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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 12, 1913, Image 5

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AS WOMAN to WOMAN
By KATHERIXE GARLAND
({ T have been invited to join the
I Panes in a trip to Panama,"
rJargcry informed me. "There
are three reasons why I should like to go.
7 /?e prospect of the trip is alluring.
"The party is, for the most part, com
p scd of charming people. And I need
a vacation. Bui there is one drawback
too serious to permit me to accept. One
of f l c girh. p'/io uto go was once a guest
at the same house I visited. Every mom-
mo she regaled the rest of us with the tale of how cold or hot her room was
aurinp the night.
"She had caught a sore throat. Weather such as we were then having
made her feel droopy. These and other such pleasant remarks were our appe
tizers for breakfast. The idea of waking up every morning to listen to a chorus
of her ailments is not inviting.
"Ii would be no vacation for me to live in the atmosphere of her com
plaints. Why, do you think any one is so stupid as io think her minor ailments
fit subject for general conversation?"
"There is no accounting for tastes," I rejoined.
On the contrary," came her retort, "there is too much accounting for
tastes and smells and feelings among some people."
Even the philosopher Emerson must have suffered from the enforced
companionship of some such person, for no one would seek it voluntarily,
that is sure.
Says he: "If you have not slept, or if you have slept, or if you have a
headache, or sciatica, or leprosy, or thunderstroke, 1 beseech you by all the
angels to hold your peace and not pollute the morning, to which all the house
mates bring pleasant and serene thoughts, by corruptions and groans."
Of course, your little ailments are of interest to you and have their effect
upon your capacity for work or enjoyment. But surely they do not have a good
effect. And they will matter less if you will not make them subjects of
conversation.
This is no plea for Christian Science. Whatever your opinion on that
subject, you must, nevertheless, give credit to your mind for some power. And
if you force your thoughts away from any unpleasantness of the night, for the
benefit of the others at the breakfast table, you will be repaid for your
thoughtfulness.
Something in the talk of the rest will hold your attention for a few min
utes and lure you to forgetfulness of self. And even that short period of relief
is worth something.
In the few days remaining before her
marriage to Joseph Upham Pearson
Miss Corinne Dillman Is being exten
slvely entertained by her friends in
Sacramento.
Last Saturday evening Mrs. Andrew
M. Henderson, the sister of Mr. Pear
son, and Mrs. Edward H. Gerber shared
the honors of presiding over a dan
i Ing party in compliment to the pretty
bride elect.
The affair was held in the Tuesday
club ballroom which was attractively
decorated for the affair in a scheme of
pink and green. Pussy willows and
fernery were arranged in vases about
the room, whose further adorn
ment was effected by quantities of
9 baskets filled with Cecil Breuner.
bridesmaid and blush roses which were
tied with pink and blue tulle.
Assisting the hostesses in receiving
Saturday night were Mrs. Charles V.
Dillman, Miss Corinne Dillman, Mrs.
Charles B. Jones and Mr. Pearson.
Among the San Francisco girls who
ncnt to the capital to attend the affair
and were guests of Mrs. Henderson
over * • <•_ were Miss Ua Sonntag,
Miss Emily Huntington and Miss Kath
erinc Meiggs. Miss Lu<-y Pearson of
Stockton was also a house guest of
Mrs. Henderson.
The following day a lily bridge party
was driven hy Mrs. Elbert Kercheval.
The guest'- of honor were three brides
elect and one of the brides of the sea
son. Mies Dillman, Miss Elm* Flint,
Qretchen Grau and Mrs. Weyman
Smith. The party was held in the home
of the hostess' mother, Mrs. Robert D.
Finnic.
* * *
Miss Kate Brigham and Miss Fath
ering Donohoe are the guests of Lieu
tenant and Mrs. Clarence Kempff in
r residence at Mare island. A num
of affairs have been planned in
honor of the visitors by the residents
if the naval station.
■s- * *
Mrs. Albert Niblack, wife of Captain
Xihlaek. military attache to Berlin, has
rrived in San Francisco and is at the
bedside of !':"r mother. Mrs. W. P.
Harrington, who is seriously ill in her
me in California street. Mrs. Niblack
was formerly Miss Mary Harrington of
this city.
* * *
Miss Margaret Stewart presided over
an elaborate dinner in the dining room
of the Hotel Stewart Saturday even
ing.
The tables were decorated for the
event with baskets of tulips and aspar
agus fern.
Among those bidden to the affair
were: General and Mrs. Arthur Mur
ray, Mr. and Mrs. Sewall Dolltver, Mr.
and Mrs. H. W. Lash. Mr. and Mrs.
Qeorffe M. Perine, Dr. and Mrs. Ed
wards. Mrs. McKinley, Mr. and Mrs.
mW. Gibson and Mr. and Mrs. Charles A.
V Stewart.
•****■*#
Miss Dorothy Deane, Miss Otilla
Lame and Miss Priscilla Hall, the lat
ter the fiancee of Ronald McCullough
of Manila, were the guests of honor
at a bridge party which Miss Jullta
CLIONIANS STUDY
FRENCH HISTORY
"Rise of Women" Subject of Lec
ture at Next Meeting
Men of letters and science in France
were given in respons to roll call yes
■ tr-rday afternoon at the meeting of the
•'lionian club, which is studying France
during the present club year.
Miss Nora Netterville read a paper
on "The French Academy," MVs. R. R.
Vail on "The Huguenots," Mrs. John
Robertson on "What the Renaissance
Meant to France." while Mrs. H. C.
Jensen gave a dramatic reading from
Lytton's "'Richelieu."
The next meeting of the club, Feb
ruary 25, will be held at the Affiliated
colleges, when the members and their
guests will attend the last of the se
ries of lectures given by Dr. A. L.
Kroeber, the subject of which will be
"The Rise of Woman."
. •-—.
SARGENT CANAL RANCH SOLD
i ~,1 Dispatch to The Call)
STOCKTON, Feb. 11.—Henry Riley
i.rul J. P. Aitken, Alaskan capitalists,
have bought the Sargent canal ranch,
< Mnsistins; of J,250 acre*. Tbe
f 460.000. It is understood the
;.-it chasers intend to euodivhle the
tfatf,
SOCIAL NEWS
w
Galpfn gave in the Clarmont club yes
terday afternoon.
Among those bidden were:
mum Gladys BtK-banail I Miss Linda Buelianan
UIM Rtfcel Pslnaateer Mlm DomtbT Canwell
!*__ £?"*** BaSwej Miss Janet Painter
Mis* M!tii Metcalfe Miss Laura P. arkes
mm Fdlth l'r.«ru,- Mi« Kettertae Boat
nm* Oweadoilo Waaty tieid
, I . wortl ' SOss Anno Sprine
X * s ~ Abi " ' Miss r.i.ian Van rant
* • •
Mrs. Thomas Scott Brooks has ar
rived from Portland and is visiting at
the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Carter Pitkin Pomeroy, in their home
in Clay street.
i * * *
Mlse Constance is receiving
a v.-arra welcome to San Francisco
after an absence of two years, during
which time she has been visiting her"
sister, Mrs. Thomas Leggett. in New
Jersey. Miss Borrowe arrived Sunday
and is a house guest of Miss Barbara
Small, one of whose bridesmaids she
will be at her marriage next Tues
day.
* # *
In compliment to Mr. and Mrs. Feld
hauscr and Mr. and Mrs. Morer of
Denver, Walter Dupee entertained at!
an elaborate dinner in Coronado last I
Friday. Pink roses, lavender orchids
and lilies of the valley afforded an
attractive table adornment. Twelve
guests enjoyed Mr. Dupee'a hospitality.
* * "f
Owing to the illness of Miss Kath
erine Hooper, which will confine her
to her home in Cough street for sev
eral weeks, Mrs. George Innes has in
definitely postponed the luncheon she
was to have given Thursday afternoon
in* her San Rafael home.
* * *
A program has been arranged by
Mrs. William Hoff Cook for an "At
Home" to be given in her residence in
Commonwealth avenue this afternoon.
Mrs. James Giffen will give a read
ing.
* * *
Rear Admiral Louis Kempff. U. S.
N., and Miss Cornelia Kempff have
gone to Riverside, where they will
remain for several weeks.
* * *
The Yama Tama girls and their
cavaliers at the recent society circus
were entertained at a dance given by
Mrs. Charles Brodek and Miss Dorothy
Dickens in Sequoia club last evening.
One of the features of the evening was
the cotillon led by Miss Dickens and
Mr. Heyneman.
Among those at the dance were:
Mr. and Mis. Frederick Mrs. Walter L*>i< k«ns
Marsh Mr, ami Mrs. William
Mr, and Mrs. f'erald A. Linge
Wilson Mr, ana Mrs. C. Mar-
Mr. and Mrs. Albert R. iln
Wlrtner ' Mr. and Mrs. E. R.
Mrs. Manfred Heyne- j Bacon
mann ! Farl Easton
MUs Marie Allen Ra.v Howard
Miss Flma Shoenfeld 'Edwin A. Foley
Miss Inez Marion t Waiter Hememann
Miss Emma Baker j James 1., ileynemann
Miss Ethel Cooper j Lieutenant John Me-
Mlss Ixmisc Esohman i Henry
Mi*3 Grace Webster 'Monroe Lesser
Miss Ethel Fenjnson ; Frank Fortran?
Miss liculse Moiaant j Dr. William Knights
Miss Thek'.a Eichoff j Louis Trron
.Mis-s (Jrare Wo'lpert Charles Rnsh
Miss Frances Clark 'Dr. EL P. Trarers
WOMEN CREDITORS
RIOT IN COURT
More Than 2,000 Investors Upset
Benches and Demand Money
PHILADELPHIA, Feb., 11. —More
than 2,000 women who had invested*
from 10 cents to $32 in credit stamps
of the American Home Supply com
pany were responsible for an exciting
scene in the bankruptcy court in the
federal building here today. Benches
were overturned, cushions hurled and
some of the women surged to the
judge's bench demanding their money
back. Notices of a hearing had been
sent to the 3,200 creditors of the com
pany, which was declared an Invol
untary bankrupt last December, and
hundreds of women thronged the court
room. Fifteen hundred others who
could not gain admittance crowded the
corridors.
• _
MAGNOLIA VALENTINE PARTY
The Magnolia club, an organization
composed of the young men of the
Haight and Ashbury district, will en
tertain at a valentine party Friday
evening in Scottish Rite auditorium
at Van Ness nvenue and Sutter street.
A -**< cial mu3icul program of vocal
• n,l Instrument*] numbers ha* beer.
pi epared. Later dauc.ns* will be held.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL. WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 12, 1913.
NICKEL WOULD
HAVE SAVED EYES,
SAYS CRUMBINE
Next to Murder to Neglect Chil
dren's Sight Avers Kan
sas Expert
TOPEKA. Kan., Feb. 11.—A nickel's
worth of horacic acid would have saved
the sight of nine out of every ten
babierv in Kansas who became blind
after birth, declared Dr. S. J. Crumbine,
secretary of the state board of health,
today after completing an extensive in
vestigation of blindness in Kansas chil
dren.
In one community out of 16 babies
born 14 were blind before they were a
month old.
"The blindness of every one of these
could have been prevented,"' said Doc
tor Crumbine. "It is a crime not far
behind murder."
A bill pending in the Kansas legis
lature provides that if the eyes of a
baby become red or swollen or there
is a discharge the proper medicine for
the child's relief must be immediately
administered under penalty of $100 fine
and six months" imprisonment.
Health, officers, physicians and nurses
are held responsible for the law's en
forcement.
FORCED TO WED,
SAYS BIGAMIST,
IN HER DEFENSE
Mrs. Lola Pierce-Rothe-Berg Is
Found Guilty After Trial
In Minneapolis
MINNEAPOLIS. Feb. 11.—Mrs. Lola
Pierce-Rothe-Berg, formerly of Dcs
Moines, la., who was found guilty of
bigamy after a trial in the district
court today, testified that she was com
pelled to marry Union Rothe, one of
her alleged husbands, to prevent him
from committing suicide and to keep
him from killing her.
"I did not marry Mr. Rothe volun
tarily." said the witness. "Upon my
arrival in Dcs Moines from Tola, Kan
he told me that I had to marry him
immediately. I asked him to wait, but
he insisted and said he would kill me
and then commit suicide if I did not, so
I consented."
Mrs. Pierce-Rothe-Berg said she lived
with Rothe three weeks, coming to
Minneapolis December 1. On Decem
ber 2 she and Frank J. Berg were
married by a court commissioner.
"My maiden name was Peaf-ce," tes
tified the witness, "and my first hus
band was named Pierce. We were
married March 6, 1904, at Fort Scott,
Kan., and lived together three years.
My marriage to Mr. Rothe was on Sep
tember 1 and September G I received a
clipping from Mr. Pierce stating that
we had been divorced."
Mrs. Pierce-Rothe-Berg was found
guilt; tonight, the jury being out but a
short time.
WOULD POSTPONE SALE
>"leee« and Nephews Oppose Request of
William Dunphy's Children
Whether the £0,900 acres composing
the Dunphy ranch at Monterey shall
be sold at the instance of the children
of the late William Dunphy, Nevada
cattle king, or retained In the estate
at the desire of other heirs, is a ques
tion that was submitted to Judge Gra
ham yesterday.
William Dunphy, a son, and his sis
ters, Mrs. Jennie Meyer and Mrs. Mary
Flood, seek to have the property sold.
The ranch is inventoried at $255,000.
Tiie other heirs, nieces and nephews
of Will law Dunphy. ask the court to
postpone the sale for several years,
declaring that the retention of the
property will greatly enhance its value.
The court took the case under ad
visement.
Brother Seeks Guardianship—Judge
Graham yesterday restrained John P.
Visser, a saloon man, from withdraw
ing $5,000 from the Hibernia bank
pending a hearing of a petition by A.
Visser. a brother, for letters of guard
ianship over John P. Wisser's estate
and person on ground of incompetency.
\, - ■■- ■■ A
In Honor of the Day
RUTH CAMERON
HAVE you remembered what day it
is?
If by any possible chance you
have forgotten, let me bring It to your
mind by telling you that as usual on
the 12th of February, I am turning
over my space to one who, though he
laid no claim to being either author or
philosopher, can fill this space as
ri.hiy as the greatest of either.
SAYINGS OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN
"He who does something at the head
of one regiment surpasses him who
does nothing at the head of a hundred."
"No time religiously spent is ever
lost."
"I am not bound to win, but I am
bound to be true. I am not bound to
succeed, but I am bound to live up to
what light I have."
"I have been driven to my knees
many times by the realization that I
had nowhere else to go."
"Those who deny freedom to others
deserve it not for themselves, and un
der a just God cannot long retain it."
(Rather an interesting utterance
when w*e relate it to the white slav
ery and the wage slavery, and the
other kinds of modern slavery that
have taken the place of the old type.)
"The occasion la piled high with dif
ficulty, and we must rise high with the
occasion."
"If we do right God will he with us,
and if God is with us we can not fail."
"Do not worry, eat three square
meals a day, say your prayers, be
courteous to your creditors, keep your
digestion good, steer clear of bilious
ness, exercise, go slow and go easy.
Maybe there are other things that your
special case requires to make you
happy, but, my friends, these, I reckon,
will give you a good lift."
LINCOLN'S RULES FOR LIVING
"I have never had a policy. I have
simply tried to do what seemed best
each day as each day came."
In view of the fact that the agnos
tics sometimes try to claim Lincoln
for their ranks because he did not be
long to any church, the following is
especially interesting. I regret that
I am not absolutely sure of Its authen
ticity and cannot quote the authority.
I clipped it from a magazine. Perhaps
someone can inform me of its source:
"I have never united myself to any
church because I have found difficulty
in giving my assent, without mental
reservation, to the long, complicated
statements of Christian doctrines which
characterize their Articles of Belief
and Confession of Faith. Whenever a
church will inscribe over Its altar, as
its sole qualification for membership,
the, Saviour's condensed statement of
hoth law and gospel: 'Thou shalt love
the Lord, thy God, with all thy heart,
and with all thy soul, and with all thy
mind, and thy neighbor as thyself,'
I t*»«" church will 1 join with all my
I soul." I
ANNA SHAW PROPHESIES
Suffrage in All States by 1920
Dr. Anna Shaw.
HOTEL NEWS
Harry 8. Recob, who conducts touts in Cali
fornia, is at tbe Stewart. Mr, Raeob is au
thority for the statement that visitors to Cali
fornia are greatly increasing in numbers each
year. He said:
"In tbe last four years since I have been
conducting tours in California, I have found
a steady increase in the number of visitors and
tourists. My own business has doubled each
year for the last three years. Easterners like
to conic to California, so they tell inc. Tbe
Yosemite is a point of great interest to tourists
ami so are the big You *wonld be sur
prised to know of the Interest that Is being
taken in the coming fair by people in the east.
I have received many letters from the east
asking me what arrangements could be made
for tourists here in 1015. This proves that the
people are planning now for the big exposition."
* * *
John Cordano, a contractor of Seattle and a
former resident of San Francisco, who is stay
ing at the St. Francis, *ays San Francisco has
a great future in store. He said:
"I am sure the opening of the Panama canal
will prove of great benefit to your city. You
need a few more booster* here to g«t tbe re
sults you are entitle.! to. Don't neglect to ad
vertise your fair, and yon Will advertise your
city. You have the climate ami the future of
tbe city is assured."
* * *
W. P. Fenton, counsel for the Southern Pacific
I company in Oregon. Idaho and Washington, is
lat the Palace. Mr. Fenton is one of tbe most
j able lawyers of the northwest, and has been
the giiidiug spirit at the legal bureau ot the
Harrimau system in ills section of tbe coast.
"'I nm hen- merely for a rest," said Mr.
Fenton, --but I am naturally interested In what
the railroads with which I have been identified
will do as the result of the recent decisions
regarding the Union Pacific and Southern Pacific
railroads. I can "Wt comment ou the situation;
indeed, I am here for pleasure not business."
George H. Ellis Jr. of New York, a member
of tbe firm of E. F. Hutton & Co., who is
staying at the St." Francis, explains his trip
to tlio coast ax follows:
"I am here looking over conditions and to
confer with R. E. Muleajjy, manager of the
San Francisco branch of our Arm. Our business
here Is satisfactory. I will remain here a little
lunger."
* * #
C. E. Walker, rice president of the Pope Man
ufacturing company of Hartford: John P. Wise of
New York; Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Lowes of Cal
gary and Mr. and Mrs. Frank I. SUaW of
-.Seattle are at the St. Francis.
William Ridpath. millionaire mining man of
Portland and a brother of tbe famous historian;
Rand .Shoup, superintendent of tbe Southern Pa
cific company's electric lines, of Los Angeles;
J. A. MacLnnn of Ottawa, and Calvin Helig,
theater owner of Portland, are at the Palace.
Mnnsignor P. 1. Fisher of Santa Cruz; G. W.
A. Ferris, an architect of Reno, and W. D.
Coates, manager of a large flour mill in Fresno,
are guests at the Stewart.
* * *
W. J. Hinckley, an attorney from Los Ange
les; Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Morgan of Appleton.
Wis.; P. B. Engle, a civil engineer from Los
Angeles, and S. Koenigstein, a Fresno merchant,
are at the Manx.
S. F. Granger, R. W. Powell and W. L.
Mitchell, who are Interested in a large irriga
tion project near Fresno; William Bledsoe of
Modesto, and S. C. Winger of Modesto arc at
the letter.
Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Wearer of Loa Angeles
and H. G. Hcibron of Sacramento are at the
Palace.
* # *
W. H. Coons, a banker and oil man of Mari
copa; J. R. Griffith, real estate dealer of
Fresno, and M. Hocbatnrber, a merchant of
Osaka, Japan, are registered at tbe Cort.
Henry Cox of Hamilton, Ont., a manufacturer
cf farming implements, registered yesterday at
tha I'nion Square.
P. W. Hull, a mining operator of Ely, Nev.,
is at the Union Square.
T. E. Edgarton Shore, a hanker of Toronto,
arrived at the Bellevue yesterday, accompanied
by his son, Allan Shore. They were joined
at the hotel by Winfred Shore of Portland. The
party will depart shortly for a tour of the
state.
Frank EL Ray of Mcd ford. Ore.. Is at the
Bellevue. Mr. Ray is heavily Interested in
the bop industry and the growing of prire
winning apples.
W. IL Latimer, a politician of Los Angeles,
Is at the Bellevue.
Fred Shelton, proprietor of a hotel at Tehama;
G. Neuman. a grocer of Redwood City; E. J.
Pierce, a real estate dealer of Fresno; C. C.
Welch, a railroad contractor and builder, of
San Diego; J. E. Bowes, proprietor of a music
store at Vancouver, B. C, and H. F. Davidson,
owner of a fruit packing establishment at
Hood River, Ore., are recent arrivals at the
Argonaut.
J. E. Haschke, electrical engineer, who ob
tained considerable prominence during his asso
ciation with Edison and when he invented the
Hasehke system for motor power, is stopping at
the Roehampton apartments, Golden Gate avenue
and Larkin street.
QUEBEC PREMIER SPEAKS
Sir Jean Lomer Gouin, Caput of France.
America Committee
PARIS, Feb. 11. —Sir Jean Lomer
Gouin, premier of Quebec, -was the
guest of honor at a banquet given this
evening by the France-America com
mittee, which was recently incorpor
ated with the object of developing and
strengthening relations of all kinds
between the United States and France.
Among the speakers were Premier
Gouin, the American ambassador;
Myron T. Herrick. and the former am
bassador to Germany, David Jayne Hill.
RAISE FOR TELEGRAPHERS
18
Per Cent Advance
WASHINGTON, Feb. 11. —The South
ern Railway telegraphers will receive
an advance of approximately 8 per
cent in their wage scale, according to
an agreement effected tonight through
the good offices of Judge Martin A.
Knapp of the commerce court and G.
"VV. W. Hanger, acting commissioner of
labor, comprising the board of media
tion under tlie Erdman law.
Prediction Made at Lunch
eon in Her Honor in
Kansas City
Diploma Conferred for Di
vinity Degree Granted
Two Decades Ago
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Feb. 11.—TVoman ;
suffrage universally in America by
1920.
That was the prophecy of wv. Anna
Shaw, president of the National Equal
Suffrage league, at a luncheon given
in her honor by 200 members of the
! Kansas City Equal Suffrage associa
tion here this afternoon.
"We would be able to give women \
[the ballot In every state before 1920,"
I Doctor Shaw said, "were it not for the
antiquated constitutions of Vermont
and several other commonwealths
which make it impossible for the ques
tion to be voted on before that year."
Doctor Shaw received a diploma for
the degree of doctor of divinity, con
ferred upon her by the Kansas City
university 20 years ago.
The diploma was presented by D. S.
Stevens, president of the university,
who introduced Doctor Shaw to the
diners. Doctor Stevens said Doctor
Shaw was the first woman to whom
the degree had ever been awarded by
his university and that this was his
first opportunity to hand the diploma
to her ln person.
Doctor Shaw said she would wear
her cap and gown and the colors of
the Kansas City university when she
marches in the suffrage parade in
Washington on March 3.
"Gen/* Jones Leads Army
NEW YORK. Feb. 11.—The long her
alded women's suffrage "hike" from
New York to Washington starts to
morrow. Sixteen women, with "Gen
eral" Rosalie Jones in command, have
pledged themselves, it was announced
tonight, to walk the entire distance,
230 miles.
They hope to complete their mid
winter journey in 17 days, reaching the
national capital on March 1, in time
to take part in the women's suffrage
parade two days later. This is an aver
age of 16 miles a day.
LEAFLETS THEIR AMMUNITION
The little army, uniformed in brown
cloaks and hoods, will carry as am
munition 20,000 suffrage leaflets and
"votes for women" buttons with which
they hope to capture all enemies en
countered on the way..
Mass meetings are planned ln the
larger towns and cities en route, in
cluding Philadelphia. Baltimore, Tren
ton, New Jersey and Wilmington, Del.
One of the towns to be Invaded is
Princeton, N. J., where the suffragettes
will urge their cause at a mass meet
ing of the students of Princeton uni
versity. Word was received tonight
that a delegation of the students plans
to meet the army and escort it into
town.
TO CARRY OFFICIAL "ORATOR"
In view of the fact that there is no
bridge across the Hudson river, the
actual start will be made at Newark,
N. J. An ammunition wagon, painted
in suffragette yellow and decorated
with flags and banners, will lead, car
rying Miss Elizabeth Freeman, the
"official orator" of the expedition.
George Wendt Jr.. son of Mrs. George
Wendt of Albany, one of the marchers,
will be the army's bugler, and Mrs.
Olive Schultze will act as scout, riding
ahead in an automobile to herald the
army's approach and to reconnoiter.
Women Are Barred
WASHINGTON, Feb. 11. —Definite an
nouncement was made today by the
inaugural committee that there would
be no college women or women repre
senting other organizations in the in
augural parade of President Wilson.
This decision was reached, it was
stated, because the committee preferred
that no women take part in the pag
eant. Mrs. Elmer Black of Chicago
had requested that the American
women's peace congress be allowed to
participate fn the parade.
At least 4.000 students from colleges
In various parts of the country, aside
from those who will form part of the
military section, will be represented in
the parade.
Most of these will come from Prince
ton. Johns Hopkins and Georgetown uni
versities. Other colleges to be repre
sented in the parade will be Eastern
college of Virginia, George Washington
university and St. John's academy of
Annapolis.
Harvard, Yale, Cornell, Columbia and
the University of Pennsylvania still
have the matter under consideration,
and, according to the Intercollegiate
committee, probably will send large
delegations.
Coeds to March
WASHINGTON, Feb. 11.—Swarth
more college at Swarthmore, Pa., offi
cially has recognized the woman's
suffrage movement, according to suf
frage leaders here, in that the college
president has appointed three young
women students to represent it in the
suffrage pageant here March 3. This
is the first, institution of learning in
the country to send official represent
atives to take part in the pageant.
■ ■ - i
WILSON FAVORS McCOMBS
President Elect Hope* Manager Will
Continue In National Committee Post
TRENTON, N. J., Feb. 11.—President
elect Wilson intimated tonight that he
hoped William F. McCombs, manager
of the Wilson campaign since pre
convention days, would continue as
chairman of the democratic national
committee after March 4. The presi
dent elect was Informed that Chair
man McCombs had called a meeting of
the national committee for March 5
and was asked if he had heard whether
Mr. McCombs contemplated resigning
on that occasion.
Society Women Wash
Their Own Hair
"Home shampooing among society
women is rapidly gaining in popular
ity," says Mac Martyn, writing for the
Boston American. "This is not a fad
or fancy, but rather because splendid
results are attained in this manner
through the use of canthrox.
"If you would have luxuriant
growth of glossy hair, try this easy
way of shampooing: Dissolve a tea
spoonful of canthrox in a teacup of
hot water, then pour on the scalp and
rub vigorously for a few minutes,
after which the hair and scalp should
be rinsed carefully. When the hair
is dry -you will be delighted with its
fluffy, glossy condition.
"While canthrox is not expensive,
you should be careful to get it in an
I original package"
Women's Club Work
Calendar for Today
c- •■
Forum club, 220 Post street,
2:30 p. m.
Pacific- Musical society, St.
Francis hotel, 10:30 a. in.
Women* Political league, Pa
cific bnildins, 2 p. in.
To Kalon, parliamentary law
section, Fillmore and Jackson
streets, 10 a. in.
(•olden Oate Mothers' club,
Golden Oate school, 2:30 p. m.
Roosevelt Mothers' club, Roose
velt school, 2:30 p. m.
PRINCESSES PLEAD
FOR WAR ORPHANS
Bulgarian Nobles to Give Picture
With Each Donation
WASHINGTON. Feb. 11.—Madame
Bakhmeteff, wife of the Russian am
bassador, has received a letter from
the two young princesses of Bulgaria.
Princess Eudoxic and Nadejda, only
daughters of King Ferdinand of Bul
garia, Inclosing an autograph commu
nication from their royal highnesses
addressed to the "Dear Children of the
United States of America."
The young princesses, 15 and 14 years
respectively, were left motherless on
the death of Queen Marie-Louise 'of
Bulgaria several years ago.
Their communication is addressed
from the royal palace at Sofia and
speaks of the great .sacrifice of human
life during the Balkan conflict, which
they say has robbed many thousands
of poor innocent children and babies
of their fathers.
With characteristic fervor, the young
princesses' note says:
"Think how the -babies will miss
their 'daddy,' whose return from work
each day they so eagerly look forward
to; think how they will miss his fond
'good night' or long for his morning
greeting; think how sad will be their
Sundays and holidays with no 'daddy'
to play with them or take them walks,
and when you have so thought, turn
to your own happy lives and think If
you w*ould not be still more happy by
making some little sacrifice yourselves
to help them."
The princesses state that any help
given them, however small, will be
used to succor the orphans of the war,
and that they will send those who help
them their portrait with their thanks.
Madame Bakhmeteff has consented to
act as intermediary for those who wish
to answer the communication of the
young princesses.
Hearing; Xevt Monday—"he prelimi
nary hearing of Miss Elizabeth Tay
lor, stewardess on the steamer Mon
golia, who is charged with smuggling
opium at Honolulu, was set yesterday
for 10 o'clock Monday before United
States Commissioner Francis Krull.
AMUSEMENTS
TRIUMPH in LONDON
At Paly's Theater.
DITTO HERE
COLUMBIA
MATINEE TODAY %*&£*
Every Night—THlS and NEXT WEEK.
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
GYPSY
Ilehar's 1 »■ \mT _P
Operetta j |m %aW W _■■
"Most musical, most brightly staged, most en
tertaining of Irs kind."—Examiner.
•'Production finest beard here this season;
charms big audience." —Chronicle.
"Really beautiful production."—Call.
"Beautifully n<ounted. well snng."—Bulletin.
m T2k _*.'___.____ LEADING THEATER
■ 'VAEVhI e1 " 8 & Market
W fl mWW Phone—Sutter 2460
W3 SI WAT. TODAY
Last time Sat. Night.
Night and Sat. Mat. Prices—soc to $2.
KmS "NAUGHTY
In VICTOR HERBERT'S M Al-EL. I I A
Comic Opera Masterpiece nxmmmmnaxax a m■»
SEATS TOMORROW FOR
BUNTY PULLS
THE STRINGS
2Weeks,CGM. MON. FEB. 17
Night and Sat. Mat. Prices—soc to $2.
ENTIRE LOWER FI.-oQß'll AT WED. MATS.
TIVOII OPERA HOUSE
■ ■ ™ V "* Opening March 12, 1913
PUBLIC SUBSCRIPTION SALE NOW ON
AT SHERMAN, CL.AY & CO., KEARNY
AND SITTER STREETS,
OF SEASON TICKETS) ENGAGEMENT
Chicago Grand Opera Co.
Including Luisa Tetrazxinl and Mary Garden.
VIA II FOR SEASON TICKETS R£-
CEIVED AND FILLED NOW.
OR.DER.S For one or nlore tsl °g lp perform
vx * rf *'* ances received now, filled after
close of Snbseription Sale as near desired loca
tion as possible.
Special attention given to orders ont of town
patrons. Make all checks payable to W. 11.
LEAHY Tivoli Opera House. San Francinco.
Full Information concerning company, artists,
repertory, at Sherman. Clay & Co.'s.
m^ Valenrla
RHpSSIII c:,
Uf LAMBARDI
GRAND OPERA COMPANY
TONIGHT, "LA TRAVIATA"
Vicarino, Folco. Nicolettl.
Tomorrow Night, "Otello"
Adaberto. Folco, Giovacchini.
Fri Night, "THAIS": with Vlcarino. Sat. Mat.
"ANDREA CHENIER"; Sat. Night, "CAVAL
LERIA RUSTICANA" and "I'PAOLIACCL"
X _W Sherman. Clay A: Co.'s. Kearny
JLJMJ HUtT and Sutter, and at Valencia.
Prices—soc, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
Steinway Piano I'sed.
:r^aß_v^_?Oj»T^P^r3rMf3»
MARKET ST.. OPPOSITE MASON.
EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT
MRS. ALLISON
' THE HEROINE OF TWO SILK
NIGHTIES."
"BATTLE-OF-WHO-RUNS"
A_F.Jn.OOO COMEDY PRODUCTION. _
GREAT GOLDEN TROUPE
CZAR'S FAVORITE MUSICIANS.
6—OTHER STAR ACTS— 6
Mat. Daily at 2:30; Nighta at 7:15-9:15.
SI N. AND 1 Matinees at 1 :Co and 3.30.
HOLIDAYS I Nights Continuous from «:30.
FASHION ARBITERS
MAKE WOMEN'S
COATS 27 INCHES
California Suggestion for 22 to 32
Inch Garment Overruled at
New York Meeting
XKW YORK. Feb. 11.—Arbiters of
fashion set today for the nation and
Canada the spring styles and length of
women's outer garments.
After arguing hotly all night and dis
cussing the matter more calmly today
representatives of the National Ladles'
Tailors' and Dress Makers' association
from 21 states, the district of Columbia
and Canada announced coats are to be
24 to 27 inches long, skirts from one to
three and one-half inches from the
ground and train skirts from four to
12 inches in length.
California. Illinois and Canada all had
suggestions" for coat length scaling
from 22 to 32 inches, while California
radically demanded that skirts range
from two to five and one-half inches
from the floor. The measures adopted,
however, were those proposed by New
York. With New York voted Massa
chusetts, Maryland, Virginia, New Jer
sey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Mis
souri, Georgia. Tennessee, North and
South Carolina and the district of Co
lumbia.
New York's proposal of "blouses as
the leader of the season* was accepted,
together with the following styles:
'Fancy cuts for tailor made gar
ments; habit effect skirts; bias lines in
tailor skirts; top coats, box effects and
small drapings on back and front;
sleeveless coats for three piece suits:
skirts not wider than one aftd a half
yards around the bottom."
PRICES OF PINE LUMBER
MAY BE SENT SOARING
President of Manufacturers' Association
Suggest* Increase in Annual
Address
NSW ORLEANS, Feh. 11.—Lumber
manufacturers throughout the United
States will increase the prices of all
grades of pine lumber if they follow
suggestions made in the annual address
of President S. J. Carpenter of the Yel
low Pine Manufacturers' association of
the United States, which met in con
vention here today.
"An analysis of last year's opera
tions will reveal the fact that there is
not a fair margin of profit ln our busi
ness at present prices," said Mr. Car
penter.
"Cost of labor and material has been
increasing faster than have the prices
of lumber."
A MUSEM ENTS__
(FtNgfcGUL aw.STOCVa OrVEr v>a*ltVV
MATINEE TODAY AXD EVERY DAY
MARTIN BECK Offers
MML SARAH BERNHARDT
AND HKIt COMPANY OF 2.">
INCLUDING MONS. LOU TELLEGEN.
Matinee Today and Tonight. "One Christmas
Night"; Tomorrow Matinee and Night. "Theo
dora": Friday and Saturday Matinees aud Nights,
'"Camille."
TOGETHER WITH
An Entirely >ew Vaudeville Bill
JOSIE HEATHER: "AND THEY LIVEP
HAPPY EVER AFTER": SARANOFF: PRE*-*
NER and RATLIFFE; MrMAHON*. DIAMOND
and CLEMENCE; HESS SISTERS: NEW DAY
LIGHT MOTION PICTUKES. Return for This
Week Only, by Special Request, RALPH HERZ.
Beginning Next Sunday Mat Feb. 16
POSITIVELY LAST WEEK
MML SARAH BERNHARDT
Sunday and Monday Matinees and Nights.
"Fhedre": Tuesday Matinee and Night, "Ca
mille"; Wednesday and Saturday Matinees and
Nights. "One Christmas Night"; Thur«day Mat
ins* and Night, "La Tosca"; Friday Matineu
and Night, "Lucrece Borgia."
Prices For This Enerag-ement Only
EVENlNG—Orchestra. $1; Box and I.oge
Seats, 11.50; Dress Circle. -50c and 73c; Bal
cony. 2Se and ."°.c; Gallery. 10c.
MATINEE —Orchestra, 75c and $1; Box and
Loge Seats. |LfO; Dresa Circle. 50c and 75c;
Balcony, 25c and 50c: Gallery. 10c.
SEATS NOW ON SALE
McAllister
___■ m x* r aTSwA m lajsa\\ Nr * Market
__P_k ▼_F Phone
W fM Market 130
Cha*. H. Muehlmac, Manager
POP. MATS. TODAY AND SAT—B5c and 50c
fMUTT m
AND M9L
jeffM
The Rig wMaMMMxa*
Mns'.cal Ommedr
SEE MUTT AND JEFF IN THEIR NEW
CLOTHES. IT'S A BCREAM.
PRICES—2Sc to $1.
Last Week Start* St"N MAT. S*ats Tfenrs.
* fy * fm a fl**"*| O'Farrell near Poweil
A 1 I /k tm\ WC Phone Kearny 2
fmljV*Z'ȣ*lmlm Home Phone C-4455
Mat. Tomorrow —Last 5 Nights
MAT. SATURDAY AND SUNDAY.
EVELYN BERT
VAUGHAN g LYTELL
"TheTalkofNewYork"
George M. Cohan's Musical Sensation. 9
PRICES—Night. 25c to $1; Matinee, 25c to 50c.
Next—Miss Vaughan and Mr. I,*rtelt In
"THE THIRD DEGREE"
Charles Klein's Masterpiece.
kni£ MOST POPULAR
■ BEFORE THE PUBLIC! M
J**^^^
CORBETT
SECOND EDITION
"20 Minutes in a San Francisco Cafe"
an \en* Year _ Eve. Entirely Dlfferent
H—ACTS—Ji i PRICES 10c. 2Qc. 3!* c
___BB______g___Bß_■■*»
ILURLINE
HUSH AND LARKIN STREETS
OCEAN WATER BATHS
Swimming and Tub Hatha
Salt water direct from tbe ocean. Open
every day and evening, including Sundays
and "holidays, from 7 a. na. to 10 p. m. Spec
tators* gallery free.
The Sanitary Batht
Natatorlum reserved Tuesday aud Friday
mornings from 8 o'cloci to noon for women
only.
"FILTERED OCEAN TTATER PLUNGE**
COMTORTABLY HEATED. CONSTANTLY
CIRCULATING A?T> FILTERING
Hot Air Hair Dryers, I2eotric Curling Irons
and Shampoo Room for Women Bathers Free.
BRANCH TUB BATHS. 2151 GEARY ST.
NEAR DIVISADERO.
5

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