores etreets.
I DAVIS BROS.—
2901 Mission street, corner Twenty-fifth.
R. E. HEINRICn—
82 Twenty-ninth street
McPHEE & SON—
1302 Eightfcnth street
MRS. C. HEIDER-
-76 Chenery street
HEWLETT'S CASH STORE
IS Jcogt avenue.
RICHMOND AGENCIES
MORRISON'S STATIONERY STORE—
285 Clement street.
SIXTH AVENTE BAZAAR—
610 Sixth avenue, Richmond.
DOCTOR BURNS—
4300 Judah street.
ADCOCKS NOTION STORE—
209 Clement street
A. STAPLER—
304 Sixth avenue, corner Clement street.
PARK AGENCIES
HAYKS' STATIONERY STORE—
1591 Haig-bt street.
P. HAOEN—
800 Stanyan street.
WAI BEL'S—
1467 Height street.
B. A. HESTER—
608 Stanyan street
PEATE'S BAZAAR—
1369 Haight street.
ADDITIONAL AGENCIES
JACOBS BROS.—
Sixteenth and Market streets.
SUNSET BAZAAR—
1292 Ninth avenue, Sunset.
J. F. HANLEY—
841 Golden Gate avenue.
MEETINGS—LODGES
A. & A. S. R. of Free Masonry. Sen
Francisco Lodge of Perfection No. J^
I—Fourth degree THIS FRIDAY. #\
January 10, 191.*. at- 8 p. tn.. Scot- mAh
Rire Temple. NE. corner Van JmVWk
N»ss ar. ami Swtter St. /LLfv
HENRY ASCROFT. Secretary. flaSS*Pi
A. E. O. SriOTS, San Fran-
Cisco Pyramid No. 1 — Rusi-
ness session THIS (FRIDAY* WMMEg
Golden Gate ay.
G. R. BROCKMANN. Pcrlb*.
CALIFORNIA Commandery No. 1. K. T.—
Stated B*semh]y THIS (F BII) A V) VH
F.VENING at 7:30 o'clock. Albert Pike (Dβ
Memorial temple. 18T»9 Geary it. T'.lua-
trious Order of Red Cross. By order
WILLIAM R. JOST, Commander.
PACIFIC Lodge No. 13«. F. * A. M., M
lir.o Fillraore st.—Officers and tnem- yy
lt»rs are notified to assemble THIS FRI-
KAV. at 10 e'ctotk a. m.. to condunt
the funeral (services orer the remains of onr
late brother. JOHN W. WORLD, a mttnber of
Pacific Lodge of Now York.
OEO. L. PARLINO. Secretary.
BALIIER U*\ge No. F. & A. M-—
Special meeting THIS rFRIDAT)mAr
EVENING, 7:30 oVlock. First degree. XX
A. LnNDQVIST. Ser. rW\
ABOU BEN ADHEM Lodce No. 112, —■->■-
I. O. v. F.. will hold joint in- JB&
of officer* with Fort
Point Lodge No. 4O« at 222 Van ''«»
Ness ay. THIS (FRIDAY) EVENING.
RAY L. SMITH. Rec. S<"-.
PRESIDIO Uvlft,. No. I. O. O.
V.. 7th ami Market—lnxlallatinn MKlyjjfe
of officers THIS (FRIDAY j *''
KVENING. "I^W"
P. >f. SHOAF. N. G.
DITIDE>'D NOTICES
ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS
THK GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY
(the German b»nk>. 526 California et.: MIS
SION BRANCH. 2572 Miwion Pt. near 22d;
RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, corner Cle
ment st. and "tt ay. : nAIGHT STREET
BRANCH, corner Haijtht and Belredere et».—
For the half year ending December 31. 1912, a
dividend has been declared at the rate of foor
(4) per cent per annum on all depoelb", free
of taxes, payable on ami after Thursday. Jan
uary 2. IMS. Dividends not called for are
added to the deposit account and earn dl»l
-dPnds from Jaruarv 1, 1913.
GEORGE TOPRNY. Manager.
BANK OF ITALY. SE. corner Montgomery and
Clay ate. (MARKET STREET BRANCH. Junc
tion Market. Turk aud Mason sts.) —For the
half year ending December 81. 1912. a dividend
has been declared at the rate of four (4> per
cent i>er annum on all savings deposits, free of
taxe*. payable on and after Jaonary 2. 1913.
Dividends not called for are added to and bear
the same rate of interest as the principal from
January I, 1913. Money deposited on or be
fore January 10 will earn interest from Janu
ary 1. L. SCATENA. President.
A prnRINI. Cashier.
ill-' HI BERN IA SAVINGS AND >.OAN 80
CIETY. corner Market. McAllister and Jone«
ets.—For the six month* ending December 81,
1312. a dividend has been declared at the rate
of three and three-fourths (3»i) per cent per
a'luuru on all deposits, free of taxes, payable
on aad after Thursday, January 2. 1913. Divi
dends not drawn will be added to depositors*
accounts, become a part thereof, and will earn
dividend from January 1, 1913. Deposits made
on or before January 10. 1913. will draw inter
est from January 1. 1013.
R. M. TOBIN. Secretary.
[ SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRAN
CISCO. 70S Market st. opposite 3d—For the
half year ending December 82. 1912. a dividend
has been declared at the rate of fonr (4) per
cent per annum, on all savings deposits, free
of taxes, payable on and after Thursday. Jan
uary 2. 1913. Deposits not called for are
added to and bear the same rate of interest a»
the principal from January 1, 1913.
OEORGE A. STORY. Cashier.
« _——T!J.
Marriage Licenses
.— »■
SAX FRANCISCO
Thr following marriage licenses were Issued
Thimdajr, Jsnoery f>. tv>n:
ALT>KN— CATANAUOH— H*fbtTt 0. Aldon. 24.
17-T Parnassus nvt-nuo. end Marguerite B. C«t
«]i3njch. 22. SS." rja.rton street.
BACCI- I.ORENZINT—R*>neto B*r*-i. 22. C 241
('lemPDt str»>Pt, and Adeline Lorenihai, IS, -6G.J
S«fr*iTiPnto strppt.
BROWKRTGG— WIES— Hrer.r J. Brownriggr. SI.
B'rni'-p and Barbers Wips. 29. r J
Berlin «tr«"Pt.
FONTANA -MAT TONE— Haffarlf Frmtenn. 2(1,
J4:;". strppt, ani Maria S[Bnton<>,
22. 33*1 C*««tnul strtpt.
K.MiiHT- SAFOBEN SfphPn R. Knijtht. 23.
Contlnoed on >*cxt Paso
11

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