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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 21, 1913, Image 1

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Rtehoftt Tenipcmture Yesterday. RK; Lowest Weslne*
«lej >«K»it, -Iβ. Ph detail* of tbr Weather ccc page 15.
SAN FRANCISCO H
The largest office building A
west of Chicago,
the Flood building. , J^
VOLUME CXIIL—NO. 83.
NATIONAL
HOUR LAW MIGHT
INJURE GROWERS
Commercial Delegates De
clare It Would •Prohibit
Interstate Commerce in
California Fruit if Women
Packers and Pickers En
gaged Worked More Than
8 Hours Handling Crops
BLACKLIST MEASURE
IS NOT APPRECIATED
Members Think Boycotting
and Picketing Should Be
Included; Then They
Woilld Not Oppose It-
Alien Land Bills Get No
Encouragement at Gath
ering of Business People
Commercial and civic bodies from the
entire state of California, from Im
perial'to Eureka and Los Angeles to
Refldingr. represented by more than 60
delegates, met for the first time at the
call of the San Francisco Chamber of
Commerce yesterday in the Merchants
exchange to decide on opposition to
Certain of the bills now pending before
the state legislature. As a positive
•tcp, it was decided to recommend an
appropriation for $1,000,000 for the
proposed counties building at the Pan
ama-Pacific exposition.
Among the most important bills
which the conference opposed were the
national eight hour law for women,
bills prohibiting all future permanent
acquisition of real property by aliens
in California, the re-enactment of the
Cartwrlght anti-trust act without
present saving clauses and exemptions,
a etrictor eight hour law for women,
and the present form of a bill making
blacklisting a misdemeanor, although
it was also declared to be the sense
of the conference that if this measure
■were amended to prohibit boycotting
and picketing as well it woulZT"tfßl ~be
opposed.
SACRAMENTO PRESIDES
D. W. Carmichael of the Sacramento
Chamber of Commerce was elected
president of the conference, and L. M.
King of San Francisco secretary.
President W. T. Sesnon of the San
Francisco chamber welcomed the dele
gates, and emphasized the common in
terest that drew them They
were gathered to discuss bills con
sidered unfair and unjust and that
threatened the commerce, industry and
agriculture of the state. In such mat
ters, he said, representatives of the
tax payers and bwsiness men should
harp a voice and influence.
"We do not intend that the action of
this conference shall bind the constitu
ent bodies," he eaid. "but bills have
been introduced that threaten to affect
the state at large detrimentally, and we
feel that we should take action here
against them.'"
PLESTV OF IAXD BILLS
It was decided there are enough bills
in the legislature to preserve the land
of the state from ownership by aliens
■who can not become citizens, and so
assembly bill 194 and senate bill 416
■will be contested. The senate bill was
also objected to because it would in the
opinion of the delegates restrain cor
porations, where a majority of the stock
is owned by aliens, from investing in
California development
The conference went on record as op
po&ed to the national eight hour law
for women ac a particularly radical
measure and one which would even pre
vent interstate railroad's from handling
California fruit if handled by women
that had worked more than eight hours.
Proposed state legislation restricting
women from working more than eight
hours a day was condemned as being
a handicap to the fruit industry under
California conditions, and representa
tives of th' 2 canning fruit industries
asked to have the national eight hour
law specially considered.
Opposition was also voiced against
assembly bills 3, 831 and 1138, so called
unfair competition and anti-trust acts,
and also against assembly bill 1897. to I
repeal the exemptions in the Cartwright
acts.
TWO MEASURES OPPOSED
Representatives of the San Francisco
Board of Trade pointed out that as
sembly bill 515 (senate 1180) would
amend the "bulk sale law" in Cali
fornia, passed for the protection of cred
itors, inasmuch as it would practically
prohibit attachments to issue except in
suits against nonresidents, although it
would permit attachments against resi
dents in case of concealment of de
fendant or secretion of his property.
A committee was appointed to prepare
the findings for presentation to the
local chambers and boards of trade
as ttie opinion of the delegates, and to
seek confirmation of the action taken.
This committee consists of Captain H.
Z. Osborne of Los Angeles, Scott H.
Ennls of Sacramento, C. H. Bentley o
San Francisco, William Robertson o
Fresno and W. S. Clayton of San Jose
The formation of a permanent stati
organization to meet annually and dis
cos* matters of common interest wa:
referred to a committee of five foi
consideration.
THE San Francisco CALL
"The People's Newspaper"
THIRD OF MILLION
FOR 26 PAINTINGS
Turner Scene Sold for $14,000,
Highest Price Recorded for
Water Color at Public Sale
NEW YORK. Feb. 20.—Twenty-six
paintings of the John F. Talmage col
lection were sold for $298,000 at auc
tion here tonight.
Two Romneys commanded the high
est prices. "A Lady of Quality" brought
$40,100, and a portrait of Lady Eliza
beth Twisden, $32,000. both going to
dealers.
A little water color, "Fluelin, Lake of
Lucerne," painted in 1840 by Turner
for the father of John Ruskin, went for
$14,400, the highest ever given, as far
as known, at a public sale in this
or any other country for a water color.
A Corot, "Le Sentier au Prlntemps,"
was knocked down for $30,000.
STATES MAY HAVE RIGHT
TO MAINTAIN EXHIBITS
House Committee, After Many Gover-
nors Urge Bill, Take Favorable
View of Proposed Grant
(Special Dispatch to the Call)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.—Bearing
the approval of 27 governors, the
house committee on industrial arts and
expositions today favorably reported to
the house the bill recently introduced
by Representative Turnbull of Vir
ginia providing for a permanent ex
hibit in Washington of the resources
of each state in the union. Under the
terms of the bill the secretary of agri
culture and the chairman of the sen
ate and house committee on industrial
expositions are appointed a
board to investigate and report.
DANCING IS DEMORALIZING

Senior Class at Southern Inlverslty
So Votes and Cuts It Out
LOS ANGELES. Feb. 20.—Basing
their action on the Relief that dancing
Is demoralizing and a barrier to proper
application in school work, members of
the senior, class of the University of
Southern California voted today to
eliminate it from future college en-
tertainments. The students were com
mended by the faculty for their action.
STATE RICHER THAN EVER
Treasury Breaks Record for Amount of
Cash in Vaults
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
SACRAMENTO, Feb. 20.—The state
of California has more money in its
vaults at the present time than ever
before in its history. The money was
counted today by the members of the
board of control and the sum was |17,- |
108,971, or about J1,000,000 above the I
highest previous mark.
JACK FIELD WILL MARRY
Yale's Star Fullback Engaged to the
Daughter of a Wealthy Family
(Special Dispatch to the Call)
BRIDGEPORT, Conn., Feb. 20.—Jack
Field, star fullback on Yale's football
team for several years and head coach
of the eleven, will wed Miss Margaret
Warner, wealthy daughter and only
child of Dover Warner. The engage
ment was announced today.
MANY INJURED IN FIGHT
Garment Strike Sympathizers Collide
With Party of Young Men
BOSTON, Feb. 20.—Fourteen arrests
were made as a result of a street en
counter between garment strike sym
pathizers and a crowd of young men
escorting some women operatives from
an East Boston factory tonight. Sticks,
stones and bottles figured, as -weapons
and many injuries were inflicted.
MAN HURT, HORSE MANGLED
Stick of Dynamite In Road Explodes
With Disastrous Result
POUGHKEEPSIE, X.' V.. Feb. 20.—
When the horse driven by P. A. Pardee
of Shenandoah, near here, stepped oh a
stick of dynamite in the road, Pardee
was blown from the wagon and seri
ously hurt and the horse lacerated.
GREAT EDIFICE DESTROYED
Troitsky Cathedral Barns Bat Priceless
Art Treasures Are Saved
ST. PETERSBURG, Feb. 20.—The
Troitsky cathedral was destroyed by
fire today. The great collection of pic
tures, carvings and precious relics
which had been gathered in the build
ing since its erection in 1703 by Peter
the Great was saved.
CHIPPERS OUT ON STRIKE
Oakland United Iron Work* Refuses to
Grant Employe* a Raise
The membership of local No. 8 of the
Casting Chippers , union employed in
the United Iron works in Oakland
went on strike yesterday because of
the refusal of the management to
grant the standard wage of $3 a day.
PASTORS AT PRIZE FIGHT
St. Joseph Ministers to Attend for
Purpose of Securing: Evidence
ST. JOSEPH, Mo., Feb. 20.—A com
mittee of pastors of churches planned
today to attend a prize fight here to
morrow night for the purpose of ob
taining information to lay before the
grand Jury.
DIVORCE LAW IS AMENDED
Reno Colony H» Only to First of Year
to Get Quick Divorces
CARSON CITY, Nev., Feb. 20.~Gov
ernor Oddie today signed the Barnes
amendment to the divorce law. It be
comes effective January 1, 1914.
SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1913— PAGUSS 1 TO 10.
LITERARY TASTE
AND SILK SOCKS
CAUSE TROUBLE
Beau Brummel of Painters'
and Decorators' Union
Taken While Enrich
ing Mind
NO CHANCE FOR MAN
WITH LARGE IDEAS
Robbed Only Fifty Homes to
Gratify Desires and Then
Police Get Him
For many years Thomas J. Sulli
van, a painter, has been known to his
fellow craftsmen as the Beau Brum
mel of the decorators' union. His
literary taste and knowledge of rare
books was also a matter of comment.
His collection of bric-a-brac and ob
jects of art excited the envy of hie
little coterie of friends. There was
much mystery, of course, about his
acquirement of these luxuries. That
is, there was until last night, when he
was arrested in his home in Linden
avenue by the Burns detective agency,
assisted by officers of the local de
partment.
Sullivan was at peace, perusing a
volume stolen from the library shelves
of John Galen Howard, the well known
architect, when William Mundell, the
Burns operative, made his appearance.
He wore a fancy shirt from the closet
of Irving Lundborg, an investment
broker, and the silk socks of Walter
Hotoart, millionaire clubman and polo
player.
About the room were souvenirs of
many homes of the wealthy, and in his
trunks were lingerie from the boudoirs
of the social elite, vests from Paris
and dainty lace affairs from the shops
of London. At lea3t 50 families, some
of them F. F. V., and others entitled
to a coronet monogram, were repre
sented in his collection.
Mundell explained his mission. It
was, in effect, that pursuing a com
plaint of Irving Lundborg of the Lund
borg, Morgan Investment company,
whose home at 643 Walsworth avenue.
Piedmont, had been robbed of |300
worth of person*! effects, he had,
through laundry mfcrks , , run the crime
down to Sullivan's door. Sullivan had
recently been employed in decorating
Lendborg's residence, and in that occu
pation, through the freedom granted,
rifled Lundborg's closets and Mrs.
Lundborg's chiffonier.
Sullivan, cornered, confessed. In the
search following, evidence was found
that the Lundborg residence was only
one of 60 that Sullivan had robbed.
His thieving covers probably a period
of 10 years.
When Mrs. Sullivan understood the
plight of her husband she rushed to the
bathroom and attempted to commit sui
cide by drinking carbolic acid. De
tective James Gallagher Interfered and
took the vial from the distracted
woman.
Sullivan, believing that the attention
of the detectives was withdrawn to the
rash act of Mrs. Sullivan, tried to escape
by the b§ck door of his residence, but
his retreat was cut off by Mundell. '
He was taken to the city prison and
is held in detinue. This morning he
will be asked to identify two trunks
full of odds and ends found in his pos
session.
SHOT DURING CONFERENCE
Third Man in Deal Kill* One and
Fatally Wounds Other
DALLAS, Tex., Feb. 20.—1n a con
ference over a proposed real estate
deal here today James X White, treas
urer of the Republic Trust company
was shot and killed and A. Silvers,
vice president of the Republic com
pany, was shot, probably fatally. J. A.
Clapton of San Antonio, Tex., the third
man in the conference, is charged with
the crimes.
CAPTAIN LOW IS VERY ILL
L'ncle of Former Mayor of IVew York
suffer* Stroke of Paralysis
SANTA BARBARA, Feb. 20.—Captain
Charles P. Ix>w, uncle of former Mayor
Seth Low of New York and one of the
last of the old time ship masters, suf
fered a stroke of paralysis today, and
hope for his recovery has been aban
doned. He was born In 1824, became
a ship captain at 23 and went to sea
for 31 yeara.
MISS TAFT TO WED SOON?
Romori Say She Will Be Bride Before
I.cavtQK White House
(Bpeclal Dispatch to The Call)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 19.—There
rumors afloat that Miss Taft will
marry Dr. Cary Grayson before she
leaves the White House. The rumor
of Miss Taffs engagement to Doctor
Grayson has never been commented on
or denied by the presidential family.
AGED SWmDLER'S CASE IS PUZZLE
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
WOODLAND, Feb. 20.—What to do
with Frank Morton, a watch repairer
who, although In his sixty-ninth year,
fleeced several persons by pawning ,
their watches and leaving town, is
bothering District Attorney Bailey.
Morton will be 70 years old in a few
days. Hβ protests that this is his
first offense
DEPOSED MEXICAN PRESIDENT IS DETAINED
AND MAYBE HELD TO ANSWER FOR MURDER
ALLEGED LOOTING OF NATIONAL TREASURY
PEACE DEPENDS
ENTIRELY UPON
REBEL LEADERS
United States Is ; Powerless
to Prevent Execution of
Native Political Of- < {.
fenders in Mexico
■ j - f>-' .'
'■ ' • •. '-, :. -' .' ..-.
WASHINGTON. Feb. • 20.—The Mex
-.. „ ,. ..,..,..-..• - •..,-.■ »-. •. - -
ican f capital rapidly Is returning to
normal conditions, according to re
ports of Ambassador Wilson to the
state department. . , ' : -, •
Mr. Wilson's dispatches announced
that quiet prevails, that the police have
resumed their duties, and that it now
is possible to remit money from Amer
ica-through the banks to persons in
need because j of the recent battles. .
Whether this peaceful condition . will
continue is the subject of much specu
lation among , government officials.' :
There seems to be a general feel
ing that unless special inducements in
the way of desirable offices can be held
out to rebel leaders in the north, these
men will refuse to recognize the new
government, afid will continue their
operations until subdued'by force.
..It generally was expected that Za
! pata would prove an unreconcllable,
but his force, while numerous, never
has • engaged in a general concerted
campaign. ;
[ The guerrilla methods employed by
the Zapatistas, while annoying, are
not regarded as particularly ;■ danger
ous to the stabilify of the i govern
ment. "
General • Huerta informed Ambassa-
Continued on Pas* -« Column 4
PRELATE AGAINST
SELF-GOVERNMENT
FOR PHILIPPINES
Cardinal Gibbons Says Plan
Would Be National Dis
honor — Alternative
Idea Suggested
_____
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
BOSTON, Feb. 20.—Cardinal Gibbons,
in a remarkable public statement, de
clares it "would be a national dishonor
for the United States to surrender the
Philippines to the tender mercies of
some neighboring power, or turn them
adrift wholly unprepared to face the
future as an Independent people."
The cardinal, whose article appears
in the Boston Transcript, says:
"I am irrevocably opposed to any.
proposal that would commit this na
tion into a scuttle policy in the Phil
ippine islands today, tomorrow or any
fixed time, and I say this wholly in
' the interest of social, material and
moral advancement of* the people of
the United States, of whom I am proud
to be a fellow qitizen, no less tlian of
the Filipinos themselves.
PRELATE HAS PI.AN
"In my opinion the wisest etep
would be for the president to select a
commission of discreet#and i observant j
citizens to visit the islands. Thus
would they be enabled to form their
Judgment upon observations made as
to the time when the Filipinos may
have the ability and education to as
sume a large measure of self-govern
ment.
"To hold out a promise to them
that we could not keep would be no
less dishonorable than to shirk our ob
ligations. I have no patience with the
argument that the Philippine islands
are the source of an annual deficit.
Even were it true, the fact would not
warrant a cowardly abandonment of
the clear and accepted duty of -the
i American people.'"
it An Independent Newspaper"
PERSONS AND SCENE THAT FIGURE IN MEXICAN NEWS.
Scnora Madero (upper right), wife of the deposed president, who wept
bitterly when her husband's enemies prevented his departure from Mexico City,
fearing that he may be executed; Emiliano Zapata, bandit chief (at left),
who is reported to have taken the city of Cuernavaca and threatens to harass
the new government; Emilio Vasquez Gomez (lower left), who has proclaimed
himself president of the republic; Kenneth Turner, who had been arrested in
the City of Mexico- as a spy, but who was liberated yesterday, and the palace
of Cortez, in the city of Cuernavaca,
J. P. MORGAN ON
BRINK OF ILLNESS
-
Family Draws Near and Spe
cialist Is Summoned to
Him in Rome
(Special Dispatch to the Cell)
NEW YORK. Feb. 20.—Wall street is ;
not satisfied with the news of J. Pier
potit Morgan's health. It is feared that I
the great financier is in much :
condition lhan the public reports mdl- I
cate. . The fact that his family is gradU i
ually drawing around him, and the fact j
that' Prof: Giuseppe Bartianelli, the fa- j
mous Italian spe«ialist. has been called;
to attend him. have furnished the
groundwork for Wall street's fears.
It .may- be true, as the reports say.
that iie is merely precautionary and Is !
suffering from some temporary and
trifling ailmerit, but simple explanation;
does not "appeal to the "street."
Mr. Morgan's affairs are in such a
shape now that the news of his death j
would cause little flurry in stock mar-1
kets. For several years he has been j
putting off more and more of the burden
of business and perfecting the vast ma
chinery of his interests in such shape
that It -will run automatically. So.
wh|le the street fears the news of the j
Continued on Page 3, Column 4
HE, A illicit t'UHJbXAsTs
Cloadjr, probably ihowertt light N. wind changing *» 9.
WANTED — YOUNG MAN EXPimiEWCBD MC
FrRNISHINOS. APPLY St7PBRm-
Ivrß!< and women—Large commfMlone; used in
9T«rr home; sure eellef; eiperience niuiep**-
For fontinaatloii of These Adrertiscments
*,See Classified Pages.
WOMEN LINE UP
FOR BATTLE IN
NATION'S CAPITAL
Suffragists and "Antis" in
Fighting Trim — Cali
fornia's Equal Rights
Forces Arrive
(Special Dispatch to the Call)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.—A1l is not
quiet along the Potomac.
Rival armies have encamped them
selves upon that once tranquil stream
and the suffragists and anti-suffragists
are drawn up, in battle array just across
the street from each other In the heart
of. the capital city.
This, is the battle of "votes for
women."
It was California which sent the
latest delegation here to do battle. .
The antis came from the lami of the
sunset.
Miss Minnie Bronzen, who is in,
«charge of the comes
from California, where for seven years
she conducted a campaign agaiast
woman suffrage. She is a born fighter
and announces that she is here for a
fight to the finish.
Mrs. Arthur M. Dodge of New York
and Pan Francisco, who is president
of the national association opposed to
"votes for women,",'is here with Miss
Brorjzen, and left last night for New
York, w'nere she will organze a troop
of debaters to take the capital by
storm.
The whole company of New Yorkers
is coming down <tn the "millio'n'dollar
special," heralded as one pf the finest
railroad trains that ever graced a
roadbed. TJie train will be bedecked
with streamers and flags of the nation
with a predominance of white, black
and rose, the colors of the associa
tion.
"Down with the yellow peril!" is the
battle hymn of the antis.
"Never say die!" is the slogan of the
suffragists.
From now until March 3. when the
Continued on I'nge 3, Column 2
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
Political Enemies Charge
That Madero Shot and
• Killed Colonel Riveroll at
Time of Coup d'Etat and
That He Plotted With His
Executed Brother to As
sassinate General Huerta
by Putting Poison in Wirie
CONGRESS DEMANDS
FISCAL ACCOUNTING
New President's Cabinet
Takes Oath of Office in
Presence of General Diaz,
Who Receives Great Ova
tion, a United Army and
Immense Concourse of
Citizens—Capital City Re
sumes Its Normal Aspect
After Reign of Terror
MEXICO CITY. Feb. 20.—That Fran-
Cisco Madero will g%t out of Mexico
without having to face official investi
gations of one charge or another now
appears improbable.
Already he has been charged with
responsibility for the death of Colonel
Riveroll, whom he is alleged to have
shot at the time of his arrest in the
palace.
A committee of deputies now has
asked that Madero be forced to account
for moneys expended by the adminis
tration.
This committee called on President
Huerta this afternoon and urgred that
Madero be held accountable for the
depleted condition of the treasury.
The lftet details of the organization
of Mexico's new government were com
pleted at 4 o'clock this afternoon, when
the members of President Huerta's offi
cial family took the oath in the yellow
room In the palace, immediately above
that occupied by the deposed president
and vice president
MADERO HEARS PLAUDITS
Unable to witness the scenes from
their room, Madero and Suarez were
able to hear the plaudits of the crowds
In the streets and in the big square in
front, and the bugle calls of the united
army.
Significant of the birth in battle of
the new administration was the frank
display of soldiers and the effect on
the crowds was not lost.
It served as a reminder that even it
it were not a military dictatorship
that had.been established, the present
administration was of much sterner
fiber than that which had just fallen.
General Felix Diaz was among those
in the yellow room when the ministers
took the oath and heard Huerta pro
nounce the formal time honored phrase:
"If* you keep this oath the country
will reward you; if you do not it wiJl
call you to an accounting."
General Diaz was present ostensibly
in no official capacity, but merely as a
private citizen, which he became many
months ago on resigning his commis
sion as a general in the regular army
Madefoand Pino Suarez betrayed in
their faces the chagrin and humiliation
which they must have felt, according
to officers of the guard. Neither
deigned to ask questions as to what
was happening in the room above, but
the conversation of the guards served
to acquaint them with the proceeding?.
FORMER PRESIDENT SSEERS
A sneer showed on tlie face of Ma
dero, but the dejection of the former
vice president was too great, appar
ently, to permit a play of other emo
tions.
Frederic Gonzales Garza, the former
governor of the federal district, is the
third prisoner occupying the room.
There ia no partition. Each man is
furnished with a bed and meals are
brought periodically and served jointly.
Madero has ceased to refuse food, and .
so far as personal comfort is concerned
he no longer resists efforts in that
direction.
Outside the room stands a guard of
soldiers, and although there are no
jgjf 708 MARKET 01*63*9
Bso Frtnclico's Finest Men's furnishing
Store. l.l*o showing Spring Neckwear *o<l
Shirte.
754 Market, Opp. Call Bl4*>

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