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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, July 11, 1913, Image 13

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Going on a Vacation?
Phone Kearny 86 and tell them you Want
The Gall sent to you while you're away.
VOLUME 114.—N0. 41.
BULGAR ARMY
OF 50.000 GIVES
UP, IS REPORT
Troops Forced to Surrender
to Greeks Following Battle
of Demirhissar, % London
Hears—Conquered Forces
Torn With Dissension and
Outgeneraled by Their Foe
ROUMANIA DECLARES
WAR; JOINS ALLIES
Repeated Reverses Cause
Ferdinand's Advisers to
Appeal to the Powers to
Arrange Peace — Internal
Strife and Turk Campaign
Drain Push Proposals
Bl I. T.F.TIN
T,O?fDOX. July 11— The king: of
Roamenln has declared war on Bnl
•■ ■ ■ ...■■•-- ■■- ■-■■•.
trarln. The Roumanian minister -In
Soflia has been recalled. The Sofia
correspondent of tlie Tiroes sends this
announcement this mornlnar.
LONDON. July 11.— Rumors were
published in Berlin yesterday, and,
according to the Daily Telegraph's cor
respondent in Athens, were current
there that Genera! I van off. with 50.000
Bulgarians, was force 1 to surrender
near Demirhissar. where fishtins: was
proceeding for thr possession of a rail -
way bridge over the Struma river.
A later Athens dispatch.to the Tele
rraph says no confirmation was ob
tained, and an official report issued
in the Greek capital, although it men
tions the Demirh!ssar fighting, 3a ys
nothing; of the surrender.
The correspondent adds that unless
M Natchevitch consents immediately to
evacuation, the porte will after 24
hours' notice, order the Ottoman troops
to drive out the Bulgarians.
r.OIMAMA AFTER LAXD '
It is expected that Roumania's first
Ftep will be the occupation of the
2.500 square miles of territory which j
she claims from Bulgaria as compen- :
sation for her neutrality in the late
war. This strip extends from Turtukai
to BaJtchlk on the. Slack sea and in
cludes the city of Silistria.
The en<l of a fortnight's desperate
fighting -■is Bulgaria forced to appeal
to the powers to arrange peace. The
Bulgarian plan to drive a wedge be
tween the Greek and Servian armies
near GuevgheH has failed completely.
The last reports of the fighting re
ceived from Athens show that the Serv
ians and Greeks at this point are com
bining their forces, while the Rouma
nian army la beginning an invasion of
The latter fact doubtless was the de
riding factor in the Bulgarian appeal
to the powers. How far Bulgaria's
defeat is due to dissensions in high
military quarters, which resulted in the
resignation of General Savoff, and how
far to the feet that the Bulgarian
Troops, which bore the brunt of the
hard fighting in the last campaign,
were more exhausted than the Greek
nnd Servian forces probably never will
be known.
UOIMAMA I.VVASIOV UPSETS !M.A\
Nothing can be predicted at the mo
ment as to how events will shape
themselves, the Roumanian invasion of
Bulgaria having brought an entirely
new factor into the problem. Russia
and France are devoting their efforts
to persuading the allies to adopt a
moderate attitude to facilitate a peace
ful settlement.
The Servian premier is quoted in the
Vienna Neve Frele Presse as declar
ing that the new war has completely
set aside all treaties of alliance and
that peace must now be negotiated on
an entirely new basis.
Bulgers Trapped in Passes
ATHENS, July 10.—Official dispatches
report that continued pursuit of the
Bulgarians and a desperate battle in
the passes of Mount Belissi and on
the road from Deiran to Strumitza, re
sulted in complete *. ' tory for the
Greeks and the rout of the Bulgarians.
The capture of these passes was a
disaster for the Bulgarians because it
enabled the Greeks to attack the rear
of the Bnulgarlan fourth army corps,
which had its front fortified against
the Servians. The Bulgarians hastily
abandoned their fortified positions in
front of Tstip and fled, headlong from
the furious assault of the Greek "in
fantry, which captured nine guns. The
Greeks pursued the • enemy unchecked
as far as Strumitza.
On the extreme left the Greeks today
attacked the Bulgarians near Demir
hizzar.
Greek Fleet Takes Kavala
ATHENS, Greece, July 10.—A Greek
r.aval force today occupied the seaport
of Kavala on the Aegean sea, hitherto
In the hands of the" Bulgarians.
MILLION DOLLAR FUND
FOR DENTAL RESEARCH
National Association -Prepares to
Knable Member* to Study; Roch
♦•Mter Wl.iM Convention
KANSAS CITY, July * 10.—A resolu- ;
tion providing:, a commission of *' 25
members.to take charge; of raising by
subscription an endowment" of 000,
--000 for a national research and scien
tific foundation fund for,; dentists , was
opted at todays. session* of the ;-Na
tional Dental association. . /
object is to enable dentists to
leave' their practice and engage in re
search work. More , than $15,000 has
subscribed. ■
Rochester,- N. X., today was chosen as
, pla< c of next year's conven
tion. Dr." Homer >'. Brown, 'Columbus,
0.. •Jetted president. ■' I
Honor Student Is Bride
Groom Is Army Officer
Mrs. Lewis K. Underhill, "who >. Was •, a bride last evening at a
military wedding in Berkeley:
West Point Graduate Weds Phi Beta Kappa
Member in Simple Home Ceremony
BERKELEY. July —At a military
wedding this evening at the residence
of Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Pence in Le
Conte avenue, their daughter, Miss Mary
Ada Pence, became the bride of Lieu
tenant Lewis K. Underhiil, U. 8. A.
Masses of roses and sweet peas in the
hues of pink were combined with ferns
to make the setting for the small
bridal party. Large American flags
were* draped throughout the "house ■in
compliment to the bridegroom, - who was
graduated this summer with honors
from the United States military acad
emy at West Point.
A half hundred friends witnessed the
ceremany, which was read by Rev. F. L.
Hosmer. -Assisting the bridegroom as
beet man was Leslie Pence, .with James
Underhiil and Robert Underbill as
ushers.
Miss Edith Pence ~ was her --sister's
only attendant. She wore a -grown of
pink satin elaborated in lace and ear
TAFT IS HONORED
BY PEACE LEAGUE
Educators in Organization
Favor National Panama-
Pacific Exhibit
'SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, July 10.—
William' Howard Taft was elected, hon
orary president at a meeting here to
day of the American School Peace
league. Among ; the ; active officers
elected were Randall .T. -Condon,; Cin
cinnati, president; David Starr Jordan,
vice president, and F. E. { Spaulding of
Newton. Mass., treasurer. h
The committee on resolutions tof i the
National Education association re
ported in favor of a national education
exhibit at the' Panama-Pacific exposi
tion. * ; -::-'-'--: ■.■-■■•:•,-■■•::■\ -","■, :
Joseph Swain, president of Swath
more college,: was elected president of
the National Education association by
an unamnlmoiis vote here today. .'.."::
Grace M. Shephard, state superin
tendent of Idaho schools, was re
elected treasurer. ■, , , ;
I •••rand W. Springer. of Ann Arbor is
continued as secretary, his selection
being by appointment. Directors were
selected for all the .states,". Hawaii and
the Philippines. -; ■';. : : 7 ;-:.;-.J-"... : -
Previous to the election of officers of
the National Education association ; the
national council of education met and
elected the following: . *' . ; ; -
j Robert J. Aley. president University
of Maine, 1 president; W. B. Owen, Chi
cago, secretary: David B. Johnson,
president Winthrop college, South Caro
lina, member executive 1 committee.
An Innovation in ; the - report of , the
committee" on resolutions at the -J gen
eral session ■ was ; that it took % the; form
of a declaration of principle!,' 12 phases
of education being treated in separate
reports. ' "A. -':J_-. -. ■'- •".. '■.■?--/-.l -~'.'" " r ''i\:
•'? The report of the school health com
mittee stated that ; the women iof ;; the
federated clubs *of I southern • states ; bid
fair to outshine those of the north with
their health campaigns. The , Religious
Education association, .which"; was to
have met today, announced that It had
been decided not to hold f sessions,while'
in Salt i Lake City. * It was denied - that
cancellation 'was:; due to - fear of . re
ligious controversy. ~
: ; WASHINGTON, July 10.— By ; tinnnl
mous consent the senate today .passed
a bill making: Oregon lands'withdrawn
or classified as oil lands subject to
entry ; under ' the homestead or desert
load laws. '
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
PART TWO.
ried an armful of pink blossom?. The
brJdal robe was of ivory satin ■ with
trimmings of lace. The % veil w as
caught with sprays of orange ;blos-
Boms. Lilies of the i valley i formed: the
shower bouquet. The bride was given
into her husband's V keeping by her
father, Charles Pence.
Lieutenant Underbill and Mrs. Un
derhill will tour the state : before re
turning to San "Francisco, where the
bridegroom Is at present ; stationed.*:
Both young people were graduated
from the University of . i California.
Upon taking her degree the bride. was
made an assistant to Prof. W. A. Mer
rill of the Latin department. She ;Is - a
member of the Prytanean society. and
Phi Beta , Kappa honor society. :: Lieu
tenant Underhiil is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. , George L. Underbill of San Fran
cisco. ■ . -;.. ;,; ;;* ..;';'-.
ARNOVITCH PLAYER PIANO CO. 212 SUTTER, COR. KEARNY ST.'
Never Before
HA YOU BEEN ABLE [ TO
;•* BUT A PIANO OR . A
PLAYER AT SUCH PRICES
. ; OTFERED. AND I
THK TERMS?
WELL. THEY r SPEAK: FOR
themselves:
JUST IMAGINE, BUYING A
FINE PIANO AT /LESS
.than THE ;usual ; .
" rent of. < NE.
- NOT ONLY TIUT. you ;.
may COME To this SALE
" WITH A feeling OF
■y-'.--/ safety!"
-'. ''' '-.-;•. ■■ :■ . '"■.'-' f' : : .
NEVE a ■
IX .THE HISTORY OF
PIANo : MEROIUNDISINGS
HAVE YOU EVES
BEEN OIVES:THE
FACTORY -■ KTMBER'
OF - THE PIANOS ADVER- j
• TISED AT :SO i CALLED:. J
••SPECIAL SiLES."'
WHY?
THE FACTORY NUMBER
\O\- WILL FIXD ON THE
INSIDE 'OK E7EB.Y, ..
PIANO. THE ONLY WAY
. BY WHICH A
- PIANO MAY BE
PROPERLY ..IDENTIFIED.
THIS WE ARE RNISH
INt"J YOf" IN = OUI LIST.
SO YOU MAY REST
' ASSfRED OF '
THE vi ano i, YOr h DHOOSE.
DON'T DF.LAV. >
COME TODAIT.
SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, JULY 11. 1913
COLONISTS CHOOSE
CALIFORNIA LANDS
• .• ■ ■ __ - ■ ',_v -,i ■;:■ . -■ ,■■■■■■-!
Norwegian Farmers May
Settle on Tract in Solano '
Irrigation Area
Selection Is Made for Luth
eran Synod by Bishops
- of Church
After two j years' search- : throughout
the west for lands upon which to lo
cate a Norwegian farmers* colony, tWO
bishops* of the Norwegian Evangelical
Lutheran church have found In Cali
fornia what they -' ire re looking: . for. *■-
'. They have made a tentative choice of
3,000 acres on ; the ;i Solano Irrigated
Farms ; tract and will report favorably
on that selection sto V their principals
In ; the ;" church in .Minneapolis. 1 ; The
land ■- that , ;fulfills all of ' their require
ments lies in two parcels, one <\l which
is now under I irrigation and the other
will be supplied with water next-year.
: The ; bishops were shown , over the
property ;by A. J. Rich, who,.upon > his
return yesterday, v said: ■-. . - ; .
'•Should : the Norwegian colony;. final
ly locate on ; Solari"o",f it will prove
the greatest stroke of encouragement
possible for ' the settlement ,of Cali
fornia lands. That ' the bishops; were
pleased •' with what we had ■: to offer .is
further confirmation '" of the faith of
the ;.; enterprising capitalist* who put
their,- fortunes into the development of
the lands.'• !
" At the Lutheran synod 'two years
ago the pastors, representing an or
ganization of r>oo.ooo ■ members" and ;a
church with 2,500,000 in the United
States * and . Canada, decided to , estab
lish* a farmers' colony in the west.
.financed by wealthy members of the
church, ■y
'Bishop 1., C. Fos?. Bishop" O. P. Vang
nes, a banker, Jens 'Johnson of Minne
apolis, and Rev. E. N. Stensrud be
gan the search for a location. * ;
They : employed;; a ' soil expert and
weighed every detail of climate, trans
portation - and market in > every state
they visited. California won. ;
: "They will be , the kind of ; colonists
that Calif or n-aiwill welcome." said; Mr;
Rich ..yesterday.' "The Norwegians are
industrious and God fearing;" - they
know how farm and they make the
best citizens.T The colony will _; have
ample financial; backing ; and nothing
has pleased ,us more than r their choice
of .:-•; Solano ' farms after such '■'. a 1" long
search." y. : .; ■' ' ;. : "; :i - . ...; ;... V.... ;■ :
In 1915 a convention' of /Norwegians
will be; held lin . San, Francisco" in ad
dition to the J gather ing: of 'the ■; singing
society of the church. There will prob
ably be 10,000 r members of the race here
at that time. 4 -;* ■ ? '.:."" -. V-": .-■'-'■•■ ■ : "
CABLE LINE WILLING TO
DO SHARE OF PAVING
Manaßcr : 'Harris''.Will Place Asphalt
;'; ■ Grouting In California Street Pentl-
13»K I". f H. Claim Settlement '
In response to a .petition from the
North Central Improvement association,
the supervisors'," street (committee - yes- i
terday,requested Manager Harris of the \
California I Street 'j Railway [ company to [
pave between the company's tracks and j
for two feet on either side with asphalt
In " California street ; from Montgomery j
to Drum. J Manager Harris expressed" a I
willingness : to ' comply, ;, but ' said * his
company did not have undisputed
ha the street, - since the United > Rail-j
roads' claim to use the right of way is I
now in the courts. * While the matter is !
pending Harris will place san asphalt
grouting between ;' the . basalt . blocks.-
TVASIUXGTOX, July lO.—-Officials of
the navy department virtually have
abandoned hope of recovering' the elec
• trie v. wiring f plans of -.the dreadnought
Pennsylvania, which were stolen last
March.-:; , j V '; ." ; "/': - ■ ' -
BETTER HURRY TO THE WIND UP
•-;.'/ of the GREATEST of all Great Piano Sales
; ' a xiiaL!L.l"AlWiffAilljj__. ■'...: We have th* following Piar.os to offer you today.
\ ' t 1 "' ■•"■ - ' Study this list and bring it with you:
Make of Piano— No. Priic PrJre
AS3SW VOSE 7064 $475.00 545.00
:$&&£&• /• ■ jj> -..-»_ wf.bf.r :;--'!v: .m:.;:: 575.00 23o!oo
fisi mL I &$> <§ fllP§H KOHLER & is;ib2e 425.00 235.00
C %V' l' ffll* , *! CHASE ........ 4*040 400.09 inS.OO;
J f».r«vrrv _ jfargJ&J kfrtzmax 51611 475.00 207.50
IP OS. if M km torso x oisu 475.00 215.00
*flfcfcfc T">AVTS 400.00 135.00
Jfr V.STKV 1238S 425.00 115.00
M* 3 HHSEmH^*' MAJESTIC 17261 400.00 220.00
ARK'X' .'.".'.'.'.'.'.'.'. .'l4lO SSSioO 15s!oo
; *tRb« I?ltl T^^ HAZEi/rdx ..v.. 14354 450.00 ino'.oo
I&\J UW TIKIXr: .... 20903 300.00 137..10
\jJr ' ; A-;''IiMAMA- HARTMAN -.V.'-!!: 44656 37o!o0 19T,.0Q
»Bl HOFFMAN' ••• • • : ; 15SS <5 350.00 157.00
■ ■ BREWSTER 400.00 178.00
"" AT TMSS- , i>.?se| STAFFORD 1.'..".':. 64001 425.00 104.00
- jgSM*±- : : ***A * " T*T : " V■, ' NH ALBERT . .7... 29301 -tOO.OO 175.00
SffKSSk ■ ■ £» A f *??'■" '■";.'•'•■' ?fj2£'JW BYRNE . . ■■.:.. . . 14120 375.00 187.50
' CAMERON : IGT'H 47.00 ; 100.00
DS7 *^ c •——. EmMBl BLASIUS 80528 &00.00 2.tn.00
Br MARIV MAIOLS fia 8w L.INDEMAN 9173 475.00 105.00
«■»-.- entire)! v.M/WVW. mStmm AVESKR 8R05....169263: 42r».00MS7^JO
;toB - TO -• - ~ M&mHF T ? AI ' En •••• -"i::t> 400.00 142.50
, '- ' *WI «»#MB» : ' ffWiriFil*" . ' Upright r. .. . .... 3387". "400.00 24.00
>Ak. 5m 5300.00: i:«5.0O
: .:■ ,^^^^^;i " ' JIKNSELL Upright- sis "00.00 55.00
• ANDRKOHLER. . fiM. , :.'. 400.00 is.-j.no
• ■ •■ ■ .'T'^Hl^^ FISCHER 93617 450.00 185.'o«
X & CAMPBELL. 57616 350.00 155.00
Wβ also hare % few Player Pianos that well di»pos» of at Proportionately Reduced prices on Easy Terms.
Look for the \ T>'NJ#^"\7'TTP/^ , l-r PLAYER (~*i~\ OPEN
Bin Piano Men jrVrvl>iV-l V 1 1 L'fl PI A > O V^ EVKM.XiS
212 SITTER, COR. KEARNY ST- Take Eleyator to 2d and 3d Floor?.
ALL PRISONS NOT
BAD, SAYS BYERS
New Jersey Official Resents
■ Sweeping Attack on
Penal Institutions
Armstrong Before Jury —
Portland Trust Liquidates ;
—Northwest Notes
-SEATTLE/ July. 10.—At todays ses
sion of the National Charities and
Corrections Joseph P. Byers, commis
sioner of charities of -New; Jersey,', dis
cussing 'The -Prison of ; Twentieth
Century," said: ' ' -'
-V'Laist week.-in ;Portland I Rat In a
public: gathering ;: and .'listened -•. to a
sweeping; arraignment' and "general de
nunciation of our penal and reforma
tory a institutions that ? disturbed me.
First, because there was in the ad
dress; a large? element of i —and it
is the truth .that hurts; and secondly,
because th« speaker failed to voice, even
If ihe recognized i the fact, that all of
these institutions are not all bad. He
characterized, our county jails as ie
primary schools for instruction in vice
—true, absolutely, land ;by no means a
recent dlacovery —our v schools for ju
venile delinquents as the r, grammar
schools," where the • instruction is con
tinued. "" "'■- ' . , ; *
MUCH TO BE SAID
; "There is much to be said: on the
other side. Our reformatories as the
high schools where criminal character
is further ; developed—often true, but
why not ; speak :of the larger : number
of cases where criminal habits are up
rooted by -the; corrective influence of
these institutions? 1 " ? " V V
"Why by implication leave In tne
public mind the idea that the officials ,
of these institutions- are themselves
structor? : and teachers in crme? .why
weaken public confidence in ■■. men and
women who are fighting your -battle
with - crime, who are T the custodians
of the 100,000 and more convicted law
breakers now in their; keeping? .
WHY \OT CONSIDER GOOD? ;.;-'
.Why not rather,take, account of the
good -result t accomplished J by t them > in
spite of the awful handicaps you ; im
pose iupon them in the way of in
sanitary housing, lack lof facilities for
classification, political interference and
vicious systems of labor, or. .what is
worse. laws that prohibit or unduly
restrict-employment?' , \ \
The ; special section, meeting on Pa
cific coast immigration conditions to
day brought out an overwhelming sen
timent against any concessions to
oriental immigrants. , ..;;,
Prof. Anton de Haas of Stanford uni
versity, opened iv the standards ■of ?living
find iibor section with an address on
'Tiiemployment Insurance," discussion |
of which Wti led by-Stewart Rice^ of j
thy ; University of •WadU't.p.lor...
The conference tonight elected these .
officer*; -"-v «T. ■■■' ■■■ *
' .•Pre*Went;'<Jrabam Taylor, president of School ,
of CltJcr itnd'Pnllanthrophy,; Chicago: .firstfrlce
president * Dr. A. J. McKelway. secretary, for , the !
southern states of • the! National i Child •,■ Labor ■ as- j
sociation, Atlanta: second vice president. v "- !
John >r. Glenn. Charity orpraniziition eoetety.
Vf»c ' "rl;: third :vU*p.president." W. A. <;ates.
secrfitnry California state board of 'cbftritlPß and
correction. San Francisco: secretary. William T.
Bom, -serretery.Mlwoßrl; state; board-; of,-charities
and correction.;-Columbia: executive commit(«»<»,
Vather John A. Ryan, - Associated • Charities/; St.
Paul: Sin - P. - Falconer,;. superintentV-nt £ Girls'
llrrasp of Hi-fug'-. Oarliti;:. Pa.; _ J. A. Reichman.
Associated' Charities, Memphis. TPTn.: . Joseph 1 , .
-H.rers.* -<..■■■• 'conitnission"of charities andcorrec- |
(fee Trenton.'-X.- J.: J. O. White." Union Bethel
uettlement. Cincinnati: Mies Maude -H. Miner, j
socrptary New •; York :, Probation and ■ Protective
association. . ■ . . .
Armstrong Before Jury
PORTLAND, July Iβ. — Former f€lyil
Service Commissioner :A. P. Armstrong :
appeared ? before the fCfaiH Jury ;hera j
this > a-'tr ■ -r.(.":i t<- testify -i m *»-.<• pr»»b#
now under way of the charges ; that
<• iv 11 service examinations for places oa I
the Portland -; police ■" force were V- per- j
meated with graft - during f his admin
istrations. » -,
V* Armstrong , .. In .: a public statement
this morning, said . that many camli
Have Something to Sell?
Phone " Kearny 86 and let The ; Call's".
/ ;-,; class ads , find; a purchaser for you.
PAGES 9 TO 16.
Did They Get Your Cat?
Record: 4,611 Impounded
« ——— ———_—•.,- •"v • ~-— ,j "-' ••;"";._ «
There have been a lot of stray
cat* In the city lately.
f-. The public pound * has taken', np
4,611 :In the last year, the largest
number ever handled, according;
to its report." :/ " -' ",.:■•'....-_-.
There were ,7,eS» dog:* Im
pounded, 322 large Mock and 225
email , stock. ' There rrere 5,444
doe*: killed.
The sale of doer licenses Is de
creasing;.'
! dates- for patrolmen had come to him
and secured from him old lists of
questions .used in previous examina
tions and he acknowledged that he
might have "been indiscreet; In giving
out these old lists, but he denies abso-.
j h!'.rtlj-\tlmt he t pave out- new list* of
questions to candidates before tncy
were used In examinations.
Alberta Officials Arrested
;: CALGARY,;; Alberta, July l(h—-Eight
official? in the Alberta government land
titles offljee \at ■ Calgary were arrested
today following , the disappearance; of
large sums :of money, during a period
: frum v 1 SO6 ■to tr.o present. Tito n>**n
are Barrieau. ; L Dulmage, Burdette.
Phelps, Herdman. Elbrigge. Sawyer and
.Wilson. Nineteen names have been
submitted to the government for ac-
I tion. Many valuable records have dis
appeared. , r '
Trust Company Quits
PORTLAND, July 10 Th« ' First j
Trust Company of Portland has closed j
its . doors with a view to going into I
liquidation and the slate comoner
"oty corporations lias asked Attorney
General Crawford to take steps for the
appointment of a receiver. .: The action
of the ;concern followed the refusal of
the ■ corporation commissioner to :issuo
a permit under the new law regulating
trust companies' to buisnesa.
WOMEN WILL SHARE
BOND ELECTION WORK
Zfmantk}-'* ,Selection -of I.S2S Precinct
Officer*, a Third of Them of Fair Sex,
Approved by Commission
"Women will.be givenalarge sharp of
official work attached to the c municipal
railway system bond election set for
August 26. The election commission
i approved yesterday Registrar Zeman
sky's selection of I.S2S precinct officers,
of ~whom approximately a third are
women. The Woman's Civic study of
the twenty-sixth district asked that
women receive their full share of the
appointments. -
: The sale has been going this week and al
ready thousands* have made their year's clever
shoe buy; there are plenty, yet for everybody.
Seasonable merchandise of every character
and in every department— "women's and
children's—ds included. It is the best chance of
the season to get real up-to-date well-made,
stylish footwear at a substantial price cut.
There's a bargain for every member of the
family.
."V-Ladies'. Button Oxfords, like illustration, in
- Gun Metal Calf, Patent Colt, reduced to " jsß
Another prade—a very superior make /•
in Gun Metal Calf, Tan Russia, Pat- / £0] M? i
ent Colt and White Buckskin..S3.3s \J*W Wltim
A dozen styles of Ladies' Oxford 1%//^^^^s^
Ties—cither light or heavy sole. Jifea&U^m ifi§ii
In Patent. Gun Metal and Kid. 1 ff-j
For $4.00 grades reduced to qS&KB&I^P^
Unprecedented Reductions in White
and Tan Shoes
Eadies' White Canvas Button Shoes, fP^^^
$3.00 grade ~.:.. .-.....;.:. $1.65 - % *
Ladies' White Buckskin Button Shoes. *l! -® i
$3.50 grades ...........:... .$2:35;: r '■©; I
$4.00 grades $2.65 and $2.85 J§/ V
$5.00 grades .......'..... $3.35 J /A
Tan Russia Calf Button Shoes, $400 f&J A "jf J
grades ..:...... .......... $2.85 £
; ; .00 grades 53.55 AwK
Champagne Kid Button Shoes, /*\* v><> ■sj-VSri*"
.00 grade $3.85 i^^^
"\ TURKISH SLIPPERS, in Tan, Blue, Pink, Black
. ,y and Lavender Kid, with gold and silver tinsel r
embroidered vamps ....-.-.........:...:... .55
Ladies' Imported Bronze Button Shoes, with bronze cov
ered Cuban heels, $6.00 grade . .............. $4.85
Ladies' Patent Colt Button Shoes, white tops, $S.OCH
grades '..*..........'.. . ..'.........../....''.. .'.-.52.65j^
With gray suede tops ........ .-.v........... $3.35
Button Shoes in Patent Colt or Gun Metal Calf, excellent
$4.00 values .. $3.10
. Children's - Barefoot Sandals, made of ]or>>}-
Tan Leather, with flexible stout "/^-~«^^^A
soies - I
. Sizes sto 8 Bto 11 11 to 1 If 1
55£ ' 600 65 \c^r
- A better grade with double ' : --\/zs-i%j!&d&r-
stitched soles. ( **%&
70c 75e 800
Many odds and ends in Ladies' Shoes from 500 to $1.65
Jammer 3b ffeuftncsii!}
836 t0.840 119 to 125
Market St. istores} Grant Aye.
near Stockton " """"ZU near Geary
PRICE FIVE cents.
DOUBLE SENTENCE
LIMITED BY COURT
Void Where Grimes Were
Committed Simultaneously,
According to Decision ■ ■..;■
Circuit Judge Reverses Dic
tum of District Tribunal
for Kansas
ST. PAUL, Minn.,. July 10.—A , man
shall not be compelled to serve a double
sentence if it can ' be shown that the
crimes charged against him were
committed simultaneously and were
prompted by one criminal motive, ac
cording to an opinion today prepared
by Judge Sanborn of the federal circuit
court of appeal?.
The decision of the district court of
Kansas was reversed and the release
of Charles A. Stevens, convicted of rob-;
bing the mails, was ordered.
Stevens was convicted .of stealing a
pouch of registered mail from a carat
Kansas City, Mo., July I, IMS. The
conviction was on two counts and he
was to serve five years for each count.
- One of the stolen letters contained
$12,500, which he embezzled, according
to ! testimony.
The decision today. It la said, clear*
up an important point of criminal law.
It was held that Stevens is being re
strained In prison upon a judgment of
a federal court, which; Is beyond juris
diction of the law, and thai Stevens
should be freed by a writ of habeas
corpus and that he is not barred from
this relief by the fact that he could
have obtained his release by a writ of
error. > ,-. v!. :, ...—--'./
Stevens serverT five years In the, fed
eral prison, then petitioned for release,
urging that the crimes named In
indictments were one continued art.
The lower court refused to grant him
release. '
'CHANGE SEAT A BARGAIN
NEW YORK, July If. — Two seats
were posted for sale on the Stock ex
change '": today. One was for $3S,oo<>.
This is the lowest price on record and
$1,000 less than the last sale.

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