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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, August 06, 1913, Image 4

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TOE M CALL
'• A a Independent Newspaper—The Paper
e»f Authority."
FOUNDED DECEMBER L MM
W. W. CHAPIN, Publisher
POST DANGER NOTICES
Mr. Alexander S. Gardiner makes
the timely and needed suggestion that
notices should be posted on the ocean
beach at the spot where two boys
were drowned on Sunday.
Danger notices are needed, and
needed at once, if such unhappy
events as that of Sunday are to be
avoided as nearly completely as
possible.
Danger notices as to the undertow
should be posted not only at the
place where the two boys were
drowned, but all along the beach
where bathers are likely to go into
the ocean.
There is no danger in bathing
inside of certain distances, which can
readily be denned.
The drowning of the boys on Sun
day should arouse the public and the
authorities to the need of doing every
thing possible to prevent drowning
accidents, which are always prevent
able.
N*ot enough precautions against ac
cidents are taken now. and the won
der is that more people have not
been drowned by reason of their ig
norance of the dangers of the under
tow.
The great beaches on the Atlantic
at Atlantic City, Asbury Park. Cape
May. Coney Island and other places
where multitudes go in summer—are
patrolled constantly, life lines are
provided and no one is allowed to go
outside the lines.
On a pleasant summer Sunday
nearly as large crowds from this city
are to be found on the ocean beach
as are to be seen at some of the
Atlantic resorts; but we have not such
complete provision for safeguarding
the lives of the bathers. It should
be supplied.
CROP MOVING BY GOVERN
MENT
Secretary»of the Treasury McAdoo
has taken a new step in summoning
banker? in 59» cities of the south, mid
dle west and Pacific aostst to meet
him in Washington anal confer on
financing the nsual fall crop move
ment.
The secretary's purpose to get first
hand information as to the specific
needs of each section is admirable and
-hould lead to unusually good results.
Mr. McAdoo proposes to distribute
500.000,000 of government funds
the banks which usually
rinance the .movement of crops in
such time and place as it may be used
to the greatest advantage.
Heretofore thve yearly moving of
the crops has- led to tight money and
has worked some hardships on those
least able to stand it, the farmers.
Money for moving the crops has
been borrowed at high rates by
the country banks from those of
New York city, as a rule. This plan
will serve to keep the banks of the
interior and of the west free as far
as possible from the influence and
(barges of the Xew York bankers,
and to make money easy throughout
the country.
The plan to deposit the government
funds only when and as they are
needed, and to require the deposi
taries to return the deposits to the
treasury as soon as possible, will pre
vent undue inflation.
Mr. McAdoo's act is one of be
nevolent paternalism.
Never before has the federal gov
ernment undertaken to move his
crops for the American farmer. That,
in effect, is what this plan will do.
\s the annual crop movement here
tofore has been a cause of financial
unrest and hardship, and as this plan
should put a stop to any trouble, Mr.
McAdoo's plan is almost certain to
prove a public benefit wherever crop
moving money is needed.
ARMY ENGINEERS FULLY
ADVISED
The holdup of the Hetch Hetchy
project in the present congress has
been due chiefly to the more or less
-vague and indeterminate charges of
fraud on the part of the city.
This allegation of fraud has been
based on the assertion of a person
not wholly uninterested in the Sul
livan Blue lake scheme, and ha? been
to the effect that if a certain report
by the city's engineers were to be
made public it would appear that the
board of army engineers would be
seen to have been deceived as to cer
tain facts and figures.
Allegation of fraud is easy to make,
but not always easy to prove. In
this case there are but two parties to
the proposed contract—the municipal
government of San Francisco and the
federal government. The only party
injured by any act of the city of San
Francisco would be the United States,
which at all times would have re
course against the city if fraud had
been committed.
This charge of fraud is not new.
It has been made publicly for many
months. The government has been
fully advised of the charges and
know> that they are trivial.
All doubt on this subject has been
ended by Colonel Biddle of the corps
of engineers, who says that, even if
the city had suppressed a seemingly
unfavorable report by its own engi
neers, the board of army
THE, SAIN FRANCISCO CALL, EDITORIAL PAGE, AUGUST 6, 1913
had made sufficient investigation of
their own to warrant their recom
mendation of Hetch Hetchy. Further,
he says the ,Blue lake scheme is of
little value, and that the Mokelumne
and Railroad Flat dams, of the same
height as the Hetch Hetchy. would
hold only between a fifth and a quar
ter of the Hetch Hetchy reservoir.
So ends the charge of fraud. There
never has been any fraud nor any
improper intent, except on the part
of those who have tried to prevent
the city acquiring the use of the
Hetch Hetchy reservoir site, in using
which the beauties of the Yosemite
will be practically untouched.
ENGLAND MAY EXHIBIT YET
The declination of the British gov
ernment to take part in the Panama-
Pacific exposition has had one effect
which is not prejudicial.
American newspaper comments
cabled to England have stirred up
the English press so that there may
be brought about a change of senti
ment.
The comment of the Pall Mall
Gazette that the exposition might give
British traders a chance to make up
leeway on the German drummers,
who are already busy on the coast,
contains a suggestion which might be
unbecoming for an American to make,
but which should serve to awaken the
possible British exhibitor to a slight
comprehension of what the exposition
may do for him.
Why the British manufacturer or
other exhibitor should give distance
a* a reason for failing to exhibit is
hard to see. Other nations do not
make that objection. Neither do
other nations say it is impossible to
get together a worthy collection at
a place so distant as San Francisco.
Apparently these worthy gentlemen
have little idea how far it is from
London to San Francisco, or how
long a time it takes to get here. Tt
certainly is not as far as Australia,
and London has found little difficulty
in sending goods there.
If Great Britain wakes up to realize
that she probably can get her exhibits
through the Panama canal; if she is
afraid of transshipment over her own
line at Tehuantepec, or, failing there,
can ship through Canada try rail and
thence by steamer, or through the
United States by rail; if the meaning
of the exposition in the west coast of
America trade becomes understood in
time, then it will be found that a
worthy collection can and will be
made "at a place so distant as San
Francisco."'
IMPROVING THE MEXICAN
SITUATION
President Wilson has taken the first
step toward cleaning up the* Mexican
situation by accepting the resignation
of Ambassador Wilson.
Without any desire to criticise that
gentleman, all of whose acts may
have been strictly in accordance with
the diplomacy which he has practiced
for nearly 20 years, it has become
evident that he has become such a
storm center and a target for the
opposition of friend and foe in Mex
ico that, unfortunate as it may be
for him personally, it is better that
he should retire, if only that by his
retirement some altogether new situa
tion may be developed.
John Lind, who goes to Mexico as
a personal representative of the presi
dent—ra wholly novel position in
American diplomacy—is a tactful,
adroit politician, a Swede by birth,
who has held executive positions as
governor of Minnesota, is a former
member of congress and a Spanish
war veteran, and may prove to be
the right man in the right place. At
any rate, hardly any one could be
chosen more unaffected by Mexican
affairs.
Only one important fact develops
out of all the rumors and gossip—
President Wilson evidently does not
intend to recognize Huerta.
On the moral side, the president
will have the support of the people
in his attitude.
Civilized as we call ourselves, few
republics have suffered more by assas
sination of its presidents than the
United States. We can not afford
to tolerate government by assassina
tion.
On the political side there are rocks
ahead. The course indicated as that
which the president is likely to take
may lead to unknown and unexpected
perils.
There is no occasion for excite
ment, and there should be no out
break of fiery emotion even should
untoward events occur. We must not
let ourselves get into the same class
as the revolutionary republics, ready
to rush to extremities without reason.
Mrs. Marshall, wife of the vice presi
dent, says "the fashions of today
ought to convince any one that a
woman is not lit to vote." Is that
what has been called feminine logic;
If so, how about a man in a bathing
suit?
"Some of the world's richest men are
the poorest and some of the poorest
are the richest," said John D. Rocke
feller's minister last Sunday, but it is
doubtful if he met the approval of his
richest parishioner.
The St. Louis Waiters' union has In
duced the city council to pass an ordi
nance forbidding- tipping. Wings must
be sprouting on those waiters, who are
entitled to a monument to their self
sacrifice.
Three men will not do the work
Which former President Mellen under
took to do single handed. They afford
three food reasons for his retirement.
FERRY TALES
LINDSAY CAMPBELL
Here Is a bouquet for the Southern
Pacific, a brickbat for the Key Route
and United Railroads and a disserta
tion on manners. All of this and more
is contained in a communication re
ceived through the mall from a Berke
ley commuter —a woman. Here is the
letter:
"You have done so much good through
mar ferry tales.' Could you not go a
little further? Living over here, we
travel both on the Key and the S. P.
Of course, the S. P. is slower, but one is
courteously treated. The conductors
assist ladies and children end in gen
eral conduct themselves in a polite
manner.
"Have you ever seen a Berkeley Key
Route train pull ln at the mole? The
conductor jumps off and turns his back
to the trajn. Children and women pile
off as best they may. The only atten
tion they receive is to be told to hurry
or they'll have to wait for the next boat.
o o o
"The gatemen on the Key Route, in
stead of signaling, at the different sta
tions, from the ground, to the motor
man or conductor or whoever they sig
nal to, close the gates and signal from
the inside —and seem to enjoy the sight
of a belated woman and child losing the
train.
"At the S. P. mole the conductors
lift all the children down and assist
every woman. You know, for a great
many women it is no easy task to board
and leave a train, and a little kindness
and courtesy goes a long way.
"The same lack of politeness is also
noticeable in the San Francisco street
car conductors. Have they orders not
to assist any one? I saw a woman
board a streetcar the-*other day with
three small children and the conductor
might have been a statue, for all the
assistance he gave or offered her.
".lust observe these things for your
self and give some space to this matter
in your 'ferry tales,' for they are read
by every one. - '
o o o
In justice to the streetcar employes. I
would like to tell of an incident wit
nessed not very long ago at the corner
of Ellis and Powell streets. It was a
windy day. The breeze lifted his hat
from a pedestrian's head and wafted it
under a standing streetcar. The pedes
trian pursued the hat and was almost
up to the car when the chapeau went in
among the wheels.
"Walt a minute"' he yelled to the
conductor as he dived under the car.
Me had some difficulty ln locating the
hat, but emerged in due time with It.
The (tat was rather spoiled and he had
ruined a pretty good looking suit of
clothes in getting it. But the point to
which I would call attention is this:
Although he didn't say "please" when
lie addressed the conductor, the con
ductor's heart was In the right place
and he did not ring the starting bell
until after the hat chaser had emerged.
o o o
She said she was too fat, and I'm not
going to question her word. I know
she spoke the truth, for we shared one
of the seats on the "narrow" side of a
Southern Pacific train the other even
ing. It wasn't much of a share, either,
for I take up little room when all
spread out, and next to none at all
when compressed, as I was on that oc
casion.
She had boarded the train with a
friend, who found a seat on the "wide"
side, across the aisle.
"This fat of mine is getting some
thing awful," said the woman who over
lapped me. She was addressing her
friend, but spoke so that all the car
could hear.
"I was once told," she continued,
"that sorrow would make one thin. I
pray for a disappointment. Sometimes
my prayer Is answered and then the
mere expectation of growing thinner
gives me such joy that I put on more
weight than ever."
LOBBY GOSSIP
SENORA DIAZ INTERESTING
Senora Diaz, wife of General Felix
Diaz, who is accompanying her hus
band, is recognized as one of the most
interesting. beautiful. accomplished
and secretive women of all Mexico.
Mrs. Diaz will talk but very little of
her husband's affairs or his ambitions.
When she speaks it Is with a calmness
bordering on the oriental.
Senorita Obregon, a dear friend of
Senora Diaz, explained that the wife
of General Diaz does not speak for
publication. Senorita Obregon said:
"She does not speak for publication,
senor. It is' not the custom in our
country for gentlewomen to parade
themselves through the press. This is
why we do not willingly oblige with
our photographs. It Is considered very
forward."
In speaking of the women of her
country Senora Diaz said:
' The women of Mexico are, as they
always have been, content to remain
in woman's sphere, the home, and pur
sue those things for which a woman is
best suited. We do not mix in affairs
of state, and it ts our duty to concern
ourselves as little as possible in po
litical matters."
COLONEL IN KITCHEN CABINET
According to Francis Harris, a well
known financier of Boston, who is at
the St. Francis, in Colonel W. iA. Gas
ton, president of the Shawmut National
bank of Boston, one of the largest
banking institutions in the world,
President Woodrow Wilson has ac
quired a very important member of his
'kitchen' cabinet. Mr. Harris said:
"I venture to say that Colonel Gas
ton will be to New England what Colo
nel House is to the rest of the nation
in advice given the president. Colo
nel Gaston is looked upon in Massachu
setts as one of the great democrats of
the state. He has been a candidate for
governor of Massachusetts twice. Colo
nel Gaston has no political ambition, I
understand, except that of becoming
chief executive of his state, as his
father was a governor of Massachu
setts. President Wilson's high regard
for Colonel Gaston was shown when
he sent Secretary McAdoo to confer
with him in Boston in ths matter of
< reatina- an* emergency fund."
POET ACCUSED OF
KILLING PRIEST
TO GAIN RENOWN
Madame Crespy Wanted to
Be Heroine of Love Mur
der, Alleges Judge Who
Tries Her
AGEN LOT-ET-GARONNE. France,
Aug. 5.—A minor poet, Madame Alice
Crespy, charged with murdering the
priest, Abbe Chassaing, on January 19,
appeared before the assize court today
and related her version of the clergy
man's death.
At moments the scene enacted before
the judge was very dramatic. The ac
cused is a little woman, neither pretty
nor plain. As she told her story her
voice at times sank to an almost in
audible pitch and at others rose to a
shriek as she insisted that the young
priest committed suicide.
Her story remained unshaken under
the searching interrogatory of the pre
siding judge, who declared that she
had murdered the man in order to ob
tain notoriety.
"In the accusation brought against_
you, you are alleged to have said to'
your dress maker that your books were
not selling well and that if you were
the heroine of a love murder, for
which the accused are always acquit
ted, "it would be otherwise," said the
judre.
Madame Crespy denied this allega
tion with the greatest indignation.
The presiding judge then remarked
sternly:
"VoW had no great literary notoriety,
but you have acquired a much greater
notoriety by your crime. You have
thus attained your object."
Medical and other evidence was
brought forward to show that the
priest had not committed suicide.
WORE DRAGONS ON HIS
FEET, NO WONDER HE WON
But When Count Sobral Showed Up
far a Second Game Superstition*
Sailors Avoided Him
Anioig the passengers due here to
morrow on the liner Shinyo Maru Is
Count Sobral de Cavallio. a wealthy
resident of the Portuguese settlement
in Macao.
The count traveled as far as Hono
lulu on the liner Korea, on board which
he won $1,000 playing chuck a luck
with the Chinese crew. It was not tin
til he had cashed in—and he Insisted
on having it all in gold coin—that the
Chinese discovered the figure of a
dragon worked on the slippers he wore
while playing.
To this dragon they ascribed his un
canny luck and when he Showed up
next day for another tussle with the
tiger, the Celestial sailor-gamblers re
fused to let him play.
MOSQUITOES DRIVE MEN
FROM SUISUN MARSH
Worker* on Southern Pnrlfic Sink Quit
Work—*© Mails In Benicia Slaee
* Monday Morning
(Special Dispatch to The fall I
BFXICI.A, Aug. s.—Great swarms' of
mosquitoes on the Suisun marshes east
of this city caused the crews of the
Southern Pacinc at work on the Suisun
sink to quit their posts.
Sunday night the sink upon which
the railroad company has expended
about $50,000 a year for many years,
began to give trouble again.
Yesterday several trains were an
nulled, while others were routed around
by Stockton. As a result there have
been no mails arriving or leaving here
since yesterday mornlnpr.
S. S. MARYLAND LEAVES
ALASKA FOR THIS PORT
Cruiser Testing Northern Coal on Run
From Controller Bay to San
Francisco
VALLEJO. Aug. 5— The cruiser Cali
fornia arrived at Mare island navy yard
today. The California will probably
remain in San Francisco bay for a
couple of weeks and will then proceed
to San Diego for target practice.
A r&diogFam received today an
nounced that the cruiser Maryland has
bailed from Controller Bay, Alaska, for
San Francisco.
The Maryland has aboard 700 tons of
Alaskan coal which will be tested dur
ing the trip south.
SUGAR REFINERY ENLARGED
Work Started at Crockett Which Will
Increase Capacity
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
MARTINEZ. .Aug. s.—Work was
started today on the additions to the
refinery of the California-Hawaiian
Sugar company in Crockett which will
cost more than $2,500,000 and which
will double the capacity of the refinery.
The output of the refinery when run
ning to full capacity wiil be 400,000
tons of refined sugar annually. Appli
cation has been, made to the board of
supervisors- for a franchise to extend
and enlarge the present wharves and
docks of the refinery.
PASTOR ASKED TO RESIGN
O. H. L. Mason of Lea Angeles Told
Charges Would Be Dropped
LOS ANGELES. Aug. s—Following
the resignation of 10 elders, four dea
cons and four trustees from the First
Presbyterian church of Long Beach.
O. H. L Mason, pastor, was formally
notified by the remaining officers of
the church today that the investiga
tion of indiscretions alleged to have
been committed by him - would be
dropped if he would consent to relin
quish his pulpit and leave the city at
once.
MORAGA COMPANY IS SUED
Ranchers Whose Hay Wava Attached
Want 911,400 Damages and Coats
(Special Dispatch to The Cal!)
MARTINEZ. Aug. 6—jAs a result of
levying upon the baled hay in the
Moraga valley and the stationing of
armed deputy sheriffs to guard the hay
the Moraga company, owners of the
land which was purchased from C. A.
Hooper is named defendant in cross
complaints filed by Jose Serpa, Thomas
Silva and John Devlin, the ranchers
whose crops were attached. Damages
and costs asked for aggregate 111,400.
GRADUATES CLOSE SCHOOL
Nine of 11 Children of One Farmer
Finish Covrae la Eltaabclk Lake
LOS ANGELES, Aug. —Because
nine of the .11 children of an Eliza
bath Lake farmer graduated from the
West Elizabeth Lake public school re
cently that Institution will be closed.
This announcement was made by tha
county superintendent of schools to
day when it was discovered but two
pupils remained, these being sisters of
4hp nine graduates.
HUGO MANSEFLDT WEDS HIS PUPIL
Miss Hess Bride of Piano Pedagogue
Angeleno Girl Is
Won by Dean
of Teachers
Hugo Mansfeldt, veteran piano peda
gogue and dean of Pacific coast pi-
anists, and Miss Hazel Hess, his young
and pretty pupil, were married last
night. The ceremony was performed
by Rev. J. YVllmer Gresham at Grace
Episcopal cathedral at 5:30 o'clock in
the presence of imediate relatives. Mr.
and Mrs. Mansfeldt then departed for
Los Angeles, where they expect to re
main about two weeks. On their re
turn they will take up their residence
at the Mansfeldt home, 238 Cole street.
Miss Hess is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Alexander W. Hess of Los Ange
les, where the bride's father is a mem
ber of the pioneer citizenship. She has
been a pupil of the distinguished
teacher for five years.
Mansfeldt's former wife, Mrs. Elsie
Mansfeldt. died last April in Tunis.
North Africa, whtch desert country
had been her home for several year's
and where she had hoped to recover
from her confirmed invalidism. A
slight sensation was caused by the an
nouncement that just prior to her
death she had embraced the religion of
Mahommed and the tenets of the
Koran.
SKATING PARTY TONIGHT
AT THE COLISEUM RINK
Dan Arena Meets George Riehnrdnoa
In the Final for the Wo r ld'n Cham
pionship Xcxt Sunday
A skating party will be held at the
Coliseum this evening, a specially at
tractive program of music having been
arranged by the band. The greatest
skating floor in America is just now in
first class condition.
Dan Arena's victory over Clifford
Howard of 1..0* Angeles has rendered
him the runner up for the world's
championship and the Oakland skater
meets George Richardson in the final
for the title next Sunday.
Dan Arena is regarded as one of the
most brilliant skaters ever produced by
the west and Oakland in particular
will be delighted to see him defeat the
champion.
Richardson is skating better than he
has ever done in his life. His tour, dur
ing which he had several races in Can
ada, put him in good condition and he
has been indulging in some practice
spins each day since.
The race should be the fastest seen
at a local rink for many months.
KNIGHTS TEMPLAR WILL
DEDICATE NEW STEAMER
Western Partite Ferry Boat Edward T.
JelTery Will Be L'aed by Order
on Initial Trip
The new Western Pacific ferry steam
er, the Edward T. Jeffery, which was
launched July 19, will make its initial
trip for the Knights Templar, who
leave San Francisco Friday evening en
route to Denver via the Western Pa
cific. A concert has been arranged for
the trip across the bay, and an In
formal dance will be given.
The Knights Templar will have one
of the finest special trains on their
pilgrimage to Denver that ever left
the state. It will consist of standard
drawing room and compartment sleep
ing cars, buffet, library and dining cars
and observation car.
MYSTIC SHRINERS COMING
Special Trains Expected During Hold
ing of Portola Festival
A record breaking party of Mystic
Shriners in special trains will come to
San Francisco during the Portola fes
tival, according to plans laid before
the committee yesterday by George
Filmer. colonel commanding the com
bined Shriner forces. Members of all
the temples will join ih a tour of the
state as a preliminary.
SOCIETY NEWS
Mrs. Benjamin Foss. who is visiting
at the Arlington in Santa Barbara,
was guest of honor at a luncheon yes
terday over which Miss Marguerite
Doe presided. Some of those bidden
to meet her were Mrs. Pierre Moore,
Mrs. William Holmes McKittrick, Mrs.
Edgar Wilson Mrs. William G. Hen
shaw, Mrs. Harry Checkering, Miss
Rolsta 'Nieto and Miss Florence Hen
shaw.
Mr. and Mrs. Julian Sonntag and
Miss Ida Sonntag, who have been
spending the summer in Palo Alto, re
turned Monday to their home in Scott
street.
* * *
Mr. and Mrs. Willard Chamberlain
will close their home in Burlingame
the last of the week and will depart
on a motor tour of the south. They
will stop for several days in Santa
Barbara, where they will be the guests
of Miss Marguerite Doe. Mrs. Charles
Keeney Monday to make an ex
tended visit with the Blakemans.
* * *
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hopkins have
taken a house in Franklin street which
they will occupy about September 1.
* * * ,
Mr. and Mrs. Eldridge Green, who
have been residing in Bacramento
street since their marriage, will move
next week into their new home at Jack
son and Laurel streets. The new resi
dence Is the gift of Mr. Greens pa
rents.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Both in have
arrived ln Santa Barbara and are stop
ping at the Hotel Potter. They ex
pect to remain in the south a fort
night.
* * ♦
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Sears Bates and
their family are spending several
weeks on the Russian river as th®
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Egbert Stons.
* * *
Henry H. Sherwood, Charles Lorlng
Brace, Miss Isabel Sherwood and Quen
tin Roosevelt, who have been the guests
of Clarence Sherwood in Salinas for
the last week, will depart today for
the Ripples, the country place of Mr.
Sherwood at Brookdale In the Santa
Cruz mountains.
# # *
Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzo Avenali have
returned to their home lh Leavenworth
street after a weekend visit with Mrs.
Russell Wilson in her home ln Bur-
Hngame.
*• * *
Dr. Edwin V. Van Dyke has returned
from a two months' sojourn In Trin
ity county.
* * * J '
Mrs. Thomas R. Minturn has returned
from Carmel by the Sea and will spend
August with*her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Everett, in their home ln Pa
cific Grove.
Among those leaving San Francisco
yesterday on the transport Sherman
were: Lieutenant and Mrs. Harold
Naylor and Ihetr children, Lieutenant
and Mra. Henry T. Biirgtn, Colonel and
Mrs. Buggies, formerly of Benicia, and
' Captain and Mrs. Douglas McCaskey.
Mrs. Hugo Mansfeldt, who until
last night was Miss Hazel Hess,
a pupil of the veteran piano in
structor.
CLEARING HOUSE TO SEND
MAN TO WASHINGTON
President Lynch Designated
to Confer With McAdoo
on Government Funds
P. J. Lynch, president of the San
Francisco Clearing; House association,
was delegated yesterday by the execu
tive committee to accept the invita
tion to confer with W. G. McAdoo,
secretary of the treasury, in Washing
ton, regarding the distribution of $50,
--500,000 of government funds to facili
tate crop movement.
Mr. Lynch will be one of 59 delegates
from clearing houses in the principal
cities.
"At present we do not feel any need
for any government money to be de
posited in San Francisco banks." said
Mr. Lynch, "but we can not tell what
the situation will be before the end
of the year. This question will be
taken up in Washington and it is our
desire to heartily co-operate with the
government." +^
Mr. Lynch added that it is pwbable
San Francisco bankers will csManize
a currency association under t» Ald
rlch-Vreeland act. similar to ttljse or
ganized in eastern cities.
MEDAL FOR SAVING CREW
King of Sweden Decorate" Captain
Andrew Dixon of Pacific Mall
According to advices received yes
terday from the ortent. Captain An
drew Dixon, commander of the Pacinc
Mail liner, is to be decorated by the
king of Sweden as a mark of appre
ciation of Ills services in rescuing the
crew of the stranded Swedish steamer
Nippon. The Nippon was driven ashore
in Philippine waters last May by a
typhoon, and the vrew, after being
marooned for several days, were res
cued by Captain Dixon, who had been
notified of their plight before leaving
Manila,
AMUSEMENTS
Ever Touring the S. & C. CIRCUIT fc
eGIRL VASE
13-PBOPLB-13
GEORGE RICHARDS & CO. 6
In the Roaring Comedy"EABY MONEY"
B—UIG S. «t C. KBATI RES-8 E
Matinee Every Day. 8:30. Nlghts-TilS ATTu -
PRICES ~". . 10c. 20c. SO* I
Phone Sutter
TONIGHT AND SUNDAY AFTERNOON
AND EVENING
THE MIKADO
THURSDAY, FRIDAY. SATURDAY AND
SATURDAY MATINEE
PINAFORE
Popular Price*—2sc. .Vie. fie; Rox Scat* SI
STARTING NEXT MONDAY, ' '
H|at the chimes
[ now I OF NORMANDY
CTTMiWLU. »vr SVOCWTCm-tr PO>NI.U.
Bafeat aad Moat Magnificent Theater in America
MATINEE TODAY AND EVERY DAY
ANOTHER GREAT NEW SHOW
THE BELL FAMILY. Nine Brother* and Sister*
in an Artiatic Musical OfTerln*;
HOLMES. Late Star of "Tbe Million": ROSE ,
VALERIO SEXTET. "The Speed Flemls " »if, <
Tent Wire: DIVINE nnd WILLIAMS "The ft
Traveling Salesman and the Female Drummer"-
FRED HAM ILL and CHARLEY ABB ATE "The
Singer and the Violinist"; AMiF.I.A KKIR aad
Co. tn "Sentence Suspended": HELEN THIN
The Piano Hong WMstleress; ORPHKT'M mo <!
TION PICTURES. Showing ( urn ni Event*' i
Last Week GUS EDWARDS' K!l> KAlt\ R ft
Evening price* 10c. 25e. .V)c, Tse. Boa Seat* Si
Matinee prices (except Sunday* aad Houdajsi C
10c. 23c, 60c. Phone Douglas TO.
PRESIDIO TO BE
A BRIGADE POST
Plan to Perfect a Mobile De
fense for Coast Defenses
Put in Action
Twelfth Regiment Coming
From Monterey—Com
mander Not Named
The Presidio will he made a brig/ad*
poet on November I, This Is -pur
suant to the policy adopted two year:
ago by the war department of re
organizing the coast defenses' h\
strengthening the land defenses of th«
posts. The Twelfth regiment, com
manded by Colonel William H. C
Bowen. will proceed from Mofrterej
to the Presidio on November 1. and th«
First cavalry, Colonel Walter Fin ley
will proceed to Monterey. Field amhn
lance company No. 2, field hospita
company No. 3 and the school of cook:
and bakers will go from the Presidir
to Monterey.
No Intimation has been given out bj
the war department as' to who will bi
In command of the brigade post. Th»
Sixth and Sixteenth regiments are now
stationed at the post with Colonel
Fehiger in command. Brigadier Gen
eral William Potts, now stationed a
the Presidio, will probably be post com
mander. with Colonel P.owen rankins
officer next in command.
"There is no signiticenee to thi:
chanpre except the carrying out of m
announced policy of the war depart
ment," said Major Mines, adjutant gen
eral of t«« Western department. "11
is only a move to perfect a mobile de
fense of our coast defenses.
This change will the Presidh
the first brigade post in the country
ranking this post as the most Impor
tant and most efficiently equipped pos
in the United States.
HOTEL NEWS
C. C. Moore of Reno Is registered a<
the Dale.
V. Bernard Herbst. a banker of N>"
York, is at the Bellevue.
.1. If. Graves of Washington, D. C.
is staying at the St. Francis.
Charles Sussenguth is registered a
the Baldwin from Holyoke. Mass
C. W. Whitney, a capitalist of Sal
Lake is registered at the Fairmont.
J. L. Stock, an advertising man o!
Chicago is a guest at the St. Francis.
J. D. Hillhouse, chief of police o1
Reno, and his family are at the Manx
Mr. Dougherty and wife are regis
tered at the Sutter from Vancouver
B. C.
Mrs. F. H. Fields of Klamath Falls i;
registered at the Antlers for a ehor.
time.
J. K. Hamilton and son of Texas ar*
guests at the Yon Dorn for a shor'
time.
Thomas McDonald, a mining man ol
Deadwood, Colo., is a guest at th«
Manx.
W. A. Schiekie and wife of Los An
geles are spending a few days at tin
Baldwin.
James E. Burns and Thomas Mally oi
Waterbury, Conn., are guests at th«
Baldwin.
F. F. Atkinson, district attorney oi
Sacramento, and Mrs. Atkinson ar«
guests at the Stewart.
H. Milne of London, who Is heavily
interested in the oil fields of Califor
nia. is registered at the Palace.
Captain John C. Dow. a nautical ex
pert with the coast and geodetic survey
service at Manila, is at the Argonaut
W. R. Guiberson of Los Angeles, whc
has just returned from South America
after a lengthy absence, is a guest ai
the Palace.
4LCAZAR
Phone Kearny U
Vlat. Tomorrow—Last 5 Nights
FORREST STANLEY
BESSIE BARRISCALE
HOWARD HICKMAN & CO.. IN
WWTHORNE n °H* E U. S. A.
PRICES —Night. 2."> c $1: Mat.. 2."<- to 50c
MATS. SATrp.UA V, SUNDAY.
• EXT WEEK—MISS RARRISCAT.E. MR.
STANLEY. MR. HICKMAN v* CO., IN
'The Rose of the Rancho"
affl a** —a — LEADING THEATER.
■ atB r Ellis and Mark*'
ft ■ mWK le* Phone Sutter 3460
S| 50 JUT. TODA)
JOHN MASON
In Augustus Thotn.is' Master-Drama.
'AS A MAN THINKS"
Nights and Saturday Matinee. :>oc to 82.
• EXT SIN. MAT.—OXBJ WEEK ONLY
rices. 25c A 50c. Mats Sun.. Wed. and Sat.
The Great French Feature Film of
VICTOR HUGO'S MASTERPIECE
'LES MISERABLE?'
lost Fascinating Motion Picture Ever Taken.
9 Reels -Special Orchestral Accompaniment.
leary and Mason.
PR AKaTfl B ? fres«i and Public
:very Afternoon at 2:30: Every Nifht at 8:3').
FIRST TIME IN THIS CITY.
Direct From The Astor Theater, X. Y.
N \ A\«.GCQRGE KIEINE Pm>tMT6 /
MVIKN I 111/ ill kWHou?!
* T0 I I I I I I I fill] aaV 1 of
Sensation QrTHtWosi t>\^
ALL SEATS RESERVE!'. 2Sc tad .W.
LURLINE
BT"SH AJID I,AFKI\ STREETS
OCEAN WATER BATHS
SWIMMING AMI) TI B BATHS
Salt water direct from the ocean. Open
every day and evening, including Sundays
and holidays, from 6 a. in. to 10 p. m. Spec
tators' gallery free.
The Sanitary Baths
Natatorlum reserved Tuesday and Friday
mornings from 8 o'clock tv noon for women
•nly.
"FILTERED OCEAN WATER PLUNGE"
COMFORTABLY HEATED. CONSTANTLY
CIRCULATING AND FILTERING.
Hot Air Hair Dryers. Electric Curling Iron*
and Shampoo Room for Woraen Bathers Free.
BRANCH TUB BATHS. 21S1 GEARY STS.,
NEAR DIVISADERO.
SKATE TONIGHT
AT COLISEUM Siftr 1
Skating sessions: WedS«'*nay, Friday nnd Sun
ay evening* nnd Sdadaj ft mooo*. Admission,
iH'tudlng skates. 23 rents
WORLD'S ONE MILK CHAMPIONSHIP
SUNDAY, Al (i 1 -ST 10.
JE'iRGE RICHARDSON (title hold*** wa. DAN
ARENA (of Oakland}. «

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