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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 11, 1913, Image 6

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GOTHAM SWARMING WITH BIG LEAGUE MAGNATES
PEACE AMERICAN
LEAGUE FEATURE:
WAR INITIAL
1913 Schedule of Ameri
can League Adopted as
It Is Originally
Drawn Up
WALTER MARCHAND
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
NEW YORK. Feb. lo.— The hotel dis
!• Pimply overrun with baseball
magnates, managers, players and fans
tonight. It is next to impossiblp to
circulate in the region of the white
lights without running across scores of
men whose names a few weeks later
will occupy more space in the public
mind than those of Madero, Reyes,
l»iaz and the other scrappy gentlemen
to the south of us are doing just now.
The American league met today at
the Hotel Wolftm. the National league
meets tomorrow at the Hotel MacAlpin
and the International association also
meets.
While the meetings were mainly for
the purpose of formally approving
schedules, there was no lack of inter
est, as these schedule meetings are to
baseball what the horse market is to
horsemen. With nearly half the clubs
in both big leagues to be practically
reorganized, there is likely to be great
activity in the deal market before 4S
hours have passcil.
The American league meeting today.
c o far as the work done is concerned.
waa nut particularly thrilling. Ban
Johnson submitted the schedule which
had been prepared, and after some talk
it was formally adopted.
The next important thing was a
committee to consult the telegraph pco
jMe as to arrangements for running ;
telegraph wires into the grounds. This]
was the sript of what was done today.
Cf-AMCE THK HHeUE SHOW
The real feature of the American !
league meeting was the formal Irtduc-
Hoa Into the fold of Frank Change.
The neerless leader who put the Cubs
on the hasebaH man. and who is ex
pected to perform the same service for
the Yankees, came in about 6 O'clock,
looking- fcesh after his cross continent
tourney '-1 t> ecompanies by Mrs.
c }if> w n a prreeted with open
Rrmi by B<»ii I •' nsmi and hie merry
c to f>-- I very much at
; m- ?
* m t t-..-. ron&oes of the
-.-,,,, i,p>s for it is
va'izrri th* 4 to jr*t fh» teem he wnnts
Chanc* is l :, <el\- to l-Hve to i*o i good
de -1 ' of t'-s"'lrer.
The meeting of the National leasrue
tomorrow is not likely to he as peaoeful
as was that of the American league.
Usually there are things doing when the
National magnates eet together, hut
with Horace Fogel out. Charles Murphy
'•hastened and subdued and Charles Kb
hetta busy with his new stadium, it was
hoped overything would be serene and
unanimous. Not so.
MKRRV WAR EXPEtTED
The question of the New York Giants
turning over one-quarter of the world's
series profits is likely to cause consider
able discussion. This matter was taken
up at the le a^U e*s annual meeting In
December and postponed until the sched
ule meeting. A year ago the league de
cided that its representatives in the
world's series must turn one-fourtli of
the elub'a profit* into the league treas
ury. The American league adopted a
similar rule. The New York club has
declared that the ruling is unconstitu
tional and lias refused to give up the
money.
The plan of Mr. Kbbetts for the Brook
lyn club to change the schedule so that
th< I ><>dgers can play the Philadelphia
dub at Ebbetts' field on April 10 will
cause considerable discussion, if not a
regular old time National league row.
The Giants are scheduled to open the
season at the Polo grounds on April 10
with the Boston club. The Dodgers are
scheduled to open with Philadelphia on
April 17. Kbbetts wants the magnates
to give, him an extra opening on April
I, President Lynch is opposed to this.
Kbbetts claims that by a three-quarter
vole the club owners can schedule
dates. Lyach claims it can be done only
by a unanimous vote, and, in addition,
the consent of the American league
must be given before there can be
' hanges in the schedules as drafted.
'Smoky" Joe Wood, the premier twirl.
or of the Boston American league team.
Signed tonight a contract for the com
ing season, which provides for an ad
vance of salary over that paid him last
year.
c \
St. Mary's Tossers Have
24 Live Games Yet
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
OAKLAND, Feb. 10._st. Mary's base
hall schedule for the season was given
out yasterday by Graduate Manager
Russell. Seven games already have
been played and the collegians will
participate in 24 more.
The Chicago White Sox will be the!
star opponents on St. Patrick's day.
Three j ears ago the Phoenix nine of
that year handed a 6 to o shutout to:
I > Sox.
The Portland. Sacramento and Oak
land Coast l-ague clubs are other op
ponents. The tean will play the Chi
nese university nine of Hawaii March
s*B. The Chinese team wMI tour the
country ami this will be its opening
game ,»n the coast.
Tne complete schedule follows:
Date Op| Place '
_>;Sti : ■' I vers Stanford l
Feb. 15 Olympic Club St. Mary's
Feb. lUiKraser Photos St. Mary*«
Feb. 11l S'anford Cniversity Stanford
Feb. 22(8tanford Cniversity Oakland
Feb. 23 Columbia Outfitters St. Mary's
Feb. •-'«*: Port McDowell Si. Maris
Mar. 1 Olympic club lit. Mary's
Mar. 2jAlnmni |San Francisco
Mar. 5 I'llh'-rsity of California. Berkeley
Mar. fc Portland Coast Visalia"
Alar, n Portland Coast .Visalia
Mar. 12Tniversity of California. St. Mary's
Mar. 15 Sacraniento Coast [Sacramento
Mar. IfllSacramento Coast -Sacramento
Mar. 17 Chicago White Sox Oakland
Mar, 10 Stanford University Stanford
Mar. l-AII Stars , j St. Maty's
Mar. -■', Oakland Coast (Oakland
i nivenrtty of California. -Berkeley
ac CalrersitJ Oakland
Mir. n Oakland Cast 'Oakland
Mar. .;n Oakland Coast Oakland
Stanford TDiversity 'Stanford
-•
DUNCAN WINS COGSWELL RACE
Tbe CuM**ell cross country rilnners held their
snuusl listen-lass cross country race yesterday
through the park, the affair lining won by Dun
<-nn of the Juniors in 2s minutes 15 seconds,
The course started st the Coliseum and from
there tbe athlete* trailed through the park to
Hie ocean bep.-h. I h» inniorg took the team
with 22 points, the Mjphonn.res landing
second place with 20 points. On (he result at
the ra<-< Captain Duncan ha* named the follow
ing nii-ti '•• represent Cogswell in the Academic
league championship erosi mtiv to he inn
February 22: Captain Dumau, McLaieu, Mc-
Donald, Bridget! and Gibbou*. j
MUD SUITS PARLOR BOY
Belies Name By Winning
From Favorite By
Six Lengths
(Special "Dispatch to The Call)
EL PASO. Tex., Feb. 10.—The mud
ders had another inning at Juarez to
day, as the showers which fell during
the day kept the track very slushy.
Parlor Roy showed his liking for the
going in the fourth event by run
ning away from a shifty field of sprint
ers. He won. pulled up. by six lengths
from Bonanza and the odds on favorite
Just Red. ' Bonnie Bard at 11 to E and
Salesia at 7 to 10 were the only fa
vorites that scored. Summary:
FIRST RA( F. Three and a half ftirlongs:
Odds. none. Weight. .Tnckev. St. Str Fin
" 1- Old G«tcb. 112 i.T. Murphvi.. 7 2 1 h
"I— J. No'vi. 116 il.nftusi C, l 2ns
.".-2 I*3l BENEDICT, 108 (Kstep)..J 3 3«
Time. :45 2-5. Botcfe 2 place. 1 show: Nolan
5-2 place. S-5 show-. Benedict 1-2 show. (2)Brev
ity, (l)Rimifax, Corona. Colonel McUougall.
Mvra Hc'mer. also ran. Scratched--Taw, Delia
Mack. Kiltie.
SECOND RACE—Si % furlongs:
Odds. Horse. Weight. Jockey. St. Str. Fin.
5-2—(IIFITZGERALD. ins iKederi 2 112
R-S—(2)DYNAMO. 110 *E«tep> 3 ;i 2.1
8-I—Luke Van Zandt. 105 (Gross). 7 4 3 ns
Time. 1:24. Fitzgerald 710 place. 2-1 show:
Dynamo 7-10 plai-e. out show; Luke 4-5 show.
OlHolabird. Swifti-are. Mayerrlale. Dr. Macias.
also ran. Scratched—Choctaw. Green Cloth, In
ipiieta.
THIRD RACE-Five nnd a half firlnnc:
Odi's. Horse. Weight. lock** St. Sti. Fin.
11-5—(1)B. BARD. 110 iMoleswrthi 2 114
11-I—Green Isle. KS fGtiv) 5 2 2 3
30-1 — Nail a Mas. tin illalsevl 4 4 3 U
Time. 1:14 3-5. Bonnie Bard 7-10 place. 1-4
show; Isle 4 idace. 8-fl show: Nada Mas 8 show.
Maeda B, Ah Moon, (2)Baden, Oscuro, (S)Coed.
also ran.
FOFRTII RACE—Five and a half furlong':
Odds. Horse. Weight. Jockey. St. Str. l-'il.
l*-S—(B)P. BOY. IO." ißUbfmlre). 1110
5 I—Bonsnra. 104 iMcCabe) 2 2 2 3
9-H-—(2),IUST RED. Kfl (Grossly. 443 > •
Time. 1:12 2-.* i. Parlor Boy 9-in place. 1-3
show; Bonanza 0-5 place. 4-r. show: Red out
show. (DFurlons, Dominica. Dr. Dougbertv, M.
Cambon. .-ilso ran. Scratched—Miss Jem.
FIFTH RACK Fire and a half furlongs
Odds. Horse. Weight. .Tocfcev. St Str Fin
7-2— (I)EHNEST H, 83 (McCabei. 4 111
fi-I—Abe Slupskev, iin |gross-)... 5 2 2 «i
910 Venetian. IC3 ißobblnsl 2 3 3 1
Time. 1:15 3-5. Ernest 4-5 place. 2-5 show:
Slupskey 2 place. 4-5 .show: Venetian nut show.
Good Intent. (2)B«_ Greanleaf (8)Tallow Dip,
also ran. Scratched —Bobby Cook.
SIXTH RACK -Five and a half furlongs:
Odds. Hor*e, Weight. .locker. St. Str. Fin
7 10—Salesia. 102 (Estepi * x 1 1 R
11 B (T)THE FAD, 112 Kirossi 2 2 2 4
25-I—Rosenta. lofl H'avanaugh). .. . 5 3 8 2
Time. I:V4 2-5. Salesia 1-3 place, out show;
Fad 11-20 placp out show; Roscnta 8-5 show
Cold Point. (2'Edmond Adams, (B)ANi9 Girl.
also ran. Scratched—Servicence. Mike Mollett
Tim Judge, Zinkand.
JJTeather showery; track muddy.
vx •
Y\ SKAT TOURNEY WINNERS
OAKLAND, Feb. 1(1. —Following were the win
ners In the skat tournament, held under the
direction of the Oakland skatverein at their head
quarters. 417 Twelfth street: J. T»ssman. Wil
liam Knapp, L. Koenle. C. Huber. Dr. M. Klonk
P. Uth and L. Brausrhle.
.
WRESTLING TITLE SHIFTS
Or„CTH. Minn.. Feb. 10.—Mike Yokel of Salt
I-ake City won tonight the middle weight cham
pionship wrestling title from Walter Miller of
St. Paul. Yokel took the first fall ln 1 howr
and 10 minutes and tjie second in IR minutes.
FULL 1913 AMERICAN LEAGUE SCHEDULE
Note: Dates in the following table set in heavy figures are for Sunday games.
' : -
Ir
a r
CHICAGO
AT
ST. LOUIS
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AT
CLEVELAND
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April 18, 14. 15, 1« Apl 29.3i>; Mv 1.2.
July 3. 4 4 June .'(0; July 1, !
sept. 4, 5, 6. 7 Oct. 3, 4, 8
April 10. 11. 12
May 26. 27. 28
July 5. 6
Sept. 1. 1. 2
» 12, 13. 14.
. 4. 5. 6. 7
t. 13. 15. 16
June 17, IS, 19
Aug. 8, 9, 11. 12
:Sewt. 9, 10, 11, 12
e 7. 9, 10. 11
30.31; Aug. 1
t. 17, 18, 19
t 8. 4. 5. <?
' 25, 26. 28. 29
:. 20. 22. 23
July 4 at St. Louis.
Labor day at Cleve-
land.
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April
LOUIS 'i"' p
Sep!.
April 17, IV It,
r* a i t j"- 1 '" 2h . 2t - ?*>
V-/!__/__/ Sept. 1, 1. 88
'April 21. 22. 23
May 29, 30, 30, 31
June 1
Oct. 3. 4. 8
e 3. 4, 5. 6
r 25. 26. 28. 29
t. 20. 22, 23
e 7. 9. 10. 11
30.31. Aug. 1
t. 17, 18, 19
June 17, 18. 19
Aug. 8, 9, 11. 12
Sept. 9, 10, 11. 12
12. 13. 14, 10
4. f>. 6, 7
13, 15, 16
'Decoration day at
Cleveland.
Labor day at De-
troit.
26".
yyyyyy- y,^y^
LYY ***,_'YS :\.'
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April 21. 22. 23 April 10, 11. 12
DETROIT May 4. 29. 30,30 31 Hay 24. 25.20.27,28
June 1 July :>. 6, 7
Aug. 30, 81
GIVES
.pril 18, 14, 15, H
une 21, 23
ulv 3. 4. 4
ept. 4, 5
M> 7, 9, 10, 11
80. 31; Ag 1.
>t. 17, 18, 19
June 3. 4. 5. 6
July 25. 26. 28.
iSept. 20, 22, 23
12. 18. 14.
4. 5, 6. 7
13, 15. 16
17. 17. 18,
8. 9. 11
9. 10, 11,
Decoration day at
, Chi.-nor.
i -Hicago.
June 17 at Boston.
July 4 at Cleveland.
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wsasmmm
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April 17. IS, 19. .10. May 1.2.3.4 Apl 24.25.26, 87. !
May 24. 85 .June 30. July 1. 2 Sept. 6, 7, 26. 27
June 26, 2T. 28. 89, Aug. 29. 30, 81 Oct 1. 2
Sept. 28
*..■-" •'■ ■ "-'*•■ .■.
CLEVELAXD j
&
ALL
I
e 17. IS. 19
;. 8. 9, 11. 12
t. 9, 10, 11, 12
12. 13. 14.
4. 5. 6, 7
13, 15. 16
June 3, 4. 5. 6
|July 25. 26. 28.
! Sept. 20, 22, 23
7, 9. 10, 11
0.31; Aug. 1,
17, 18, 19
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WASHIXGTON
Mar 7. 8. 9, 10
Julr 20, 21. 22.
Aug. 84, 25, 2H
(May 11, 12, 13. 1
iJulv 10. 17. IS, 1!
Aug. 21, 22. 23
May 15. 16. 17,
July 9. 10. 11
Aug. 14, 15, 16
19, 20. 21.
12. 18, 14,
. 18. 19, 20
Si
THE
1 26, 28. 29.
24, 26. 27,
. 1. 1. 2
I 17. 18. 19, 21
4. 4. 5. 7
. 25, 2«. 27
May 1. 2. 3. 5
:.Iune 30; July 1
Aug. 28, 20, 30
July 4 at Xew
-ork.
Labor day at Phil-
adelphia.

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PHILADELPHIA
Mhv 11, 12, 18.
July 16. 17, 18,
Aug. 21, 22, 23
[Hay 7. 8. 9, ,0
I July 20, 21, 22,
I Aug. 84, 25, 26.
May 19. 20, 21. 2
i-Inly 12. 18, 14. 1
Aug. 18, 19. 20
May 15, 16. 17,
July 9. 10. 11
Aug. 14, 15, 16
I 14. It, 16
2. 25. 26,27.:
. 29, 30; Oct
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BEST
1. 2. 3. I
30; July 1.2,1
28. 29, 30
,3
I 10. 11, 12
4, 4, 5, 7
. 24, 25, 26, 27!
4 at Boston.
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KIW YORK I
Miv 15. 16. 17, 1
Julv 9. 10. 11
Aug. 14, 15, 16, 1
'May 19, 20, 21, 22
.Inly 12. 18, 14, 15
Aug. 18, 19, 20
May 7. 8. ». 10
Julv 80, 21. 22. 23
iAng. 21, 22, 23
May 11, 12. 13. 1
July 16. 17, 18, 1!
Aug. 84, 25, 26
April 10, 11, 12
June 20, 21. 23,
Sept. 4, 5, 6, 8
I 22, 23, 24,
29. 30. 30,
2. 3, 4
! .* *r-S--,. 'J ',■:..+■•:#'■ i.*< . :.-.-- .
BASE
April 14, 15, 16
June 25, 26. 27, I
,_#pt. 1, 1, 2, 3
day at
Ma
ma.
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Ma} 19, 20. 21,
IX lulj 12, 18, 14.
Aug. 18, 19, 20
I
May 15. 16. 17, H Mm- 11, 12, IS, 14 May 7. 8. 0. 10
July fl. 10. 11 July 16. 17, 18. 19 Julv 20, 21. 22. 23 i
Aug. 14, 15. 16. 17 Aug. 24. 25, 26 Aug. 21, 22. 23
I 22. 23. 24. 29
2». 30, 30, 31
2. 3, 4
I 17, 18, 19,
20. »l. 23,
. 4, 5, 6
; 26. 28, 29. no
24. 26.. 27. 2S
29, 30; Oct. 1
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I" Sunday! i:
'Decoration tlar. Iji
HOME ' Conflict Ing dates:
April 27. Mar 4.
'2.V Aug. 31. i
S;
Si
iy
-.aturdars. 13 Saturdays
iundays. 12 Sundays'
' 4 ; Labor day.
_-.r:
11 Saturdays.
11 Sundays
Decoration day
July 4
Labor day,
Y
13 Saturdays,
Decoration day.
_ ttmtnrAkrn.
♦ narnrnay".
•ecoration day.
.abor day.
14 Saturdays.
July 4.
Saturdays.
i« 17.
iy 4.
bor day.
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NEWS
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THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 11. 1913.
The Call's Selections In
Today's Card for
Juarez Races
JOE MURPHY
Following Is the handicap for today's races at
Juarez:
FIRST RACE—Six furlongs; 3 year olds and
unward:
Index. Horse. Wt.
1955 MANDADERO 107
194S FANEUIL HALL 110
inr.o MAZURKA 9*
1967 Baden 107
1059 Quid Nun.- 107
1954 lookout 110
1927 Choctaw 9S
Mandadero Is ln a nice tpot and distance and
going will be to Its liking. Faneuil Hall round
ing to form and Is placed nicely for a cleanup.
Mazurka consistent.
SECOND RACE—Five furlongs; 3 year olda
and upward:
Index. florae Wt.
19«3 UNCLE TIMMY GRAY 110
11*70 THE FAD 112
1913 KID NELSON 100
IV" Hnch Cray 103
6228 Red Rose 85
1941 Wolfreso 90
RS.SO Don Ramon X
MM Ada Doyle 102
Stonecutter 107
Unc'e Jimmy Cray arr excellent mudder and
at the distance looks like a go<>d bet. The Fad
a rare mndder, but has been getting too much
racing. Kid Nelson should prove a contender.
THIRD RACE—Six furlongs; 3 year olds and
upward:
Index. Horse. Wt.
1961 ROYAL DOLLY 105
1943 PHIL CONNOR 110
1907 BONNIE BARD 110
1970 Rosenta 108
1934 Caitem 110
1954 Evran 110
1901 I.escar 113
Royal Dolly looks best of this bunch. Phil
Connor is fast and his last race a good one.
Bminle Bard to good now.
FOURTH RACE—One and a sixteenth miles:
4 ye;ir olds and upward:
Index. Horse. Wt.
1958 COCKBPUR 103
19." SLEEFLAND ..100
19i;9 BEN GREENLEAF 105
ISO 4 Dick Baker 10R
1954 Bainev Oldfleld 100
1929 El Toro 103
1964 Sam Bernard 105
Coekftpor Is placed nicely and should win
handily. Sleepland will And track and distance
right. Ben Greenleaf improving.
FIFTH RACE—Six furlongs; 4 year olds and
upward:
Index. Horse. Wt.
1952 BER VICENCE 110
1 MS L. X. ECXERT 106
1949 JIM L 102
1957 (iolden Agne« 10R
ls9S Princess Industry 109
1943 Zool 105
1901 t otnpton 114
IfM Don Enrique 11l
Servicence has the t-peed and will favor the
soft going. L. XI. Eckert is around to his best
form. Jim I. ia fast.
SIXTH RACE—Six furlongs; | year olds and
upward:
Index. Horse. Wt.
1955 VEIIE FORTY 93
1957 DAVE MONTGOMERY 105
1942 JUDGE WALTON 113
1945 Tim Judge 110
1955 Russell McGIU 102
1934 Uelteo 1U
1929 Blaze b 110
Velie Forty Ig a rare mudder and looks to
have the speed. Dave Montgomery looks like
the contender.
Bast Bets—UNCLE JIMMY GRAY. COCXSPUR
JIM THORPE AS A GIANT
THORPE SHOULD BE GOOD TOSSER
Indian Figures Out Every Move in Advance
NEW YORK, Feb. 10. —Jim Thorpe,
the great Indian athlete who has be
come a Giant, has one characteristic
that will be a strong point In his favor
even before his physical dexterity or
knowledge of the game begins to de
velop.
"Did you notice," said McGraw en
thusiastically, "that trick or habit he
has of looking out the corner of his eye
and taking ln the surroundings before
he expresses himself on a subject?"
After talking with this wonderful
athlete a few minutes one couldn't help
noticing it.
"That is a sure sign of a calculating
athlete." added McGraw. "I guess you
have observed Mathewson doing It
when apparently he was paying no at
tention."
According to McGraw, the ball player
who studies out details is nearly al
ways successful.
That Thorpe Is an observant fellow
was shown when I asked him why he
preferred to join the Giants. He glanced
out of the corner of his eye at a large
framed picture of the New York team
which Included all the substitutes last
spring.
"I could have gone to St. Louis and,
according to what the scout told me,
could have been a regular." he said.
"But it occurred to me that I had
never seen any startling newspaper
stories about what the St. Louis team
had done. That is what decided me in
favor of the Giants. If the St. Louis
club was willing to put an untried man
like me on the regular team they would
likely put other untried men on it and
it wouldn't be much of a team. I think
GOSSIP HEARD BY THE MAN IN
THE STREET, COVERING
THE WHOLE WORLD OF SPORTS
The Chicago White Sox are scheduled to play
in San Francisco and live in Oakland. They
should prove a great help to the community.
# * *
Parlor Boy is not as fancy as his name would
indicate. According to the press dispatch from
the Juarez Irack, he is a mud running fool.
* * *
Jim Cortwtt must he good in his monologue, as
those who have seen him are complaining that
his act Is too short.
* * »
Application for passage on the Indoor Yacht
club's cruise to Sisson are coming in so fast that
Commodore Hennessey is planning to add a couple
of rowboats to the main vessel.
* * *
In the absence of Skipper Joe Peering of the
yacht White Seal In the cruise to Sisson, the
wheel of the good boat will be handled by Jim
Orlffln. who is planning to take a select party In
bis craft.
*« * .
The amateur race meet at Burlingame Sunday
reminded many of the good old days. See its
aftermath on the opposite page!
* * *
Charlie Murphy has offered I.arry Cheney $.1,000
to pitch during the coming season, while the lat
ter demands $5,000. Their views on financial
matters are not at ail In harmony.
* * *
I.uther McCarty. white champion. Is said to
have a skin like a baby. After Luther Is
through with the ring he could open a beauty
parlor and get away with it. , **
* # »
Strange how the ham and beaten ball players
are never holdouts. Their trouble seems to be
holding on.
Jack Lester says he can beat any white man in.
tbe world. We are all from Missouri. John.
* * *
Tom Jones declare* that he Is tired of the box
ing game. Tom is probably troubled with pa
ralysis of the fingers picking up soft change, and
he needs a rest.
BOZEMAN BULGER
I would rather sit on the bench with a
good team than to be on the field with
a bad one. After seeing what good
players do I might be able to do it
myself.
"I have never heard of a ball player
who sat on the bench with the Giants
turning out badly," he added. "A lot
of good coaching, I figure. Is worth
more to a young player than a little
bad playing."
Thorpe explained that he had a small
income from his property ln Oklahoma,
but that It was not sufficient for a
good living. In other words, he is
going Into baseball purely for the
money there is in it.
Contrary to the general impression,
Thorpe is not a full blooded Sac and
Fox Indian. His parents are both half
breeds. His father is a well to do
farmer in what was formerly In
dian Territory. Jim was born near a
little place called Prague. He is a
ward of the United States government
and owns a tract of land which is a
part of the grant to the Indians.
Though there Is a general impression
that McGraw signed Thorpe purely for
the sake of having a worldwide famous
attraction for the Giants, the New
York manager is really enthusiastic
over his chances as a player.
"Thorpe is the Ideal build for a hall
player," says McGraw. "He is broad
shouldered, clean limbed and. weighs
176 pounds. His mind is quick and his
record is ample evidence of his game-
I like the way he has of study
ing things out. Of course. I realize
that he will be a big novelty for the
public, but I also expect to turn him
Into a good player."
Ad Wolgast wants a ranch, and ha* picked out
t_e San Francisco public to buy it for him.
The holdout trio of the Seals. Baker. Wnffll
and Cadreaii. are still strong and no stimulants
have been applied up to date.
San Francisco is still ln the land of the free.
It will be the only town in the baseball circuit
where you can enjoy a drink while witnessing
the game. Some privilege in these days of the
moral rulers!
Harry Wolverton's prestige as a baseball leader
has not dropped 1 per cent in this section as a
result of his failure with the. New York Yankees.
The fans expect him to come back and make good
with the Senators.
[ Charleston Race Results
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
CHARLESTON, S. C, Feb. 10.—Results of to
day's races:
First race—Rose Queen. 2 to 1. won; Polly
Worth, 16 to 5, second; Gaguant. R to 1. third.
Second race-Frog. 12 to 1. won; Cynosure.
7 to 1. second; Berkeley, ;; to 2. third.
Third race—l.ochiel. 3 to 1, won; John Furlong,
even, second; Carlton G, 11 to 5. third.
Fourth ra.-e—Spohn. IR to 5, won; Gold Cap.
even, second; Colonel Ashmeade, 5 to 1. third.
r-ifth race—lncision. 8 to 1, won; Silicia. 15
to 1. second; Fatherola, 16 to 5, third.
Sixth race. Lucky Ceorge. 6 to I. won; Colonel
Cook, 3 to 1, second; Henry Hutchison, 3 to 1,
,
J\ VICTORS 8, COLLINS 3
/'OAKLAND. Feb. 10.—The Victors defeated the
Collins Brothers yesterday in a close game. The
winners won out on their superior hitting The
'core: r. h. E.
Victors g 12 2
Collins 3 5 j
Batteries —Hammond aud Hall; Collins and
Collins.
Edgren
WOLVERTON HERE;
RIGHT HAND BUSY
New Manager of Senators,
Greeting Friends, Full of
1913 Hopes
Harry Wolverton. who will guide the
1913 destinies of the Senators, was a
visitor here yesterday. The former
leader of the Yankees looks as though
he had a lot of baseball left in him.
Harry was kept busy renewing old
acquaintances. He held a meeting
with J. Cal Ewing of the local club in
regard to some baseball deals, but
nothing definite was accomplished.
Pitcher Jack Gilligan, who played
with the Senators during the latter
part of the year, met Wolverton for
the first time. Gilligan is desirous of
getting his release from the Senators
on account of his wife's health. There
was some talk of trading him to the
Seals hut Gilligan wants to go east.
Wolverton told him he would dicker
with eastern clubs and try to make a
trade. He has a couple of players in
view and if he can get one of them
by a trade Gilligan undoubtedly will
get his release.
Wolverton thinks the Senators have
a promising team this season and
looks for the club to be up in the run
ning throughout the pennant race of
1913.
* * #
Contracts continue to come in to the
office of the local club. The latest tos
sers to send in their signatures are
Peter Standridge. hurler, late of the
Calgary team in the Western Canadian
league, and Dr. Forrest Thomas, who
did mound duty with the St. Joe club
of the Western league last season.
Thomas pitched during the early part
of the 1912 season with the St. Paul
club of the American association, but
had poor success. When he joined St.
Joe he fared better and finished the
I season with a creditable record.
* ♦ *
President Allan T. Baum and J. Cal
I Ewing have returned from their duck
j hunting trip around Stockton. They
report that ducks were scarce.
George Schirm, crackerjack out
fielder for the Buffalo team, sent his
contract to Manager Mitze of the Oaks
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How They Construct
Baseball Diamonds
Daown in Floridy
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
TAMPA. I-'la., Feb. 10.—When
Ground Keeper Kuhn of the Chi
cago Cub* started preparing a
training diamond here he n««
Informed by Tampa's mayor that
he would have several prisoners
from the elty hastlle to do the
heavy part of the job. Last
week Kuhn reached the conclu
sion that, despite the assistance
of the prisoners, he vronld be
unable to Bnlsh the grounds In
the allotted time/
The following day. when the
mayor and chief of police made
their dally tour of inspection af
file park, Kuhn remarked that
he would deem It a great favor if
his force of laborers was In
creased.
"Hon many more men do you
need to get through on schedule
timet" the mayor Inquired.
"Well, your honor, I suppose
that If I had five more men I
would be all right," Kuhn re
plied.
The chief magistrate turned to
the chief of police and blandly
remarked:
"BUI, you get basy right awny.
Go around town and lock up tbe
first 10 able bodied men you see.
Charge them with vagrancy and
send them right over to Mr.
Kuhn."
yesterday from St. Louis, and soon will
appear himself. Schirm was landed by
the payment of a considerable sum, the
exact amount of which is not known.
He has played for the last four years
with Buffalo. His work has attracted
attention and he has been drafted two
or three times Into the major league,
only to be dropped without a trial.
A baseball team representing tho
Chinese university of Hawaii plans a
tour of the United States, and Nat
Strong, who will manage them, has
written to Ewing, asking for a date
here. Ewing has answered tl*at the
Seals will play the slant eyed tosseis
on March 27.
Massow, the left handed heaver who
was with the Seals during their train
ing season last spring, but failed to
catch on with the club, will be given
another chance to make good. He has
been ordered to join the team at Boyes
springs.

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