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The Datly National Era ia published every even
ing, and contains the reports of the proceedings of
Congress up to three o'clock.
The Office of Publication is oo Seventh street, be
tween I) and E.
Daily paper, for term of eight months ... $5.00
Rate* of Advertising in Daily.
One square, (ten lines,) one insertion ? - ? $0.60
Do. do. three insertions - - 100
Do. do. one week .... 1.50
Do. do. two weeks .... 2.50
Do. do. one month .... 4.00
Do. do. two months.... S.00
Do. do. three months ? - * 8 00
A liberal discount for long advertisements, and to
those who advertiso for a longer time.
WASHINGTON, I) C.
PROSPECTUS or THE DAILY NATIONAL ERA.
I shall issue, on the 2(1 day of January en
suing, the Daily National Era, a Political
and Literary Newspaper.
In Politics, it will advocate the Rights of
Man, and the Equality of Rights, and oppose
whatever violates or tends to violate theui,
whether this be Involuntary Personal Servi
tude, Civil Despotism, Spiritual Absolutism,
Class Legislation, the Selfishness of Capital,
the Tyranny of Combination, the Oppression of
a Majority, or the Exactions of a Party.
It will hold no fellowship with the Whig
and Democratic organization, believing thai
the main issues on which they have been ar
rayed against each other are obsolete or settled,
and that they are now chiefly used by the Sec
tional Interest oi Slavery, to impair the love of
Liberty natural to the American mind, and to
subjugate the American People to its rule. Dis
claiming all'connection with them, it will
sympathize with those of their adherents who
are honestly seeking through them to advance
the substantial interests of the country, although
it must believe that they have not chosen the
better way.
It will be a supporter of the Independent
Democracy, which holds that the Truths of the
Declaration of Independence are practical; thai
in their light the Constitution of the United
States is to be interpreted; that to thein the laws
and institutions and usages of the country
should be conformed?a Party, whose mottu
is, Union, not for the sake of Union, but for the
sake of Freedom ahd Progress ; and Law, not
for the sake of Law, but for the Protection of
Human Rights and Interests?the only sure
foundation of order and concord.
In no sense will it be the organ of a Party, or
a mere Party Paper, but absolutely " free and
independent," claiming to speak by " authori
ty" for nobody except its editor, and recognis
ing no authority in any quarter to prescribe its
course and policy.
In Literature, it will aim to unite the Beau
tiful with the True, and to make both immedi
ately subservient to the practical purposes of
every-day life.
Able correspondents, at home and abroad,
have been secured, and ampie provision has
been made for its Literary Miscellany.
It will publish condensed reports of the pro
ceedings of Congress, explain movements in
that body, the causes of which do not always
lie upon the surface, and from its position be
able to keep a constant watch upon the action
of the Federal Government in relation to all
questions at issue between Liberty and Slavery.
The extensive subscription of the Weekly
Era, which, during the year about to close, has
reached the number of twenty-eight thousand,
must make it an eligible medium for advertisers.
The Daily Era will be issued on a sheet as
large as that of the Daily jyational Intelligencer,
on the 2d day of January, 1854, and daily there
after, until the 1st of September, 1854, (or long
er, should Congress continue in session,) at
rive dollars roK that rERioD; and should
the remit then warrant, the publication will be
resumed on the 1st of December following, by
the year.
As but sixteen days intervene between this
and the 2d of January, it is important that
subscriptions he forwarded at once.
Payment in cuhmncs will be invariably re
quired Q. BAILEY.
Washington, December 15, 1853.
PROSPECTUS OP THE EIGHTH VOLUME OF THE
NATIONAL EEA.
G. BAILEY, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.
JOHN O. WHTTTIER, CORRESPONDING EDITOR.
WASHINGTON, D. 0.
The National Era is a weekly newspaper,
devoted to Literature and Politico
Id Literature, it dims to unite the Beautiful
with the True, and to make both immediately
subservient to the practical purposes of every*
day life.
In Politic?, it advocates the Rights of Man,
and the Equality of Rights, and oppoeea what
ever violates'or tends to violate them, whether
this be luvoluntary Personal Servitude, Civil
Despotism, Spiritual Absolutism, Class Legis
lation, the Selfishness of Capital, the Tyranny
of Combination, the Oppression of a Majority,
or the Exactions of Party.
It holds no fellowship with the Whig and
Democr&tio organizations, believing that the
main issues on wliioh they have been arrayed
agaiint eaeh other are obsolete or settled, and
that they are now ohiefly used by\he Sectional
Intercut of Slavery, to impair the love of Lib
erty natural to the Amerioan mind, and to
subjugate the American Poople to its rule. Dis
claiming all connection with them, it yet sym
phises with those of their adherents who are
honestly seeking through them to advanoe the
substantial interests of the oountry, although
it must believe that they h*ve not ohosen the
better way.
It is a sup|>orter of the Independent Democ
racy, which holds that the Truths of the Dec
laration of Independence are practical, that in
their light the Constitution of the United
States is to be Interpreted, that to them the
laws and institutions and usages of the ooun
try should be conformed?a Party, whose
motto is, Unwn, not for the sake of Union,
but for the sake of Freedom and Progress;
and Law, not for the sake of Law, but for the
Protection of Human Rights and Interests?
the only sure foundation of order and oonoord.
Id no sense is it the organ of a Party, or a
mere Party Paper, but absolutely " free and
independent," claiming to speak " by author
ity'' for nobody eicept its editor, and recogni
sing no authority in any quarter to prescribe its
oourse and policy.
The Eighth Volume of the Era will oom
meooe on the first of January ensuing, and be
enlarged by the addition of four oolumns. We
havo neglected no meaiiH that oould promise to
make it an agreeable companion for the House
hold, and an efficient oo-adjutor to the enlight
ed Politician, it has secured able correspond
ents at home and abroad, and no journal in
the oountry can surpass the Era as it respects
c(*ntributors to its Literary Department.
The Era publishes oondensed reports of the
proceedings of Con gross, explains movements
in that body, the causes of whioh do not always
lie npon tho surface, and from its position is
enabled to keep a constant watch npon the ao
tion of the Federal Government in relation
DAILY NATIONAL ERA.
G. BAILEY, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.
VOL. I. WASHINGTON, D. C., SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 1854. NO. 18.
to all quotations at issue bntwooD Liberty and
Slavery.
The only journal at the seat of the Federal
Government, representing the Anti-Slavery
Sentiment of the Republic, while the Pro-Sla
very Soutiment in represented here by four
daily papers, nearly all of them being liberally
sustainod by Governmental patronage, it asks
the support of all who believe, in sincerity, that
the Union was formod to secure the blessings
of Liberty, and not to perpetuate the ourse of
Slavery.
Payment in advanoe is invariably required.
To prevent annoyance and low to ourselves
and readers, to pre^orvo thoir files unbroken,
and to enable us to know how large an edi
tion of the paper to issue, all subscriptions
should be renewed before they expire. We
have no aredit-Hubsoribors on our books.
' These are the terms for both old and new
subscribers, forwarding their own subscriptions.
Agents are entitled to fifty cents on each new
yearly subscriber, and twenty-five cents on
each renewed subscriber?except in the case of
clubs.
A club of three subscribers, one of whom
may bo an old one, at $5, will entitle the per
son making it up to a copy of the Era for three
months; a club of five, two of whom may be
old ones, at $8, to a copy for Biz months; a
tflub of ten, five of whom may be old ones, at
$15, to a copy for one year.
When a olub of subscribers has been for
warded, additions may be made to it, on the
same terms.
Money to be forwarded by mail at our risk.
Large amounts iqay be remitted in drafts or
certificates of depoeite. When money is Bent,
notes on the Banks of Boston, New York, Phil
adelphia, or Baltimore, are preferred. New
England notes are at lees discount than New
Vork State notes, and these lees than Western
notes. G. Bailky.
P. S. Newspapers friendly to our enterprise
will please notice or publish our Prospeotna, as
they may see proper. ?
PH06PECTUS OF TACTS FOB THE PEOPLE.
The " Facts roa the Pboplb " Is a monthly, de
signed for preservation as a document for reference,
or for general circulation, as a Free Democratic Mis
sionary, especially among those not yet familiar with
the Anti Slavery movement. It will be composed
chiefly of articles from the National Era, adapted
particularly to the purpose named.
Each number will contain eight pages, and be print
ed on good paper, of thetfse of the Congressional
Globe, in quarto form, suitable for binding.
It will be furnished at the following rates, by the
year, twelve numbers constituting a volume :
Six copies to one address ? - - - $1
Twenty copies to one address ... 3
One hundred copies to one address ? IS
Any person or club may in this way, by raising
$12, supply Anti-Slavery reading every month, for a
whole year, to one hundred readers. Singi* subscri
bers will not be received. Send for a club, and order
it to one address. The pontage is a trifle?only half
a cent a number, six cents a year, paid in advanoe at
the office where the paper is received. All pay
ments must be in advance. (}. BAILEY.
P. S. Editors of newspapers favorable to the fore
going will entitle themselves to six tfopies of the
monthly, by publishing the Prospectus, and directing
attention to it.
TlilKMS.
Single Oopj - " -
Three oopies -
Pive oopies - -
Ton copies -
Single oopy six months -
Ton copies six months
S2
5
8
15
1
8
AGENTS.
PREMIUM OP TWENTY-POUR DOLLARS.
DEB NATIONAL DKMOKRAT
Thin newspaper has now bom in eziaUnce only
four month*, anil hu already quite a considerable
circulation. We have spared no coat to make it, as
to site, typography, and paper, the firat Herman pa
per in the country. Aa to ita literari merita, we bar*
received luhtfantial proofa of approval, from Maine
to Tezaa. We have no agenta for whoae acta we are
reaponaible, but any person can act aa a voluntary
agent, and he will find that our terms are sufficiently
liberal to reward hia trouble.
We now offer the following additional inducementa:
1. Any peraon sending ua 10 aubaoribera and $16.
will receive aa a premium any one of the following
worka:
Koklrauachi's Hiatory of Germany;
Life and Writing* of Cnaaiua M. Clay;
McCartney'* United (Hates; or
The National Era for one year.
2. Any peraon sending ua 26 aubaoribera and $87.60, j
will receive?
Gibbon's Rome, 6 volume*, price $S j or
Hame'a England. A volume*, price $3
5. Any peraon sending ua 60 aubaeribers, and $76,
will receive?
Schiller's Work*, (German,) price $T;
Preecott's Ferdinand and Iaabella, price $7;
Prescott's Conquest of Mezleo, price $7; or
Josephua, (German or Engliah,) price $7.
4. Any peraon *ending n* 100 aubacribera and $160,
will receive?
Goothe'a Worka, (German,Vprice $14;
Shakspeare's Worka, London edition, 6 volumea,
bonnd in red morocco, price $14;
Pictorial Hiatory of England, 4 volumea, imperial,
price $14; or
Hildreth's Hiatory of the Unitad Statea, 6 volumea,
price $14.
6. Any peraon aending us 160 *ubacribera and $226,
will receive?
Life and Writing* of Washington, by 8parka, 12
volume* octavo, half calf, price $24.
Q7* The book* can be sent by Adam* A Co.'a Bz
preaa, or. il preferred, the price of the booka will be
transmitted in caah.
TERMS. ? .
One copy, one year" ? $2 I Five copiaa, one year $8
Three copies, one year 6 | Ten copies, one year 16
QT?" Persona who procure a club of three, five, or
ten aubacribera, at two dollara each, may remit to na
at the above rates, retaining the balance u a remu
neration for their trouble.
All eommunicationa must be poat paid, and ad
dressed U> BtJtLL A BLANCHARD,
Washington, D. C.
ATTKNTinm !
OOLDIKRH who served in the various wars, and
kl sailors, or their widows or heira, to whom ar
rears of pay, aztra pay, bounty land, penaiona, Ac.
may be due, may And it to their advantage to hart
their claims investigated. Address
A M. GANGRWRR,
Attorney and Agent, Washington, D. 0.
Bounty-land warrants bought and wld.
LIST OF MEMBERS OF_THE31D CONGRESS.
SENATE.
The Senate conning oi two Senators from each
Stat*. There are thirty-one State*, represented by
sixty two Senators.
Whigs, Italic; Democrats, in Roman. Those mark
ed P. ST, Free-Soilers or Abolitionists; U., those elect
ed as Union men; S. R , those elected as Southern
or State Rights men.
President - - David R. Atchison
Secretary - - Asbury Diokins.
Term expires. Term expires.
ALABAMA. MISSISSIPPI.
Bonj. Fitxpatrick- ? 185# Stephen Adams, (U.) 1867
C. 0. Clay 1869 Vacancy - 1869
ARKANSAS. MISSOURI.
R. W. Johnson* ? - 1865 David R. Atchison ? 1866.
Wm. K. Sebastian - 1859 Henry S. Geytf - - 1869
CONNECTICUT. NEW IIA MPS III K K.
Truman Smith - - 1855 Moses Norris, jr ? - 1855
Isaac Toucey - ? ? 1857 Jared W. Williams - 1869
CALIFORNIA. NEW YORK.
William M. Gwin ? 1855 Wn?. H. Seward - - 1856
John B. Weller - ? 1857 Hamilton Fish - ? 1857
DEUWAKK. NKW JERSEY.
James A. liajard ? 1857 J. R. Thompson ? ? 1857
JeJtu. M. Clayton - 1859 William Wright - - 1859
FLORIDA. NORTH CAROLINA.
Jackson Morton - 1855 George E. Badger - 1855
Stophen R. Mallory 1857 Vacancy 1859
GEORGIA. OHIO.
W. C. Da if son - - 1855 S. P.Chase (P. 8.) - 1865
Ro!>ert Toombs (U.) 1859 Benjamin F. Wade 1867
INDIANA. PENNSYLVANIA.
John Potit 1855 .Tame$ Cooper ... 1855
Jesse D. Bright - ? 1857 Rich'd Brodheod, jr. .1857
ILLINOIS. RHODE ISLAND.
James Shields - - - 1865 Charles T. James - 1857
Stephen A. Douglas 1859 Philip Allen ^ - - - 1869
IOWA. SOUTH CAROLINA.
Augustus C. Dodge - 1855 A. P. Butler (S. R.) - 1855
George W. Jones ? 1859 Josiah J. Evans ? - 1859
KENTUCKY. TENNESSEE.
Archibald Dixoii - - 1855 James C. Jones - - 1857
John B. Thompson 1859 John Bell 1869
LOUISIANA. TEXAS.
John Slidell - - - - 1855 Thomas J. Rusk ? - 1857
J. P. Benjamin - - 1859 Sam. Houston - - 1859
MAINE. VERMONT.
Hannibal Hamlin - 1857 Vacancy 1855
Vaoancy - - r - - - 1859 Solomon Foot - - - 1857
MASSACHUSETTS. V1RQINIA.
Chs. Sumner (P. S.) 1867 J. M. Mason (8. R.) 1857
Edward Everett - - 1859 R. M. T. Huntor " 1869
MARYLAND. WISCONSIN.
James A. Pearce - - 1855 Isaac P. Walker - - 1855
Thomas G. &att - 1857 Henry Dodge ... 1867
MICHIGAN.
Lewis Cass 1857
Chas. E. Stuart ? - - 1859
* By Governor's appointment. The Legislature
of Alabama will have two United States Senators to
elect during the coming session
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
The House consists of 'wo hundred and
thirty-four Members and five Territorial Dele
gate*, one new Territory having lately been
formed, ra: Washington. The Delegate*),
however, have no vote.
ALABAMA.
Democrats.?Philip Philips, Sampson W.
Harris, Wm. & Smith, George S. Houghton,
W. R. W. Cobb, James F. Dowdell.
? Whig.?James Aberorombie.
ARKANSAS.
Democrats.?A. B. Greonwood, E. A. War
ren.
CONNECTICUT.
Democrats.?JameH T. Pratt, Colin M. Ingcr
soll, Nathan Belcher, Origen S. Seymour.
CALIFORNIA.
Democrats.?J. A. MoDougall, Milton S. La
| tham.
DELAWARE.
Democrat.?George R. Riddle.
FLORIDA.
Democrat.?Augustus K. Maxwell.
GEORGIA.
Democrats.?James L. Seward, Alfred H.
Colquit, David J. Bailey, Wm. B. W Bent, E.
W. Chastain. Junius Hillyer.
Whigs.?David A. Reese, Alex. H. Stephen?.
IOWA.
Democrat?Bernhardt Henn.
Whig.?John P. Cook.
INDIANA.
Democrats.?Smith Miller, Wm. H. English,
Cyrus L. Dunham, James A. Lane, Thomas A.
Henrieks, John G. Davis, Daniel Maoe, Nor
man Eddy. E. M. Chamberlain. Andrew J.
Harlan.
Whig.?Samuel W. Parker.
ILLINOIS.
Democrats.?John Wentworth, W. A. Rich
ardson. James Allen, William H. Rinse)!, Wii
lis Allen.
Whigs.?E. B. Washburne, J. C. Norton,
James Knox, Richard Yates.
KENTUCKY.
Democrats.?Linn Boyd, James S. Chrisman,
J. M. Elliott, J. C. Breckenridge, R. H. Stan
ton.
Whigs.? Beni. E. Gray, Pronly Ewing,
Clement S. Hill, Wm. Preaton, Loan tier M.
Cox.
LOUISIANA.
Democrats?Wm. Dunbar, John Perkins, jr.
Whigs? Hunt, John B. Smith.
MASSACHUSETTS.
Democrat?Nathahiel P. Banks
Whigs ? Zeno Seudder, Samuel L. Crocker,
J. Wiley Edmunds, Samuel H. Walley. Wil
liam Appleton. Charles W. Upham, Tappan
Wentworth. Edward Dickinson, John Z. Good- ;
rich.
Independent Democrat.?Ale*. De Witt.
MICHIGAN.
Democrats.?David Stuart, David A. Noble,
Samuel Clark, Hestor L. Stephens.
MAINE.
Democrat* ? Moses McDonald, Samuel May
all. T. J D. Fuller.
Wkigs.?R Wilder Farley, Samuel P. Ben
son, Israel W ashburn, jr.
MIS8I8SIPPI
Democrats.?'Daniel B. Wright, Wm. S. Bar
Br, O R. Singleton, Wiley P. Mams, Wm.
arksdale.
MARYLAND.
Democrats.?Jaoob Shower. Joehua Vansant.
Henry May, Wm. T. Hamilton.
Whigs.?John R. Franklin, A. R. Sollers
MISSOURI.
Democrats ?Thomas H. Benton, Alfred W.
Lamb, John S. Phelps
Whigs.?John G. Lindloy, John O. Miller,
Mordeoai Oliver, Sam. Caruthers.
MINNESOTA.
/bmrnraf.*?-Henry M. Rioe.
NEW YORK
Democrats.?James Maurioe, Thomas W.
Cumming, Hiram Walbridge, Mike Walsh.
William M. Tweed, John Wheeler, William A.
Walker, Frannis B. Cutting, Jarrd V. Peek,
William Murray, T. R. Westhrook, Gilbert
Dean, Rufus W. Peokham, Charles Hughes,
Bishop Perkins, Peter Rowe, Daniel T. Jones,
Andrew Oliver. John J. Taylor, George Hast
ings. Reuben K. Fen ton.
JTAfg*.?Russel Sure, George A Simmons,
George W. Chase, O. 1. Mat tenon, Henry Ben
nett, Edwin B. Morgan, David Carpenter,
Thomas H. Flagler, Solomon G Haven.
Indefttvdeul Democrats.?Gerrit Smith, Ca
leb Lyon, Benj. Pringle.
NEW JERSEY.
Democrats?Nathan T. Stratton, Charles
Skelton. Samuel Lilly, George Vrail.
Whig?A. C. M Pennington.
NEW HAMPSHIRE.
Democrats.?Georgw W. Kittredge, George
W. Morrison, Harry Hibbard.
NORTH CAROLINA.
Democrati.?H. H. Shaw, Thonum Ruffin,
Wm. S. A*he, Burton S. Creig, Thomas L.
Clingmau.
Whie*?Sion H. Rognrs, John Kerr, Rich
ard C. Puryear.
NEW MEXICO.
Democrat.?Jose Manuel Gallego*
OHIO
Democrats? David T. Disney, Matthias H.
Niuholn, Alfred P. Edgertoo, Andrew Ellison,
Frederick W. Green, Thoisas L Ritcliie. Ed
son B. Olde, Wm. D. Lindwey,- Harvey H. John
son, Wilson Shannon, Goorge HIihh. Andrew
Stuart.
Whigs.?Juhn Scott Han-inon, Aaron Har
lan, Mown B. Cos win, Jojtn L. Taylor, W. R.
Sapp, Edward Ball.
Independent Democrats.?L. D. Campbell,
Edward Wade, J. R. Girling*.
oRKoOBf.
Democrat.?Joseph Line.
PENNSYLVANIA.
Dl mocrats?Thomas B. Florence, John Rub
ins, jr., Wm H Witte, John McN.iir, Samuel
A. Bridges, Henry A. Muhleaberg, Christian
W. Sti-auh, H. B. Wright, Ana Packer, Ga
lusha A Grow, James Gamble, Wm. H. Kurtz,
Augustus Drum, John L. Dawson, Michael C.
Trout, Carlton R. Curtis.
Whigs.?Joseph R. Chandler, William Ever
hart, Isaac E. Heister, Ner Middleswarth,
Samuel L. Runsol, John McCollooh, David
Ritchie, Thomas M. Howe, John Diok.
RHODE ISLANP.
Democrats.?Thomas Davis, Benjamin B.
ton.,
SOUTH CAROLINA.
ate Rights Democrats.?John McQueen,
W illiaiu Aiken, L. M. Kcitfc, F. S. Brooks, Jos.
L. Orr, W. W. Boyee.
TENNESSEE.
Democrats.?Brookins Campbell,* Wm. M.
Chnrchwell, Samuel A. Smith, Geo. W. Jones,
Frederick P. Scan ton.
Whigs.?William Cullora, Charles Ready,
R. M. Bugg, Felix K. Zollikoffer Emorson
Etheridge.
TEXAS.
Democrats.?Geo. Y. Smyth, Peler H. Bell.
UTAH.
Democrat.?John M. Bernhisel,
VIRGINIA. /
Democrats.?Thomas H. Bavly, J. M. Mill
son, John S. Caskie, William O. Goode, Thos
S. Bocook, Paulun Powell, William Smith,
Charles J. Faulkner, H. A. Edmondson, John
Letcher, Z. Kidwell, J. F. Snodgrase, Fayette
MoMullen.
VERMONT.
Whigs.?James Meaoham, Andrew Tracy,
Alvah Sabin.
WISCONSIN.
Democrats.?Daniel Wells, jr., B. C. East
man, John B. Macy.
ANTI-SLAVKBV WURKs PUU KALE AT THIS OP
PICK, BY LEWIS CLKI'MANK.
Life of Isaao T. Hopper?prio? #1.25, postage 21
ccnu. ?
Unci* Tom'a Cabin?price 37) oenta, postage 12 oenta;
Are copies for $2, pontage paid
Uncle Tom'a Cabin in German?price 50 oenti, post
age 16 eenta.
Key to Uncle Tom'a Cabin?prise 60 cent*, postage 1A
cents.
White Slavery in the Barbary States, by Hon Charles
Sumner?price 50 oenti, postage 12 eenta.
Giddinga a Speeches, one volume I2me?price $1, post
age 26 eenta.
Goodell'a American Slave Code?price 76 centi. post
age 18 cents.
Manuel Pereira?price in eloth 75 cents, postage 13
cents; in paper 60 cents, postage 10 cents.
Address LEWIS CLEPHANE,
National Era Office.
THE GREAT BRITISH QUARTERI.IBP
AND BLACKWOOD'S MAGAZINE.
Important Reductum in the Rates of Postage
Leonard scott a go., No. m Gold <*??<
N'tr York, continue to publish the following
British Periodicals, via:
The London Quarterly Review (Conservative.
The Edinburgh Review (Whig.)
The North British Review (Free Church.)
The Westminster Renew (Liberal.)
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine (Tory.)
These Reprints have now been in successiil opera
Uon in thia country for twenty year*, and their circa
latiou is constantly on the increase, notwithitandinf
the competition they encounter from American pert
odicals of a similar clasa, and of numerous ErUttir
and Magaaincs made up of aelections from foreign pe
riodicals. This fact shows clearly the high estimatiot
in which they are held by the intelligent roadinf
fiublio, and affords a guarantee that they are <vtak
ished on a Arm basis, and will be continued withoa
interruption.
Although theee works are distinguished by the po
litical shados above indicated, yet but a small portiot
of their content* is devoted to political subjects Ii
is their literary character which gives thorn their chie'
value, and in that they stand confessedly far abort
all other journals of their claaa. Hlarktcood, still an
der the masterly guidance of Christopher North, main
tains its ancient celebrity, and la at this time unusu
ally attractive, from the serial works of Bulwer and
other literary notables, written for that Magazine, anr
first appearing in its columns both in (treat Britait
and in the United States. Such works as " The Cax
ona" and " My New Novel,"' both by Bulwcr; " Mj
Peninsular Modal," "The Hreen lland," and other
serials, of which numerous rival editions are issued by
the leading publishers in this country, hare to be re
printed by those publishers from the pages of Black
wood, after it has hern ittwA hy Alestr*. SetXt <V Co.
so that subscribers to the Iteprint of that Magatint.
may always rely upon having the earliest reading n'
these fascinating tales.
TERMS. Arm
For any one of the three Review.' - $)
For any two I
For any three )
For all four of the Reviews h
For Blackwood's Magarine ? .*
For Blackwood and three Review* V
For Blackwood and the four Reviews - .If
For Farmer's Guide, complete, 22 numbers - 1
Cmissino ? A discount of 26 percent, from th?
above prices will be allowed to clubs ordering four
or more copies of any one or more of the above works
Thua four copies of Blackwood or one Review will j
be sent to one address fAr $9, four copies of the fou> ,
Reviews and Blackwood for fM, and so on.
POSTAGS
To any part of the United State* on Blackwood, %?
cents per annum , on either of the Reviews, 14 cents
Remittances and communications should he alway
addressed, post paid, to the publish era,
LEONARD SCOTT A CO., 7V Fulton ?t., N. Y.,
Kntranee, 64 Gold streat.
N. B.?L. 8. St Co. have recently aabtislMd, and hav?
now for sale, the Farmer'1? GvtHt, oy Hrary Stephens
of Edinburgh, and Professor Norton, of Yale Colloga
New Haven, complete in two volumes, royal octavo
containing 1.A00 pages, 14 steel and A00 wood engra
vings. Price, in uiuslin binding, ; in paper covers
for the mail. $6. Sep 29,^
tm?c Lirrt.it vimmiw.
A Monthly Journal for (hrU ant Hoy*
KDtTRP ?T WRACK OR KEN WOOD.
A PAPER, under tha above title, will be published
at Philadelphia on the Arst day of October next
In site and general character, thia publication will
resemble Mrs Margaret L. Bailey slately diacontinned
Friend of Ymitk, the place of which it is designed U
take.
IWmr?Pifty cents a year, for single conies; oi :
ten copies for four dollars. Payment invariably it |
advance.
All subscriptions and communications to be ad
dressed to L K LIPPINCOTT. Philadelphia.
CALENDAR FOE 1864.
(-V
?s i i 11 & i
a ? X U 2 ^ 3
a J2 s* u. rO u eg
t? S h P H (m t/j
Jan 1 2 3 4 5 ft 7
8 W 10 II 12 IS 14
15 1ft 17 18 19 20 21
22 2:} 24 25 2ft 27 28
' 20 30 31
Feb. ... I 2 i 4
5 ft 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 1ft 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
2? 27 28
Mar. ... 1234
5 6 7 8 0 10 11
12 13 14 15 1ft 17 18
It) 20 21 22 S3 24 25
2ft 27 28 20 30 31
Apr. - - .... I
2 3 4 5 ft 7 K
9 10 II 12 13 14 15
1ft 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30
May . 12 3 4 5ft
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 1ft 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 20 27
28 29 30 31
June - - - - 12 3
4 5 ft 7 '8 9 10
II 12 13 14 15 1ft 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 2V 30
tj.
^ ^ ?* "3 ? ?
y ?? " a *2 !?, -a
| 1 1 1 3 | I
! s ? * ? ? <3
July , 1
2 3 4 5 ft 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
l? 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 2ft 27 28 29
30 31
Aug. - - 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 Ift 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 21 25 2ft
27 28 29 30 31
Sept. 12
3 4 5 ft 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 1ft
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 2? 27 28 29 30
Oot. 1 2 3 4 5 ft 7
8 9 10 II 12 13 14
15 1ft 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 2ft 27 28
29 30 31
Nov. - - - 1 2 .1 4
5 ft 7 8 9 10 II
12 13 14 15 1ft 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
2ft 27 28 29 30
Deo. 12
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 II 12 13 14 15 1ft
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31
TIIK UltBAT AM Kit IRAN iK>lVHItA\CK TALE.
X R 8. BEN DARBY;
OB,
(THE WEAL ANI) WOE OP SOCIAL LIFE.
One Volume 12mo, Si,
THE object of this talo is to exhibit in different
phages, in high life and low life, tbo accursed
effects of intemperate drinking, tho bane of social
life, the curse of civilized man. The characters are
well and sharply drawn, and tho various sconce are
described with much spirit and graphic effect. * *
* We are disposed to rogard tho book as tho host
of its kind thut has yet appearod.?Huston Traveller.
It is not often that we read a story of any kind,
but wo have broken our practice, and have read this
book not only with pleasure, but with a gratification
which but very few novels havo ever afforded us. It
is a quiet and simple, but still striking and effoctive
picture of American social life.?Chicago Tribune.
Written with marked ability.?Zarmsville Courier
A thrilling picture of the effects of that infernal
bane of social life, intemporance.?Richmond Pal
ladium.
The style is attractive and fascinating ; thero is a
freshness and originality about it, that is vory pleas
ing. * * * One of its chief merits is tho excel
lence of its conversations.?Enquirer.
Has so many thrilling pas*nges and well-drawn
characters, that -ad it with absorbed attention.
It oannot fail to ve for Mrs. Collins an enviable
popularity. She -woa us with her to the drunkard's
homo, and tolls ol the hunger and the fear, tho toil
and the suffering, that are there. She paints, with
a woman's delicate skill, the meek pationoe, the
long-abased, but unchanging lot o of the drunkard's
wife, touches the deepest chords of the heart, and
makes them vibrate with pity and with indignation.
Christian Herald.
Though Mrs. Collins has already hosts of admi
rers ot her literary productions, this work, we pre
dict, will increase that number ten-fold, and give
her a reputation worthy of her high talents.? New
A/t~? TO-jSwre
The style is easy, natural, beautiful, chaste, and
at times very eloquent. We would commend it es
pecially to young ladies, that they may see to what
dangers they are exposed, in forming alliances with
thefashionable in high life.?Ohio Organ.
A deeply interesting and powerful work. It vivid
ly portrays some of the terrific exploits of strong
drink in both high and low life. Nor are such scenos
as it depicts either imaginary or few. Lot this hook
circulate. It has a beneficent aim, and is the vehicle
of admirably old and most salutary lessons.?Prtt
byterian.
* * * Has sketched it in its daintiest form of
fascination, as woll as in its gtim and dismal aspect
of open degradation. Raroly has a woman ventured
to hold the torch to such a dark reeesa of human
woe.?Dtitlif Time*.
We know of no passage, anywhere, more uniquely
beautiful, more intensely absorbing, more overpow
ering in the pathetic, than the thirty-fourth chapter.
It is indeed a gem. We doubt whether the celebra
ted chapter devoted to the death of Eva, io Uncle
Tom's Cabin, is superior. * * ? It is certainly
the most powerful temperance tale that we have ever
perused.?Journal ana Messenger.
Beautifully written * * * A work of great
strength and power.?Ooipel Herald.
mm* The incidents dramatic, and the inter
est intense to the end.?Ohio Stutoman.
Wields an easy pen, and sketches men auJ man
ners to the life.? Presbyterian Herald.
Graphic, truthful, chaste, and deeply affecting, the
story winds itself into our footings, and we become
absorbed in the plot, as if we beheld before our own
?yes the realities of the author's delineations.? Out*
ly Sun.
RECENTLY PUBLISHED:
POETRY OF THE VEGETABLE WORLD; A
Popular Exposition of the Science of Botany, in
its Relations to Man. By M. J. Schluiden, M D .
Professor of Botany in the University of Jena.
First American, from the London edition of Hen
flrey. Edited by Alphonso Wood, M. A. lyithor of
the " Class-Book of Botany." One vol. 12mo. II
lustrated. Second edition. $1.25.
It is as interesting as the most Attractive romance,
as heautiftil as naturo, and as pleasing as the finest
poem.? Boston Atlas.
LIFE OF THOMAS CHALMERS, D D., LL. D By
Rev. James C. Moffat, D. D., Professor of Latin
and Lecturer on History in New Jersey College,
Princeton. One vol. 12mo; pp 435, With a fine
Portrait on steel. Third edition $1.36.
As an orator, a philosopher, a professor, a philan
thropist. a successful parish minister, and a learned
divine, Dr. Chalmers stood foremost, not only among
the great men of Scotland, but of Christendom.?
Commercial
THE THREE GREAT TEMPTATIONS OF
YOUNU MEN. With several Loctures addressed
to Business nnd Professional Men. By Samuel W.
Fisher. D. D. One vol. l2mo; pp. 336. Third
thousand. $1.
We shall put the book by upon one of the choice
shelves of our private library.? Boston Congrega
ttonaJtst.
HART'S VALLEY OF THE MISSISSIPPI. One
vol l2mo; cloth; 88 cents.
A Succinct compilation, from authentic documents,
of foots in the history of the Mississippi Taller to the
latest dates The work hears tho marks of industry
and discrimination.? N. V. Tnbnnr.
SCENES AND LEGENDS OF THE NORTH OF
SCOTLAND. By Hugh Miller, author of " Foot
prints of the Creator, Ac . Ac. Fourth thousand.
One vol. 12mo; pp. 436. $1.
Home stories and legends in their native costume
and in full life - The Imiefmndent.
THE COURSE OF CREATION. By John Ander
son, D D. With a Glossary of Scientific Terms,
Added to the American edition. With numerous
Illustrations. A popular work on Geology. Third
thousand. One vol. 12mo; pp. 384. $L2ft.
A tioatise of sterling merit? N. T. Tnhtim
The simplest, most lucid, and satisfactory exposi
tion of geological phenomena we have had the good
fortune to meet wi tb.?Philesdtlphiei Chrome I*.
JUST READY:
KARLY RNGAGKMKNTS. By Mary Frtwr. One
neat vol. 12mo.
THI LIFE OF BLKNNKRHA88KTT Comprint*
an authentic Narrative of the colobmted K*p*di
tion of Aaron Burr, and containing n?*nj addi
tional fa<-t* not heretofore published. By William
H. ttafford One vol. 12tno; cloth.
MOORK, ANDERSON, A CO ,
Pnhliahere, Cincinnati
For *ale hy Bookftclleni in Philadelphia. New
York, and Boaton. and throughout the country.
Dec. 16?3t?ow
pHiMpsmm roR ism.
THE SATURDAyTcVENING POST.
UNRIVALLED ARRAY OF TALKNT.
THE Proprietor* of tl?e POST, in again coming be
fore the public, would return thanks for the grn
eorua patronage which hna place*I tbein far in ad
vance of every other literary weekly in America; and
a* the only suitable return for sue 11 free and heart y
support, their arrangements for 1851 have been made
witli a degree of liberality probably unequalled in
the history of American newspaper literature. They
have engaged, u? contributor* lor the ensuing year,
the following brilliant array of talent aud genius:
Mrs. SotUkwnrth, Emersum Hennelt, Mrs. I)eni
son, Grace Grtenwootl, and Fanny Fern.
In the Brut, paper of January next, we design com
mencing an Original Novelet, written expressly for
our columns, entitled
THE BRIDE OF THE WILDERNESS,
By EMERSON BENNETT, author of "Viola,"
"Clara Maryland," "The Forged Will," etc.
This Novelet, by the popular author of "Clara
Moroland," we design following by another, called
the * ry votvk .
I By Mn. MARY A. i *ji >N, aali ? i ?? t'w
! turns," " Gertrude Ruwioll," etc.
We have also the promise of a number of
SKETCHES BV GRACE GREENWOOD,
Whose brilliant nnd versatile pen will be almost ex
clusivoly employed upon the Post and her own " Lit
tie Pilgrim."
Mrs. Southworth- whose fascinating worlin are now
being rapidly republished in England ? also, will
maintain her old and pleasant connection with the
Post. The next story from her gifted pen will be en
titled
Miriam, The Avenger; or, The Fatal Vow.
By EMMA D. E. N. SOUTHWORTH, author of '? The
Curse of Clifton," " The Lost Heiress, ' " The insert
ed Wife," etc.
And last?not least?we are authorised to announce
a series rf articles from one who has rapidly risen
very high in popular favor. They will be entitled
A NEW SERIES OF SKETCHES,
By FANNY FERN, author of" Forn Leaves," etc.
We expect to ho able to commence the Sketches t.y
Fanny Fern, as well as the series by Uraoe Green
wood, in the early numbers of the coming year.
Engravings, Foreign Correspondence, Agricultural
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TERMS.?The terms of the Post are two dollars
per annum, payahlo in advance.
Four copies, $5 per annum.
Eight copies, and one to the gettrr-up of the olub,
$10 |>er annum.
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The money for clubs, always, must be sent in ad
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advertisement or notice Dec. 1?eoSt
JANtUKV NHftlBfr.R JUST PUBLISHKD.
THE ONLY LADY'S BOOK IN AMERICA
80 pronounced by the entire PreM of tha\j State*
fill DRY'S UDtTbMK POK 18S4.
Twenty-fourth Year.
ONE HUNDRED PAGES of reading each month,
by the be*t American author*.
A NEW AND THRILLING STORY,
certainly the most intensely interesting one ever
written, entitled
THE TRIALS OF A NEEDLEWOMAN.
BV. T. ?. ARTHUR,
wilt be commenced in the January number.
THE ONLY COLORED FASHIONS
upon which any reliance can be placed, received di
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direction*.
DRESS MAKING. ? Our monthly deaariplion of
Dreas Making, with plane to cut by. None but the
lAt?*t fashions are given. The direction* are ao
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EMBROIDERY. ? An infinite variety in av^ri
number.
DRESS PATTERNS. ? Infant* and children#
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kind* of CROCHET and NETTING work. New
pattern* for CLOAKS, M ANTKLETS, TALMAS.
COLLARS. CHEMISETTES, I'NDERSLKEVES
with full direction*. Every new pattern, of any por
tion of a lady'* dree*, appear* first in the Ladv >
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fiodey'f Ini<aluahlf ReceiptJ upon every Subject.
! Indispensable to every family, worth more than the
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MUSIC.?Three dollar* %orth I* given every year.
DRA WTNO - Thi* art can be taught to any child,
by a series of drawing* in every number for 1854.
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! SPLENDID STEEL LINE AND MEZZO
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in every number. They are alway* to be found in
i Godey.
GODEY'S LADY'S BOOK contain* preci*ely that
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The /Wy'< li?*i i* a periodical literary treasure
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L A. GODEY,
No. 113 Chestnut street, Philadelphia.
Specimen* *ent if de*ired. Dee 22
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Either ol tho above will pay very large profit*.
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FANNY FRRN'M NEW BOOK FOR THK HOLY
sm
20,000 ordered in Advance of Publication.
Will be ready Monday, Dec MU.
Little ferns for fassy s littli
FRIENDS. By the author of " Fern Leave*."
Ono elegant ltfuio; 3lMt pages, Mix Illustrations.
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PIIBI.KHKHS' ANWOVnCKKKNT!
ELEVENTH VOLUME OF
j'THE AMERICAN AGRICULTURIST,
THK LEADING
! Weekly Agricultural Paper of the Country.
THE AMERICAN AGRICULTURIST, a weekly
i Periodical of sixteen large quarto pages, making
' an anuual volumo of 8.12 pages of nearly double the
i site of thoso in the first ten volumes of tho Agricul
I turist.
It i>; beautifully printed with type cant expressly
f?, Mt?i on the bent of clear white paper, with wide
j margin, so that the numbers can bo easily stitched
or bound together.
A copious Index is weekly added, which will ha
fully amplified at the end of the year, for the bound
work.
Comprehensive in its Character,
Each volume will contain All mailer worth record
ing, which transpires either at hoiue or abroad, and
which can nerve to instruct or interest the Farmer,
tho Planter, the Fruit-Grower, the Oardoner, and
the Stock Breeder i than malting it the moot com
plete and useful Agricultural Publication of the day.
Correct and valuable Market Reports.
The Markets will be carefully reported, giving the
I actual transactions which take place from week to
woek, in Grain, Provisions, Cattle, Ac., thus keep
ing our readers constantly and reliably advised as to
their interosts. During the past year, the knowledge
obtained from theso Market Report* alouo has saved
our readers thousands of dollarti, by informing them
of the host time to sell or purchase.
Suck a Paper is demanded by the Farming
Community.
The publishers confidently believe that the agri
culturists of this country are becoming too much
awake to the demands of their own calling to be
longer satisfied jwith the slow monthly issues of a pa
per professedly do voted to their interests, or to trust
alone to the irresponsible extracts in a " farmer's
column," so popular just now iu papers chiefly devo
ted to business, politics, or literature; and they look
for tho unitod support of all the intelligent farmers
of this country in their continued effort to furnish a
weekly papor of a high and reliable character, which
shall he progressive, and at the same time cautious
; and conservative in all its teachings. ?
Essentially an Agricultural Paper.
The AsrrrnUturist will not depart from its legiti
' mate sphere to catch popular favor by lumbering up
its |>agt's, with the silly, fictitious literature, and
light, miscellaneous matter of the day ; it has a high
er aiin; and a small part only of its space will be
devoted to matters not iraraodiatelv pertaining tot he
great business of Agriculture. The household us
well as the out-door work of the farm will rcoeive a
due share of attention. The humbugs and nostrums
afloat in the community will bo tried hy reliable sci
entific rules, and their wnrthlessnoss ox posed. It if
, the aim of the publishers to keep this paper under
the guidanoe of those who will make it a standard
work, which shall communicate to its readers only
that which is safe and reliable.
An Independent Journal.
The American A grim.lt urist stands upon its own
| merits; nnd the truthfulness, seal, and ability,
which it brings to the support of the interests of the
farmer. It is untramiueled by any collateral buri
' i ?t-rrui vg.'i^vrr nor i? U the organ of ?nv
clique, or the puffing machine uf any man or tntng.
Thoroughly independent in all points, its ample pa
got are studiously givrn alone to the support and im
provement of the great agricultural class.
Editorial Department.
The Amrriran AgrimitmriM Is under the editorial
supervision of Mr. A B. Allen, its principal editor
for the past ten years, and Mr Orango Judd, A. M ,
a thoroughly practical farmrr and agricultural
chemist.
They will lie assisted by Prof Na?h. who has been
for a long time one of the most successful farmers of
New England, and is now Agricultural Professor of
Amherst College; Rev. Wtn Ctitt, widely known as a
pleasing and instructive writer on gardening and
other departments of practical agriculture, and, ia
addition to these, a number of other eminent agri
cultural writers.
All the editors are men practically exnerieneed in
their profession, each of whom can handle the Plow
as well as the Pen.
The Cheapest Paper in the country, of its cknr~
acter
The American Agriculturist is supplied to regular
subscribers at a cost of less than four cents a number,
of sixteon large pages; and to large clubs for I'l
than two and a half cents. Each nmutier will eontnin
suggestions for the treatment of soils, wsnues, crop*,
stock, Ac , which will often be worth to the road or
more than the co?t of the paper for a jea?.
Specimen Copifi
Specimen copie* will be forwarded, gratis, to any
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Trrma, Ac.?The paper will La promptly iiwnej on
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To aingle subscribers, at $2 a yenr -fl
To nlulii of three subscribers, at $1 t(7 a year? $5.
To club* of Ave subscriber*. at $1 Att a year?$H.
To cluha of ten ?ub*?rib*r?, at (I I/O ii vear?915.
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?25
j The money always to accompany the oatne* for
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The Postmaster ?r other person sondinir * club of
toil will be entitled to ?????- extra copy (gratis.
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and alao a copy of tbe National Miigaxine, Scieiitilij
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Subscriptions may be forwarded by mail, at the
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and all in?tters reli.tinjf to the business dupanincnt,
ahould bo addressed to the publishers,
ALLEN A CO.
I)ec 22 1M> Watrr struct, New York
whii km.w kit * i\ rnr barrari aii > i *
BY IION. CU AR.LKS 8CMN ER With 40 iq.leD.Ud
illuatration* by Billing*, engraved by Baker A
.Smith It make* a beautiful IA>n? ?oluiue of about
140 pftjrex. bound in cloth thin hoard*, printed in th*
moat elegant style, on the beat paper
THE AKUl MENT.
Introduction Territory of the Rnrh*r> Mate* Tba
Subject and Source* of Information
I. Origin of 8f?t*v9. Slavery in Ike tixrnarv Stai, a.
II. Htttorif of Whiti X/tivrtii if Rurhtrty, Knrly
Effort* acainn it ?by Ferdinand th?- Catholic, by
Charles V, by England by France, by Holland,' Free
dnm by &*4rw</rfM"< . Freedom by I m< ifttrn 1, ; Frea
I dom by En*/* Whit.' American Victim* to ])ari>a
ry; Parallel between Whit* and Alack Slavery; Tri
ninphant Abolition of Whit* Slavery
III. Trvt Ch'irartfr t>f Whih S.'mvrt/ in H<nhi/i y.
Apologies for White ,v'lat t?ry ; Happy Condition of the
?rhite Slave*, Better off in Barbary than at llome;
Better off than the Fr?e Christian* in Barbary; Nev
ertheless, Unquestionable Enormity of Whit? Slavery
in Barbarv Conclusion Price 5A cut,; postage 1Jctt
For tale by LEWIS CLKPH AN*
March XL office National Wm
THK HlVKRMAI ?I.AVI II THMihl
Alii rktt nn.
rTS I>i*tinetive Fcatnres shown by it* Statute*. Jn
dicial Decision*, and Illustrative Fact* By Wtl
liam Ooodell, author of the " "Democracy of t hruttian
ity," " Slavery and Ami Slavery," Ac Th* work
contain* ASA page* 12mo, neatly bound in cloth. Prica
75.cent* per copy, postage IRccnt* For saH by
June 3A L CLEPII AN* OWne Nat ttr*
The following i* an extract of ? letter from Ho?
William Jay to the author
"Tonr analyst* of the aiav* law* i* iery able, and
;'your exhibition of their practical .tppli' Mion by th?
Southern court* evinoe* great an<l oarclnl research.
Your book i* an itnpregtinblc a^riinrt the < harge of
nxaggeratlori a* Enolld'* fteome.try. *ince. like thut,
it connirt* of proposition* r.nd dcmonfttrnflr^oe. Th#
book i> not only true, bat it i* true."

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