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The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, September 06, 1913, Image 3

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CALL LEAVES
ALL RIVALS
BEHIND
Caminetti Verdict on Street
15 Minutes Ahead of
Closest Competitor
RELAY SYSTEM FOR
GETTING RESULT
Hot Springs Fire, Norcross
Case and Other Important
Stories Exclusively Told
Fifteen minutes ahead of its near
est competitor. The Call last night
had the news of the Caminetti trial
verdict—the biggest outstanding
news feature of the day—on the
street within two minutes after the
words "We find Caminetti guilty"
came from the lips of the jury.
By means of a relay system. The
Call lived up to its reputation for
enterprise and had the presses whirl
ing as soon as the flash came from
the "courtroom. Although the ver
dict was the principal piece of news
for which people were waiting, The
Call also was the only newspaper
which told its readers that Secretary
->avld C. Norcross of the Western
Fuel company, the local "coal trust,"
had been sentenced to remain in the
Alameda county jail until he turned
t-vcr the company's books to the fed
eral grand Jury, and that the com
pany had been fined $2,000 by Judge
Dooling. Still another piece of news
not to be found in any other paper
was that Hot Springs, Ark., was be
ing destroyed by fire.
Newsboys who were selling "extra"
Calls like hot cakes up and down
Market street last night had the
satisfaction of knowing that there
were three extra news stories be
sides t'-<s complete results of the
baseball games of the afternoon in
the papers which they handed out.
Just how quick thf> work of The
Call was in getting its extra on the
street and relieving the anxiety of
the thousands waiting for the Cami
netti verdict is shown in the fact
that those who left the courtroom as
rcon as they could and started down
Market street were met at Sixth
street, one block from the postofftce.
by newsboys selling The Call extra.
Yesterday's work was the culmina
tion of a week of fast but systematic
news gathering and publishing.
The Call's lead over all the other
papers was' not the result of an acci
dent, but of careful planning. In the
future all news will be covered just
t.s quickly and thoroughly.
PRESS CLUB WILL
OPEN NEW ROME
Dinner and Jinks Arranged
for Formal Dedication
This Evening
The Press club will formally open
Its new quarters at Sutter and Powell
streets this ei-enlng with a dinner
and jinks. The affair will be a stag
party and the invitation list Is con
fined to members.
T.he members have been busy with
the construction and furnishing of
, the club for many months. The
rooms are said to be the costliest in
the city.
W. W. Naughton, president of the
club, will officiate at the festivfties.
The jinks program has been arranged
by a committee made up of Edward
F. O'Day, Willie Jacobs and Burr
Mcintosh. They have many surprises
in, store and promises of excellent fun.
Oscar Tolle, Selby Oppenhelmer,
Walter Doyle, Fred Hoff. Alexander
; Sutherland, Robert A. Roos and
Harry Robertson will have charge of
.the dining room features.
After the dinner the members in
tend to put on an informal program.
The newly organized Press Club
quartet, consisting of Harold Pracht,
Frank Thompson, J. C. Flood and
George J. Wallaoe, will contribute
several numbers.
TEN FAST CRAFT
IN SPECIAL RACE
The special yacht race next Sunday
ever the new course, for the Commo
dore Jones trophy, has called out 10
/ast craft of Alameda. The event will
oe the first annual race, and the yacht
winning the race three times will
keep the trophy.
The new course figured out by Com
modore Jones is from a stake boat off
Surf Beach park to a boat off Alameda
mole, to Hunter's point, to Howard
street wharf and return.
The race will start at noon, with
the Speedwell, Vice Commodore Ben
Jost's yacht, at scratch.
COLLEGE "GRADS"
TO BE LIFEMATES
STANFORD UNIVERSITY, Sept. 6.—
Miss Alice B. Cuthbertson and Donald
i-'teel will be united in marriage at
the home of the bride's sister, Mrs. R.
E. Swain, in Channlng avenue, Palo
Alto,, tonight.
Steel, since graduation from Stan
ford,* has been in Africa with a mining
' ' Miss Cuthbertson is the youngest
daughter of R. H. Cuthbertson. a Men
hocino county capitalist. She was
graduated from Stanford with the
class of 11)09.
TAIIOE SPECIAL,
With Pullmnn Sleeping Cars for
Trnekee
Leaves Oakland pier 7:4" p. m. daily,
©n arrival of 7:20 p. m. boat from San
l'ra.nci!=co ferry station. Leaves Oak.
land, Sixteenth street station, 7:54 p.
m.* arriving early following morning
at Truckee, where connection is
made with train of Lake Tahoe Rail
way, fifteen miles to lake.
Returning, the sfeclal leave*
Truckee 9:10 p. m., arrives Oakland,
Sixteenth street station, 6:60 a. m.;
Can Francisco ferry station, 7:30 a. m.
»—Advertisement.
AUNT WHO SPOILED BRIDES
HAT WANTED NIECE TO WAIT
Mrs. Chas. B, Gully, Who
Was Alma L Jackson, Never
Did Get Trousseau
Though she tore the bird of para
dise on her niece's $100 hat in her ef
forts to prevent her marriage, Mrs. R.
Baker now says she had no objection
to the wedding, but merely wanted
Mrs. Charles B. Gully, who was Miss
Alma Lorraine Jackson, to wait a
couple of years at least.
The niece was wedded, anyway,
even though she had to go through
the ceremony of becoming Mrs. Gully
in a pink evening gown because the
aunt had the wedding finery locked
up in the Hotel Dorchester.
Mrs. Gully says that her aunt, who
has been running the Hotel Dorches
ter for several months, prevented her
marriage with Mr. Guily twice before,
and did everything she could this time
to stop the proceedings. Her niece
disagreed and was married Thursday
Hamilton Square Baptist
church by Rev. Louis J. Sawyer, in
spite of all objections.
Locking her nice out of the Hotel
Dorchester was Mrs. Ba
ker's first step against the marital in
tentions of Miss Jackson. Alma Lor
raine had to spend the night with rel
atives.
Thursday afternoon there was more
trouble. Miss Jackson sent a transfer
man to put all her clothes into his
wagon and take them away.
According to the niece, the aunt
came out to the street and pulled
half the belongings out of the wagon
and took them back to the house.
The niece never did get her trousseau,
and her hat, with the bird of paradise
on it, was torn.
Miss Jackson employed detectives
to try to get hold of the wedding fin
ery, but they were no match for Mrs.
Baker. As far as clothes went, the
aunt won out, hands down.
A marriage license was obtained
Thursday afternoon. Hardly had the
couple got away from the county
clerk s office when Mrs. Baker came to
protest, but as her niece was 18 years
old there was no help for her.
Seattle Man Buys
San Francisco Bonds
Faith in San Francisco's future is
found in Seattle as well as at home.
Treasurer McDougald reports that a
resident of the northern city ha* pur
chased $61,000 of municipal 6 per cent
bonds. Sales over the counter by the
treasurer now total $605,000, while he
has on file inquiries that promise an
additional sale within the next few
days of $100,000. On Friday the sales
were $105,000.
Germans Wire That
Exhibit Is Certain
H. F. Dorgeloh, manager of the
Hamburg-American line, has received I
a cablegram from Director General
Ballin of the Hamburg-American line
that private organizations were being
created to bring about a participation
of the German industries in the j
world's fair at San Francisco. The ;
organizations have a central bureau
In Berlin, with Doctor Stapff of the
Association of Industries in charge. ,
CLOAK MAKERS ARE
URGED TO RETURN
The report of the executive com
mittee of the San Francisco Labor
council as to the strike of Cloak
Makers, local No. 8. which was called
before the council had given its con
sent, presented many angles at the
meeting last night.
The committee presented a report
in which was set fortn the condi
tions upon which the association
would take back the 3EO men and
women who had gone out. and urged
that the cloak makers accept the
terms and fro back to work.
Delegate Sallinger of the Cloak
Makers said that the conditions of
fered by the employers had been pre
sented to the strikers and had been
unanimously rejected, because it fixed
a scale at so much a week "and up"
for the different kinds of workers,
and pave the women from $2 to $4
a week less than was demanded.
POULTRYMEN DON'T
WANT MIDDLEMAN
The San Francisco Labor council
was addressed last night by J. M.
Murphy and J. K. Bigelow of the
Sonoma County Producers' associa
tion, who asked the counoil to take
action in bringing together the pro
ducer and the consumer and doing
away with the middleman. A com
mittee of five will be named by the
council to confer with the associa
tion. «
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1913.
Mrs. Charles B. Gully, until
Thursday evening Miss Alma
j Lorraine Jackson, whose aunt
j tore bird of paradise from her
| hat in attempt to delay wedding.
NIGHT QUARREL
MAY END FATALLY
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., Sept. 6.—
Harold Dickerson, 20, son of Colonel
R. P. Dickerson, wealthy ranch owner,
sportsman and financial backer of the
late Stanley Ketchel, was In a critical
condition at Reed's Lake sanatorium
today with a bullet hole through his
breast.
The shooting followed a quarrel
with James Gray of St. Louis, Mo.,
while the two men were in a rowboat
on Reed's lake about midnight.
Gray, according to young Dicker
son, jumped overboard after the
shooting, and it was believed he was
drowned.
ADMISSION
DAY
September 9th
Reduced
Round Trip Rates
Between
All Stations in California
Tickets on Sale
September 6, 7, 8 and 8
Retnrn Limit Sept. 11
Attractive Places for a Day's Oi'Ung
Every Few Miles on Southern Pacific Lines
See Agents
Southern Pacific
THE EXPOSITION LINE—I»IS
SAN FBANOISCO: Mood Bine. PitUre Hotel Ferry Station Ph. Kearny 3160
Third and Tewnaenif Street* Station Phone Kearny ISO
OAKLAND: Broadway arm' Thirteenth Street Plume Oakland 1«2
Sixteenth St. Station Ph. Lakoalde 1420 First St. Btatlon. Ph. Oagland TB6O
CALIFORNIA INVITATION DAY—SEPT. 10
NORCROSS, FACING
JAIL, WILL APPEAL
Western Fuel Secretary
Gets Stay of Execution.
Lawyers Plan Fight
Appeals were made today from the
judgment of Maurice C. Dooling in the
United States district court in sen
tencing David C. Norcross to the Ala
meda county Jail for contempt in re
fusing to deliver books and papers of
the Western Fuel company, of which
he is secretary, to the federal grand
Jury, and the fine of $2,000 Imposed on
the Western Fuel company as a cor
poration. The appeal in the case of
Secretary Norcross will follow the
filing Monday at noon of a writ of
habeas corpus.
With the consent of Special Prose
cutors Matt L Sullivan and Theodore
K. Roche when the sentences were
passed yesterday, a stay of execution
was granted until noon Monday. Sec
retary Norcross and the Western Fuel
company were found guilty of con
tempt on two separate accusations.
They were found guilty of not obey
ing the grand jury's subpena and
guilty of contempt in refusing the
order of the court directing them to
obey the subpena of the grand jury.
Secretary Norcross was sentenced
to remain in Jail until he saw fit to
comply with the courtfs order and
produce the documents before the
grand jury.
DE LA BARRA
SAYS "HANDS
OFF"
Southern Republic's Minis
ter to France Says Move
Would Be Deeply
Resented
PARIS, Sept. 6.—lntervention by
the United States in Mexico either
directly or indirectly will not be tol
erated, according to Senor de la Barra,
Mexican minister to France.
In an Interview today De la Barra
said that all Mexicans deeply resented
outside interference and would reject
politely any proposal from the United
States, no matter how pacific.
Mexico, he said, is fully able to set
tle her ewn domestic brawls.
BELIEVE MEXICO
CAN LICK U. S.
According to the story of H. S. Fore
man of the Oakland Commercial club,
recently returned from Mexico, that
country is "having one long laugh on
Uncle Sam," because the Mexicans be
lieve that Huerta has "turned the
tables" on President Wilson and
Bryan.
Foreman maintains that interven
tion by the United States is inevitable.
"In every part of Mexico I found
eight out of every ten men Arm in the
belief that Mexico could whip the
United States," says Foreman. "And
the soldiers down there are aching to
cross the line and storm Washington."
Foreman states that the American
government has failed to maintain its
dignity and prestige and has become
the laughing stock of all Mexico.
SPECIAL ENVOY OF
U. S. ON BUFORD
To prevent any delicate interna
tional complications resulting from
the army transport Bufords voyage
to Mexican ports to rescue stranded
Americans, the state department will
send a specita.l representative whose
duties it will be to see that only
citizens of the T'nited States are al
lowed transportation to this country,
according to announcement made to
day at headquarters of the western
division of the army.
Charles Jenkinson, an authority on
diplomatic affairs, has been chosen by
the state department to make the trip
on the Buford, which sails Monday
morning.
Mr. JenkinHon has orders to co
operate with the officers of the army
transport.
The ports that the Buford will visit
was tentatively decided upon thfs
morning. They will be Sallna Cruz,
La Paz, Guaymas, Pacach, Tapachula,
Mazatlan. Man/anlllo and Acapulco..
The scene at the • transport docks
today was similar to that in 1898,
when the troops were preparing to
go to the Philippines.
Officers scurried about giving orders
and the men worked with breakneck
speed to have all In readiness to pull
up anchor early Monday morning.
Meanwhile, through an oversight
on the part of the war department,
two companies of the Twelfth infan
try are being held at Monterey in
readiness to proceed to the Mexican
borders to do patrol duty. It Is not
probable that they will be sent, but
the war department neglected to re
voke the order to hold the men ready
for an emergency.
COMMISSIONER TO
MANDAMUS HIMSELF
Commissioner John T. Wilson of
Berkeley, a member of the Berkeley
city Council and of the Berkeley
board of education, will be suing
himself on account of the peculiar
situation arising from the school tax
question. Wilson, as a member of
the education board, is party to a
writ of mandamus to compel the
council to levy the school tax, and
as a member of the council is one of
those against whom the writ is
aimed.
Another tangle has arisen because
some of the Berkeley schools are
out of the city limits, over which
the council has no jurisdiction. The
writ of mandamus is expected to clear
the matter up.
THROUGH /n\
ELECTRIC Mf\J
TRAINS to
SACRAMENTO
Protected by Automatic Block Signals
In Addition to Local Service
SACRAMENTO TRAINS Will Leave SAN FRANCISCO
(Key Route Ferry)
7:00 A. M. 1:40 P. M. 6:40 P. M.
9:00 A. M. 3:40 P. M. 8:00 P. M.
10:40 A. M. 5:00 P. M.
5:00 P. M. Train Carries Parlor, Buffet-Observation Car
9 A. M. and 6«40 P. M. trains connect at MONTEZUMA with Auto Stage
for RIO VISTA
A Scenle Trip Through Redwood Canyon, Moraga Valley, San Ramon
Valley. Mt. Diablo Country and River Delta Country.
Rock-Ballasted Roadbed, Steel Coaches and Modern equipment.
Connects at Sacramento With Electric Lines for North.
For Information Address
L. H. RODEBAUGH,
Traffic Manager, Oakland.
Oakland-Antioch & Eastern Ry.
Great Uhlan Trots
In Wonderful Time
ST. PAIL, Minn., Sept. «.—
The state trotting record of
2iOSV«, established by Croe
mna, Antra** 81, 1001, wu broken
by the champion Tblan, when
the great steed went against
time on the Hamllne track this
afternoon, Billings' trotter do
ing the mile in the wonderful
time of 1)50%.
Alice Eis,
whose
daring
dance
is a
feature
of the
mechanics'
fair.
TIDWELL UPHELD
IN OPIUM CASE
Treasury Department Slaps
Stratton, but Ruling
Comes Too Late
It is no of the business of the col
lector of customs or of the surveyor
of the port, hereafter, to conduct in
vestigations into opium smuggling or
eny other infractions of the law, out
side the scope of their usual and ordi
nary employment, according to an
order just issued by the treasury de
partment. Such investigations are
made the business solely of the spe
cial agents.
This ruling comes as a distinct but
belated victory for Special Agent W.
H Tidwell over his old enemy, former
Collector Fred Strattcn, but it comes
too late to enable Tidwell to triumph
sreatly, Stratton being now out of
office.
While Stratton was collector of the
port the relations between him and
Tidwell were so strained that they
would not even speak to one another
when they met in the corridors of
the federal building.
As Special Agent Tidwell, the new
collector. J. Q. Davis, and the new
surveyor, Justus Warde'.l, are all on
friendly terms, the ruling probably
will not affect much change In the
present situation.
FIRST SHIPS OF
SALMON FLEET IN
The first ships of the salmon fleet
arrived today and the others are close
behind. The Indiana, from Nushagak
with 49.910 cases of sslmon. docked
first. The other arrivals were the
schooners Prosper end Premier, with
salmon in barrels.
The catch has been good. Fisher
men from Kvichak wilt average about
$700 apiece for the four months* work,
and those from Nushagak will have
paydays ranging from $500 to $650.
TENNIS ACROSS THE BAY
The Lincoln Park Tennis club of
Alameda will start a tournament on
the Lincoln park courts today and
play will continue until Tuesday
Some of the best known racquet
wielders on the other side of the bay
will compete.
KNIGHTS TO VISIT TAHOE
Knights of Columbus numbering
200 or "mors will leave San Francisco
tonight for Lake Tahoe for a three
days' outing at Tahoe tavern. The
party will travel in a special Pullman
car.-
ALICE EIS' "VAMPIRE,"
AT MECHANICS' FAIR,
TOPS DARING DANCES
Pretty
dancer
is shown
here as the
"Vampire,"
based on
Kipling's
poem.
VIOLET GROWERS
NOW FIGHT TRUST
The Italian violet growers of the
peninsula don't want to form a trust
and have applied to the district attor
ney to quash the efforts of W. D. Mc-
Lellan to do so.
Nine days ago McLellan met the
Italian growers at a banquet and an
nounced a plan to create a trust and
double the price of violets. They
agreed and signed ;m optional agree
ment In favor of McLellan for 15 days.
Now they learn that McLellan has
the right to refuse to accept any more
violets than he decides to place on the
market, and in this event they can not
dispose of them elsewhere.
Today they appealed to Assistant
District Attorney Louis Ferrari. He
promised them if McLellan attempts
to force the option and establish a
trust he will be prosecuted under the
Cartwright anti-trust law.
URGE CITY PRINTERY
me socialist party is circulating
a petition asking the supervisors to
establish a municipal printing plant
conducted along strictly union labor
lines.
Wit Write Urnta-?
CUSTOM MABE SHEETS
ML MEN
Tlfo® [email protected]@sfc> ©IT MfflteMs
§@fedti©ini Sua mato®,
silk m<& ®r©g>@o
Tfe pritess rasng© Sr©im $4 cup-
tt© <p<silky ©if E&steoaS).
A* fool there was and he made his i/avef
(Etch a» you aud I)
To a rag and a bone and a hank of hair.
Rudyard Kipling- wrote it and now
Alice Kis and Bert French are dan
cing it —she the Vampire, he the man
who "made his prayer." San Fran
cisco is to see this daring I danco as
well as the "rouge et nolr" dance at
| the end of this month as one of the
added attractions of the Mechanics'
j fair.
I Announcement to this effect was
I made today by the fair directors.
Through Prank Paret, head of the
Gilbert and Sullivan opera forces now
touring the country, contracts have
! been signed and this sensational cho
| rographic act, which oTTTy recently
j repeated its London. Paris and Berlin
i successes in New York, will be
j brought to San Francisco.
The "vampire dance," according to
reports preceding its coming, is, if
anything, a trifle more daring than
any terpsicorean offering yet pre
sented in San Francisco. This city,
too. has seen the best of the inspira
j tional and interpretative dancers —
: Maud Allan in her barefooted rlassi-
I cal dances, Gertrude Hoffmann's un
| clad "Spring Sonj?" and her "Arabian
Nights" orgies. Pavlowa and Mord
( kin's "Bacchanale" and Ruth St. Denis*
| studies in Hindu posturings.
Alice Eis possesses more striking
beauty than any of her predecessors,
making possible an adequate pictur
ing of the lady of Burne Jones' fa
mous painting and Kipling's immortal
poem. Upon the occasion of her in
itial appearance in London she created
a sensation which went ringing
through the dally press and the
weekly papers in columns of as
tonished praise.
"The performance of Miss Maud
Allan," one critic wrote, "is as but
termilk to liqueur brandy when com
pared with that of Miss Alice Eis."
3

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