OCR Interpretation


Cañon City record. (Cañon City, Colo.) 1883-192?, May 27, 1909, Image 2

Image and text provided by History Colorado

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85067315/1909-05-27/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for TWO

TWO
EFFORT MADE TO
GET PARDON FOR CON
VICT RUSSELL BOLLES
Much Sympathy is Expressed for the
Murderer and an Effort Will
be Made to Secure a
Pardoa
Denver, May 22.—Another effort is
to be made to get Russell Bolles out
of the penitenttary. Everybody knows
who Russell Bolles is. Practically
everybody believes he is innocent but
someway on another he has never
been given an opportunity before the
board or pardons to prove that inno
cence.
Six years ago a boy on the north
side in this city was murdered and his
sister was outraged. Two years later
Russell Bolles was brought back
from British Columbia and convicted
of ihe crime. His conviction was se
cured under an entirely different po
lice and criminal court administration
and those who worked on the case at
the time of the murder have always
maintained that an innocent man was
convicted.
There were a hundred and one
things that entered into his conviction
that have never been fully explained
and that don’t look good on the sur
face. Yesterday Governor Shafroth re
ceived a letter from C. W. Bond, a
DISCUSSED PLANS FOR
PROPOSED COLORADO SPRINGS--
CANON CITY HIGHWAY
Further plans for the new road
from Colorado Springs to Canon City
were outlined last night at a meeting
attended by the county commission
ers of El Paso and Fremont counties,
the engineers who will run the sur
veys of the proposed new highw r
Warden Thomas Tynan, of the Canon
City penitentiary, and a number of
citizens of both Colorado Springs and
Canon City who are interested in the
good roads movement.
The party returned yesterday after
noon from its tour of inspection over
the route, and last evening was spent
In making notes, etc., of the journey.
The new road, according to those who
made the trip, will be one of the most
picturesque in Colorado, and in addi
DR. ALEXANDER J. M’IVOR
TYNDALL GREETED BY AN
ENTHUSIASTIC AUDIENCE
A splendid audience of representa
tive men and women gathered at the
opera house last evening to greet Dr.
Alexander J. Mclvor Tyndall, the fam
ous educator and editor of the Swas
tika Magazine.
The general interest in the subjects
classed as New Thought was notice
able from the size and character of
the audience. The business man, the
professional man, the laborer, the so
ciety woman and the domestic were
all represented in the widespread
thirst for entertainment and instruc
tion along the line of the New Psy
chology.
The doors opened at the opera
house last night at 7:30 and before 8
o’clock every seat was taken. The
house was packed to standing room
and many were turned away.
Dr. Mclvor-Tyndall’s theme was
“Proofs of Immortality,” and the
large audience listened in rapt atten
tion to the many remarkable state
ments made by the doctor, and loudly
applauded the numerous proofs that
he gave relative to the "after life.”
Last night's meeting was a great
success, and the startling demonstra
tions of mental influence and psychic
manifestations were greatly enjoyed,
while the hundred or more answers
to personal questions, through the
power of clairvoyance impression,
seemed to afford much interest as
well as satisfaction.
Dr. Mclvor-Tyndall will remain at
the Hotel Denton for a few days long
er and can be seen and consulted up
on any personal or private matter
during his regular office hours.
If any question of health, invest
ment, business, changes, love, domest
ic trouble, or doubt regar Tng a fu
ture course of life troubles you, Dr*
Mclvor-Tyndall can and will give you
the benefit of his wonderful clairvoy
ant powers and will concentrate his
forces to assist and advise you, while
his fee for an Interview Is trifling,
compared to the knowledge of the
psychic and mental forces which he
can give you.
prominent publisher of this city, ask
ing the governor to make arange
ments to allow Mary A. Stephenson
to tell him what she knew about the
case. Mrs. Stephenson is old and is an
invalid. She maintains that on the
night of the murder Russel Bolles was
with her or rather at a party she at
tended. At the time of the trial she
was not allowed to testify because
she was deaf and could not under
stand the questions.
She wants ta make a statement to
the governor while her faculties are
still clear. The governor will, no
doubt, invite her to make it before
the board of pardons.
At one time, when Bolles had his
case before the supreme court, he was
offered the Christmas pardon and de
clined It on the ground that he had
done nothing for which he should se
cure a pardon. There is not a man in
the penitentiary for whom more sym
pathy has gone out and in whom more
people are interested.
tion to its scenic attractions, will cut
fully 10 miles from the road that now
runs to Canon City.
Engineers of both counties who at
tended the conference were instructed
last night to make their preliminary
surveys as soon as possible and to
present their figures of the estimated
cost of the work.
Warden Tynan now has 80 convicts
working on the roads near Trinidad,
and he hopes that the surveys for the
Colorado Springs-Canon City road
will be completed within a week or
two in order that the men may be put
to work at once, so that it will be un
necessary for them to be taken back
to Canon City.—Colorado Springs Tel
egraph.
The July issue of The Swastika
magazine, which Dr. Mclvor-Tyndall
edits, contains some remarkable ex
periences in psychic research. The
magazine is for sale at all newstands
or may be had of Dr. Mclvor-Tyndall
at his parlors in the Hotel Denton.
WILL ORGANIZE SPORTS
MEN’S ASSOCIATION HERE
NEXT THURSDAY NIGHT
A public meeting will be held in the
district court room next Thursday ev
ening for the purpose of taking steps
to organize a branch of the Colorado
Sportsmen’s Assocaition, which Is
rapidly spreading throughout the
state.
The object of the organization is to
provide means for the Just protection
of game and fish, to assist the state in
acquiring ownership of o right of way
on all trout streams within its Juris
diction and to secure the enactment
of Just and equiable laws in relation
eherto. The indiscriminate killing of
game animals being a prevailing fault
calculated to exterminate many of the
most valuable species, it has become
necessary in order to counteract the
same to take Individual and united ac
tion in opposition to this destructive
tendency. It is realized by sportsmen
that if present conditions are allowed
to continue it will be but a short time
until the opportunity to fish will be
in the hands of a few, to the exclusion
of theg eneral public, one of the first
objects of this association is to se
cure for the fishermen of the state the
right to fish on all streams by the
state.
A "moonshiners" outfit brought
from the mountains of eastern Ken
tucky will be exhibited at the Exposi
tion at Seattle this summer.
THE CANON CITY RECORD, THURSDAY’ MAY a 7 , igog
PROTEST REMOVAL
OF CONVICTS FROM
LAS ANIMAS COUNTY
Trinidad, May 22. —The efforts on
the part of the citizens of Fremont
county to remove the state convicts
now engaged in the construction of
the Colorado state highway in this
county to that county and place them
at work upon the road between Colo
rado Springs and Canon City has
aroused a storm of protest from the
residents of this city and county who
inaugurated the work of using con
victs in highway construction.
Trinidad and Las Animas county
have contributed something like $5,000
by free subscription and in addition
to this the bill allowing the use of the
convicts in road work was fathered
by Senator Barela of this county and
introduced by him in the state senate
two years ago. It has been through
the work and with the aid of the mon
ey of Las Animas county citizens that
the experiment has been proven suc
cessful and much feeling exists here
over the effort that is being made to
bar this county of the benefits uow
that it has proven a success.
The Automobile club has taken up
the matter and the business men of
the city and chamber of commerce
will bring the matter before Gov. Sha
froth at once, W. M. Jamieson, presi
dent of the chamber of commerce, be
ing in Denver for that purpose at
present.
TO PROTECT CHILDREN
FROM WORK IN FIELDS
Denver, May 20.—1 tis said here
that the Society of Child and Animal
Protection is likely to take cognizance
of the situation 6f taking out of school
the three or four hundred children
who are said to be employed in the
beet fields in onrthern Colorado. Most
of these children are from the Garden
Place schools and it is understood
that several other schools are to be
besieged for additional child labor.
The situation is becoming serious and
the state authorities, who have juris
diction in such cases, announce that
they expect to exercise their powers.
These children who have been
drawn into the beet fields -are not
there without the consent of their
parents, but this fact will not prevent
the officials from taking action. They
come from among the poorer families
of the city and usually receive about
three months schooling during the
year. They leave for the beet fields
about the first of May and the work
they do is to thin the beets, and later
they are put to pulling them, which is
said to be very laborious work. When
this work is finished -the children are
in no physical condition to re-enter
school and are in a state of almost
physical exhaustion.
For this and other reasons, the
fight against their being employed at
such work is to be made by the of
ficials. The officers are to be assisted
by members of the Woman’s club,
which has been making an investiga
tion of conditions.
STATE PLANTED
TEN MILLION TROUT IN
STREAMS IN 1908
There are something like 10,000,000
fish waiting for May 29 to roll around,
which is the first day that anglers
may try their luck.
These figures were learned yester
day by County Clerk Sheldon when
he was in Denver discussing Ashing
laws with Chief Warden Holland. Al
together ten million trout fry were
planted in Colorado streams snd
lakes in 1908. The number deposited
last year is more than double that of
1907.
While the game warden desires
everyone to enjoy fishing, he will be
strict with regard to violations of the
law. During the present biennial pe>
riod, to date 174 persons have been
convicted for violations of the fish and
game laws, their fines amounting to
$8,661, or more than double that of
the preceeding year. In 1908 87,856
resident hunting licenses were issued,
as against 29,337 for 1907.— Colorado
Springs Telegraph.
PROF. G. W. WARNER
ELECTED SUPERINTENDENT
SOUTH CANON SCHOOLS
Prof. George M. Warner, for the
last three years teacher of science In
the faculty of the South Canon high
school, has been selected by the board
of education to be superintendent me
as the successor of Prof. E. P. Swing,
who was not an applicant for re-elec
tion this year. Prof. Warner is a grad
uate of the University of Chicago and
is regarded as an educator of excep
tional worth. He came to Canon City
from Boulder, but was employed for
some time previous to that time as an
Instructor in one of the schools at
Austin, Texas. Prof. Warner has
earned his promotion to the superin
tendency of the South Canon schools
and his friends congratulate him upon
the recognition he has received at the
hands of thet board of education.
Special to The Daily Record.
SLAUGHTER OF
SHEEP AROUSES GOV
ERNOR SHAFROTH
Ruth left a Cowards Mast Be Jailed* He
Declares—“lt Was aa Abomla
able Oatrage.”
Denver, May 22.—Governor Sha
froth was much worked up over the
massacre of the 2,000 sheep In Mesa
county day before yesterday.
“It was an abominable outrage,"
said the governor. “It was unjustifi
able from every point of view. The
idea of murdering and wounding in
nocent animals because of a bitter
feud against their owner is something
I can’t understand. I trust the officials
of both counties will not stop until
every person connected with the ruth
less and cowardly attack is in the
penitentiary and you can say that if
they are ever landed there no pardon
will issue for any of them so long as
I am governor of this state.
“If these men are convicted I will
do iny part to see that they serve the
terms which the courts impose. These
outrages in Colorado must stop. There
is absolutely no provocation that jus
tifies such an attack of this kind
against property in this state, no dif
ference what class is subject to the
protection of the law and certainly a
flock of innocent sheep is just as
much entitled to protection as any
thing else.”
When asked whether he would offer
a reward or not the governor said, “I
am not quite sure that a reward helps
much in convicting criminals. The
attorneys for the defense always play
on the sentimental end and they use
this In an effort to acquit their client.
However, I intend to consider the
matter and should the county officials
see fit to make a request that the state
offer a reward it will be given due
consideration.
“At any rate those men must be un
ished and the state must not let up
until every one of them is boarding at
the Canon City penitentiary."
CONSIDERABLE DAMAGE
DOME TO TELEPHONE COM
PANY BY THE STORM
From Saturday's Daily.
Considerable damage was done to
the ijcal telephone exchange by the
electrical storm Friday evening which
put a good many instruments out of
commission in consequence of blow
ing out fuses and carbons. A gang
of men have been busy making re
pairs today, but will not be able to
finish up the job before tomorrow
noon. The lightning for a little while
was very severe and during its contin
uance the rain fell in torrents. A
rise of fully two feet was noted on
the flow of the Arkansas river, bat
It quickly subsided and the river cur
rent was normal this morning. It is
reported that the volume of water
that came down some of the gulches
in the foothills of the Greenhorn
mountains Friday evening had not
been equalled for years at tills season.
So far as we have been able to as
certain no bridges were washed out
and no serious injury of any kind
done. The rain was “a clod smasher"
and will be worth many thousands of
dollars to the agricultural internets
of Fremont county.
A Cealded Boy's Shrieks.
horrified his grandmother, Mrs.
Marla Tayllr, of Nebo, Ky., who
writes that, when all thought he
would die, Bucklen's Arnica Salve
wholly cured him. Infallible for
Burns. Scalds, Cuts, Corns, Wounds
Bruises. Cures Fever Sores. Bolls,
Skin Eruptions, Chilblains, Chapped
Hands. Soon routs Piles. 25c at
Hunter Palmer’s.
REPORT OF FLOW OF
WATER IN THE ARKAN
SAS RIVER ON SUNDAY
B. R. Chew, irrigation division en
gineer with headquarters in Pueblo,
reports the flow of water In the
streams in this destrlct on Sunday as
follows:
Arkansas river at Canon City, 1010
cubic feet per second.
Arkansas river at Pueblo, I960 cub
ic feet per seoond.
Arkansas river at Oxford dam, 770
cubic feet.
8t. Charles river, 12 cubic feet.
Huerfano river.6 cubic feet.
Fountain river, 18 cubic feet.
Twin Lakes outlet, 40 cubic feet.
Oil Creek, 20 cubic feet.
Beaver creek, 20 cubic feet.
Sait Creek, 29 cubic feet.
It Is related that a man went away
on a month's trip lately, and found
his women folks reduced to skeletons
upon his return. They had been liv
ing on a little thing slice of bread, and
Jam and tea to save the trouble of
getting regular meals, i They were
envied by all women in the neigh
borhood who had cross men to cook
big meals for three times a day. They I
admitted that sometimes they did not
even eat their bread and Jam, be
cause they had cleaned the dining
room and fairly reveled In keeping It
shining*
Adjuster Established ISBS
Wm. T. BridweU
Real Estate, Loans and Investments
Firs, Life, AocUnt and Plato Gists insurance
Otfidal Bonds FarnisM
onto*. 417J4 M*in StrMt _ _ ,
mom. i ioi si** Canon City, Colo.
aswwwwwwwßswsswswswssssseseasesssssensasMS—sesassss
THE TALE OF A TOUGH TOWN
How filled with stirring scenes and
dark deeds is the history of the magic
city of Tombstone that sprang into
being almost in a day. There is noth
ing to compare with the trying,
troublesome times of southwestern
Arizona thirty years ago. As Interest
ing in their intensity today as was
the allurements of the rich sulphide
ores to the miners in those days are
the stories of incidents that may nev
er be repeated in any community.
Tombstone was headquarters for the
great southwest. Northern Sonora and
southern Arizona were so far re
moved from other settlements that it
became the rendezvous of the whole
region.
Mining men, prospectors and invest
ors. cattle kings and cattle rustlers;
territorial rangers and self-arrogated
regulators; sheriff’s officers and depu
ty United tSates marshals all swarm
ed to Tombstone as the hub of its own
social universe. Army officers in com
mand of snuade of companies sta
tioned at posts in that region also
rave the dignity of their presence in
bright uniforms to the motely crowds
that made things lively in the dance
halls and gambling dens. The pres
ence of these numerous officers did
not prevent the stage robbers, the
smugglers and the border ruffians
making it their headquarters as well.
In fact, some of these latter gentry
were elevated to a rank of respectabil
ity by being authorized to wear a star.
Outlying camps regarded Tomb
stone as the virtual capital of the
region. They looked to Its force of of
ficials to afford protection in case of
trouble and It must be recorded that
the responses were more prompt and
effect vie than those more modern in
official life. F«*ar. coupled wi h hatred
of the Apachea. made It p •sslble for
the territorial rangers to call out for
service a small army of men on short
notice. Sturdy young miners were an
xious for adventure and bent on re
venge for the many bloody crimes of
the Indians as well as depredations
of outlaws. When a general alarm
was sounded by the blowing of three
loud long blasts of the mine whistles
the men flocked to a central point of
the camp. The alarm was the means
of distributing the important news of
events. A stage robbery, fire or Indian
outbreak were each considered of suf
ficient Importance to assemble the
populace—Field and Farm.
HAS RETURNED TO CANON
CITY AFTER SEVERAL
WEEKS IN THE HOSPITAL
Julius O. Cramer, malt clerk at the
penitentiary, has returned to Canon
City from Pueblo where he has been
undergoing treatment for several
weeks at St. Mary's hospital for a se
vere attack of rheumatism. Mr. Cra
mer Is not entirely well yet. but it so
much better that he decided to return
home. He was In the hospital five or
six weeks. He was accompanied back
to Canon City by Mrs. Cramer.
A. put This Stove In i
Your Kitchen I
It b wonderfully
convenient to do
kitchen work on > j I
it the inatant wanted, / jOy W
V moment you’re done. BjJU'
■ Such > Move it the New
I with comfort, even in doc-
I day*. The
I NEW PERFECTION J
Wick Bine Flame Ofl Cook-Stove I
it eo constructed that it cannot add perceptibly to the heat of I
a looms the flame being directed up a retaining Chimney to ■
the store top where it ie needed for cooking. You can B
ssee that a atom eending out heat in but uu di- K
mction would bo preferable on a hot day to fl
a store radiating heat in til directions. The
“New Perfection" keeps a kitchen uniformly
comfortable. Three sizes, fully warranted.
If sot with your dealer, write our ussrast agency.
M
for fsaiily use safe,
cony lent, scoeeetlsal sad a great light ,
glvsr. If act with yoar dealer,write our near-
IMPORTANT QUESTIONS
TO BE DISCUSSED AT TRANS
MISSISSIPPI CONGRESS
The most Important among the
many conferences to be held In Den*
ver during the Trans-Mississippi Com
mercial congress week. August 16-SI,
is the gathering of traffic managers of
the Southwest to consider railroad
rates with reference to the Galvsa
ton gateway and the Mississippi
crossings. As inter-state commerce is
one of the subjects under discussion
in the congress, the Southwestern
Traffic Managers’ association has
been granted representation and
President Powell of Wichita has re
quested consideration upon tht pro
gram.
REPUBLICAN STATE
CENTRAL COMMITTEE
MEET IN DENVER
Denver. May 20.—State Chairman
Vivian yesterday held a conference
with a number of the members of the
Republican executive committee and
decided to open permanent headquart
ers for the Republican state central
committee in this city. The call for
the meeting of the executive commit
tee was sent out Saturday aud the
meeting was held in one of the down
town office buildings instead of the
ordinary of one of the hotels as baa
been the custom.
Those In attendance were State
Chairman Vivian. Richard Broad of
Golden. Frank Cat tin of Montrose.
Robert Breckenridge of Monte Vista,
ivdward Trounstine of Huerfano, Wil
liam Story of Ouray, George Williams
of Sal Ida. W. R. Freeman of Denver,
A K. Vickery of Denver. R. G. Dalton
of !,a Jun'a. Willis Kiliott of Denver
and Harry Tarbell of Saguache.
At the meeting it was decided to
< pen headquarters and to ask for a
maintenance fund of $lO from every
delegate at the last state convention.
In other words, if a county had five
delegates It would be required to con
tribute SSO. No contributions are to
be received over $lO and no contribu
tions at all are to be accepted from
corporations. If all the counties re
spond the amount collected will be
about SB,OOO.
Young Girls Are Victims
of headache, aa wall at older women,
but all Ret quick relief and prompt
cure from Dr. King's New Life Pllla.
the world's best remedy for sick and
nervous headaches. They make pure
blood, and strong nerves and build
up your health. Try them. SSe at
Hunter Palmer's.
:: V THEM LIKE CANDY.
r remedy can be compared with
• or. * ct lie* for the easy, plaaaant and
. ea rr.ent of constipation. Voa
t . j money you pay ua foe
/ f ill to aatitfy you. F.at them
• j"/time <»f day or night. They
<-r C4ii«e any annoyance what*
» -i ten, toe. and sjc.

xml | txt