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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 22, 1913, Image 1

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Tlekrat Temperature YcMerdny. SO? Tiowcwt Thuredar
Ught. 46. For detail* of <li«* WenthiT wee pair*- 17.
THE SIX O'CLOCK EDITION OF THE CALL
prints all the news that is made
after this edition lias gone to press.
LOOK OVER A COPY OF IT.
VOLUME CXni.—NO. 84.
OFFICIAL SAYS
THAW ATTORNEY
OFFERED BRIBE
Dr. John W. Russell, Super
intendent of Matteawan,
Testifies Before Sulzer's
Committee That Lawyer
Sought to Influence Him
to Effect Patient's Release
WITNESS TELLS OF
VISIT FROM CLARK
Chairman of Commission
Declares Secretary of the
Investieatine: Body Ap
proached Him and Insist
ed That Governor Wanted
the Slayer of White Freed
ALBANY, X. V.. Feb. 21. —Dr. John
W. Russell, superintendent of the Mat
teawan state hospital for the criminal
(nun*, testified torl.iv before Governor
£-"':!zer"s committee of Inquiry that he
had been offered $20,000 if he would
release Harry K. Thaw.
The offer, he said, wns made durinsr
.tter part of 1912 by a lawyer
tvhose name he could not remember, in
an "uptown lintel" in New Yorlc city,
and was refuse!.
This testimony was developed dur
iner an investigation of reports that
William F. Clark. secretary of the
committee, recently had requested Doc
tor RusfpM to release Thaw on the
ground that p;;eh an action was de
eired by Governor Sulzer.
The grovernor himself had stated
previously that he had authorized no
one to make such a request.
Dr. Jame= v. May. chairman of the
state hospital commission, another
witness. told of having been ap
proached by Clark several days ago
with the same request.
TO»,0 fiOVKRXOR OF IXCTOEXT
Doctor May said he tr.Ul Governor
Sulzer of the incident and the gover
nor said he would not interfere in the
Thaw case and had not authorized
anybody to say h*> would.
Clark, when sworn today, denied
having: told eUiUbr Decter Russell .or
Doctor May fiat the governor wanted
Thaw released. Tie said, however, he
had visited Doctor RufMli while in
veetijrmting a report that the latter
l:a<7 received $25,000 to free Thaw.
While Doctor Russell's memory was
hazy concerning the identity of the
lawyer who offered him the bribe, he
denied any reason for wishing: to con
ceal the man's name, and thought he j
could furnish it later.
The witness al=o told of a conversa
tion he had with "Mr. Hoffman of
I'otiarhkeepsie. Mr. Thaw's private de
tvtive," in which he said he had been
piivised he would be called to Albany
soon on the Thavr matter and that the
"governor wanted Thaw out."
"WOI r LD HAVi: lOORRD ORDER
The superintendent added that even
if he had received a written order
from the governor to release Thaw he
would not have done so.
Doctor Russell, when asked point
blank whether he considered Thaw in
sane, declined , to answer.
Doctor May later testified that Doc
tor Russell had expressed the opinion
i'> him that Thaw was "not a para
noiac, but was suffering from a form
of mental unsoundness which is spoken
of as constitutional inferiority."
Clark likewise declared Doctor Rus
fpll had remarked to him that Thaw
v. as "perfectly sane."
The governor's inquiry followed the
recent circulation of stories of an
alleged plan to bring about Thaw's
release by bringing political influence
to bear.
FIVE SCORE CHRISTIANS
MASSACRED BY TURKS
Bulgarian Capital Hears of Other
Atrocities Committed in the
Tehatalja District
SOFIA. Bulgaria. Feb. 21.—One hun
dred Christiana were massacred by
Turkish troops yesterday in the village
of Kenaminio, according to dispatches
received by the Bulgarian government
today. Similar massacres and other
atrocities are reported throughout the
Tehatalja district, a large portion of
which has been left unprotected by the
partial withdrawal of the Bulgarian
troops.
_ •
SWISS BANKER ARRESTED
t bnrjtinff !•« Indie, European Republic
11ns Financier Held In Chicago
<:iIfCAGO. Feb. 21.—Hans Mauder,
president of the International Realty
association and head of the savings
banks in Basle and Zurich. Switzerland,
was arrested here today on complaint
of the Swiss government. It was
charged Mauder swindled Switzerland
citizens out of $500,000.
ASTOR IS SUED FOR CRASH
i vcllst. Rub Down by Richest loath,
Ask* f25.000 Damages
WHITE PLAINS. N. V.. Feb. 21.—
Charles E. Palmer of Tarrytown today
brought suit In the supreme court for
5J5.000 damages against William Vin
cent Astor for injuries received Septem
ber 30, 1910, when, he says, Astor's
„ ito crashed into his motorcycle.
THE San Francisco CALL
"The People's Newspaper" \
AGED LOTHARIO
WINS HEIRESS, 105
Court's Action Prevents Armed
Guards From Staving Elisal
da-Lcon Wedding
fSpeHal r>!PT>atoh tn Tb* Call)
LOS ANGELES. Feb. 21.—The court
today vacated Its previous order ap
pointing Mrs. Claudia Lugo guardian
of Mrs. Marcellina Elisalda, the 103
year old heiress to a fortune of $50,000.
thus leaving her free to marry Pleas
nntino Leon, S," years old. who has
Vipen prevented by armed guards from
1-"eonmfn2r her husband. The marriage
took place at 5 o'clock this evening at
the home of the h^ir^ss.
COUP Ton OM riPiDPn AT
MRS. HASKELL'S TRIAL
Spectators. Che*rlnsr T.nwyer , * Efforts
to Halt Raring; of WntnnnVi Past
Ufo. Are Ordered Out
SACRAMKNTO. Feb. 19.—Superior
Judge Hughes ordered the sheriff to
clear the courtroom of spectators this
afternoon during the trial of Lillian
Belle Haskell for the murder of Frank
T. Fischer. The audience had become
demonstrative over the protest of Mrs.
Haskell's attorney against the Inquiry
of the district attorney into the
woman's past history and applauded
loudly. Every one except those inside
the rail with the attorney and others
directly concerned in the case was com
pelled to retire and the doors were
locked.
Mrs. Haskell was under cross exam
ination all day, this being her second
day on the stand. The cross examina
tion was not completed when court ad
journed until Monday.
The questions of the prosecution con
cerned threats made by Mrs. ilaskell
against Fischer's life, but she often
pleaded that she did not remember.
SUICIDE PROVES TO BE
EXILED RUSSIAN COUNT
Police Find Papers Showing That Yon
Detling Escaped From
Siberia
CHICAGO, Feb. 21. —Count Francis
yon Detling, a Russian, died today in
St. Anthony's hospital. Yon Detling
had escaped from Siberia, where he
had been exiled by Russia. His name
and were found in papers opened
by the police today. He shot himself
two days ago in a public park. A
photograph of the dead man found
among his effects was inscribed "To my
son. ILadislav yon Detliag, Granite
vine, Mass."
MRS. BOWNE SINGS 11^CHOIR
Mott and Affinity Happy In Their Life
In HnnekooK
(Special Dinpatob to The Call)
NEW YORK, Feb. 21.—Mrs. Frances
Hewitt Bowne. who eloped with Jordan
L. Mott 111 and whose husband is suing
for divorce on the ground of desertion,
is singing in a church in Hongkong,
China. She and Mott are said to be
contented. Mott has a job on a news
paper.
GIRL, 10, SAVES MOTHER
Throws Blanket About Biasing Parent
and Rushes for Aid
(Spwial Dispatch to The Call)
SACRAMENTO. Feb. 21.—The prompt
action of. her 10 year old daughter
probably saved the life of Mrs. J. C.
Cavier of Oak Park, who is In a serious
condition from burns incurred when
her dress caught fire from a stove to
day. The girl threw a blanket about
her mother and rushed for assistance.
KILLED SPRAYING TREES
Solano County Frnlt Grower Is Victim
When Tank Blows Up
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
WINTERS, Feb. 21.—C. A. Murray, a
Solano county fruit grower, was killed
on his ranch six miles east of Winters
today by the explosion of a spraying
tank. Murray and his son were spray
ing trees when the explosion happened.
CHINESE DOWAGER IS DEAD
Former Emprnw, vrldovr of Kwasgio,
Succumbs In Peking
PEKING. Feb. 21.—Yβ Ho Na La,
empress dowager of China, died in
Peking early today. She was the
widow of Kwangsu, who died November
13, 1908.
S. C. TOMSKY SENTENCED
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
WOODLAND, Feb. 21.—For obtaining
property under false pretenses Sam C.
Tomsky this afternoon was sentenced
by Judge Hawkins to five years' im
prisonment in San Quentln.
Hugh Fullerton
The baseball writer
who is contributing to
The Sunday Call a se
ries of "dope" articles
on the teams in the
National and American
leagues, discusses the
1913 prospects of the
Cleveland and Boston
National teams in to~
morrow's issue of The
Call.
SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, 22, 1913.—PAGES 1 TO 10.
ELECTRIC RATES
MUST STAND BIG
SLASH THIS YEAR
Reductions Are to Go Into
Effect July I—Slight Cut
in Gas Charges Is
Probable
EXPERT RETAINED
TO INVESTIGATE
State Railroad Commission
Will Be Called Upon to
Assist Board
Big reductions in electric rates and
probably a slight cut in the gas rates,
to take effect July 1, will be made by
the supervisors. The light committee
will meet Tuesday afternoon to initiate
plans for the reductions.
The state railroad commission will
be called upon to assist the supervi
sors in fixing equitable rates. Ar
rangements already have been made
to ha\-e Expert F. Emerson Hoar of
the commission Investigate the Pacific
Gas and Electric company's rates.
COMPAXY PILES REPORT
The company filed with the super
visors yesterday a report of the valua
tion of Its properties and Its balance
sheet for the year 1912.
Big cuts were made in gas and elec
tric rates last year, but it Is prom
ised that the electric cuts will be
larger than ever before.
Supervisor Koshland of the commit
tee In charge of fixing these charges
said yesterday that the matter will be
taken- up at the Tuesday meeting at
4 o'clock.
PREDICTS 810 CUT
"It is safe to say that there will be
a big cut In the electric rates," he
said. "The report of the committee In
fixing the rates last year indicates this.
But with the co-operation of the rail
road commission's experts "we expect
data =which will be more far reaching
than we have ever before received.
"About th»e gas rates I do not care
to 6ay. There may be a slight reduc
tion. But this will have to be deter
mined by the results of the railroad
commission's investigation. , *
It Is evident from the financial re
port submitted by the gas company
that It will seek to have the old rate
of 80 cents, which last year was cut
to 75 cents, again set. The supervisors
have a surprise for the company In ob
taining the services of the railroad
commission as in the telephone rate
flxingr case.
MUSIC DISPLEASES, SO
STEIN STARTS FIRING
Two Benlcla Men Shot at Dance by
Powder Man Who Doesn't Like
the Orchestra
(Special Dispatch to the Call)
BENICIA, Feb. 21.—Because he ob
jected to the music at a private dance
given in a local hotel. Andy Stein, head
powder man for the San Francisco
Bridge company's crew dredging for
the new ferry slip here, appeared in
the doorway with a gun and opened
flre on the startled guests. His aim
was true and brought down E. G.
Albinson, a guest, and Chester Hoyt,
employed by the bridge company.
Stein then barricaded himself in a
room with another gun and two boxes
of cartridges. After trying for two
hours to persuade the man to come out
and give himself up, Officers Hyde and
Malone sent a deputy to feign an attack
upon a window leading to his room
while they broke open the door.
Stein was placed in the city Jail and
later taken to the county Jail at Fair
field. Hoyt, who was wounded in the
thigh, and Alblnson, whose wound was
in the abdomen, were rushed by physi
cians to the Vallejo hospital.
ELKS FROLIC IN THE $NOW
San Francisco Lodge Party Enjoying
Yosemlte Valley Storm
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
TOSEMITE, Feb. 21.—San Francisco
lodge, B. P. O. E., in a special party
of 150 Elks and ladies, arrived in Yo
semite valley thla morning on their
theater train de luxe and are enjoying
the time of their lives in a raging
snowstorm. The valley folk are al
ready convinced that they are enter
taining the best people on earth.
HILLES AWAITS DEMAND
Chairman Won't Call Revision Session
Intil Party Members Voice Wish
WASHINGTON, Feb. 21.—Until a ma
jority of the members of the republican
national committee express desire for
a national convention to revise rulee
and change the basis of the southern
representation Chairman Charles D.
Hilles will not is%ue a call for a meet
ing of the committee to consider the
subject.
MORE HASH FOR SOLDIERS
Forbes Thinks Guard Cooks Too Waste
ful aad Plans to Conserve Supply
SACRAMENTO, Feb. 21.—A school for
national guard cooks is the latest idea
of Adjutant General E. A. Forbes, who
intends to stop the tendency, noticeable
at the last encampment, to waste food.
If George Washington Were to Come to Town
JEALOUS RAGE CAUSE OF KILLING
Joseph Jungclaus Slain by Jose Macia
Victim Enamored of Beautiful Nurse Engaged to Rival Attacks
Both in Room of Woman's Choice
Driven to jealous" rage at finding Mrs. Nannet Robinson, a beautiful nurse, of whom he was enamored, in the
rooni of Jose Macia, 1473 Post street, Joseph Jungcl ius, while assaulting his rival, was shot and killed by Macia.
The tragedy occurred at 3:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Four shots were fired at Jungclaus, two taking
effect, one piercing his heart, the other his shoulder. He died before reaching the central emergency hospital.
HOOTS AND CHEERS FOR
MRS. PANKHURST AS SHE
TAKES BLAME FOR BOMB
Suffragette, Assailing Lloyd-
George, Saved From At
tack by Police
LONDON, Feb. 21. —Mrs. Emmeline
Pankhurst. the militant suffragette who
has declared that she was responsible
for the dynamite explosion which re
cently wrecked the home of David
tiloyd-Georgo, chancellor of the ex
chequer, met with a mixed reception
at a meeting tonight In the Chelsea
town hall ntider direction of the
Women's Social and Political union.
When Mrs. Pankhurst appeared on
the platform she was greeted with
groans, hisses, yells and cheering, and
only a large force of police in the naty
prevented the hostile section of the
audience from attacking her.
When she left the hall Mrs. Par.k
hurst twitted the authorities for being
afraid to take advantage of hei ?.s
--sumption of responsibility for blowing
up Lloyd-George's house, and send her
to Jail.
She declared that, short of ttk'nfe
human life, the militant suffragettes in
tended to do everything possible to set
tle once for all the political status of
the women of this country.
DUCKS STUCK TO
RAILS MALI CARS
Birds Freezing to Trolley Traces
After Swim Are Liberated
by Motorman
GRASS VALLEY. Feb. 21.—Traffic on
the local traction line was delayed 15
minutes this morning, due to five ducks
freezing to the track. The ducks had
just come out of a pool and as each
stepped on the rail their feathers froze
almost Instantly. The motorman had
to puM each duck off. The birds left a
bunc "'* of feathers on th* track.
J "An Independent \ewsoaoer"
Policemen Jack Esperance tind
Frank W. Robl arrested Macia and
booked him on a charge of murder
Mrs. Robinson is held at the prison
as a witness.
Mrs. Robinson, who is employed as
a nurse in the home of Mrs. B. Llllen
thal. at 1807 Gough street has for
some time been paid attentions by both
Macia and Jungclaus. She met the
former a year ago in the Hotel Riche
lieu, where he was employed as a
waiter. She has known Jungclaus for
seven years.
Up to a few weeks ago the latter
was employed as an inspector by the.
United Railroads. Since that time he
has been engaged as a motorman on
an observation car. He was 40 years
of age and married, and resided with
his wife at 1201 Divisadero street.
MACIA TELEPHONED WOMAN
Macia yesterday afternoon tele
phoned, asking Mrs. Robinson to spend
the afternoon with him. She agreed,
and upon the suggestion of the waiter
went to his room to await his arrival.
On his way home Macia met Jungclaus
in Franklin street near Geary, where
the two had a few words. In parting,
the motorman said he was going down
town to meet a friend. He had called
at the Lilienthal house and found Mrs.
Robinson absent.
Ten minutes after Macia arrived at
his room Jungclaus rang the bell of
the flat and asked the landlady, Mrs.
R. Kolf. if "Joe was in." On being
advised in'the affirmative, he went to
Macia's room. Without knocking, he
entered and began upbraiding Mrs.
Robinson.
JUJTGCL.AUS HITS RIVAL
Heated words followed, after which
the intruder left. He was g-one only
a few minutes when he returned, and
grasping Mrs. Robinson, tried to take
her away by force.
Macia Intervened and told Jungclaus
that he was in a private house and
not to make a scene.
The motorman turned on the waiter
and hit him In the face.
Being a large man Jungclaus
knocked Macia to the floor.
The latter got up and was knocked
down again. As he fell he reached
for the bureau drawer and pulled it
out. Among the effects was a revolver,
which he succeeded in getting. Macia
fired four shots, emptying the pistol.
Jungclaus fell to the floor fatally
wounded.
The landlady, hearing the noise and
the subsequent shots, telephoned for
th* police. Macia was waiting for
the officers, trying to comfort Mrs.
Cotttlnned oa Pace 2, Column 4
WEATHER FORECAST
Showm: brlak north winds, cVmnuJnc <n wf«t.
Have you a piece of real
estate or an auto to sell?
I The Call's Classified Ads
*-h > will find a buyer for you.
"TELEPHONE TRUST"
SITUATION ON COAST
SUBJECT OF INQUIRY
Department of Justice Is
Making Investigation on
Sherman Law Basis
WASHINGTON, Feb. 21.— The "tele
phone trust" situation on the Pacific
coast Is being investigated by the fed
eral government to determine whether
the Sherman law is being violated.
The department of justice particu
larly Is Inquiring Into the attitude of
the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph
company, subsidiary of the American
Telephone and Telegraph company, to
ward the Northwestern Telegraph com
pany, an Independent long distance
line.
This investigation is separate from
the big telephone Inquiry which the
interstate commerce commission has
undertaken at the suggestion of At
torney General Wlckersham. United
States Attorneys John McCourt of
Portland, Ore., and Beverly W. Coiner
of Seattle Jointly will conduct the Pa
cific inquiry.
FISHERMEN LAND
FINNY DYNAMO
Electric Specimen Weighing 76
Pounds Comes Up in Mon
terey Bay Net
(Special Dtspatoh to The Call)
SANTA CRUZ, Feb. 21.—A rare speci
men of the mammoth electric fish was
among the catch that attracted much
attention on Fisherman's wharf toiay
The flsh. which was caught by Louis
Beverino while seining for drif« fish
weighed 76 pounds and had to be han
dled carefully, as one of such size. Qsh
{ ermen say, can produce an electric
shock sufficient to knock a man Jown.
Smaller specimens of electric fish
have been caught In Monterey Day.
averaging 10 pounds in weight. I
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
GENERAL DIAZ
COMING HOME
FROM EXILE IN
FOREIGN LAND
Will Arrive on Anniversary
of His Capture of Puebla,
When Army Defeated the
Forces of Maximilian in
1867—Day Will Be Cele
brated in His Honor—Re
ports Say He Will Not
Take Part in Politics, but
Will Be Simply an "Inter
ested Spectator" of Events
NEW REVOLUTION
IS ALREADY BEGUN
Three Governors of States
Refuse to Recognize Pro
visional President—Three
Others Doubtful — Ma
dero's Brothers Plan With
Carranza for Another
Fight—Executive of Yu-
catan, Uninformed of Gus
tavo Madero's Death, Of
fers Him Men and Money
MEXICO CITY. Feb. 81.—General
Porflrlo Diaz, former president of the
republic, who has been In exile In
Europe, is coming home.
It is said there is not the slightest
possibility that he again will mix in
the politics of Mexico, but his enfoiced
exile is cnde:* Word was received to
day from Paris that within a ehor*.
ttWe General Diaz will be In hie private
residence In Cadena street, an inter
ested spectator of the development o'
the new regime.
It was authoritatively stated to3ay
that the .irrival of General Diaa will
not be later than April 2, the anniver
sary of the taking of Puebla by his
forces in 1867 in the war of French
intervention. This day will be cele
brated In honor of General Diaz.
ANOTHER REVOLUTION
It is certain that the new admitils
tration in Mexico must deal with a aew
revolution in addition to the remnants
of the old one. Three governors of
states in the republic formally have
refused ro recognize Provisional Presi
dent Hu3rta, and two or three otl'trs
are doubtful.
Venostiano Carranza. governor of the
state of Coahuila. with 1,200 men, is
working with Emilio and Raoul Ma
dero, brothers of the deposed president,
who are at San Pedro. Madero's old
home near Saltillo, which Is Carranza's
base-
Jose Gayou. former governor of So
nora. has telegraphed from Mexlcall to
Governor Maytorena of Sonora offer-
Ing him 3,000 men and 2,000,000 pesos
to restore Madero to office. Governor
Maytorena has telegraphed the senate
and Provisional President Huerta re
pudiating the new administration.
HASNT HEARD THE NEWS
The governor of Yucatan, ignorant
of the death of Gustavo Madero, has
wired him offering the services of 1,200
men and money to assist In a new rev
olution.
What will be done with ex-President
Madero has not yet been determined.
Juan Sanchez Azcona, Madero's private
LAND
$8 an acre
12,000 acres
8,000 acres can be irri
gated by gravty* system
BIG CREEK ON 3 SIDES
A splendid colouliation proposition.
Good w>ll and climate: cheap electric
power; close to B. R. Developed section.
Maps, photographs, engineer's reports
end full inforuiution.
Quick action necensarjr.
We bare short time option.
NOTICE—AUCTION WITHDRAWN
The property on the northeast corner
of Pert and I.Mvenworth streets, which
wan to be sold at pottle auction at our
office on Feb. 2<l. 1913, has bteu sold bjr
us at private sale.
Harrigan,
Weidenmuller Co.
ST., S. F.

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