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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 09, 1913, Image 12

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EVERYDAY HELPS FOR WOMEN
I SEKI'L INFORMATION
For ventilation open your windows
both at the top and bottom. The fresh
air i nines in one way. while the foul
air leaves the other way. Thrs is let
ttnc in your 'friend and expelling the
"enemy."
("lusters of cloves hung up in rooms
and allowed to dry will eradicate flies
quicker than fly paper.
To stop a leak, mix whiting and yel
loap »into a thick paste with a
little water. Apply this to the leak
and it will be stopped instantly. A
visit from the plumber will still be
accessary, but much damage may be
averted by the foregoing.
A package or envelope sealed with
the white of an egg can not be steamed
open.
To keep insects from bird cages, sus
pend a small bag of sulphur inside.
Wash silver ornaments in borax and
water.
If you varnish the soles of your
boots it will render them impervious
to damp and will make them last
longer.
To take dents out of furniture, wet
the part with warm water. Double a
pie <of brown paper six times. Soak
it and lay it on the pla.ee. Apply on
that a. hot flatiron until the moisture Is
evaporated. If the dent has not disap
peared, repeat the process until the
surface is level.
To make a half ton of coal go as far
as 1,500 pounds, place a quantity of
chalk in the grate. Once heated, this
is practically immune from combus
tion and pives out great heat. Place
The chalk at the back of your fire in
nearly equal proportion with the coal.
Full satisfaction will be felt both as
to the cheerfulness and as to the
warmth of the tire and will prove a
• savins: throughout the winter.
MRS. MARIE WRIGHT.
JOTs Pacific avenue, City.
FAVORITE RECIPES OF CALIFORNIA HOUSEWIVES
LENTEN DISHES
SCRAMBLED EOGS WX*TH TOMATOES
lake two tomatoes, peel and cut irr.squares and fry in hot olive
oil. Canned tomatoes may be u/ed if fresh ones are not to be had.
When cooked, drain off the liquid and take four eggs, well beaten,
add two spoonsful sweet cream and scramble. Mix the tomatoes with
the eggs, season with paprika and salt to taste.
QUAKER OMELETTE
Take two ounces of codfish for four persons and break into small
hits or shred it. Boil in double boiler with half a cup cream. Scramble,
four egg.-, in the usual way, cut toast into small triangles, pour over
the buttered toast, and over this the creamed codfish.
EGGS A LA CORTLANDT
Chop halt" an onion very fine and brown lightly in a heaping spoon
of sweet butter. Add six chopped chicken livers and fry this mixture
10 minute-. Drain off the butter and add two tablespoons brown
sauce. Let it come to .a boil and season with paprika and salt. If
the mixture is thin, add a small quantity of cornstarch to thicken. Serve
over two poached eggs. If the flavor is liked, four or five ripe olives,
chopped fine, may be added just before the livers are poured over
the toast and egg*- The toast should be cut round and all the crusty
edges cut off.
OYSTERS A LA MIGNON
Take 12 line oysters on deep half %hell, chop one-fourth pound of
fresh mushrooms very fine and sprinkle over the oysters; dot with
bit- of butter, season with salt and bake in hot oven 10 minutes.
FISH FRIES
Take any kind of small fish and skin, wash and dry. Salt'and
pepper both sides, dip in milk, and then in flour. Fry in butter, allow
ing butter the size ot an egg for every three or four fish..depending
on their size. They should not be fried dry. Fry 10 minutes, by
which time they should.be a golden brown. Put on a hot platter. To
butter that is left in the pan add more butter, using the same propor
tions. Melt and pour over the fish and, while hot, squeeze over them
lemon juice, using one lemon to every four fish. Sprinkle with finely
chopped parsley.
CHEESE BALLS OR CROQUETTES
.Mix one and a half cups grated cheese, one teaspoon flour, quarter
teaspoon salt, a few grains of cayenne pepper and the whites of three
eggs, beaten stiff. Shape in small balls or croquettes, roll in cracker
dust, fry in deep fat and drain on brown paper. Xew lard'is neces
sary, and they must hot stand after cooking. Serve immediately.
MRS. FLORENCE WEST.
131 Wool street, city.
BUNS, BREAD, BISCUITS J
+ »
HIM I ITS THAT ARE TEMPTING
I M)i- quart flour sifted with two tea
spoons baking powder, one and a half
cups milk, one teaspoon salt; mix very
lightly with spoon. Have biscuit pan
on stove with two tablespoons lard or
oil, warming. Cut biscuits, turn on
both sides in warm lard and bake
quickly. Here is the secret in biscuits:
Little handling and a hot oven.
MRS. R. J. GAMBLE.
822 Pacific avenue, Alameda.
."BROWMKS" »
' »ne cup sugar, one-half cup butter,
two eggs (beaten slightly), two squares
chocolate (melted), one-half cup flour,
one-half cup walnuts (broken), and one
teaspoon vanilla. Pour into pan ;ind
spread thin. Bake 15 or 20 minutes in
moderate oven. When perfectly baked
iliey .should be spongey inside. De
licious with tea.
GRACE HALE LANGE.
Kimona avenue. Piedmont.
GINGERBREAD
One-half cup butter, one-half cup
sugar, one-half cup molasses, one-half
cup sour milk, one and a half cups
flour, two eggs, one teaspoon soda, one
full teaspoon ginger, one full teaspoon
.innamon. Cream butter and sugar;
add spices, molasses and sour milk
with soda dissolved in it. Lastly add
beaten eggs and flour. Bake in slow
oven. GRACE HALE LAXOE.
-<b"' Ramon* avenue, Piedmont.
D(»I(iHMTS
Two tablespoons melted butter, one
eg;g, or) f ru P sweet milk, one and a
quarter cups sugar, two cups flour, two
teaspoons baking powder, one-quarter
teaspoon nutmeg:. Beat egg and butter
together, add milk, flour, sugar and
baking powder sifted together. Beat
well. MRS. GEORGE WINTER.
:'.fi Fifth street, Petaluma.
BITTEHMILK MIFKI\S
I'se one pint rich buttermilk and mix
in sufficient flour to make the batter
stiff. Add one egg (beaten In), a little
salt and a half teaspoon soda dissolved
in a little hot water. Bake in a quick
oven. A. C. JOCHMUS.
Pacific Grove, Cal.
COOKIES ~T*
-♦ -♦
FILLED COOKIES
One cup sugar, one-half cup shorten
ing, one egg, one-half cup milk, two
and a half cups flour, two teaspoons
baking powder, one teaspoon vanilla.
Roll thin, put filling in, then an upper
layer of dough.
Filling—One cup chopped raisins,
one-half cup sugar, one-half cup water,
one teaspoon flour. Cook until thick.
Bake carefully. You will find these
delicto MRS. S. F. CARLILE.
4-5 East Wyandotte St., Stockton.^
SUCCESSFUL HOUSEHOLD HINTS
Before using new enameled cooking
utensils grease inside with butter.
This prevents cracking and chipping.
To clean zinc, use a piece of soft *
flannel moistened with kerosene. When
the spots are of long standing use a
little powdered bath brick in addition
to the kerosene.
For cleaning water bottles, decan
ters and glass jugs, cut a lemon into
small pieces, put into bottle with a
little water and shake. Cut potatoes
are also good.
To restore curdling mayonnaise,
place a tablespoon melted butter
(which must be cold) in a round bot
tom basin and gradually work in may
onnaise. This is for a small amount
of mayonnaise.
The best thing for fish bone in the
throat is raw egg swallowed immedi
ately.
Celery can be kept two weeks by
first rolling it in brown paper, then in
a towel, and keeping in cool place. Be
fore preparing for the table, place in a
pan of cold water for an hour.
MRS. V. M. VAN HOOK.
223 M Main street. Salinas, Cal.
COMBINATION PIN CUSHION
The most charming combination
handkerchief box and pin cushion can
be made out of an ordinary cigar box.
Place on the lid a small bag of bran
and cover it and the sides of the box
with pink muslin, over which the white
dotted Swiss makes a pleasing effect.
Add a little ruffle edged with lace
around the border of the box and a
strip of lace diagonally across the lid:
also a small pink bow in each corner.
This is very inexpensive to make and
besides being useful Is decidedly orna
mental. MRS. MARIE WRIGHT.
1378 Pacific avenue. City.
SOUPS I
♦ ; *■
TURNIP SOUP
Slice 12 large turnips, 4 onions and 4
ounces of raw ham, put into a kettle
with one tablespoon butter and a quart
of stock. Simmer until done, then run
through a sieve. Reheat and add one
pint sweet cream, one teaspoon sugar
and serve. A. C. JOCHMUS.
Pacific Grove.
GIBLET SOI P (Original)
Cut the livers, wings, gizzards and
hearts of chickens in half inch squares,
roll in flour and fry them in one table
spoon butter with one onion chopped
fine. When brown cover with two
quarts water, add a little salt, one car
rot, one small turnip, two tomatoes, a
few peppercorns and a small piece ot
bay leaf. Let all boil for one and one
half hours, then add a bouquet of two
green onions, two nieces celery, two
pieces leek and a few sprigs of parsley.
If the latter articles are put in too
soon it will lose its delicate flavor.
When meat is done put aside, strain
the soup and thicken a little with
brown flour. Add one tablespoon
mushroom catsup, salt and pepper to
taste; add the pieces of meat, reheat
and serve with toasted bread cut In
squares or strips. One-half cup sherry
wine added last is an improvement. By
cutting off the necks of the chickens
rather close to the body, scalding the
legs and feet (taking off the skin and
the nails) and boiling necks and legs
with the gizzards, you will have a good
plate of soup.
MRS. MARTE WRIGHT.
137S Pacific avenue, City.
SALADS f
4 ».
SALAD AU PRUNE
Soak prunes over night and cook un
til tender. Drain the juice from them
and cut the fruit into shreds. Arrange
on a lettuce leaf, sprinkle with pecan
meats and cover with cream dressing.
A. C. JOCHMUS.
Pacific Grove.
SIMPLE SALAD DRESSING
Two tablespoons sugar, one teaspoon
salt, one heaping teaspoon mustard,
two tablespoons butter, four table- 4
spoons sweet cream or silk, three-quar
ter cup vinegar and one well beaten
egg. Heat all the ingredients until
the eggs are well cooked. This is espe
cially nice for lettuce and cabbage.
MRS. S. T. CARLILE.
425 E. Wyandotte St., Stockton, Cal.
COLD SALAD DRESSING
Put yolks of two eggs in a bowl; one
teaspoon mustard that has been mixed
with vinegar—just enough to make
smooth—salt to taste, a bit of cayenne
pepper; stir in oil, drop by drop, until
mixture can almost be lifted from the
bowl. Beat whites of two eggs very
stiff and stir into dressing just before
serving. GRACE HALE LANGE.
205 Ramona avenue, Piedmont, Cal.
Monthly Prizes for Household Ideas
The Call wants every housekeeper to send her most useful and practical house
hold helps and suggestions to this department.
Contributors should aim to be original, helpful and timely in their suggestior
and should write on ONE SIDE of the paper only.
One prize\>f $5, one prize of $3 and one prize of $2 will be awarded each month.
Address The Housekeeper Pase. The Call, San Francisco, Cal.
SUGGESTIONS
To keep aluminum bright and free
from rust, rub with a cloth saturated
with olive oil after washing it well.
Cut flowers may be kept fresh a long
time fiy burning stems with a piece of
wood. Do not use matches, as the sul
phur is injurious to flowers. . The
charring process allows the water to
penetrate the stem and sustain the life
of the flower. Chrysanthemums may be
kept in good condition for a month or
more if treated in this manner. This
hint is worth remembering when
flowers are scarce and high in price.
Another way is to dip the stems in hot
parafllne.
To Keep- Candles I pHjfht—As every
one knows, warm weather plays havoc
with candles, causing them to take on
a decided droop when used on tit* din
ner table or about the room. This can
be obviated by Placing the candles in
the ice box for several hours before
they are to be used, where they harden
sufficiently to remain upright through
out the evening.
MRS. FLORENCE WEST.
- VEGETABLES
♦ ■♦
POTATO PUFFS
Take quarter pound butter, one cup
water, one cup milk, four eggs, one
cup flour and one cup mashed potatoes
(strained through a sieve). Heat the
butter, milk and water. "When boiling,
remove from the Are and add the flour,
then the potatoes, mixing with, a
wooden spoon. Add the eggs (one by
one), last a pinch of salt, a pinch of,
sugar and a little grated nutmes.
Make into small balls about the size
of a half dollar in diameter. Place on
areajed papers, then fry In hot lard.
They will puff up considerably. Very
nice to serve with fried chicken, tur
key and the like, or used as a gar
nish with baked meats.
MRS. FIX3RENCE WEST.
131 Wool street. City.
EGG PLANT WITH RICE AND HAM
(Creole)
Fry in lard an onion and some
chopped raw ham. When almost done,
add one cup rice, an egg plant (sliced
thin), and let fry. Pour water enough
to cover, adding more if necessary, and
stir often until cooked. Season with
pepper, very little salt, two bay leaves
and thyme." MRS. FLORENCE WEST.
131 Wool street, City.
STUFFED TOMATOES
Select tomatoes of a size (about
eight) and drop in boiling water just
for a second. Then remove skin, scoop
out inside, which can be saved for put
ting in soup. Take a 10 cent can of
deviled ham. mince fine with mayon
naise dressing and three hard boiled
egg, add a little parsley and celery
which has been chopped fine, juice of
onion and a little Worcestershire
sauce. Mix all well and place back in
tomatoes and berve on lettuce leaves.
Put a teaspoon of mayonnaise dressing
on top of each, then cover lightly with
grated hard boUed egg.
MRS. A. H. KULL
1346 Henry street, North Berkeley.
CANDY |
4 , — -*
WALNUT CREAMS
One egg white, a little water, one
pound powdered sugar, a little vanilla
and walnuts. Mix sugar in with egg
white, water and vanilla, and beat un
til thick enough to shape. Press on
each side walnuts and leave for a day.
Will make about two dozen. Any flavor
can be used. MRS. R. J. GAMBLE.
822 Pacific avenue, Alameda.
NUT CARAMELS
Melt one cup white sugar, add one
cup milk and let dissolve. Add half
cup white sugar and half cup brown
sugar. Boil 20 minutes and take from
fire and stir till nearly cold; then add
two cups coarsely chopped nuts.
MRS. S. F. CARLILE.
425 E. Wyandotte St., Stockton, Cal.
PINOCHE
Four cups light brown sugar, two
cups white sugar., half cup milk or
water. Boil till forms a soft ball in
cold water. Take from stove and beat
till it starts to thicken. Add nuts and
dates and pour on buttered plates.
MRS. GEORGE WINTER.
30 Fifth street, Petaluma.
PUDDINGS ||
.» «.
ALMOND PUDDING
Take three pounds sweet almonds,
blanch and chop fine; pound with table
spoon rosewater. Beat six eggs to
a froth and mix four tablespoons pow
dered sugar. Stir in one quart sweet
milk, add three tablespoons powdered
crackers and four tablespoons melted
butter and four ounces shredded citron;
add the almonds last. Line a dish with
a puff paste, put a rim of crust around
edge, pour In mixture and bake 30
minutes. Serve cold.
MISS F. MOSS.
1753 Eighth avenue, Oakland.
GOLDEN WEST PUDDlNG—(Original)
Half pound flour, half pound bread
crumbs, half pound suet, quarter pound
brown sugar, four tablespoons Califor
nia orange marmalade, two eggs, pinch
of salt, a few chopped nuts, one and a
half teaspoons baking powder, milk to
make.a firm batter. Steam from two
and a half to three hours. Serve with
lemon juice. MRS. MARIE WRIGHT.
1378 Pacific avenue, City.
CREOLE ICED PUDDING
Grate one pound pineapple into a
basin. Add this to the yolks of eight
eggs, one and»a half pints boiled cream,
one pound sugar and a very little salt.
Stir together in a stewpan over a fire
until the custard begins to thicken.
Then pass It through a tammy by
rubbing with two wooden spoons to
force the pineapple through the
tammy. This custard must now be
iced in the usual manner and put into a
mold. In the center of the ice cream
put glazed red fruits, consisting of
cherries, currants, strawberries and
raspberries. When about to send the
pudding to the table turn it out of the
mold onto its dish. Embellish with
glazed fruit. MRS. H. LIPMAN.
1733 Post street, City.
PAGE WILL PROVE SLCCESS
Dear Editor—l have missed
the housewives' page in The
Sunday Call of late and am glad
to see it has commenced again.
You can rest assured that T
will do my hest to help make it
interesting. Yours sincerely.
MRS. MARIE WRIGHT.
1378 Pacific avenue, city.
A KITCHEN LIBRARY
Take 24 cigar boxes, 6 by 8 inches in
size. These, with the leaves of a dis
carded oak table compose a wall
cupboard that somewhat resembles a
country postoffice. There are three,
rows of boxes, underneath which is a
space for account books, bill file. Call
cooking recipes, etc. Paint the library
to match the woodwork. It will be
found very useful.
MRS. MARIE WRIGHT.
1378 Pacific avenue, City.
Monthly Prizes for Cooking Recipes
A first prize of $5, second prize of $3 and a third prize of $2 will be given each
month for the best cooking recipes sent to this department and published on this
page.
Contributors will please write on one side of the paper only and sign name and
address at bottom of each separate recipe.
Address The Housekeeper, The Call, San Francisco, Cal.
CAKES—AND MORE CAKES
APPLE CAKE
One egg (beaten well), one cup
sugar, half cup milk, melted butter
size of egg, two cups flour sifted with
teaspoon baking powder, salt, teaspoon
vanilla. Mix as for cake dough, add
ing butter last. Put in bread pan and
smooth out about one and a half
inches thick. Add on top sliced apples,
sugar, cinnamon and a few currants.
MRS. R. J. GAMBLE.
522 Pacific avenue, Alameda.
A GOOD RAISIN CAKE
Cover one and a half cups seeded
raisins with boiling water and let sim
mer -0 minutes. Cream three-quarters
cup sugar with one-quarter cup but
ter, add one and a half cups flour, one
half cup raisin water and one egg
(beaten light). One teaspoon soda
should be sifted with the flour. Season
with one teaspoon each nutmeg, cin
namon, allspice and cloves. Add one
cup nuts and the raisins, well dredged
with flour. Bake 30 minutes. Raisins
should be seeded before boiling.
MRS. S. T. CARLILE.
425 East Wyandotte St., Stockton.
RUSILLAXAKE
One-half cup butter, one cup brown
sugar, two cups flour, one cup milk,
one cup chopped raisins, one-quarter
cup nuts, one teaspoon soda dissolved
In one tablespoon warm water, one tea
spoon ground cinnamon, one teaspoon
ground cloves, one-half nutmeg, one
teaspoon baking powder put in flour.
Bake in gem pans.
GRACE HALE LANGE.
205 Ramona ay.. Piedmont, Cal.
WALNUT CAKE
Two cups white sugar creamed with
a generous half cup butter, three well
beaten eggs, two-thirds cup milk, three
cups sifted flour, one and a half tea
spoons baking powder sifted through
the flour, one tablespoon mace and one
cup walnut meats (cut fine). Fill the
pan with a layer of cake, then a layer
of raisins and strew a handful of wal
nut meat. Continue until the pan is
two-thirds full and bake In a steady
oven, but not too hot, for 45 minutes.
MRIS, AGNES GRAY.
511 Prescott st., New Monterey, Cal.
ALLIGATOR PEAR SHORTCAKE
(Original)
Beat to a white cream one cup sugar,
one tablespoon thick cream and one
tablespoon butter. Add the yolks of
two eggs and the white of one egg and
beat well for five minutes. Add a pinch
of salt and one-half teaspoon almond
extract. Sift four times one and a half
cups flour, one teaspoon cornstarch and
two level teaspoons baking powder.
Stir this into eggs with enough milk
and water (half and half) to make a
layer cake batter and pour into two
layer cake tins. Bake in medium oven.
Filling-—Remove the seeds from two
alligator pears. Scrape all into-a dish
from skin and mash. Add a scant cup
thick sweet cream and the white of
one egg; beat until stiff, then add a
pinch of salt, one teaspoon good rum
and sugar enough to suit taste; beat
well again. Pile this quite thick be
tween cake layers and on top while
cake is hot. Very delicious.
MRS. FRED WHITNEY.
2048 Polk street. City.
VARIOUS WAYS OF PREPARING MEATS
ROAST WILD DUCK
Parboil each duck with an onion to
remove the fishy flavor. Use carrot un
less there is to be an onion in the
dressing. Stuff with desired dressing
and roast until tender. Baste with
melted butter at first and then with
the gravy in the pan. Weaken the pan
gravy with boiling water, thicken with
browned flour and stir in one table
spoon currant jelly. Serve separately.
MISS F. MOSS.
1753 Eighth avenue, Oakland.
MIRONTON OF BEEF
Mince some cold beef (about one
pound). Season with half teaspoon salt
and half teaspoon pepper and mix with
two hard boiled eggs, chopped fine. Wet
it with gravy or broth and cover with
cold, seasoned mashed potatoes which
have been mixed to a soft paste with
milk and butter. Place in greased
J baking dish, cover with bread crumbs.
Bake (covered) one-half hour, then
brown after removing the cover.
A. C. JOCHMUS.-
Pacific Grove, Cal. . j
MAKI>G USE OF HUBBY'S OLD
APPAREL
When the collar, bosom and wrist
bands to my husband's shirts were
worn to a frazzle the body and sleeves
were still so good it seemed a waste
to throw them away. So*t made myself
a good, large work apron, using the
back of the shirt for the apron proper.
The sleeves and lower part of the
shirt front were ample for ruffle and
band. BELLE S. PEARSONS.
1539 Spruce street. Berkeley.
-*
HOUSEHOLD HELPS
People living in small apartments or
rooms may find the following helpful:
Have a suitcase fitted up as a medicine
chest, covered with denim, containing
denim pockets in which to keep medi
cine,, bottles. Have a place for hot
water l.ottles and a reference book, a
portfolio of generous size, each labeled
to hold pictures, recipes, clippings, etc.
MRS. AGNES GRAY.
511 Prescott st., New Monterey, Cal.
DROP CHOCOLATE CAKE
One-half cup butter, one cup sugar,
one-half cup water, one and a half
cups sifted flour, one small teaspoon
baking powder, two eggs, one teaspoon
vanilla, four tablespoons grated choc
olate. Beat butter and sugar together,
then the yolks of eggs, then the water,
chocolate, flour and whites of eggs well
beaten.
Front I bk —One cup sugar, scant half
cup milk, butter size of a Walnut and a
little vanilla. Let boil rapidly about
five minutes, pour into a deep dish and
beat until cool enough to spread. Add
vanilla when beating.
MRS. M. S. BROWN.
Care Mrs. McCallum, Mendocino, Cal.
POTATO CAKE
Take three cups sugar, two-thirds
cup butter and cream together; four
eggs (beaten), one and a half cups
chopped nuts, one-half cup grated choc
olate, one-half cup milk, two cups flowr,
one teaspoon vanilla, small pinch salt,
two level teaspoons baking powder,
one-half teaspoon each of ground cin
namon, nutmeg and cloves; two cups
warm mashed potatoes. Add eggs after
sugar and butter are creamed, then the,
rest of the ingredients, but add the
masked potatoes last, beating all well
together. Save out half cup of nuts
and sprinkle on top of cake. Bake in
a moderate oven. This makes a fine
cake and I think every one will like It.
MRS. D. CALL.
Clovis, Cal.
"PRUNE SHAPE"— (Orlginnl)
Take one pint prunes, boil till soft,
take out stones and' put into a butter
moid with a few almonds around. Then
take the juice the prunes were cooked
in and put a half box gelatin in one
half pint of water. Boil and pour over
prunes. When cold, turn out. Make a
boiled custard by. taking a pint of milk
and two eggs, one tablespoon sugar, a
little almond flavoring; cook till coming
to a boil in a pitcher set in boiling
water over the fire and pour over all.
MRS. MILTON.
528% J street, Sacramento.
DELICATE SPONGE CAKE
One cup sugar, tablespoons
water, pinch of salt, three eggs, one
half teaspoon vanilla, one cup flour.
Cook sugar and water until it just
threads. Turn this hot syrup slowly
Into the whites of the eggs, which have
been beaten very light. Beat while
turning in the syrup and continue beat
ing for 15 minutes. Then add salt,
vanilla and beaten yolks. Beat "to
gether thoroughly, then gently cut and
fold in the flour, which has been sifted
three times. Make on a large platter
with wire egg beater. Bake in a loaf
In a moderate oven about 40 minutes.
No baking powder required.
MISS GLADYS L. MacCALL.
720 Paru street, Alameda.
BREAD SPONGE CAKE
One cup bread sponge, one cup
raisins and boil in water to cover for
10 minutes. One-half cup butter, one
cup sugar, one beaten egg, one tea
spoon cinnamon, one cup flour with one
teaspoon soda* sifted in it. Mix
smooth and add the bread sponge at the
last. Bake in 15 inch pan in moderate
oven. MRS. E. F. HAWLEY.
Hotel Douglas, San Jose.
SPANISH ROAST
Take six medium sized red peppers,
one good sized onion, three tablespoons
vinegar, one-half teaspoon salt. 801 l
the peppers In water until you can
crape the pulp from the skin. Chop
the onion very fine, mix onion, pepper,
vinegar and salt together. Take a
three rib roast, unroll it and spread
with above mixture, roll again, let
stand all night and roast the next day,
basting very often. This is delicious
for those who like Spanish cooking.
The gravy is delicious.
MRS. JOHN A. LITTLE.
Pacific Grove, Cal.
BAKING POWDER DRESSING
When making a dressing to stuff
chicken or other meats, add a pinch of
baking powder and the dressing never
will be heavy. > A. C. JOCHMUS.
Pacific Grove, Cal.
SWEETBREAD FRITTERS
Parboil one pair of sweetbreads.
throw into cold water for 10 minutes,
.remove all pipes and skin, cut into
I small dice; also cut into dice eight
TO REMOVE STAINS
Fruit stains should be treated at
once. Rub the stain with soft or good
yellow soap, well moistened and then
cover It with s paste of salt and water.
Tf grease stains, rub with pure alcohol
and they will disappear, but this should
be done at once.
To remove claret stains, soak the
cloth at once in skimmed milk and
in cold water.
I •'White stains on polished wood
caused by liquids or by hot dishes may
be removed by applying a feather
i dipped in spirits of camphor. This
should be used very sparingly and the
wood rubbed well with a cloth dipped
in sweet oil. repeating the process
If necessary. When the stain is re
moved, polish,well with beeswax and
turpentine or" any good furniture
polish.
To clean ivory, rub stains with lemon
juice, then with whiting made into a
sofVpaste with lemon juice. Allow this
to dry and rub off with a soft cloth.
For calla Illy stains, take a quarter
bar of laundry soap to one gallon of
water, heat until soap dissolves, pour
in one teaspoon kerosene, soak gar
ment over night in cold water, wring
out, put in sudsvfor a half hour and the
stain will disappear.
MRS. FLORENCE WEST.
131 Wool street, City.
AN ECONOMICAL, EGG HINT
Eggs are very expensive in winter
and the economical housekeeper finds
it an advantage to buy cracked eggs
when boiled eggs are wanted for
salads, garnishing, etc. A difficulty is
encountered when attempting to boil
those that were cracked. I find if salt
be liberally added to the water in which
they are cooked they will not crack
more, nor will the cooked egg exude
from the shell. MRS. W. E. ALLEN.
Box 516, Santa Rosa, Cal.
V
mushrooms. Put one cup cream over
the fire and when warm stir in one
teaspoon arrowroot mixed with a little
milk. Add one tablespoon butter, a
pinch of paprika, a little black pepper,
mace and salt to taste. Now put in the
mushrooms, sweetbreads and a well
beaten egg. Remove from the fire and
set away to cool. Make Into small
round balls, dip into rich barter and
fry in deep hot fat.
MRS. N. E. MARCILL.
820 Fourth street, Santa Rosa. Cal.
DELICIOUS MEAT BALLS
Have butcher grind 25 cents worth
round steak and 15 cents worth of
pork through meat grinder. This will
make about two dozen balls, according
to size. Add bread crumbs soaked in
half cup milk, two good sized onions
chopped fine, one egg beaten, salt and
pepper to suit and one tablespoon
chopped parsley. Mix well together
and shape into balls. Fry In oil or lard
until well browned. Put aside In pan
to keep warm until all are browned,
then add in pan one tablespoon flour
and mix nice and smooth. Lastly
add one tablespoon vinegar. Then put
balls into gravy again and cook about
20 minutes. Enough for family of four.
MRS. R. J. GAMBLE.
822 Pacific avenue, Alameda.
AN ENTREE
Soak four calves' sweetbreads in
water for two hours, then parboil ,in
salted water for half an hour. Then
rub off skins with a clean towel, cut in
halves and fry in, olive oil until tender.
Have some toast nicely browned and
shaped nearly the same as the sweet
breads and arrange on a dish for the
oven. Have asparagus tips cooked and
make a cream sauce nicely seasoned;
mix both together and pour over the
sweetbreads, sprinkle grated cheese
and white bread crumbs over all
Place a little piece of good butter on
each sweetbread. Then put In the-oven
and bake until a nice brown color.
MRS. M. FARRELL.
4403 Linden street, Oakland.
"TOAD IN THE HOLE" (Original)
Take one cup sifted flour, one pint
milk and one-fourth pint water mixed
well. Take two eggs, beat well, put In
batter a little salt and pepper. Grease
a baking pan. put in the batter, the pan
to be half full. Take any cold meat,
sliced or hamburger steak, and put in
the batter. Bake 30 minutes in a hot
oven. When raised good it is ready to
serve at once. MRS. MILTON.
Hotel Ray, Sacramento.
MEAT ROLLS
(This recipe will make enough for
fonr persons)
Take 25 cents worth of round steak
and put it through meat grinder. Take
two slices of bacon cut in pieces, a me
dium sized onion, half a green pepper,
and put in a frying pan with a little
butter. Brown slightly, add meat,
three tablespoons tomatoes and let
steam two hours, turning often. Sea
son with salt, pepper and paprika-
Make rich pie crust, fill with meat and
make individual rolls. Bake till brown
and serve with tomato sauce.
MRS. GEORGE WINTER.
30 Fifth street, Petaluma.
CHICKEN CUSTARD
Cut a young fowl into quarters, take
the lungs away from the backbone,
wash the fowl and place it In a stewpan
with a little parsley, half a head celery
and turnip. Fill the stewpan with
three pints cold water, place it on the
fire and as soon as it boils skim it
thoroughly; put in pepper and salt ac
cording to taste. Let boil for one
hour and a half, after which strain the
broth into a basin through a napkin
and use it in the following manner:
Acording to the number of custard
cups required to be filled place so many
yolks of eggs in a basin. To these add
the same number of custard cups of
prepared chicken broth. With a fork
beat these together in order to mix
thoroughly; then pass through the
tammy, fill the custard cups, put
the cups in a pan of water in the oven.
Steam them in the usual manner. This
is a very healthy custard.
MRS. H. LIPMAN.
1733 Post street, San Francisco.
BLANQUET OF VEAL (Creole)
Remove the bone from a brisket of
veal, chop into small pieces and fry.
Brown a chopped onion and a little
flour in a saucepan and add the fried
veal with a little water, some green
onions, parsley, thyme, cloves and gar
lic. Add half a cup green peas, and
when all is thoroughly cooked add the
yolks of two eggs beaten in water.
MRS. FLORENCE WEST.
131 Wool street. City.
The San Francisco Sunday Call
HOUSE GOWNS
There are many women who do all
their housework and like to keep
dainty around the house who do not
belong to that fortunate class of beings
who can wash dishes, peel potatoes,
water the garden and remain like a
resident of "Splotless Town."
Soiling many house dresses or all
over aprons means an Increase in laun
dry bills, whether paid for in cash or
personal labor. 1 think that I have
solved the problem of a maximum of
daintiness with a minimum of work.
First choose material for your
dresses that requires little starch and
ironing, such as crashes, sateens, etc..
Crinkled seersucker serves me for
morning and crepe for afternoon.
Change as often as you please—you can
launder two dresses In a half hour-
Fill tub with warm soapsuds an*
souse the dresses up and dowrt, squeea
ing the water through them. Rubbing
on a washboard is not necessary unless
the dresses are very soiled. Do not rub
soap directly on them, but rinse
through two clear waters nnd. if de
sired, through thin starch. The latter
keeps the gowns clean longer, but is
not an absolute necessity. Wring
lightly, but not through a wringer.
Then (and this is the point) hang the
gowns on wooden coat hangers, button
or hook them together and pull into
shape. The bottom hems may need
pressing, but as a rule you will find
them, when dry. clean and ready to
wear and looking like new dresses.
This Is the time of year to make
summer house gowns. Take my advice
and do it now. MRS. F. FISCHER.
711 Franklin street, City.
Dear Editor: I thank you most
heartily for the l«eautiful sterling
butter knife which was awarded me.
It was well worth trying for. Sin
cerely yours, MRS. P. G. BLOOM.
' Petaluma.
| FISH and SHELL FISH |
-» .—; ■♦
SALMON LOAF
One can salmon, one cup bread
crumbs, one egg, pepper and salt. Re
move skin and bones of salmon, mix
with buttered bread crumbs, the white
of a beaten egg, season and form into
a loaf. Beat the yolk and put on the
outside of the loaf, dust with crumbs
and bake until done In a moderate
oven. Serve cold with mayonnaise, or
hot, with Hollandaise sauce.
MRS. FLORENCE WEST.
131 Wool street, City.
BATTER FOR FISH
Fry fish always in oil, as It is crisp
and browns better. Take two bea + en
eggs, add a little water to mixture and
half cup flour. Put slices of fish in the
batter and fry in oil. Salt when done,
add chopped parsley and slices of
lemon. MRS. R. J. GAMBLE.
822 Pacific avenue, Alameda.
STUFFED RAKED FISH
One four pound fish, one cup bread
crumbs, two tablespoons butter, one
speck pepper, one-fourth cup of hot
milk or water, two teaspoons salt, one
tablespoon chopped parsley, one salt
spoon thyme, one egg. Prepare the
fish and wipe dry. Mix crumbs, season
ing, butter and hot milk and beat an
egg and mix it in. Fill fish with this
force meat and sew it up by running a
trussing needle with double white
string through the head, middle of body
and tail. Draw flsli into the shape of
letter "S" and tie firmly. Place fish in
greased pan; brush over with melted
butter, dredge with crumbs and bake in
a moderate oven about 45 minutes or
until when pierced with a fork no juice
runs out. Place on hot platter, draw
out strings and garnish with parsley
and slices of lemon. Serve with egg,
anchovy or parsley sauce.
MRS. I. P. BEBAN.
225 Jersey street, City.
CLAMS ON TOAST
Wash clams and put in a kettle with
just enough water to keep from burn
ing. Heat until shells open. Remove
clams and save liquor. Heat clams in
part of liquor, season with salt, pepper
and butter. If strong, put in half
cream or milk. Toast bread carefully;
moisten in remainder of liquor heated
and seasoned for the purpose. Butter
liberally and pour the clams over this.
Before the milk is added it is neces
sary to boil them gently 30 to 45 min
utes. MRS. F. MOSS.
1753 Eighth avenue, Oakland, Cal.
SARDINE RAREBIT
(Original)
Toast in oven six slices of bread.
Drain the oil from two cans of sardines
into a cup and add to the oil a small
piece of grated garlic, the juice of half
a lemon, half a teaspoon tabasco and a
pinch black pepper. Put this in a fry
pan with half cup butter and let melt
very slowly. Chop fine the sardines,
two hard boiled eggs, a dozen olives
and one whole pimento and one table
spoon very finely cut parsley. Dip each
slice of toast into the warm oil and
lay in baking pan. Then put the sar
dine mixture in the remaining oil,
adding a little soup stock or milk.
Stir and cook a few minutes. Cover
each slice of toast thickly with this and
set in medium hot oven about five min
utes. Serve hot.
MRS. FRED WHITNEY.
2048 Polk street. City.
DEVILED OYSTERS ,
One heaping saltspoon dry mustard,
one-half saltspoon each pepper and
salt and the yolk of one egg. Mix to
a smooth paste and coat six large
oysters with it. Roll them in fine
crumbs and boil over a clear fire. Ar
range and serve. A. C. JOCHMUS.
Pacific Grove, Cal.
RELISHES ]
4 _ ___^
YORKSHIRE PUDDING
(To Eat With Meats)
Take three tablespoons flour and mix
with water; beat up well with one pint
milk and one egg. Grease a baking
tin, quart size, and put in mixture.
Bake in a hot oven for 30 minutes till
it raises good and serve with roast
beef or fine gravy. Can be eaten with
cooked fruits by putting in a very lit
tle sugar. MRS. MILTON,
Hotel Ray, Sacramento. CaL
CHUTNEY (By Reoueat>
Slice 10 pounds green tomatoes, lav
them over night in a deep pan and
sprinkle over with one cup salt. Next
morning pour off the water that has
gathered, slice in small pieces four
white onions, sprinkle one teaspoon
allspice, one and a half cups brown
sugar and add enough elder vinegar to
cover all—about two and a half quarts.
Then add Aye pounds sliced clingstone
peaches, one cup seeded raisins and boil
20 minutes. Put into jars while warm
and serve with cold meats. A delicious
filling for sandwiches.
MRS. I. N. MILLER JR.
311 Lester Avenue. East Oakland, Cal.
SAUCE FOR FRUIT RELISH
Six tablespoons sugar, half teaspoon
cinnamon, one-fourth cup sherry, two
tablespoons lemon juice. Mix and stir
, until sugar is dissolved.
GRACE HALE LANGS.
l 205 Ramona avenue.. Piedmont CaL

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