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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, May 14, 1913, Image 7

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AS WOMAN to
WOMAN
RUTH CAM ERON
f ~J^:HE*'!sibc' clerk deftly slipped my
i■'-'* foot * a pair of hygienic shoes
and-asked me to stand up and try
them. _l . '. _.' , - ,- .
• I dtel so and n>as delighted at the
perfect ease and comfort which I felt.
But tiicy fere such hideous things with
their big rounded toes and their flat
heelsf "hrit it too bad they * cant be
pretty the other shoes, , ' I said re
gretfully as I surveyed them.
The shozxlerl? smiled. "I think they
ere much prettier," he x ' said. "Why
shouldn t ifrey be? They foliate the outline of the human foot. I\on> isn t
; the line of normal human foot, as nature made it, far more beautiful than
ipany shape ihni man has invented? What lis: there more beautiful about a
pointed toe than a rounded toe? 'Curved is the line of beauty,' you know. ,.
It's a perfectly good argument, isn I it?
And yet it only convinces the mind; it doesn't seem to convince the eye and
] the heart — at least of the average woman."
But isn't it too bad that we can't see it that Way? "' /']
Isn't it too had that we cant realize that a woman dressed in a skirt cut
n»i7i sufficient fullness to permit her the free use of her [imbs, is a much more
'-autiful object than a on % hobbling awkwardly along with ridiculously
hammered Rait in a skirt which is a scant three-quarters of a yard around the hem?
And yet such is the peculiar blinding power of fashion that the average
Woman can not help admiring the abnormal and inartistic if everybody is wear
ing it.
She may know that by all the canons of art it is ugly, but nevertheless it
looks active to her. : • '.:''. 'H ;
Once in a : while art and fashion happen to agree, and we have some mode
vhich has real beauty in itself in addition to the luster which fashion gives it.
But this seldom lasts long; for freakish fashion soon exaggerates a beautiful style
until it becomes unbcaaiifuL ~"i~ '* -"".''..<.-
Of course we don't,always-realize how large a share fashion has in mak
ing a thing seem beautiful We fancy we like it for itself, but let the fashion
change and see how soon :it grows ugly. Look at some picture you had taken
10 years ago in a dress you thought most charming, and see how homely it looks
today. Last summer you thought long sleeves hot and ugly; this year they will
look very different to you, because they are going Iq be "the fashion." ■ ■" ■' ,
Don't you wish there were some way to kso educate our eyes that we might
see fashions as they are and love the truly beautiful instead of the fashionable?
Perhaps after hearing this tirade you'd like to know what I did about the
hygienic shoes. Well, 'then, being menially convinced that they were the s best
thing, 1 bought them for walking; but being unconvinced in my heart, I also
bought a smart pair of pumps to dress up in. .-.V «'. • 1 j
Miss Gertrude Davis'entertained at
an informal-tea Monday afternoon ,in
her home In Pacific avenue in honor of
Miss. Esperance GhlrardeHi. Among
those present were Mrs. Fritz yon
•Schrader, Mrs. Harold Casey. Mrs.
Adelbert Blackmer. Mrs. : Joseph K.
Hutchlnscn (formerly Miss Katherine
Hooper), Miss Margaret Carrigan, Miss
Elizabeth Bull, Miss Elizabeth -I Bates,
Miss Dorothy Porter. Miss Dorothy
Allen, Miss Corona " Ghirardelli, Miss
Marie Louise Bryant and Miss Marianne
Mathieu. ". . , "-, , .' '; '■' \
The wedding of Miss Vera Cope and
R. 1,. ilikel of Oakland will take place
June 10,, following which they will live
iii Sacramento..' Miss Cope is the daugh
tpr*i£'.f Mrs. George .W. . Cope and a
the late Judge Cope. ; . ,:' _ ; ; *■
Mn>'. Beverly MaeManagle and her
son, Douglas MaeManngle. are; estab
lished in* their home m Broadway, at
Laguna street. Since their return
f:-oro. Europe they Have been living in
ficific avenue.
* * * . ,
Miss Etta Warren is spending a few
•iiys in Menlo Park as ;the guest of
Mr. nd Mrs. Alexander Hamilton. lV
!: jindsonio country home is in course of
; i nstructjon' foe Miss - Warren, who will
r'sidc in Menlo permanently as soon
r..-- tlje house Ui cpmpleted. '_
* * #
pruninioml MacGavin has recently
; rived in, Tromso, Norway, after an
r'\tended visit In London, where Mrs.
:?J u-Gavin will remain a few weeks
/4' ! i?er with Miss Kate Stone and Miss
•f I'aro'thy: Baker. '■''*i'\r :
■■■"•'» *. l'~~* ■/■■: .■* ■:'■
Sympathy is , being extended to Al
fi»d Holmes, who has received news
-of the death of his brother in Chicago
'ast Saturday. .
# # ■*• # >: : :'
. J! rs.: William S. Tevls left Monday
evening tor Bakersfield for a few
■Ja>s* visit. - "'-.
Charles A, Black entertained a num
ber of friends at the Miramonte club
house'"over the. weekend! The party
left In automobiles Saturday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Dwight Norman
have arrived from Santa Barbara and
are at the Palace hotel.
* * *
Mrs. , Charles M. Keeney will depart
Jun*- 1 for San Mateo, where she will
spend the summer at the Hotel penin
sula. . ■ ; X; ; '--'■':' !
Mr. and Mrs. Hans Voorman are re
ceiving the congratulations of. their
fri|7Ws upon the arrival of a daughter.
Mrs\ Voorman was formerly Miss Edith
'' - .;.,' " • : '"■..'.-./' ''■ ''
MAY QUEEN IS CHOSEN
FOR KENTFIELD FETE
Mi*.- .iHtiit-r Iliirtchnll :of San : Rafael
Will Ilelsn Over Sports and "
■"•»'*: I'aMline* ;
A May; i•■' a fote will be held at Kent
field. Marin county, next , Saturday,
'under the auspices of the Tamalpais
Center Woman's club. Miss Janice
Kurt-'nil of San Rafael has been
chosen May queen. '
Festivities : will ' commence .. at ,9
o'clock with races, followed 1 by" a pa
rade "and May-pole dances, then lunch
at noon.' Later there J will he folk
"dancing."and track: meet between 'the
Han Ha faol* and Tamalpais union high ! j
schools. Hitchcock military, academy
nnd ML T&malpaia military academy.
. Music will be furnished by the St.
Vincent Orphanage band.-.'-. ',\
The' parade", marshal.- will -be K. L*
Merivih. ... - ~«I
MRS. MERRIAM: IMPROVES
« ~|»<nin- « Witt, Divort-e, Defendant,
JJKcIy to I,rave H«>«l»itnl Soon
Vttorney Walter If. Linforth, repre
g Captain Henry 0. Merrlam, told
'fudge Graham that he ;had : been ' in
formed by Mrs. Bessie C. Merriam's
~h ysc fan that ehe miuht be nut of the
hospital short!; The'court'will con
, nue the case limn Lime to time, until
A!rs • !<>rri;un is; able to appear; and tile
i,(-r : cross complaint;for divorce 1 charg
ii.-fHer husband,with deser,tic)n>;.
j£ --* v ■£ ~~
IT &*• Mutton, « member of the Hut
i-] tut company, caught speeding
Iα- Motorcycle Officer PistoleM, was
d $20 by Judge Shyriull yesterday.
SOCIAL NEWS
'Mr., and Mrs. Arthur Brown have re
turned -to• their home in *;San* Rafael
after a brief visit in Columbus, 0., hav
ing been railed by the :r death of Mr.
Brown's mother. . ''; '■ ■--...
* # *
Mrs. Joseph Moody will spend the
summer in San Rafael, where she has
rented the home of Mr. and Mrs. Har
rison Dibblee.
*'" ' • *
Mr. and : Mrs. - Kirkliam "Wright have
purchased a lot at the corner of Green
and Baker streets and will commence
to build Immediately an attractive
home next door to that of their eon
In law and-; daughter, Mr.- and r Mrs.
Henry Avery Campbell, formerly Miss
Marion Wright. .: - "• • ■ - -
« Mr. and Mrs. Athole Mcßaan re
turned Monday to their home in Wash
ington ': street from a 10 days' motor
tour and visit to William Mayo New
hall at the Kewhall ranch. J "/
* « *
■' Mr. and Mrs. John Dickinson Sher
" ■ ■•■■' of Spokane are traveling in
Italy.- >: , :■ 'Qfj : ■' -■ . ~,. ' ■ :■ ," ■'
Mr. and Mrs. Junius Flanders have
closed their * t home at Burlingame and
will depart today for :; Glencde,■': near
Chicago, where they will visit John
Flanders,* father of Junius Flanders,
for a few weeks. they v.ill be
the guests' of Mr. and Mrs." Wyatt. pa
rents of Mrs. Flanders, in Chicago.
-■ * ■ *.. * -!-..;.;
"■ Mrs. Joseph M. ; Masten is visiting
her brother, Mattel, at his J ranch
in Mountain View for a few days.
The San Francisco Tea club held an
enjoyable, meeting yesterday afternoon
in the i residence of ; Mrs. A. Brown Yin
Presidio terrace. An unusually attract
ive musical program was rendered.
,-'■ ■_,- * .;■■■ ♦;•;-■ ,*.- _- : "- "■'
Mr. and Mrs. Alphonse . Judis ; have
returned, from a few months tour
abroad and . are ' guests at \ the Bellevue
hotel. i' They r " will pass the eurnmtr
at the Hotel Peninsular. -
Mr. and , Mrs. Harry Holbrook re
turned from Coronado in Mr. Spreck
els* yacht. They were accompanied by
Mrs. Sands Farman,' who will.. spend
several weeks with her friends. ■
Mrs. G. F. Ashton has returned to
town after ! a few days' > visit with Mr.
and i Mrs. George jA. Moore *at their
home in Ross.: '
When last-heard from Mr. and Mrs.
William V. Bryan were joying "a,"
visit in , Paris, -.. which they -: will i make
their headquarters - for several months/
taking : motor tripe to various ; peaces !of
Jntereet. - They will not return to Cali
fornia for a year. ;. ; » ■ ;.
YEARS GRIND FORCES
ARBITRATION COURT
International (luiiua ■ Beach . Mop.-.* ' <..
Have All Differences Settled liiVi
1 i Time for Peace. ' Fete. :
; WASHINGTON - , May M3.—With Sir
Cecil Spring-Rice, the ; British ambas
sador, and John Bassett Moore, coun
selor of the state department, j present
to ? represent their respective ; govern
ments, the ; ; international tribunal for
the arbitration of outstanding pecuni
ary claims between the United States
and Great ; Britain, held its opening
session;* here today. - ' •■ ■ " ;
* Henri A. Fromageot of France, pres
ident of the tribunal, spoke of the d* , -*
sirabillty of i arbitration In settling dif- 5
ferences between nations. *' '
; ; Earlier in the day members^: of "the
court, AT. Fromageot, Sir Charles Fitz
patrick, , " chief justice of Canada, and
; Chandler P. Anderson, former counsel
or of I the state department, paid their
"respects to 1 President Wilson and Sec
retary Bryan. , '■;..;. ; *; " : ' ! j
Efforts will ■} be made \to '■■ settle one
case a day, so that the 300 cases which
are on the '•first" schedule may be die
posed of.
"Wβ believe," said Mr. Anderson;
"that the best way to prepare for the
celebration of the hundred year* of
peace-is to wipe out s all claims between
the two governments."
FORMER MINISTER ARRIVES
WASHINGTON", May 13.— William J.
Calhoun. tiie retiring American minis
ter Ito ■ Peking,-, with Mrs. Calhbun, ar
rived in Washington today- -.'
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 1913,
THE CALL'S
DAILY
SHORT STORY
BETTY'S BLESSED LADY.
A. MARIE CRAWFORD
"Aren't you : afraid out in these .woods
;<?*«?«.^*si:... -•* ■ L .-- ■■■•'- .■<■ .■-■■•■• . ■ ■■■ .■■■■. .
all alone, little girl?"
Betty looked up at the tall stranger.
In his big gray coat and soft gray hat 1
pulled well over his eyes, and shook h-er
head negatively. ,' " #
■"■': "No," she said, "I'm not afraid. It ie
iso pretty here with the enow over I
I everything."
I '? "Perhaps you want vto -make a snow i
: man."
h "I came to build a fire before 'the
I shrine.: It is so cold for our blessed lady- j
[ today. , * '
"A ehrine—in these ; woods?" ques-
I tioned TheoTen , ' Todd • curiously. "Who
I put it here?" «• , , ' •'
"I'll show it to you," volunteered
j Betty. Mother and , il, ! found it one day
when we were looking for 7 galax leaves
about the spring." i'J*JZH .',*. ~' '
She.went before him. her feet leaving
tiny tracks in the light snow." When
she reached a big , gr.anite boulder s over
hanging a clear spring she pointed ■to l a
riche in the stone where A beautiful
j little image had been placed.
--[ s.f Theoren Todd exclaimed in wonder at
the I beauty and ■? the rare workmanship
lof the v figure. It stood there as if to
I bless the passer-by who paused to drink
of the crystal water that flowed un
; ceasingly some hidden source far
tip in « the mountain, symbolic of divine
mercy that It offered without price. : •; ',:.
M Theoren bared -; his head reverently.
A. '■ few stray snowflakee fell unheeded
on hie hair, already'- turning gray above
his temples.Tf'^^' >-<;,/ {? ,-■
"You love our lady like Jean c does,
don't you?" asked Betty, watching him.
"glie ; looks at it for hours at a time."
•Jean?" lie turned to the child sud
denly, ' "What Jean?"/ ■ ■"
*'- "My Jean." answered '-' l possessively.
is never, never, never going away
from here any more. , She said so." -
"Who is your J<*an?"
"She is my beet i grown up friend;
She ]iveg across the road from us up
on the. mountain. Mother says that
Jean is " lovelier than anybody else "in
the world. I want to build a fire now,
to surprise her ; when f=he cQmes."
M : •I am afraid that the wood around
there ,is too wet to burn." said Theoren.
.* ? PL"I have ' some pieces of . pine all 5 ready
in n hollow log behind the rook. Pine
burns- like everything," announced
Betty, knowingly. . "■••i
iviHejj helped her brush (he snow and
leaver from v two rocks and then - they
carried the dry pine from the hollow
log started a fire. - •■- '' '' ,
''If you ■ hadn't been here ;I j couldn't
have made 8 fire, 'cause I~ forgo tf the
matches. You must be like Jean. i She
always j* has fevery og' ready. Won't
you give me i. your name so that I - can
tell Jean about r you?" ,"'. '
"Why, bless your heart. I; did forget
to introduce myself, didn't 1? Theoren
Todd, lawyer, at your service." S J
"Are you looking for anybody here,
Mr. Theoren? ■ I'm Betty O'Neil," said
the child, Quietly/* looking at > him out
of suddenly startled eyes.; : -
'•No. I'm up here to hunt } game,
Betty. My guide was sick today, *o I
was just knocking about ;to kill time
when I met you. Why djd you think
that I was hunting somebody?" : :'
"Your name." said Betty, Just above
a!; whisper, "is ' the same ;as Jean's ; bad
husband's. He went away and left
her. ; . I -heard" mother ; tell• father :i so.",
.A dull red that ; was \ not a reflection
from the fire swept into 1 the man's
throat and brow. '..". -. \"
"Did Jean -say _ that ;he was a bad
husband?" ? ■*./-:" - ■ '-"■ ■*' •■'-■''';
•Not exactly." said Betty truthfully;
"hut he wasn't ■ real good." '• He was
always going off Vori; tripe and - leaving
her ": alone. Mother ? says site ought to
get a divorce and marry Uncle Bob.
He's V. dreadfully '*. in : love with J« her.
Everybody on ■ the mountain says so."
•Who is he?*.' " The l demand \ was so
vehement that Betty looked ;up quickly.
"He's- just my * Uncle Bob and > he'e
splendid." '. •' ■,: J .rv.. ~-.;■ ."■•..,'.'."•: . ; : "-.., ' ■>■
'.'Suppose I find a dry log and bring it
here before the ' fire ' for us to sit on
while I tell you a story: '■'■ Would yon
like that?"
! Betty meditated. The . promise of a
story was dear to , her <hildish heart,
but Jean's happiness was still dearer to
her. * ; :--.v ; ' ; ; " • • -".„,.
V "I think that it would make Jean sad
to know you because you have the same
name as her, husband. Could you make
the story, short so that you could leave
before sbe comes?' . / ;. . '■!■-:• •'■*"•
'"Yes," said the man gravely. "I'll
make it short." '.--,' - -
"; "Begin now.'' said Betty, moving near
the big gray clad figure beside her. He
put his arm: around her and she snug
gled close to his heart. ' .
~ "I'd!like you a lot if you had another
name," she confessed. ! v! ' V '■"
"I am going to tell you a story about
a man who married a beautiful girl like
Jean, <we: will say. They were very,'
very v happy for, a while, j: but ! ; the f girl
liked to , make ;little; figures of clay and
carve sothers out ,of stone and the man
didn't ' want - her *to do it. £1 He wanted
her all to himself. .-. So they/quarreled."!
"How*'dreadful!" interposed Betty,
watching little , flames curl around the
pine:
• y "The man begged; her, not to work
for whole days on a figure of i-a' little
child or a dog or some, other object
she wanted to copy. ;But]; the girl!
loved i to rdo it, for . tin- work . kept i her
busy and -happy,.while , the ? man was
away In I the big' office." ',•*., -_". ,
:,."She ought to i have' told him that it
was none of his business what 5 she did
when he was gone from home. That's
what Polly Reynolds' mother told
Polly's"3'father when ' he y said > she
mustn't try ;to 5 sing." I ... - •.;;_:>., ■■~ V\ ;Yj.;-£* ;
v| Theoren smiled. "That's right,' , he
said, "but this girl J, was so i interested
in her J little figures that (gtie X wanted
to ~ work !on " them ,in sj the • evenings after
dinner when * the .-'man;; wanted. her to
talk to him. So he went away on
long trips, to ;; Africa, to * South Amer
ica and to other. far away places. He;
hoped that she would mi** him so
that * when '• he <ame i home % again!?; she
would be so i! glad "to i see« him that she
would »give- up modeling the little? fig
ures in clay and carving- them out of
stone."
"Jean .. says ■ that somebody : * whose
heart ' was ' very [ sad ? made * the I Blessed
Lady of - Sorrows ; and put it ? over I the
spring." \ • .
:£,Theoren's ■ eyes rested-; on the little
gray \stone:'/" image that I had flushed
rosy in the warm "glow from the big
wood "fire." -- '* :<■':-' ! .
"Then oh«» day." : he went Jc'on/'
"when % the .. man ;; came '* -.home t,! from S*a! \
long trip, he found J that hts wife had
gone away. Since then lie. has I hunted!
her all through the world, to ■teilpjerj
that if she will only come b*dc to him
she can model figures all tho time. He
will never, be ] happy any more until* he
finds her." . > ', -- ;' - '
Betty slipped a tiny .;-: hand into one
of the mans I beside slier. r^'^y^'^'M^A
* -"You arc looking for somebody/aren't
you. Mr. Theoren?" V
"Yes." he answered her.; huskily. "I
shall keep on searching for her until Si
find her."
i ■ "Maybe the blessed lady will hear
you and help • you find her," comforted
Betty. t: ' ■-■' ■'»
-: A slender woman A dropped down on
her knees in the snow behind them am]
put-her: arms about the two on the log
before the tire. •
"Our blessed lady; has 'heard,* Theo
ren." % "
- He sprang up and caught her savage
ly in hie arms. ' " 'AY ; :"; :
"Oh, .Scan, Jean, my own little Jean!"
he cried. ; "Come back Ito me. I'll love
■ your work "; now. :- Did you carve the
blessed lady over the spring?"
. "Yes," she acknowledged breathlessly,
-
SEVENTEEN YOUNG
WOMEN GRADUATED
Large Concourse at : Mills
College Exercises When
Degrees Are Conferred
Bishop Hughes Delivers the
Commencement Address ;&
Program of Day
OAKLAND, May .17.—Seventeen
. . . - •-. -
young women received their degrees
from Mills college . this afternoon. As
the students in this year's class were
freshmen when r>r. L.uel!si Clay...Car
son took up her duties a» president of
the college, the exercises had a pe
culiar significance. Several hundred
friends of the graduates and alumnae
were present in TJasner hall to listen
to the commencement address delivered
by Biehop Edwin Holt Hughes. L.L.. D.,
D. D., of the Methodist Episcopal
church in California. 'Bishop Hughes
ie 'tt'j former president of De Pauw uni
versity and a --member of the Carnegie
Foundation.
'Education and * Its - flic tie n< y incite
Relation to Life" was the theme chosen
by|thefspeaker.':; He fepoke of the pas
sion of the American people in the last
century for;; wholesale §. education and
the changes which had been wrought
in the financial standing of the many
institutions of learning. That f : when
$42,000,000 had fat one time heen sub
scribed'? for the ■ spread of knowledge/
he • saw. in the fact .-. that it was not
prominently featured in the dailies and
inug-aKinee : that the American people
had' taken \. it las an; action not unusual.
MAHTY SUBJECTS OOVERKD
V; The "sophomore degree" in the stage ;
of knowledge I which was Indicated : by
self-consciousness 5 and an • ideal which ':
was not approached in exercise and the
critical attitude of ! lifting up an ideal i
and measuring all by it he 'declared in r
correct., In "a Ti broad survey Bishop
Hughes covered the field of politics, 'the j
world lof ■ finance, < ■ moral and % religious j
movements of f- the f,centuries.\* naming,
the i: leaders ; and showing !Ho vl each was ]
Han intellectual giant,, the child of the j
best university of tiif time. lie did not
find a necessary relation between mor
als and education. Bishop Hughes said
in v concluding: ...■■ .-■* ■■~> " ".''■' "■■
f\ "You who 'step' out from the threshold
of preparation into the new realm of
activity have had invested in you a j
priceless gift, and from you the home,
the city, the.; state, ■ the world have r a
right jto expect i great things, because
you t have brushed \ against culture and
been taught, knowledge. i-;* "'. .-,,
- "We want ; nothing in America which
amounts to ;an £ Intellectual snobbish
ness—that ;is weakness which does
not ■ contribute to efficiency. The 'book
worm' who gleans aH knowledge and
does not spend it on !. others will : ? a be
looked 1 upon : as the most contemptible
thing in ;. the world— worse* even than ]
a miser end his gold.' , ',:>'.,,''; '
PLEA FOR EXDOWME.NT
Doctor Carson for tie flret . time In
the: history .? of ; the college} made :a v plea
for the endowment fund in her address
to the 'I class. \i She \ covered the history
of I woman's f education en the pacific
j slope from Its I early] beginning in 1844.
j showing the ! development which \ finally
j resulted in the perfection Mills college
J has j!attained, In two years 4 the only
woman's university on the. coast will
celebrate its S fiftieth fj%tvf,tf ar y, and
It is k planned 1 ; that at thIA time ;an en
dowment of : $500,000 shalf have been
established.; 1 Plan* will".shortly be made
to accomplish this, purpose. Doctor
Caraon yj announced the ; ' late jfe Edward
Coleman had bequeathed r the sum of
$25,000 to the ; college, making his gifts
in all $115,000.
; I'ROGBAM OF EXERCISES
The following, whs the ~ program of
the commencement exercises: , -' •''
Organ* prtinde, ' intorHaptro *In? E' ma jor. *:."I : ?f- ••
'ak.; : :. ..-.vr.". <>.'.r...". i.-. Mien M*rgar»r Tailor
Pea»ee«tfon»l, "H§U to thcLerd'BA.noiDt^d , . , . —.—
I ToTocatlon/. , .. .*; K«>v. Fr»»k L. Goodspe*d, D. D.
I Recitation of srriplnrps ' *;- p: :■ '.- : -.,.-.- . >
"Arise, j Sbiu*\ for > Tby r l.igbt H«# Come"... ;
: ; ;>* Choral class, under direction of A. T. ; Stew
:.•:■;■:-:; art.','. ■': ■>''■-<""■' •■' '■"•" '" •'■• : '?-;'.: •■'- ■ •,-' ,■-■
Addre55.......;............. ?.V. Bishop Hughes
"Jerusalem. <> Turn '-Thee Jto tiie ! Lord"" .:.-.. ..*£?;'
•..'.:■-. ...— M i««.. Alice j Co)email? etui ; choral cl ass
Con f prr tag ; f>t ' degree*.'...; ■. /■ ■ -':» ;;- •. *_y. ■
College hymn, "Guide r Me, O Tliou Great Je- >
..': hi>vah" ........ ..'.1.'.."..'..'.. ;.^'.'.";..: .-«* '--■■-'
Braedlrpea ... Rpt. <»<K>«epeed
"I knew that you Joyed tbeae moun
tains, so j I eet fthe j little figure where ?I,
hoped you f would Btop to drink ; and
then, seeing: the image, think of me." vi
"As if ;I • could ever forget you! The
world has been co "; empty since'; If. lost
you.. 1 love you, Jean. , '.
Betty slipped away Quietly.. Twi
light shadows crept out ot the valley
and up the mountain. Above tli« tree
tope -i the evening star gleamed like a
single jewel , »et-In; the bosom of night.
'.;- I"Come J with \l me." said ;:;- Jean softly,
and !• pointed *•. up I the; mountainV trail to
.where; the home lights burned : red in
the dusky.' gloom. v • "-' \ -'■, ■~ ;
(Copyright,* !0i:;, hy'Vr.tbe - McCiure •' NoiTßpapfr
~, '':■■ -;-, :■'.■: Syndicate)^;;-:,: : --.---' ,%>v.'.fj>/i.'-.'." ■
Low Rates East
'■■■"■• v Via ;;, " ' -'- " ROUND TRIP
v, Baltimore - $107.50
1 Boston ' 110.00 .
OOUUlfjrn , Cincinnati ■• . ; 84.50 .
, « July 22, 23 and 24 only
T> ' •!*• -'.">' Colorado Springs 55.00
\r TiCXtXC ' *' ' * Dallas 62.5©
* C%V****V* Denver 55.00
Dulnth 83.8*
Limited Trains, Gettysburg 103.80
Also last Express . V Jane 25. 26 end 27 only
Trains 5 With Tourist ■«--#». * nsjiA
Sleeping Lars. Kansas City W^o
irroUrmt Memphis 7§.#©
«*Sr us , " £s
Montreal. 10&50
' ■■•■■■"■■ • en All irams. New! Orleans' ' 1 :ejW
nffVSL Philadelphia 10&5#
and Returning. Sehwter W. 40
SAI.K DATES \ "I Ju, y *• 2 * nd 3 onl y
Ju ?; ?'x eJ i 4. 5, c, ,0, ,1, St. Paul 75.70
is, 14, is, it, is, ai. aa. Toronto 95.70
."?•?% S , /^? , . 1A « Wasidngten W3M
July ;1,:«,"*» 4v8,'8, 9. 10, 11,"' .. , lliritiA«* Tj>k* 7fi.l§ '
Iβ. i«. 17. 33. xs, 34. m, si: < Winoßa Lake 78.1»
. ' Ammmmt 1. 2, T.«. », i#, 13, •( May 22, 23 and 24 enlr
other poiate.
In addition to tin* ahore, tickets . will fee sold to Baltimore July
-38 »nd 59.
Final return limit three months from date of sale, bnt not later
than October SI, 1913.
Southern Pacific
SAN FRANCISCO: Flood Building ' palace Hotel - Ferry FUtloe i Ptee* Kesny 8100
mirtl end t Towttuma Streets : Station as Ptone Kearnj 180 .
OAKr^AI Thirteenth \ Stre*t maA BreifdwmyM: Phone i Oakland 3 J6B
eiiteenth Street SUtIOB PfcoM LakMlte 1490 First Street BUtloa Phoo* OekUofl TM9
i , ——-a , ■' ,i , i, i. i i hi i i ii. "■ j...'l .!'.-.
Women's Club Work
i£ragMH?#g-. ♦♦♦- ■■-
Calendar for Today
". ; v \Vo»ee'e Political league. ■ Vm
«•!««• building;. 2 |>, m.
Fnrain chih, 290 P«st mtreet,
2:30 p. m.
WOMEN'S CLUBS^
Hanging baskets and canaries make
conditions practically ideal in San
Francisco's city prison at the present
time, according: to Miss Margaret Cur
ry, chairman of the social science de
partment of the California club, In her
annual report, given yesterday after
noon. Many facte pertaining to other
sections of her department also were
set forth by Miss Curry.
,
, Yesterday was the annual report day
and much of deep interest in the life
of the club and the city was recounted
by Mrs. Louis Hertz of , ; the depart
ment of ; social science, Madame Emilia
Tojetti of the department of educa
tion and Mrs. George T. Marsh of the
department of the Outdoor Art league.
Business will occupy the next meet
ing of the club also on next Tuesday.
Members of the Housewives' league !
met yesterday afternoon In the Palace
hotel for a brief business meeting. Dr.
Caroline, C. Coffin, president, was in
the chair. The afternoon was devoted
to a resume of the history 'of ' the
league In this state, which was the
second of its kind established in the
United States, the ? one in New York
being, the first. Its grrowth was of
necessity slow. >;j Doctor .Coffin ;,. said,
became it was not in any sense a
"fad," nor could it be termed definite
ly a club. It comes too close to busi
ness for that. >' - '• .
; a Plans for a Housewives , league din
nei' to be given Thursday evening, May
22, were discussed. ;: It will take place
at ; the Commercial v club and, will be
principally for the vpur pose of intro
ducing Australian meat. - A program
to be prepared under the direction of
Doctor Coffin ■ will be announced \ later.
--- - . •* • # #
-; At the annual meeting of the Clion
ian club yesterday afternoon the fol
lowing' officers were elected: i :'\ ■ ,1 ',
President, Mrs. W. E. Secombe; first
vice » president. Mrs. A. Z. High;Ksec-J
ond vice president, Mrs. B. Schaller;
recording .secretary, t Mrs. H. C. Jenseh ;j
corresponding secretary, Mrs. 'C. R.
Avery: "| treasurer, ? Mrs. Chester\Tea«s;;
auditor. Mrs. Jl. ft McGavren; chair
man ;; of 0 the program committee, ; Mrs.
M. : lα, Whaley; j chairman, music 3 com
mittee. ; Missy.Dora Nettervill*; chair
men portfolio, M»ee , Jean Cumming;
chairman house committee, Mrs. S. T.
Blake.
:;; Next, year the study of Fren(#i; his- •
tory .- from T»uis XVI ;to the .present.
day will be continued and for the sea
son of 1914-15, the study of Italian
history will be taken up. The chair
men for the outline of study are: Mrs.
W. J. Drew and | Mrs. Joseph Fife. 3£;
'* The annual breakfast of the Clionian
club will be held in the Hotel Bellevue
on May ( 27. - , >' ;. J ■ ...": "■* " * .
VOCATIONAL SCHOOL IS
WINNING IN INTEREST
Seat Sale for Benefit Party
Is Evidence of Popular
' .V**• -" Favor ■ ' '* -1
Interest in the vocational training
school for girls is growing apace, as
is shown by the increasing 'sale* of
B?ats4for|the card party to be - : , given
Thursday afternoon by the Women's
Outdoor.* club. ; The party \ will h be held ;
at the Palace hotel. Miss Hattie
Mooser is: chairman Cof : the card party
committee.
" The vocational i training, school sis to
be? established for the purpose of giv
ing young £ women practical education
along the lines for which they are best
adapted. The first affair for this in
stitution was given \f April 29. when
more than $300 Jwere ;J added fto > the
school r fund. / .'..;■ '. ' • ■.■••.." j
The executive board of the Women's
Outdoor club is: ' -, . •
' Mrs. «'harl*'<: ,A. .Hawkins, president; Mrs.
Cleveland i Forbes/ first: vice;president;tMUe? Ada
• Cfoldamltb, r5 seoond -I vice 1 jirt?*ident; % Mrs. B#rt
BecMelonal. "Who Iβ 'on the Lord* Side?"
Organ Postlude,'.march' in T. : (Eteane):";.:.'.t; = v S
•=.'--.-..'. r:;:..*;..^;;.7:;'...'.V.■. s -;v;':ri&Hes'T«ylor.
RECIPIENTS OF DEGREES
The young women who received their
degrees were: *'' , .
5 i Degree *«f ■> B«wheJor of * Letter* —Merle '. Edna
Binkley, B*rkpl«?y; >i OliFe ■* Carter ,\«i Riverside;
Alice i, Mildred Coleman, ; SMro-Wolley, ?j Waeh.;
Florence ? May" : Harper. f Seettle, Wash.; \ Eleanor,
Lewie Jones, Colusa; Joyce Eliza Lobner. Coif ax;
Lena Alta Mauley, i Sanger;-! Eleanor Thenlinda
Mat tic. Malaga: AltU.-a - Edna ; Moore*, Salem,,
Ore.; Mildred .El lea be th ■. Ritchie, , Berkeley; • Buth
Wisifrwl Wood. Saratoga., -. . , ■ •
?-«Degree » of {. Bachelor v of * ; Morey
Boyd. f I*tesno; ■> Olive t Eleanor f Henderson, * Han-'
ford; <■ Poia Sybil it I-finon, i»Wat»onviJle: k. Myrtle
Ida i Mill ward, Hants Ana; | Ethel ; Roflfcone, Red
lands; t Gladj-s May t ...Tildes; \ Lo* f Anjreles. • , ;,-
i L«ii|pai,'i secretary: Miss S Haiti*? 1 Moosm-. treas
urer; directors;' Mrs. A. E. Granpner,\Miss * Beat
rice *Vrooman,v Mrs. O. H. Fernbach/s Mis?« The *
reee Sammerneld, Mrs. Mary C. Bell, Miss I Ha*«>l I
a. King, Miss Lillian Grogan, Mrs. *O. R. Cur
tax, Miss Louise Eble. > ..... ... ,
The of - the - card party
are:
I Mrs. James Rolph Jr. ■* Mrs. Ella M. Sexton
i Mrs. Eleanor.' Martin :•> Mrs. H. :E. > Hißhton I
j Mrs. Milton ■' Pray' vfcf v Mrs. l.oula «Heilbtron v; '■-
Mrs. Henry A. MelTin Mrs. , ' R. O." Saalficld >i
lMre;|'j;S'M.-|Dickeoo»S Mrs.iFrederickiLina f-ifl
Mrs. Henrylßemhardfej ! Miss M. T. Caro -«> ■«/
Mrs. Marcus Koshland ft ! Mrs. John- Adler .
Mrs. I. X. Walter : Mrs. - William Edward*
Mrs. Scott Baker Miss Mary Morse
Mrs.; J...W. Rulnfson ;| : Mrs.' H. Hamburger
I Mrs:* Webster Welbaake i Mrs. B. U. Steinmaa
'Mrsrt'J.sAdler. . .. .4 \ Harry C. Morrill
's Mrs. California Newton ; Mrj>. Eugene iW. Lew %
i Mrs.-* Herbert I Choyqski, j Mrs. * O. 11. . Curtaz t*t
fMrs.fA.'fAronsofi i Mrs. A. P. Black '■'".
Mrs.iFrank|KerriKan : : Mrs. . Julian?Llebes ': ■ '■-'•
Mrs. A. L. Meyer ' i Mrs.-'Louis SLandsberger
i Mrs. A. i C Bogers • , Mrs: t John Promberger ,
;;Mrs;p«>lfat|Frendenthal . -
TechauTavern
Re-appearance of Miss Leßoy
This Afternoon
.- : At the request of many patrons who
visit the Techau Tavern, Mica '. Leßoy I
consented to reappoar, in San Francisco I
and will begin this afternoon, at 4 p.
m. This talented artist brings a num- j
ber of vocal -gems, from the eastern
stage that have never before betri ren- j
dered to a San Francisco audience. In j
j addition to Mies Leßoy, Miss s Helen ■
' Asselena and Miss Llewellyn Hughes !
just recently engaged, each with ; a
repertoire entirely new.
~■•• Next ; Saturday, May 17, ■ between 3:30
i and 5 p. m., < the management will pre- j
sent a souvenir bottle of ; Halcyon Rose
i perfume, manufactured by the?Hanson-
Jenks Co. of New York, to each lady
who may be present. .'. " ;
CHILD HAD SCALD
HEAB VERY BADLY
•''■'"i-p' .-'•'•'..'■*-' , » .* ' ■ ■-"■■' ■■-■■■■•
Eruption Came as Pimples on Face
and Scalp. Less Than One Box
of . Cuticura • Ointment and One
Cake of Cuticura Soap Cured.
■ ' ( \ ; / _ .-' ■■'■' "'" '~'-»,.- .'■' ~-.:.'-•-"•' .' ': .. *•
Arapanoe, Colo. —"My daughter, : while
an infant, had scald head very badly. The
': eruption came » pimples, then a scab would" ;
■ '■A:^''/is&*S*-'-'-: ; form. If the scab was re
\sT - \ - moved yellow excretion,
* :'■ iV *• would ooze out » and
,-vL Zm. ,]_r would spread where the
/' /C[?\ > 'v»w"«rV > excretion went. It was I
f on her facte and scalp. *',■=
x* JaJj-) & " 1 used Cuticura Soap
Iγ — ' for her every time ene
\, ■/. V • *U3 -f. wae bathed, using the =
Cuticura l ; Ointment i afterward, also every ;
night. I used lee* than a box of Cuticura
Ointment and one cake of . Cuticura Soap
* and she was ; soon cured of the trouble." •
' (Signed) Mrs. Clyde Snyder. Sept. 23, 1912.,
% , HANDS BEGAN TO CHAP
■'\-". Lock i Box 61. [ Ovid, Colo. —"My hands |
were wet the biggest part of the day and ;
they began to chap. They were in bad t
j shape. ;• My hands chapped so they would V
I bleed quite badly and were red and rough. i
'} I began to use Cutlciira Soap and Ointment,
washed with the Cuticura Soap three times
* a day and '- used '! the ■ Cutieufia; OmtmVnt at
night and had "relief in three days' time." I J
used the Cuticura Soap and Ointment a I
I; week and a half and they completely cured i
me." (Signed) " Julius Beiael, April 30. 1912. '
4,1 Cuticura Soap 28c; andCuticura Ointment '
&oc. are cold everywhere. Liberal sample of c ; ,
each mailed free, with 32-p. Skin Book. Ad- «
X dress post-card "Cutfcnra. Dept ! T, Boston."/ j
~,'tt 4W"Tender-fa«ed men should use Cuticura I
I goap Shaving Stick. 2&c. i Sample free. ,-,.;-■.;-
} . AMUSEMENTS
I LEADING THEATER
■ Tf Ellis and Market
! W Vim l< 1 ! Phone—Butter 2460
■ "" POP." Matinee TODAY
This Week Mid Next— Wed. & Sat.
: '!•■ "•- \. ■''<■ W«rba end,Lneecher.Present ;, '
' ■ ! - America's »Price !Laugh-Maker >
•'• ■ -
l EDDIE FOY
; & d SEVEN LITTLE FOYS
,", . •' yin - the i Smashing ' Musical; Success ■ * '
1 "OVER THE RIVER"
[ i Wtfets k Sat. Mats., SOc to $2. "Pop." Wed. Mats. :
'-i'l <-fi Leading Playhouse —Geary and.Mason.
Matinee TODAY SC&fBTLw
Nightly I Except I Sunday— > Wed.; and I Sat.
THIS AND NEXT WEEK
DAVID BELASCO Presents >;
FRANCES
■-■■■'■ ■■ ... ■. ■ ■ ~, :- ■ ■ ■ , J .. -a ■.
STARR
:-,.'. ;■;.:.. . • In Her ;Greatest Trluraph, ; .-.; ;...\ "•
"THE CASE OF BECKY ,,
. ■ Original- Nfs York Cast. ..■",■..: '
fYSAYE
T™ GKEEK THEATER
% Dl BKKKEI.EV V
TODAY at 3:15
VTOTTI AND U BEETHOVEN is CONGEBTOS, ;
WITH ORCHESTRA!, AiTOMPA NIMENT i
AND DVBTe WITH | UAKSIXL YSAVE - .
Tickets f'2, fLStr *\. «t I'Sual ria>-e». or
Doors Today.
! SOTTISH EITE ArDITOBIIM t
TOMOHIum XUiHT and SVS. AKT.
Tickets—s2, $1.30. $1. Int s Clay & I
|i§ ; I COw'f ,or, KottlCT £ Chase*. *. V..-" ' ■■':
CHICKKBIXG PIAXO. . '„.
-1 RACE THRU CLOUDS
■|fii^l{9opßl!t!oUß
(RACE THRU CLOUDS
jHSnTT 90 MllfS AN HOUR
J7JJ OHLMEYER
■ PARK and His Band
OAKLAWD *'«%% 552222*
■ Take nnd Kvt-nlag
Key! System ■■ - - -, ;
■ F«ry I Ostrich fanp Now Open
30-oihtß ATimcnows—3ol;
Superfluous
Hair Truths
*-. • ; - :; -
Stop Experimenting
;i «4iThere are but few depilatories; soli.
You think there are hundreds because
you have used tbe same identical,
i % preparations » under ; several j different;
I names. This ■t is \ easily ,; explained.-
Women stop using
So-Called Hah Removers
I when they learn that they are harm-
I?ful. Therefore, can not be sold ;
under, the l same name for any length.
of time. Then the identical, worth
% less, harmful concoctions * are t given i<
new' names s and i? advertised ■; again as /
totally different preparations to;
Defraud the Same Foolish Women "
who s innocently buy them over and
> over again under different names, ana I
this will continue as long as women I
•re *so 5 unwise ;as \to experiment wita •_
unknown, so-called hair removers.
l^lilcicfe
Has Stood the Test of Time
De Miracle has s been I sold as Dβ
4 Miracle for over eleven * years, and its ■
name has never been changed. t It la
•' acknowledged the world over; by cmi
' nent * authorities as i the one safe, per- -
; ' fected hair ? remover, therefore .it. is
v the i only depilatory. you can use with•
out experimenting. ; .-; ; ;::^^,--: , :..,V- '■ :..■ ~
Leaves No Tell-Tale Smell
■ If you use De Miracle it will be Im
'X possible '1 for *1 any curious^ person to -,
I■; know » that s you have used a hair re- |
j ©lover because IDβ Miracle evaporates
I Immediately after accomplishing ,'its ;
1 work, therefore I leaves no odor what-
ever: yOn the V other $ hand, if i you ) use
any depilatory with a distinctive odor, j:
tan offensive, tell-tale smell will cling»
to your skin for hours. . v :
Avoid Permanent Disfigurement
i by refusing substitutes. If your dealer
will : net supply,; you j send 1.00 direct.,
1 Free Information £ how to I determine
5 which depilatories ■ are harmful and,
worthless sent In plain, sealed enve
lope. " - \vv- ■■ ''•"-<'-■ :-■ r'v'i ' " ■■'■.■• ■■■■; ''r;•■'''■
- ! . : :; ,New truths : In : next . advt
Da Miracle Chemical Co., New York
AMUSEMENTS ;
Matlfie« Today and Ever T Day
THE HIGHEST STANDARD Of VAUDEVIUf 7 ;
DON", THE TALKING BOG. introduced by I.oiier
llaskelj; "THE TOP.; O' TH' WOULD DANG-'
ERS," :, with the * Original "Collie Ballet." -in
"KRIS KRINGLE'S DREAM": LEST BR. Amer- 2
ica's Premier VentrlloqHiet;■ CURZON SISTERS. -
Original: Flying / Butterflies; ■', HALE -■« NOIU ROSS
and « CO.. in I the Comedy " Playlet. -< "Lot* .. in the
Suburbs": LYDIA BARRY: v ARNAI D • BROTH
ERS; ; NEW i EDISON TALKING : MOVING PIC
TURES. Lest We«l£.' Great '--'Artistic Triumph.
JULIUS STBGER and CO., in "Justice."
'J livening; Prices—We, 2JR*r. WV\ ' 75c; j Boj Seats
$1. • Matinee Prices (escept Sundays and Holi
days)—lOe. 25c. $oc.' Phone Douglas TO.. :'. :■",;
ALCAZAR ts** '•wen.
MAT. Tomorrow—Last 5 Nights
Charles Waldron
JUSTINA - WAYNE and th*, Al<ra«ar Company in
. :■; a Sew Dramatization :of Charles r>
■!':" ~ . : ■; Dickens' Famous Story, , ■■■;-■"■ •
"A TALE Of TWO CITIES"
. PRICES -Night, 25c to $1; Mats., 25c to 60c.
MATINEES SATI AND SUNDAY
• '.j-. '*:.• -V- , ' ' ' . ■',-•-■ :•-; •-.-.•■.•'-.
; Next—Mß. WALDRON and MISS WAINE io
"THE PRINCE CHAP ,,
r c: MARKET. ST.. orr. MASON. -
LASKYS HOBOES
__"7 KWIGHTS OX THE ROAD ,, ".:
6TETSUWARI
; ACROBATIC JUGGLINO_MARVELS \\:
SI X 6 T HER 3 ACT S
wrrflA Pic r
EUROPE'S GREATEST SENSATION:
10-AMBIAW HOP LOOS-ID ;
10 ARABIAN HOOLOOS-iO
Am*Tica,'s Distinguished Irish Comedy Stairs -
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Murphy
COAL STRIKE."
>"i?« - Th« ', Famous Wajneriaa Pianist, ■, ,;, ;
VILMOS WESTONY
__ FAMOUS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. ':,
\ H-HeadllaerM-8 ,f g f*rjce» ' Joc,~2oc, 30c I
THE MISSION PLAY
OF SANTA CLARA .
, BY MARTIN V. MERLE, A. M., '06.
UNIVERSITY of SANTA CLARA
«•: ;Vv, : :',- FOUR PERFORMANCES: -,: ::•" J.- : ;u'l
iWEDNESDAY-EVENING, MAY 14 .
THURSDAY EVENING, MAY ,15
% i SVTIHDAY » EVENING, ~ MAY-: 17
V ; SIWDAY APTFHWOX, ; MAY IS . _
Evening Performances 'at 8 o'clock. Afternoon
at 2 : o'clock.v i is >^£"-'''---',; »-'." :: i. y"-': , !-':'■'■• - [\,:.- -,?.;►:?;
■ RESERVED BEATS «1.50,' $1.00 and 76c.
y •■■■;■■-:.-:-/■: GENERAL ADMISSION 50c. ■y.p-yH
m Tickets for sale at :Sherman,*:Clay/* Co.'s,iSan; ■'
Francisco; University Drag Store.i San 3(mf. Mad
dens ? Drug * Store, '% .Santa ■ Clara. , 5 Kcr { bo* * party • "-,
accommodations "apply " UnlTfrsity ■"; Drug ,; Stnr»>. ■■
San' Jose, t?Special• train to San ■,Francisco; after. : i'
each performance.;-, , .■.",' '.''. , : .' '-
Phone Sntter 4200
Seats Ready at 9 A. M. Today
GALA OPENING; WED. EVE., MAY 21
'■?-"; SUMPTUOUS ? REVIVAL? OF;,
WHEN JOHNNY COMES
MARCHING HOME
REMARKABLE CAST! ;
SPLENDID ; CHOBL'S! 1
;< MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. 3i '£''■■
POPULAR PRICES—£6c, 600 and 76e.
LURLINE
BUSH AND LARKIN STREETS
OCEAN WATER BATHS I
"'.-•' Swimming; and Tub Bath* -."■■•. ■;; -
IlleiUl waiecf direct from ■ the ; octee.*>\. Op#n :■/
3fi«y <lav * a«4 j;ev«nlay.-5; lncli*llnr * Sandays; £.'
ji and holidays, , ; from 6a.m.t010 p. m. Spec y
i.tators'^Rallery?fre'. .
The Sanitary Baths
Natat-oriuna 'l'u'>>rl«T and|Frida.TA X
I mornings! from; 9 .o'clock ito Boon j for« women • «
"only .»>-'..
-lef/ITtTWaEBIoCEAN' WATER i PLUNGE ' "■;•
t COMFORTABLY HEATED. CONBTANTLV |
CTRCTTLATIIIG AKD FILTERING
Hot Air Hair Dryers, Electtie Ottriinc Irons J
I and Skuaao« Room for Women ' B»th«rt Fr««. f i
BRANCH TUB BATHS. 8161 O£ARY ST. I
HEAR DIVISADgRO.
7

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