OCR Interpretation


The San Francisco call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, December 04, 1913, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1913-12-04/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

'SLAVE' GIRL
SUES FOR
MONEY
Lily Slager Attaches Bank
Account of Wolf Wolborsky,
With Whom' She Eloped
The* money that Lilly Slager de
clares Wolf Wolborsky, an opera
singer, took from her during the four
years she had been a "slave," is un
der attachment today at the Hibernia
bank as a result of a suit by Miss
Slager to recover it.
From the time the girl disappeared
from New York four years ago until
slit was found recently in a Stockton
dive by h«>r brother, Louis, who had
set out to find her. Miss Slager has
paid Wolborsky more than $4,000, and
she asks the court to make him pay
her $4,000, which she says she knows
he has on deposit. In addition to. the
suit, the girl obtained from
Judge Durfhe an injunction restrain
ing the bank from paying Wolporskl
anf money before the suit is ended.
Wolborski Is held In detinue, at the
c'ty prison pending the outcome of a
federal investigation into his con
nection wUh the girl's departure from
New York. . . " '
REV. MR. PALMER SPEAKER
Rev.. Albert W. Palmer, pastpr of
f4ie .Plymouth Congregational church,
Oakland, will speak on "Conditions In
Our, City as-Compared with Other Cit
ies* at the. meeting of the Child's
WfKfare league in .Chabot. hall, ■ Oak
land, %at 2:30 cCclock Monday -after
■ ooft.. Judge It.-B. m _Tappan will also
speak. *~ *
Grant Aye. at Geary St., San Francisco—Phone Sutter 3600
1 - B THE SMARTLY DRESSED a OUR SHYER HAS JUST RE- !
ALWAYS SEE TO IT THAT £f TURNED FROM NEW YORK I
■ |2LS/i THEIR LEATHER ACGESSOR- pL WITH SOMUEW WAISTS ff
, v- f /IES ARE IfMHt CRI §§Pf\
I i w • j g~k II tdfe'^V"^.'» v -' chiffon, and white shadow lace over
» W L Magnin and Co. Have a \s flesh pink crepe chiffon. The lace
Leather Goods Section % Medici collar is held by a velvet cravat pii
That Is Not. Large but Very Choice. The Articles 1 as are als ° Ac sleeve friik . h f e I
Are Chosen for Their Elegance and for Their Suit- , , K'W* \ "ZT
■ - ft- •■ * •!• n rt* | for less than $20.
. |; ability to Persons of I aste. t. ■ WmM NEW Crepe de Chine Waists at
V I. Magnin & Co., Grant avenue at
] .Yet these-articles are: not expensive, as they have been \V^»s|s*^ w Geary, street, are at the following jL^^
cfiosen. with discrimination. prices: $5.95, $6.95, $7.95 and on pl^^i
S. . . As. an evidence of this see the fitted Dress Suit Cases k up to $25.00.
made in stylish- colors; light because built on alnm i n v m Colors: Egg yellow, gold, jade green, chartreuse and mm^A
frames. .' These start at $19.85. absinthe are the most popular. iaM^ll
Covers for tine leather goods will be made to order of Garniture: Oriental and Malines laces. W=3sjk
— an'v materials desired. See the window of New Blouses (gold and jade green) at W'mgf.i
' ■ 1. Magnin & Co., Grant avenue at Geary street. I jßߧ|
\\ #SMp\ New DancinTbresses [
! $6.95 (Miniature Motor Bag)- JIM A Flail-ir
7 fittings:, brush, comb, mirror, powder #/W vA AFC I^/cLlljr
yS===2 Colors: Rose, blue, lavender, black. ~~^Jy They are inexpensively priced. Ask to see:
JsKpS*' A gift that any person of Taste would $§95 490 *7C No. 4232-3354—Satin Charmeuse in all the dainty l|S|jja
delight in. (See sketches.) " ' ' ' —■' I D light colors. A double tunic of shadow lace, or per-
. haps we ought to write, two deep Spanish flounces. These lace slfjWKfi
_ -m - . . flounces are bound with bias Satin bands of the color of the frock.
P AafnOl* I -#\/>rlc l\/la3fclYtS\ The bodice is built of the shadow lace and chifJon - A SSS..
UUUUO IflClllU vide crush girdle is picote edged and there is a dainty pearl edge p|o
■ a. en 7c <m Ai re d i around the decollete. A meager description for so distinctive a[l
At jk) cents, /J cents, $1, an as- A line or Sewing baskets, com- frock
sortment of Address Books, Note bination of wicker and leather, ,
ZJ&SJ&Z * Hoiday Sale Dainty Art Goods
Z , ~ ' , ", . leathers in light pinks, blues and A , ~ • ' .
Boob. Phone Pads. Shoppuig lavf . ndar . others of natnra | A real gift opportunity. g—^
Wm l;' sLs I rav f lb V Re ™ m ™- in red -««», a " d 45c, Reduced from 75c 111
Dianes Dnnkmg Cups Tie Raci,. purple; pnees rangmg $1.75. Pin Cushions (two styles). Paperweights. g
Jewel Cases, Sewing Sets, Unnk- $2.5U, $3.50, up to $ZD apiece. J Wmmmm
tng Flasks, Needle Cases, Mcdi- Collar Boxes of leather for gen- 55c, Reduced frOITI $1.00 lljip
YmSk cine Cases Rcto'Framtt. Mam- tlemen from $1.75 up Hand-embroidered Lingerie Bands mounted on Satin ribbon l|fgt
tmimhmn rure Sets, Playing Card Sets, and Coat Hangers and Dress Hang- ... , T/ • SS
i l.i j *i 7c j with little roses, k er}; h,xqmsiie. mmiuM
many others. ers in leather goods, $1.75 and up. _ _ . c tf»o r\r\ SSIBj
Traveling, Toilet and Roll Up A full line of gentlemen's card 95c, KeClUCed aTOHI $Z.UU
Cases for both Men and Women, cases and wallets, $1.50 to $10 Hanging pin cushions, "Companions"; trays. Large hand
s 3, $5 and $7.50, up to $85, made apiece. some traySf $3 59 t0 $4.Q0
lof different leathers, such as Moroc- Jewel Cases for ladies, $ 1.50 up D J Jm. <M QC
co, Seal, fine double cross gram to $25 apiece. KedUCed tO $I.^o
1 Morocco; trimmings in all Parisian Miniature Victoria Cases, $6.95 These articles are made of French brocade, gold galoons and
llSj Ivory; some plain and others en- to $45, fitted in nine fittings up- facsimiles of fine old French Prints. The glass in the trays is of =|||§|i
graved and inlaid in gilt.. ward. superior quality.
These are gifts of elegance to Persons of Taste. €|HS
«l!-m ¥\« Or. I See Mi,imer y Section; also Main Floor, Magnin Main |||||H
25% Discount Sale of Parisian Ivory BuMn * §§ m
continues until further notice. We are closing out the department as /. Magnin & Co. Merchandise Orders are the most sensible
pMfgP we need the space. gifts members of a family can present to each other. M§|jP
Parisian Ivory Clocks, 85 cents to $10.50 each. /■ Magnin & Co. Merchandise Orders are graceful courtesies IT"
* I Parisian Ivory Trays, 35 cents to $3.50 each. to use in returning social obligations.
j. Sea Garden Pearls llimllii
I arp! a new man,lia ct"red pearl. The color is faultless. The appearance of each individual H
I I }I l' p arl is of a substantial substance that gives the impression of tbe weight of a real pearl. ll' •3&**'l£
1 >. ■ liir 11 is on 'y when an expert jeweler handles the Sea Garden pearls that one Is apprised these PlliSvMi v i^^^^
J beauties are manufactured beauties. Come in and see them and verify these statements, § 'Saifia^
Stars Will End in
Frigidity; Universal
Night to Prevail
However, It Is a Long Way Off,
Says Prof. Russell, So What's the
Use of Worrying?
NEW YORK, Dec. 4.—ln a lecture
on the "heat action of stars," Prof.
Henry N. Russell of the department
of astronomy at Princeton declared
that upon their creation the stars
became hot, but are gradually cool
ing off. and that the ultimate end of
the universe, therefore, is absolute
frigidity, in the blackness of inter
stellar night.
"The end of the universe is incon
ceivably far off." was Professor Rus
sell's consolation.
Judge Hangs a Fine
Over Head of Picket
A. .Tohansen, a union picket who one
month ago beat up a nonunion printer
at Market and Beale streets, was fined
1" today by Police Jupdge Crist on a
charge of battery.
Loiter the fine was remitted on mo
tion of Attorney Taaffe, representing
the Franklin Printing council, and
Johansen's case was placed on the re
serve calendar.
"If you ever come into my court
again," said Judge Crist, Til take up
this charge then and you will get a
straight jail sentence."
"Girls, Don't Drink,"
Says Woman Thief
NEW YORK. Dec. 4. —"Before I am
sent to jail I want to warn girls
never- to take a drink, especially a
cocktail." This was the advice given
by Miss Grace Legendre, former book
keeper at the Hotel Gregorian, after
confessing the theft of J4OO from the
hotel. "A cocktail taken four years
ago at the wedding of a friend started
me on the downward path." said Miss
Legendre. "Before that I had never
tasted liquor."
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1913
BETTER POLICE
PROTECTION
DEMANDED
Sunset Improvement Club
Criticises Department Be
cause of Many Holdups
Criticising the police for lßck of
protection in the Sunset District, and
demanding that more officers be sta
tioned in the district, the Sunset Im
provement club last night named a"
committee to call upon Chief White.
This action Is the result of six hold
ups having been committed, two In
broad daylight, last Friday evening,
all within a radius of several blocks.
Among the holdups was that of Rev.
W. L. Stidger of Calvary Methodist
church.
Detectives are still working on in
definite clews to the three masked
highwaymen who have committed six
saloon holdups and two shootings
since last Thursday. The descriptions
furnished the police are as follows:
Robber No. I—Height. 5 feet 8
inches! 25 to 3© years old; long no»e
and face; dark unit, dark soft hut,
telescope or slouch.
Robber No. 2—Height, r> feet 6
inches; 25 to 30 yearn old: dark suit,
dark or brown soft hat, telescope or
slouch.
Robber No. 3—Height. 5 feet 0
inches i 25 to 30 years old; brown suit,
black or dark hat, tan nboes with
brown uppers.
MOTHERS' CLUBS WILL
FORM A FEDERATION
The mothers' clubs of Alameda have
taken steps to form a federation
which will be effected la a short time.
The Porter, Lincoln, Haight and Ever
ett school organisations will form
the federation.
Met Holdup Man in
Broad Daylight, but
Didn't Call Police
Oakland Man Refused to Be Robbed
Third Time, but Revolver
Kept Him Silent
After being twice robbed by the
same man within two weeks, Clarke
Burroughs, 2914 Boehmer street, Oak
land, had the pleasure yesterday of
meeting the holdup man face to face
in broad daylight and smoking a
cigarette with him. After exchang
ing courtesies with his erstwhile vic
tim, the footpad suggested that he
might induce Burroughs to part with
his spare change again, but the latter
declined to take the suggestion and
threatened that he would call the
police. The holdup man smiled and
walked away, holding Buriougns pow
erless: with a suggestive pat of his
hip, where bulged a big gun. Being
a married man and a father. Bur
roughs decided discretion to be the
better part of valor and hesitated to
apprehend the footpad.
Statutory Charge
Against Conductor
Victor Church, a streetcar conduc
tor of Eureka, was arraigned today
before United States Commissioner
Krull on a charge of white slavery
and bail was fixed at $2,000. Church
was arrested by Thomas H. Selvage,
assistant United States attorney, on
a warrant charging him with taking
Clara Holliday, a 16 year old girl of
Fortuna, Humboldt county, outside
WIFE GRANTED DEQREE
AND HALF THE PROPERTY
The divorce suit against Jesse C.
Martin, a locomotive engineer, de
veloped today that he owns several
flats at Jones and Jackson streets and
$1,500 worth of household goods and
has numerous minor investments.
Mrs. Nellie V. Martin was awarded
half his property as her community
share when Judge Hunt granted her
an interlocutory decree.
CALL PHOTOS TO
GO ABROAD AS
EVIDENCE
Will Be in Exhibits in British
Court in Child Substi
tution Case
When The Call published photo
graphs of Lieutenant Charles Slingsby
and the baby, "Teddy" Slingsby, the
putative father was so convinced that
the sectional views comparing the
features of father and son proved the
parentage of the boy that the British
high court of chancery is going to
study the newspaper photographs.
John Gum, one of The Call's staff
of artists, was subpenaed at the hear
ing in the "baby substitution" case
before the British commissioner in
the consulate today to identify his
photographs of the baby and the puta
tive father, which were introduced as
evidence and will be a part of the
bulky transcript that will be for
warded to England next week.
Walter Trefts, official stenographer
in Judge Shortall's court, read from
his notes during the trial of Dr.
W. W. Eraser.
Miss Azile Black, a nurse and friend
of Mrs. Slingsby, testified also.
Miss Gunnell New
Editor of Sequoia
STANFORD UNIVERSITY, Dec. 4.—
Miss Dorothy P. Gunnell of Salt Lake
City, Utah, has been chosen by the
English club to edit the Sequoia, Stan
ford's literary monthly, next semes
ter. She succeeds J. L. Duff of Menlo
Park. H, C. Boyd of Easton has been
named to take charge of the business
affairs. C. F. Paul, the present busi
ness manager, will not return to col
lege next semester.
"POOR LITTLE RICH
GIRL" REFUSES TO
DESERT HER MOTER
Ramona
Borden,
who is pawn
in divorce
suit which
is denied by
court
Mrs. Helen Borden, Denied
Divorce From Millionaire,
Living in This City
Ramona Borden, "the poor little
rich girl," is sorry that the supreme
court denied her mother a divorce
from Gail Borden, the condensed milk
king. From the palatial Borden home
In Southern California she sends forth
her regret today to her mother, who
is living in seclusion in San Francisco,
and declares that she doesn't see how
mamma can "retain her respect" with
out a divorce.
And the "poor little rich girl" will
stay with her mother, in spite of the
decree of the supreme court.
Ramona was surprised at the news
of the supreme court's action, but her
mind was fully made up.
"I am very sorry mother didn't get
her divorce," she told The Call repre
sentative. "I have made friends with
my father, but I shall never leave my
mother to go to him.
ENTITLED TO DIVORCE
"I will not discuss the divorce—
that's my mother's business. But I
believe that any woman should be al
lowed a divorce If she wants It. My
father and mother can't get along, and
it would be better if they were di
vorced. I certaintly shall not make
any effort to reconcile them.
"As for me, my love for my mother
is so strong that I should stay with
her on any- account.
"Whatever my mother's lot is, I will
share it.
"Mother has been receiving $10,000
a year from father. Just what effect
the divorce suit will have on this I
don't know."
Cap and Bells Members
Hold Kaffee Klatsch
Cap and Bells members are holding
their regular club day this afternoon,
which is to take the form of a Kaffee
Klatsch, to be preceded by an elab
orate and interesting program under
the direction of Mrs. Frederick P.
Plageman, chairman.
The features of the day will be as
follows: "The Ideals of the National
Theater Movement," Mrs. Edwin W.
Stadtmuller; "The Fundamental Dif
ference between Pageantry and the
Drama," Mrs. D. E. F. Easton; half
hour of music, Mrs. Will D. Shea,
chairman; a, "Sunlight and Flow
ers" (Santisteban): b, waltz inter
mezzo, "Canto de Amor" (Almagra),
Cap and Bells mandolin orchestra;
cantlllations, Mrs. Josephine Swan
White; songs, Mrs. Lyman Dickerman
Foster.
Members were requested to bring
their sewing to aid in making it dis
tinctly a "club day."
Gompers Still Sees
Peace for Gas Men
His return to the east delayed sev
eral days, Samuel Gompers, president
of the American Federation of Labor,
is holding dally conferences in his
apartments in the Argonaut hotel
with a view to ending the present
war between labor and the Pacific
Gas and Electric company. Though
no final results have materialized,
Gompers expresses belief that the
matter will be settled very shortly.
At a banquet given last night by
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters,
Gompers and James Kirby and other
prominent labor leaders were guests
of honor.
BOY BURNED TO DEATH
PLAYING WITH MATCHES
Play with matches caused the death
last evening of 4 year old Louis
Schaffer at his home, 1413 Montgom
ery street. His clothes caught Are,
and when found by his parents he was
beyond medical aid.
CLERK HELD FOR LARCENY
Andrew Podesta, a clerk, was ar
rested early today and charged with
grand larceny. Podesta is accused of
stealing- $120 from Chris Aiker, 663
Clay .treet.
Daughter
of millionaire
called
"poor little
rich girl"
because
of parents'
'marital
troubles.
Copyright by TTnderwood & Underwood, N. T.
Wat Uhtfe forme
Art Needlework Department
(Third Floor)
A large collection of tapestry covered ar
tides, suitable for gifts and prizes, includ
ing desk sets, phone book covers, phone reg
isters, engagement and memorandum
pads, pin trays, etc. • .
A complete assortment of lingerie novel
ties, consisting of glove and* handkerchief
cases, pin cushions, pen holders,-etc.
16=inch round lamp shade, variety off col
orings, medallion effect, with gold 'trim
ming and silk fringe, regular $7.5®.. ,ss.®<D
18-inch silk shade in old-rose, gold and
green, ribbon flower trimming, regular
SflOoS© .• $8.75
THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY ONLY«==
The entire line off imported tapestry pil
lows and all colored silk and velvet pillows
AT 11=4 OFF
Continuation
of
ANNUAL SALE OF WOMEN'S
WEARING APPAREL
(Second Floor)
GREAT REDUCTIONS THROUGHOUT
Oreamemtal Objects off Art
Especially Suitable for
Holiday Qitfts
are shown on third floor,
comprising bronze statuary, clocks and
clock sets, electric lamps, Italian terra
cottas and marbles, ornamental pieces of
furniture such as tables, desks, cabinets,
etc., photograph frames, pictures and. ar»
tides of Dutch silver.
TOYS BOOKS
HANDKERCHIEFS
GLOVE AND MERCHANDISE
ORDERS ISSUED
| Look Heret
| Every Day/|
! # JL !
| BOYS! 1
| There's a Gun in the|
| City of Paris ToyJom|
| that" is called "Aerona |
land it spins butterflies.|
j It's great sport. Come*
♦in and try it. |
| UNION SQUARE |
»»♦♦»♦»♦♦♦»»»♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦»»»
Man, Hit by Train,
In Serious Condition
"William F. Bell. 30 years old. a
laborer living at 732 a Natoma street,
who was hit by a taxicab in lower
Market street early this morning
while he was endeavoring to avoid
being run down by a Valencia street
car, is in a serious condition at the
harbor emergency hospital. Bell is
suffering from a" fracture of the skull,
lacerations of the body and possible
internal injuries. The taxicab was
badly damaged by collision with the
streetcar after hitting BelL but the
driver escaped Injury. , .
TONS OF RADIUM ON
OCEAN FLOOR, HE SAYS
BALTIMORE, Dec. 4. —"There is In
the hands of man all over the world
only one-half an ounce of radium, but
on the floor of the ocean, out of reach
of man, there are 1,000,000 tons of that
precious chemical element."
This statemont was made today by
Dr. H. C. Jones, professor of chemis
try at Johns Hopkins university.
3

xml | txt