OCR Interpretation


The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 10, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1913-04-10/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

"Miehrot Temperature Yesterday,*'-. L<mest Tnesdaj
Xiirht, IS. For Details of the Weather See Page 18.
The Call's 6 o'Clock
A. M. Edition
contains the very latest city
> and general news of the night.
VOLUME 113.—N0. 131.
PRESIDENT WILL
NOT ATTEMPT TO
STOP ALIEN BILL
Recognizes Right of Califor
nia to Make It's Own
JLaws—Merely Calls At
tention to Treaty Obliga
tions and Suggests That
Violations Be Avoided
by the State Legislature
STATE RIGHTS, SAYS
GOVERNOR JOHNSON
California Executive Asserts
Stand Taken Will Not in
terfere With Policies of
Alien Land Legislation—
Tokyo Dispatches Tell
of Irritation in Japan
IRA E. BENNETT
<?p«>rf«! r»!spetPh to Tb<» C«H)
WASHINGTON, April P.—President
Wilson nnd Secretary of State Bryan
have writtcTi letters to friends in the
California legislature setting forth
Hearly tlie treaty obligrations of the
Vnftcd States toward Jrtpan and spe
ciflcaljy asking that, no law he passed
that may be considered a violation of
the treaty obligations.
The president simply calls attention
to the fact that a treaty with a foreign
nation is the supreme law of the land
and asks that nothing be done to cause
an international complication.
Representative Raker of California
had a talk with the president today
and was told exactly what Senator
Works and Representative Kent were
told—that the president recognized the I
right of California to make its own
laws and that the federal government
had no desire to interfere with the sov
ereign rights of the state to make laws
to protect herself against a Japanese
invasion.
WILSON TRUSTS STATE
The president repeated that he
Wished to avoid federal authority in
fcttar. In his lettes he eaid he ,
rriy called attention to our treaty
obligations and what the treaty re
quired of this country, and trusted to
the good taste of California not to
bring about any situation that would
involve the whole country.
After an hour's conference, in which
retary Bryan also took part, they
authorized RakT to announce the gov
ernment's position of noninterference.
A telegram from Senator .T. B. San
ford of the California legislature was
shown to the president by Representa
tive Raker. The telegram said:
IKIKf.BAM FROM SA\KORD
"People demanding enactment of
tad law. Tf legislature refuses,
pl« -will resort to initiative senti
ment. Five to one in favor of alien
land law. Government should not In
terfere with our local affairs. Hands
off at Washington. Japs own 52,000
acres of land, lease 400,000 acres. More
information to come."
Additional statistics-- on the growth of |
the Japanese population and their hold
ings were also presented by Raker.
Call correspondent was definitely
informed at the Japanese embassy that
no formal protest had been made to
-state department from that source.
The Japanese ambassador had "merely
made some inquiries." No formal com
munication has been received by Secre
tary Bryan from the ambassador.
It had been stated that Viscount
Chinda, Japanese ambassador to the
Vnited States, has made representa
tions to President Wilson and Secre
■.- of State Bryan. The Japanese
> ipn office is optimistic and believes
that a satisfactory solution will be
found.
WILL NOT AFFECT
US, SAYS JOHNSON
CALL BUREAU,
SACRAMENTO HOTEL.
"lurninrnin, April 9.
' 'ESthei , hands off or hands on , is my
definition of President Woodrow Wil
son's policy regarding the alien land {
hills. It is simply the decision of
'state's rights:.'
"I am of the opinion that President
Wilson's stand will not affect the poli
tics of the state in reference to the
.-ilipn land regulations."
Tliis was Governor Hiram Johnson's
statement to The Call tonight when the
question "What will be the effect in
«alifornia of President Wilson's hands
<>ff policy in regard to Japanese bills?"
was put to him.
• California will go right along on its
own line ef legislation," said the gov
ernor. " "Hands off or hands on' ex
presses my views in a nutshell."
Irritation in Japan
TOKYO, April 9. —Widespread irrita
tion has been aroused in Japan by the
proposed anti-Japanese legislation in
• alifornia. Commercial men threaten
a ■ boycott the Panama-Pacific exposi
on unless the objectionable bills are
withdrawn.
Xlie executive committee of the na
ti'W-il liberal party passed a resoln-!
tion today urging the governments of
Japan and the Vnited States to pre
vent tin passage of the California
land ownership bill, owing to the sr-ri
oue effect it will have on the interests
of the two iutlioiis and on their rela
tions.
"The People's Newspaper"
Petting Girls Costly
Head of Circus Sued
AI G. Barnes, Defendant in $100,000 Alienation Suit
Brought by Peanut Man, Sets Forth Manner in
Which He Must Treat Beauties of the
Sawdust Arena
(By Federal Wirflpss to The Cell!
LOS ANGELES, April 9. —"My ardu
ous duties brought this upon me," ex
claimed Al G. Barnes, proprietor of a
circus, today, sued by Fred Barlow in
the superior courtfor $100,000 on the
charge of having alienated the affec
tions of Mrs. Fred Barlow, wife of th«
circus peanut man.
"No one but a. real circus, man knows
what a circus man has to do,"
Barnps exclaimed. "You see, I run the
show. Each morning I have to make
the rounds I have to go up to the
lady bouncers, slap them nicely on the
shoulder and tell them they are the
finest girls I ever knew.
"Thon the bareback girls think they
are th*» most beautiful creatures ever,
and I have to tell them so and talk
SCION OF WEAKTHY
FAMILY MISSING
Angus Caldwell, on Receipt
of Mysterious Letter,
Drops From Sight
(Sr>*M«? Dispatch to Th# Cain
REDWOOD CITY, April P.—Angus
Caldwell, member of a wealthy family
of Pittsburg and nephew of Mre. James
Robinson, society matron of San Fran
cisco and San Mateo county, dropped
from sight last Saturday under mys
terious circumstances, and efforts o"
the police and private detectives to lo
cate him have been diseouragingly un
successful. The relatives fear foul
play.
Caldwell, who is about L , 1 years of
age, came to California from the east
,about a month ago and took a position
vi-ith Herrick At Ilerrick. a firm of ie- j
countants with offices In the Mer- j
chants' Exchange building. San Fran- j
cisco. He has been staying at the]
Redwood City home of Mrs. L. P. Alex
ander, a friend of Mrs. Robinson.
Saturday afternoon Caldwell an
nounced his intention of spending the
weekend with his cousins, the Misses
Caldwell, in San Jose and said he
would return after business Monday
evening. Just before his departure a
special delivery letter was delivered at
the house, and Mrs. Alexander handed
it to him without noticing the post
mark. She noticed, however, that
upon reading the contents of the mis
sive Caldwell showed signs of great
emotion, hie cheeks becoming ghastly
pale. He made no comment to any
one and left for the railroad station.
WILL DO PENANCE FOR
HER BANDIT BROTHER
MnrtfPn Year Old Sinter of Robert
\\ ebb. Leader of Chicago Auto
(iang. to Enter Convent
CHICAGO, April 9.—Mary Webb, 19
year old sister of Robert Webb, the
most daring of the automobile ban
dits who terrorized Chicago last win
ter, will enter a convent as atonement
for the crimes to which her brother
lias confessed.
She admitted this intention as she
sat. a spectator in Judge Kersten's
court today, and her brother confirmed
it.
Webb already has pleaded guilty to
several holdups, but elected to enter a
plea of self-defense on the charge of
murdering Detective Peter Hart.
RAILROAD FINED FOR
OVERWORKING EMPLOYES
Chicago and F.aatern Illinois Mulcted
In 910,000 For Violation of law
Aβ to Hours
CHICAGO. April 9.—The Chicago
and Eastern lillinois Railroad com
pany was fined $10,000 today by Fed
| eral Judge Carpenter for violating the
law prohibiting the working of em
ployes more than 16 consecutive hours.
The company confessed to 100 offenses,
all committed last November.
MOUNTAIN LIONS BOUNTY
Brisk llnnlnrM in Killing Anlmala la
Thla State Last Month
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
SACRAMENTO, April 9. —The state
paid $640 last month for the killing of
mountain lions. Eight were killed in
l>cl Norte, five in Siskiyou, four each in
Humboldt and Mendocino, three each in
Monterey and Trinity, two in San Luis
Obispo and one cacii in San Benito,
Tehama and Tuolumne.
FROM TOWER TO ALSACE
IVireleen Communication Reported Be- j
tTreen Part* and Colmar
BERLIN, AprJl 10.—A Strassburg i
dispatch says that wireless commu
nication between the Eiffel tower in
Paris and private houses in Colmar,
capital of Upper Alsace, has been dis
covered. It is believed that a system
of espionage has beep established by
this means.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
SAN FRANCISCO, THURSDAY, § PRIL 10, 1913—PAGES 1 TO &
about their pretty eyes and graceful
riding , .
"Then the women who ride on the
elephants have original ideas about
clothes. It's quite a unique act to stick
on a bull—that's an elephant—and the
women have to have compliments.
"The lady tiger tamers are the
greatest women you ever say to want
to go to town, and T. having the only
auto with the show, have to take
them."
Mrs. Barnes, who is very bitter
against her husband, declares she is
being "legally decoyed" from the court
room. She is under subpena as a
witness for her husband, but she de
clares he made her his witness so he
could keep her from the court room.
SPIRITS FAIL TO
SAVE MILLIONAIRE
Dead Despite Ghostly Ad
vices That He Would Live
Until 95 Years Old
DE.VYER. April o.—Alonzo Thomp
i son. SI years old, millionaire, spiritual
; ist and war time auditor of Missouri,
who firmly believed ghostly advices
: that he could not die before he was
;95 years old. died today.
f For six weeks his belief in his imag
ined span of life supported him in
resisting pneumonia and an incidental
I operation for the removal of a rib. A
year ago his declaration that his
"guides'" told him his wife and son
were conspiring to obtain his fortune
led to Mrs. Thompson's divorce decree.
The aged millionaire, although three
times married, was nlanning to follow
his* "guides" 'nto a fourth "matrimonial
venture.
—— «
THIS TAME TROUT EATS
FOOD FROM A PLATTER
Hl* \iimc In Pete and He Shown Ap
preciation he Flopping on
Hie Sldea
(Sn»e!«! Dispatch to The C«m
WIXSTED, Conn.. April 9.—Pete, ■
tame trout, which has its home in a
walled in reservoir at Highland lake,
has been taught to eat from a platter
on the surface of the water.
At the sight of the dish Pete will
rise from the bottom of the creek and
take creamed wheat, bites of beef and
angle worms from the partly sub
merged plate. He shows his apprecia
tion of the feast by flopping on hts
sides on the surface of the water.
The trout is almost a foot long and
weighs more than a pound.
LI YUAN HUNG MURDERED
Vice President of China Aaeaealnated
in Wuchang
(Special Cable to The Calli
LONDON, April 9.—Two years almost
to a day since his death was before
announced in a cable from Peking,
London heard to day that Li Yuan
Hung, vice president of China and
leader of the Chinese progressives, has
been assassinated in Wuchang, oppo
site the city of Hankow, from which
he headed the military campaign of
revolution which drove little Pu Vi
from his Mam-hu throne.
FUMES CAUSE SUFFOCATION
One Dead, Three Dangeroualy 111, Six
Revived by Pal motor
CHICAGO, April 9. —Fumes from a
vat of boiling bluing suffocated Wil
liam Woerts and overcame three of his
fellow'employes, who are not expected
to recover. They were at work in the
Alston Lucas Paint company. Six
others were rescued by use of a pul
motor.
CURFEW WILL WINK THERE
Sacramento City Commiaalonera <oi
elder Plan to Have Lights Flicker
(Special Dfepatch. to The Call)
SACRAMENTO. April 9.—Curfew will
wink in Sacramento henceforth, if <i
plan suggested to the city commis
sioners today prevails. The idea is to
have the electric street lights all over
the city flicker at 9 o'clock to notify
th,e youngsters that it is time for bed.
GERMAN AVIATOR KILLED
Falla 120 Feet When Gnat of Wind
Overturn* Monoplane
GELSENKIRCHEN, Prussia, April 9.
A German aviator, Lichte, was killed
today while making a flight in a mono
plane. A gust of wind overturned the
machine, which crashed to the ground
from a heigth of 120 feet.
PERU RECOGNIZES CHINA
Announced Officially That South Ameri-
can Republic (•lve« Countenance
LIMA, Peru, April 9.—rt was an
nounced officially today that Peru had
recognized the Chinese ren'uhliiy
POPE'S CONDITION
AVERS PHYSICIAN,
NO LONGER CRAVE
While No Immediate Dan
ger Threatens, Anxiety
Continues on Account
of Weakness
TEMPERATURE IS
SLIGHTLY HIGHER
Sisters and Niece Visit Pon
tiff ; Scenes in Square Re
call Illness of Leo XIII
:■■
ROME. April official reports
regarding: the condition of Pope Plus X
agree that Tils conflation is not grave,
and that there fs no.^immediate danger.
Anxiety continues, hftwever, on account
of the weakness of the pontiff and
the action of his heart, which is in need
of constant stimulation.
The attending physicians found that
the condition of the pope had Improved
during the night and this improve
ment was maintained throughout the
day. although his temperature showed
a slight increase this afternoon.
Again this evening his temperature
rose slightly, but the difference from
that of the afternoon was hardly per
ceptible.
tOIVTRIBLTES TO DEPRESSION
The patient is being given e&gs
beaten up in milk, but his inability to
absorb nourishment contributes to the
depression from which he suffers.
The relapse is following the same
course as the original attack of influ
enza, a cough being present with irri
tation of bronchial tubes and difficulty
in respiration, which has led to the
report in some cases that the pope is
afflicted with asthma. This, however,
is erroneous. The condition of albu
minuria, which usually accompanies
influenza, is also present, indicating an
inflammation of the kidneys of greater
or lesser degree, but it is hoped that
this is of a transitory character.
Professor Marchiafava visited the
pope only twice today, morning and
evening , . He expressed satisfaction at
the course the illness is taking. The
pope'e sisters and niece spent much
time at the bedside, and when not there
were kept constantly informed by tele
phone as to the pontiff's condition.
POPE EXPRESSES TERROR
The pope has expressed terror at re
ports which the newspapers are capable
of Inventing , concerning his relapse. He
is being watched in turn by his valet
and his secretaries, Messrs. Bressan
and Pescinl, and the chemist monk,
Proedocimo, also Is in close attend
ance.
When he felt this afternoon the
effect of a thunderstorm of extraordi
nary violence, the pope remarked that
his organism was so sensitive to at
mospheric changes that he had tome
to be a kind of barometer and ther
mometer.
It was reported that Cardinal
Katschthaler, archbishop of Salzburg,
had postponed his departure, as he
wished to be in Rome in case of
eventualities, but this proved not to
be true, as he left here today for his
home. This Is considered another evi
dence that the pontiff really has Im
proved, or, at least, that the danger is
not imminent.
RECAIXS PRKVIOIS SCKIVES
The aspect of the Immense square In
front of St. Peter's today recalled the
scenes during the illness of Pope Leo
XIII, but, instead of a burning July
sun, as in 1903, there was a downpour
of rain.
This did not prevent thousands of
pilgrims from gathering and gazing
with grave anxiety at the three win
dows of the room on the third floor
of the apostolic palace.where the pope
lies, or from directing sypmpathetic
glances at the <ittle house in the square
below, where the sisters of the pope
occupy a modest apartment.
Professor Marchiafava, in a state
ment to the Associated Press tonight,
expressed himself as highly Indignant
________—__ —t ——, „
( ontiniifil on I'aee 2. toluma 1
"4n Independent Newspaper" \
Bryan's Aid Sought
Princess Petitioner
Ola Humphrey Hassan of Oakland, fcno߻n in Paris and Cairo as Prin
cess Hassan, who is soliciting the aid of the state department in her settlement
n>ith her prince husband.
Former Ola Humphrey of Oakland Asks Slate Department
to Help Her Obtain $250,000 Indemnity
Ola Humphrey of Oakland, known in
London, Paris and Cairo as the Princess
Hassan, is soliciting the aid of the de
partment of state in her settlement
with her prince husband, the cousin of
the khedive of Egypt. She has asked
the aid''of Secretary of State Bryan
and Senator George Perkins in obtain
ing a cash Indemnity of $250,000 in
exchange for her title.
Princess Hassan is now staying at a
New York hotel. Her mother, Mr?. M.
J. TT. Humphrey, who is living in this
city, said yesterday that she expected
a visit from the princess shortly.
The separation of her daughter from
the prince was brought about by the
Egyptian's extreme jealousy of his
beautiful wife, says Mrs. Humphrey.
Prince Hassan is a gentleman, she
adds, well educated, an Oxford gradu
ate, but hajs many of the faults found
among Americans of large income and
Jittle to occupy their serious thought.
TROOPS WITH FIXED
BAYONETS DEFIED BY
MOB - THREE WOUNDED
Striking Carmen Attempt to
Wreck Car on Bridge
Over Niagara
BUFFALO. X. T., April o.—Troops
with fixed bayonets held no terror for
the striking carmen of the Internationa!
Railway company and their sympa
thizers today and the riots were re
newed.
Once this afternoon the troops used
their rifles. A woman and a man were
wounded and a boy received a thrust
from a bayonet.
The most serious- disorders occurred
near the international bridge. Here
the Niagara streetcar lines pass under
an overheat! railroad bridge- Rioters
carrying heavy timbers rushed upon
the span as a car was approaching and !
tried to drop a railroad tie upon it. It j
missed the i-ar. The rioters were pre- j
paring to drop more obstructions when
troops ordered them to halt. They
jeere<* the soldiers, who fired, wounding
two.
-ft ,11
> njfATHER
Fair; lag diy/niorniiig; moderate wesf> iHnfls.
RECEIPTS OF
CALIFORNIA GOLD
at the San Francisco Mint during
March were 18,041 OUNCES.
He has an allowance of $20,000 a year
from the Egyptian government.
SALARY WAS f750 A WEEK
As Ola Humphrey, the princess won
considerable fame on the stage and
it was while playing in London that
she met the prince. It is stated in her
appeal to the secretary of state that
at tho time of her retirement from
the stage to marry Hassan, she was
receiving a minimum salary of $730 a
week.
Being a member of the royal fam
ily, however, was not all skittles and
beer and the royal couple riuarreled,
the younjf American woman return
ing- to New York. If a settlement is
reached, the princess most likely will
make her home here with her mother
and brother, who has been connected
with stock companies about the bay
cities.
-Miss Humphrey, or Princes■ Hassan.
Continued ou Page 2. < olumn 4
BELGIUM FACES GREAT
CRISIS IN FIGHT FOR
VOTES FOR MANHOOD
Four Hundred Thousand to
Lay Down Tools Next
Monday Morning
BRUSSELS. Belgium, April 9. —The
first move for a general strike to en
force the grant of manhood suffrage
was made today by sending out of the
country many children of the 300,000
or 400,000 workers who will quit work
Monday, April 14, at the bidding of
the socialist party.
It is expected that train service will
cease or be greatly impeded and wives
ami daughters of hundreds with the
little ones of their own families or
of neighbors are crossing the frontiers
on every train.
The strike has been de< Ided on by
the socialists to make the government
grrve Belgium a system of manhood
suffrage instead of tli«e system of plural
voting
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
PRESIDENT AT
CAPITOL TALKS
TO SENATORS
ABOUT TARIFF
Following Conference Exec
utive Violates Another
Precedent by Speaking
Frankly to Newspaper
Men, Declaring "Nothing
Stands in Way of Harmo
nious Support of Party
Platform on Tariff Revi
sion"—Leaves the Method
of Procedure to the House
DEMOCRATS CAUCUS
ON MANY SCHEDULES
All Attempts to Amend Are
Prostrated by Big Major- >
ity—Leader Underwood Is \
Confident Measure Will!
Go Through as Desired by j
Framers—Louisiana Dele- ,
gation Has Hope for a
Change in Sugar Clause
Before Law Is Passed i
WASHINGTON, April 9. —ln the In
terest of success for the democratic j
tariff revision bill President "Wilson to- f
day stepped over another obstacle in
the way of perfect harmony between
the White House and the directing
forces of congress.
For the second successive day he left
his own offices in the White House and
journeyed to the capitol, this time for .'
an hour and a half conference with
democratic members of the senate
finance committee.
HARMONY PREVAILS
At lta conclusion the president
frarikly to ncvspaper men that
he and rrrrfnbers of the senate were
agreed tiiat nothing: stood In the Way
of harmonious support "of the party
platform" as to tariff revision. The
senate situation was canvassed in de
tail at the conference. The dangers
that might threaten a single bill should
the opponents of free sugar and free
wool combine in sufficient strength to
endanger the democratic majority In
the senate were discussed, but no
agreement was reached that binds the
senate leaders to any definite line of
action.
HOI SE DEMOCRATS (AICIS
While the conference was in prog
ress the full democratic membership of
the house was In caucus at the other
end of the capitol. discussing the de
tails of the tariff bill, the first schedule
of which was agreed to without
change. Representative Underwood,
democratic leader, stated at the conclu
sion that the tariff revision would go
through the house as a single bill.
The president again Ignored long
standing precedent in seeking a legis
lative conference within the capitol.
He met the senators in the president's
room, near the senate chamber, where
presidents long have come to sign the
last bills of a dying congress, bu*
which never before had been used as it
was today within the knowledge of
senate historians.
TALKS TO REPORTERS
At tlie end of the conference the
president, with democratic simplicity,
stopped in the senate corridor to tell
newspapermen the results of the meet
ing. Members of the senate finance
committee had agreed that the presi
dent should be the only spokesman for
the conference.
"I hope the senators and representa
tives will permit me to come here fre
quently and confer with them In a way
to save their time and mine," lie said.
"At our conference this afternoon we.
of course were discussing the tariff.
The net result is we don't see any dif
ficulty about standing together in a
sort of party program."
The president was ask*>d if the con
ference bad decided whether the tariff
would be revised in a single bill or
schedule by schedule.
"That's a matter for the other end of
WILLIAMS
—AND
HUMBERT
SHERRIES
JEREZ, SPAIN
For Quality, the Best.
Nine Grades
CHARLES MEINECKE A. CO.
tk%UMT» PMin* e»*»T. •14 |M»NUT« ST.. •. «W

xml | txt