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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 25, 1913, Image 1

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THE BIG SMOKESTACK EDITION
O!" The Call i«<ued Sunday .an lie
mailed to any part of the United StuU-s
FOR 7 CENTS POSTAGE
It foreign countries-- '3c is required.
VOLTM E (JXI EL-γNO. 87.
RAIL COMMISSION APPROVES
U. P. MERGER PLAN PROVIDED
RIVALS GET TRACK RIGHTS
USE OF BENICIA
SNORT LINE OPEN
TO COMPETITORS
Other Lines to Share Same
Conditions of Contracts
S. P. May Enter
. With C. P.
BODY AGAINST TWO
LOCAL S. P. SYSTEMS
Wickersham, in Wire, Is
Informed of the State
Board's Ruling
The state board of railroad commis
sioners at midnight last night handed
In a decision that approves of the ap
plication of the so called Harriman
railroads for recognition of the dis
solution contract made between the
railroads and the Attorney General,
and approved by him. The commis
sion however, imposes conditions that
may bring the entire matter again into
the courts.
The Union Pacific will be limited to
the line from Sacramento by way of
Niles to Oakland as exclusive.
If the Southern Pacific grants the
ntral Pacific right to use the Ben
i short line it shall acord to all
■ competing carriers like privilege
in similar terms.
Other provisions required by the
Commission were wired to the attor
ney general and will be presented to
day in the hearing in the circuit court
in St. Louis, where final action on the
application submitted to and approved
by Mr. Wickersham is awaiting the
dings of the California body.
. >CHLACKS OX STAND
The session, that lasted from 10 o'clock
in the morning; until 7:30 in the even-
Ing, with an hour and a half Interval
for luncheon, was opened for the West
cm Pacific with Charles H. Schlacks,
vice president of the Gould line, on the
stand. Attorney Charles S. Wheeler, for
the Western Pacific, brought out through
the witness that certain influences had
been used upon the Western Pacific to
terminate In San Francisco a contract
relative to trackage arrange
ment.'; over industrial rails in this city.
rtatn dty ordinances governing the
■trol of joint Santa Fe and Southern
of streets of the city were
niitted in evidence, and it was shown
! bere, and in other cities that the
Western Pacific had industrial or spur
track privileges that might be con
ded on 60 days' notice from the
Southern Pacific company.
FORCED INTO S. P. COVTBACTS
Mr. Wheeler offered in evidence an
interview from the Wall Street Journal
with one of the bankers Interested In
financing the unscrambling , , and other
documentary evidence of the negotia
ns for the purchase of stock of com
janies concerning in the unmerging.
After explaining that 75 per cent <>f
tonnage is reached in this city by
• lustrial tracks, Mr. Schlacks said
t htfl line wis virtually forced into
■vith the Southern
thai was detrimental
I corporation.
The witness showed that In San K:at:
cisco it cost the Western Pacific l
cent of Its earnings to obtain use <>f the
state belt line and the Southern Pacific
industrial track*.
During the hearing William It. Wheel -
traffic manager of the San Francisco
*' .amber of Commerce, was heard on
San Francisco's interest in the railroad
commissioner's decision and the adjust
ment of local track privileges.
1 EARS "BOTTLING UP" OF CITY
Mr. Wheeler eald the Chamber of Com
merce was principally concerned in find
ing out whether the city would be bot
tled up by acceptance of the attorney
general's decision favorable to the dis
solution of the Harriman merger and
the subsequent contract between the
Uiiion, Southern and Central Pacific
companies.
Kegarding the joint use. of Industrial
tracks In San Francisco under condi
tions that the Western Pacific assorts
:irc detrimental to it, Attorney Wheeler
nsked his client:
"It this contract was unfair, v,-\iy ■][<]
you enter into 1t. ,-,
"I believe there should have been
reasonable compensation for the privi
legee," answered Mr. Bebiacka, "Wβ
were anxious to reach the shippers of
California and ire lia<] to make the
best arrangements we could.' ,
LINE THREATENED, HE SAYS
At this point Attorney Wheeler
asked whether any threats had been
made to make the Western Pacific "be
good** or lose the contract that gave it
v, hat little privileges it had, according
to its contentions.
"There have been threats," answered
Mr. Schlacks. "The vice president in
< harge of traffic of the Southern Pacific
mcd me veYbally that if I entered
to any arrangement or interchange of
traffic with the Northern Electric (a
building from Sacramento to
continued vu Page 3, Column 1
"The People's Newspaper"
Board's Wire to Wickersham
Ruling on "Unscrambling" Case
The railroad commission sent the following message and sum
marizing its findings to Attorney General Wickersham, w>o is in St.
Louis: .
The commission approves application on the following conditions:
FIRST—The Union Pacific be limited to the line from Sacramento
by way of Niles to Oakland as an exclusive.
SECOND—If Southern Pacific grants Central Pacific right to use
Benicia , short line it shall accord to all of the competing carriers like
privilege on similar terms.
THIRD—If Southern Pacific grants to Central Pacific joint uee
of terminal facilities and industry tracks it shall grant to any other
competing line applying therefor privileges on similar terms.
APPROVES 999 YEAR LEASE
FOURTH—Commission approves 999 year lease of line from Te
hama to Oregon line.
FlFTH—Commission approves sale of California portion of line
from Weed to Natron, Ore.
SlXTH—Commission approves trackage rights over Bay Short
cutoff for term of 50 years.
SEVENTH—Commission reserves right to pass upon valuations
for rental and sale purposes when arrived at under the method pro
vided in the contract.
ElGHTH—Commission imposes condition that Central and South
ern Pacific shall file joint rates which shall not exceed the rates now
in effect between the same points upon the Southern Pacific within
the state of California.
RAIL AGREEMENT DEMANDED
NINTH —Commission provides, by agreement of the parties, that
its approval shall not serve to revive or extend any franchises of com
panies involved. Although the commission deems this unnecessary, it
was done on application of Oakland and Sacramento and by agree
ment with representatives of railroads.
Commission requires that railroads involved shall bind themselves
to accept conditions imposed before order becomes effective.
Judge Lovett testified that imposition of conditions would require
further negotiations and would defeat plan and requested that if the
commission found such course necessary it indicate the terms upon
which it would approve those matters within its jurisdiction. Accord
ingly in supplemental opinion commission sets out terms of its approval.
OBJECTS TO TWO SYSTEMS
It objects to the breaking up of the local system of the Southern
Pacific within the state of California into two disassociated local sys
tems with attendant inconvenience to shippers and traveling public.
It suggests that your design to divest the Southern Pacific of a
line from the coast to Ogden, which should be competitive with its
Sunset line, could be brought about equally well by a lease by the Union
Pacific of the main line of the Central Pacific from Ogdet* to Sacra
mento and thence by Stockton and Niles to Oakland, together with
the branch from Roseville to Tehama.
This would leave the Southern Pacific in control of the local Sys
tem within the state of California.
JOINT TERMINALS DEMANDED
If, however, after considering this suggestion you and the court are
of the opinion that the better plan is for the Southern Pacific to sell
the Central Pacific stock, the commission will waive its objection, but
deems it proper to call to your attention the inconvenience and pos
sible higher rates for local traffic to result from the breaking up of the
local system within the state.
Either on the basis of the sale of the stock, or the lease of the main
lines suggested by us, the commission will insist upon its condition re
specting the joint use of the Benicia Short Line and the terminals and
the other conditions heretofore referred to.
TWO BUNKOMEN
TRICKED OUT OF
$1,000 IN BILLS
J. G. Spitzer, Newcomer,
From North Dakota, Turns
Tables en Sharpers;
Ky One Captured
OAKLAND, Feb. 24. — J. G. Spitzer,
who arrived In Oakland this morning
from Sterling. N. D., will probably pret
Ino commission from Oakland for en
! lichjog the city treasury by $1,000, but
he has the satisfaction of turning the
j tables on a pair of bunkomen and tak
iincr this larg-e sum <>f money away
; from (MM of them.
Peter Mcllenry, one of the ACCUMd
; sharpers, was told to get out of town
within 24 hours and the police are
ion the trail of his- confederate, who la
known as Elihii Davis.
Spitzer met Davis on a Western pa
cific train and was apparently in
terested when Davis expatiated on the
glories of the bay cities and offered
to show him the sights. They had not
been long in Oakland when they saw
a man in • doorway counting a huge
roll of bills.
"Why, if it isn t Pete McHenry,"
D&vla exclaimed as he shook hands
with his old time friend, "Playing the
races again, Pete? -,
Hβ was told that McTlenry had had
all kinds of hick and with inside In
formation on the Juarez races was on
the road to fortune. Spitzer was per
suaded to make a few small bets and
more than doubled his money. Finally
i McHenry handed Spitzer $1,000 in bills
and told him to hurry to the poolroom
and get it down a certain horse.
Instead of going to the poolroom
i Spitzer called to the first patrolman and
I explained that he had two bunkomen
Icorraled. McHenry was' arrested but
Davis made his escape.
When Spitzer and McHenry were
taken before Chief of Police W. J.
Petersen, Petersen promptly confiscated
the money as contraband,
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
SAN FRANCISCO, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1913.—PAGES 1 TO 10.
WHAT! ROB UNCLE
JOHN! SUFFERING
CATS, READ THIS
Thieves Strip Oil Magnate's
Car of Lamps and Horn,
and Old Fellow Is
"Perturbed"
(Special Dispatch to the Cell)
SKA BREEZE, lla., Feb. 84.—Thieve
stripped the automobile of John L>.
Rockefeller of its lamps and horn
while on the way last week from New
York to Daytona by freight. It wmi
learned today at the Hotel Clarendon
here, where he is stopping: for the
season.
When crated for shipment In Xew
York the automobile and Its accessories
were intact. When the ear was un
loaded here Monday the lamps and horn
were missing.
Mr. Rockefeller has started an inves
tigation to ascertain where the part?
were stolen.
This is said to be the first time any
hody has stolen from Mr. Rockefeller
and he is quite perturbed.
MOTHER SLAIN; BOY SAVED
Caesarian Operation Proven Snrccsfnl
In Connecticut tame
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
NEW HAVEN, Conn., Feb. 24.—Im
pelled by the urgent request of a mur
dered woman's mother, Dr. William L.
Sheehan, performed a Caesarian oper
ation on the body of Mrs. Raffele Den
negaro, who had been shot to death
by her crazed husband and tonight the*
doctors say the baby boy will live.
OPIUM CAUSES CIVIL WAR
Hundred* of Provincials Killed Restat
ing I )e»t motion of Poppy Plants
PEKING, Feb. 24.—Hundreds of in
habitants of the province of Fukien
have been killed in the last week or so
while offering armed resistance to the
government troops engaged in destroy
ing puppy plants. I
"IRON HAND" COWS MEXICANS
Central America Near Upheaval
CRAFTY PLOTTERS
CfIMBIHETORUKE
REVOLTS GENERAL
Castro, Zelaya and Others
Lead Revolutionary Move
ment to Overthrow
Republics
fSrv-rtni r»1«.«efrl: in The Call)
"WASHINGTON, Feb. 24.—General
revolution throughout Central Amer
ica is to be feared, according to in
formation which has reached the de
partment of state.
Thr change of administration, the
hostility of the democrats to the Taft
policy, the probable supremacy of Sen
ator Bacon in the committee on foreign
relations and the inexperience of Pres
ident elect Wilson and those he will
have to rely on for advice have in
spired with hope a group of profes
sional revolutionists who have banded
together for mutual protection and
conspiracy, confident that the ne*v ad
ministration will prove unwilling or
unable to check the machinations of
experi-nced professional conspirators.
It is nut. therefore, the gravity of
the situation in Mexico alone, but the
Imminent danger of a general revolu
tionary movement throughout Central
Am ric.i wiiirh has led President Taft
to mobilise 19,994 troops on the gulf
of Mexico, to NSMembhi nearly 5,000
puirtneg off the M< xicaa border and to
concentrate extensive marine reserves
■■n < ',nn ntanamo.
MOKI) WARSHIPS fJOING SOUTH
Supplementing tbepe precautions or
ders will I<r Ifetied within the next 10
day* for Halt a dozen additional war
ships to proceed to Mexican and Cen
tral Anuriran waters.
Already thoro are six battleships at
Mexican ports and seven smaller ves
sels in Central American waters.
Conforming with the plan announced
by Preside/it Taft, .Saturday, orders
were Issued today directing Alajor Gen
eral "William JI. Carter, commanding
the Ksots4 division, reorganized army,
to mobilise the remainder of his com
mand at tJalvoston and In the vicinity.
These orders mean that in addition
to tho Fifth brigade, which already is
on Its way to the mobilization point,
the Fourth brigade, comprising the
Twenty-third, Twenty-sixth and Twen
ty-seventh regiments of infantry, and
(Jin .Sixth brigade, comprising- the
K!< venth, Eighteenth and Twenty-sec
ond regiments of infantry and the
Sixth cavalry, which constitutes the
divisional cavalry of the second di
vision, will entrain as soon as possible.
Under these orders there will be
concenterated at Ualvestott between
8,000 and 9,000 infantry, about 800 cav
alry and about the same number of
field artillery being already on its way,
making a total of about 10,000 men
available for service in Mexico or Cen
tral America.
PRESIDENT FORESAW TROUBLE
These precautions are taken for the
sole purpose of protecting the new ad
ministration from the dangers now
threatening Mexico and Central Amer
ica.
Even before the release of Diaz
from prison and the battle In Mexico
City, resulting in the downfall of
Continued on Vage 2* Column 9
j "An Independent \ewsoaoer , '
Major General William H. Carter, to the left, is in supreme com
mand of the United States troops mobilizing on the border. Colonel
Jenno, U. S. M. C, commands the marines from Portsmouth, N. H.,
seen assembled in the loxver picture on their Ti>a\} to Cuantanamo, Cuba.
The center picture shouts marines marching in Nevt York-
STATEMENTS BY
MRS. PANKHURST
CAUSE OF ARREST
Suffragette Leader Charged
With Complicity in the
Wrecking of Lloyd-
George's House
LONDON, Feb. 24.—Mrs. Emmellne
Pankhurst was arrested today In con
] neetion with the destruction of the
! country residence of David Lloyd-
George by a bomb explosion last. week.
Her arrest resulted from her declara
tion at a public meeting that she had
conspired with and incited her follow
ers to carry out the outrage.
The warrant was issued by a police
i magistrate at Epsom, near Lloyd
| George's country house. It charges
her with '"incitement to commit dam
age." She la to be arraigned at Epsom
tomorrow.
The announcement of her arrest was
made at a big suffragist meeting in
London today and was received with
cheers.
Under the law the offense Is , pun
j ishable with penal servitude for a term
jof 14 years.
Mrs. Lillian Lenton, detained for trial
1 for setting fire to buildings, was re
leased today on the ground o< ill
health. She started a hunger strike
on entering the house of detention and
! had not eaten anything since that day.
Public feeling is high against the
surrender by the authorities , every time
a suffragette goes on a hunger strike.
Unless the government announces in
the king's speech its determination to
introduce legislation on the subject, the
opposition officially will move an
amendment to the address.
TTlclip.vt Temperature Ye§tet&iT, !#: t£xr*et Sander
Mftfat. 42. Ki>r d»«.ill< oT the A\^»theJ > mvr page IK.
VrtUX<; DnßisTi pk<a\gJl('<yvkMs**\*t in gen
c-iTTT.-nfTO|^-.|. ||j| g"^' u | M gj| wiUinsr to
t»tarf tor ymal) wago« if chance fof advance-
FOR CONTINUATION OF THESE ADVERTISE
MENTS SEE CLASSIFIED PAGES.
MUNICIPAL ROAD
BILL PASSES BY A
UNANIMOUS VOTE
Work on Van Ness Avenue
Line Can Begin as Soon
as Plans Are Made;
Tunnel Assured
With even less formality and delay
than is occasioned by paying a fare on
the Geary street line, the supervisors
yesterday unanimously adopted the
Van Ness avenue municipal railway and
Fillmore street tunnel projects.
A few minutes later Mayor Rolph
signed the railway bill and it became
a law, so construction can be begun as
soon as the specifications are prepared
and the contracts let.
The Fillmore street tunnel project
now stands as embodied in the follow
ing , resolution adopted:
"Declaring- that public interest and
convenience requires and that it is the
intention of the board of supervisors
to order the construction of a tunnel
in Fillmore street between Sutter and
Filbert street?. -.
Despite the refusal of final passage
of the Van Nese avenue railroad bill
last Tuesday, there was no objection
raised to it yesterday.
Within si* months after construction
is started the work will be finished on
the line, which will be run from Market
street to the bay. The $.100,000 surplus
left over from the present <ieary street
municipal line will be sufficient to build
the Van Ness extension, of which the
estimated cost in $292,000. although ad
ditional funds will be necessary to pur
chase equipment
KING HONORS MRS. SCOTT
Wldorr of I>ead Explorer to Be Knonn
a* "Lady Scott" In Future
CONDON, Feb. 24.—The widow of
Captain Robert F. Scott, the Antarctic
exploref, henceforth will be known as
Lady Scott. King George today be
stowed on her "the same rank, style
and precedence as if her husband had
been nominated a knight commander of
the Bath, as he would have been had
he survived."
TREASURE HUNTERS FAIL
Party Long on Experience But Short
on Pirate* Buried Gold
PANAMA. Feb. 24.—Tho treasure
hunting party led by Miss OenevWe
Davis cf London, which has boen
searching in C'ocoe island for soma
'months, arrived hefe today with a store
;of experience but without any pirate's
wealth.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
HUERTA STILL
HOLDS PEOPLE
TERRIFIED BY
HIS BAYONETS
I Mystery of Shooting of For
mer President and Vice
President Remains Un
solved, But Whole Affair
Generally Is Accepted as
Having Been a Carefully
Planned- 'Frameup , to Get
Rid of Distinguished Pris
oners for All Time to Come
GOVERNMENT STICKS
TO ORIGINAL STORY
BL'LI.ETI.V
EL PASO, Tex., Feb. 24.—Mnety-flve
federnl TOlnntcer aoldlers were exe
cuted late today at Sans, below Jnarrr..
I They composed part of tbe garrison
tvlilcib. revolted yesterday, an ere rod at
the killing; of former President Madrro,
their former leader. One at a time the
Holdiera were stood against an adobe
wall.
(Special Dispatch to the Call)
CITY OF MEXICO, Feb. 24.—The
exact manner In whi%h Francisco T.
Madero and Jose Maria Pino Suarez
met their death probably never will
be known.
The sticks to the state
ment that the men were killed during
an' attempt of their friend* to secure
them.
What the official Investigation which
is promised by the government will
turn up to throw exact and detailed
light upon the final moment of Madero
and Suarez no one can say.
If anything is developed by the in
vestigation it probably -will be that
what was mistaken by the government
as an attempt to rescue the prisoners
in reality was an attack by a band
of Madero haters, with the sole purpose
of taking the life of the former presi
dent and his puppet vice president in
revenge for wrongs and crimes charged
against the Madero administration.
It is more than likely that the whole
affair was what In the United States
would be called a frameup, to enable
the administration to get rid of Ma
dero and Suarez without being held
responsible for their murder.
WHO AVIM. BE SCAPEGOAT!
The pledge of a vigorous Investiga
tion and prompt and severe punish
ment for the slayers, if it is established
that the helpless men were put to
death in the heat of political passion,
is taken to indicate the position of the
government.
Huerta will seek and find a scape
goat upon whom to unload the odium
of the assassination.
Foreign Minister de la Barra ex
pressed himself today in most emphatic
and extreme terms of condemnation
and reprobation of the murders, but
requested that all comment coming
from him be confined to the statement
emanating from the foreign ofll'<\
Mis personal sentiments were echoed
by every one connected with the gov
ernment, from Huerta down.
Dc la Barra was greatly moved when
discussing the matter.
He held that in fairness it must be
assumed that the government's hand. , )
are stainless und that the explanation
made through the foreign office must
be accepted in preference to unproved
and irresponsible stories that there is*
a more sinister side to the tragedy
than the public is allowed to know.
WANTS JUDGMENT RESKRVEI)
At any rate he asks that judgment
be suspended until it is seen what is
brought forth by the investigation.
It was quite possible today to r«-
LOOK IN THE MIRROR
and notice novv /rf">v
you appear Ijl __.mri
with old style \l'4\\
eye glasses.' It's \| \ Wjo*
unnecessary to
wear glasses
which detract j _
from your personal
appearance. fiS^
Equipoise eye I *||nBLj
glasses are becoming \1 Jj
and look as if they ■ \i
were made specially n||/
for you. Wear Equipoise.
Caiforna Optical Co,
iW.D.rtMininioro J.W.IJaTi-t A.ll.Fetinlmorci
181 Post St San Francisco
1221 Broadway Oakland
(<'. L. lloK'.ie »it Oakland Store)

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