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Daily national era. (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1854, January 23, 1854, Image 1

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The Daily National Bra if published every even
ing, and contains the ruports of the proceedings of
Congress up to three o'clock.
The Office of Publication if on Seventh street, be
tween 1) and E.
Daily paper, for term of eight months - ? - $5.00
Rates of Advertising in Daily.
, One square, (ten lines,) one insertion - - - $0.M)
l>o. do. throe insertions - - 1.0?
Do. do. one week . . - - 1.6?
Do. do. two weeks ... - 2.50
Do. do. ono month .... 4.00
Do, do. two months - ? W
Do, do. tbreo months ? - - 8.00
A liberal discount for long advertisements, and to
those who advertise for a longer time.
WASHINGTON, 1). C.
PROSPECTUS OF THE DAILY NATIONAL ERA.
I shall issue, on the 2d day of January en
suing, the Daily National Era, a Political
and Literary Newspaper.
In Politics, it will advocate the Rights of
Man, and the Equality of Rights, and oppose
whatever violates or tends to violate them,
whether this be Involuntary Personal Servi
tude, Civil Despotism, Spiritual Absolutism,
Class Legislation, the Selfishness of Capital,
the Tyranny of Combination, the Oppression of
a Majority, or the Exactions of a Party.
It will hold no fellowship with the Whig
and Democratic organizations, believing that
the main issues on which they have been ar
rayed against each other are obsolete or settled,
and that they are now chiefly used by the Sec
tional Interest ol Slavery, to impair the love of
Liberty natural to the American mind, and to
subjugate the American People to its rule. Dis
claiming all connection with them, it will yet
sympathize with those of their adherents who
are honestly seeking through them to advance
the substantial interests of the country, although
it must believe that they have not chosen the
better way.
It will be a supporter of the Independent
Democracy, which holds that the Truths of the '
Declaration of Independence are practical; thai
in their light the Constitution of the United
States'is to be interpreted; that to them the laws
and institutions and usages of the country |
should be conformed?a Party, whose motto
is, Union, not for the sake of Union, but for the
sake of Freedom and Progress ; and Law, not
for the sake of Law. but lor tfie Protection of
Human Rights and Interests?the only sure
foundation of order and concord.
In no sense will it be the organ of a Party, or
a mere Party Paper, but absolutely " free and
independent," claiming to speak by " authori
ty" for nobody except its editor, and recognis
ing no authority in any quarter to prescribe its
course and policy.
In Literature, it will aim to unite the Beau
tiful with the True, and to make both immedi
ately subservient to the practical purposes of
every-day life. ?
Able correspondents, at home and abroad,
have been securedLand ample provision has
been made for its Literary Miscellany.
It will publish condensed reports of the pro
ceedings of Congress, explain movements in
that body, the causes of which do not always
lie upon the surface, and from ita position be
able to keep a constant watch upon the action
of the Federal Government in relation to all
questions at issue between Liberty and Slavery.
The extensive subscription of the Weekly
Era, which, during the year about tq close, has
reached the number of twenty-eight thousand,
must make it an eligible medium for advertisers.
The Daily Era will be issued on a sheet as
large as that of the Daily National Intelligencer,
on the 2d day of January, 1854, and daily there
after, until the 1st of September, 1854, (or long
er, should Congress continue in session,) at
rive dollars for TfMT period; and should
the result then warrant, the publication will be
resumed on the 1st of December following, fry
the year.
As but sixteen days intervene between this
and the 2d of January, it is important that
subscriptions be forwarded at once.
Payment in ailtmnc* trill be invariably re
quired Q. BAILEY.
Ifashin^tun, December 15, 1853.
PROSPECT OB OF THE EIGHTH VOLUME OF THE
NATIONAL ERA.
O. BAILEY, KDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.
JOHN O. WHfTTIER, CORRESPONDING EDITOR.
WASHINGTON, D. C.
The National Era in a weekly newspaper,
devoted to Literature and Politics.
In Literature, it nims to unite the Beautiful
with the True, and to make both immediately
subservient to the practical purpoeos of every
day life.
In Politic?, it advocates the Righto of Man,
and th* Kquality of Righto, and oppose* what
ever violates or tends to violate them, whether
thin he Involuntary Personal Servitude, Civil
Despotism, Spiritual Absolutism, Clam Legis
lation, tho Selfishness of Capital, the Tyranny
of Combination, tho Oppression of a Majority,
or the Kxactiona of Party.
It holds no fellowship with the Whig and
Democratic organizations, believing- that the
main issues on which they have been arrayed
again?t oach other are obsolete or settled, and
that they are now ohicfly used by the Seotional
Interest of Slavery, to impair tho love of Lib
erty natural to the American mind, and to
subjugate the American People to ito rule. Dis
claiming all connection with them, ift yet sym
pathise* with those of their adherents who are
honestly seeking through them to advanoo the
substantial interests of the country, although
it must believe that they have not chosen the
better way.
It b a supporter of the Independent Democ
racy, which hold* that the Truths of the Dec
laration of Independence are practical, that in
light the Constitution of the United
is to be interpreted, that to them tho
,?.d in JMMIHM and inagw r>f tho oonn
Ivy should he conformed?a Party, whose
volte 1% V?ion, ant for the sake of Union,
hut f>?r the sake of Freedom and Progress;
end Lam nr4 for the sake of Law, but for the
Prstealtea af Human Righto and Interests?
ite untjr sore foundation of order and oonoord.
In na mm Is it the organ of a or a
Party Paper hut absolutely " free and
? laiming to speak <( by author
ny** to mdmdv e?eept Ito editor, and reoogni
aagna authority ia aay quarter to prescribe ito
Tfca Rigbth V?4ame of the Rra will oom
> an Ike irsl of January ensuing, and be
i by the addition of four oolnaina. Wo
that could promise to
?mfce M an agreeable companion for the House
lmtt, and aa anient co-adjutor to the enKght
It baa secured able oorrespond
and abroad, and do journal in
the Kru aa it respects
i la ite Literary Department.
reports of the
af Coagri m, explains movements
i of wbieh do not always
and from ite position is
samhted ia leaf a w stent watch upon the an
tten af Hm Federal Government in relation
DAILY NATIONAL ERA.
G. BAILEY, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.
VOL. I. WASHINGTON, D. C.. MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 1854. NO. 19.
to all questions at iauue between Liberty and
Slavery.
The only journal at the seat of the Federal
Government., representing the Anti-Slavery
Sentiment of the Republic, while the Pro-Sla
very Sentiment iu reprobented here by four
daily papers, nearly all of them being liberally
sustained by Governmental patronage, it asks
the support of all who believe, in sincerity, that
the Union waB formed to seoure the blessings
of Liberty, and not to perpetuate the ourse of
Slavery.
Payment in advanco is invariably required.
To prevent annoyance and loss to ourselves
and readers, to presorve their file* unbroken,
and to enable us to know how large an edi
tion of the paper to issue, all subscription!;
should be >enewod before they expire. We
have no orodit-suhsoribors on our books.
TERMS.
Single oopy 82
Three copies ... 5
Five copies - 8
Ton copios - - - 15
Single copy six months - 1
Ton copies six months - 8
Those are the terms for both old and new
j subscribers, forwarding their own subscriptions.
I AGENTS.
Agents are cntitlod to fifty cents on each new
yearly subsoribor, and twenty-five cents on
each reneioed subscriber?except in the case of
clubs.
A club of three subscribers, one of whom
may be an old one, at 85, will entitle tho per
son making it up to a copy of the Era for three
months; a club of five, two of whom may bo
old ones, at $8, to a oopy for six months; a
club of ten, five of whom may be old ones, at
$15, to a oopy for one year.
When a club of subscribers has been for
warded, additions may be made to it, on tho
same terms.
Money to be forwarded by mail at our risk.
Large amounts may be remitted in drafts or
| certificates of deposite. When money is sent,
i notes on the Banks of Boston, New York, Phil
adelphia, or Baltimore, are preferred. New
England notes are at less discount than New
York State notes, and these less than Western
notes. G. Bailiy.
P. S. Newspapers friendly to our enterprise
will please notice or publish our Prospeotus, as
they may see proper.
PROSPECTUS OF FACTS FOR THE PEOPLE.
Tho " Facts for the Pkopi.b " ia a monthly, de
signed for preservation as a document for reference,
or for general circulation, as a Free Democratic Mis
sionary, especially among those not yet ikuiiliar with
the Anti Slavery movement. It will be composed
chiefly of article* from the Nuiwnat Era, adapted
particularly to the purpose named.
Each number will contain eight pages, and be print
ed on good paper, of the site of the Congressional
Glob*, in quarto form, suitable for binding.
It will be tarnished at the following rates, by the
year, twelve numbers constituting a volume :
Six copies to one address - - ? - $1
Twenty copies to one address - - - S
One hundred eopies to one address -12
Any person or club may in this way, by raising
$13, supply Anti-Slavery reading every month, for a
whole year, to one hundred readers. Siuglf subscrl- j
bers will not be received. Send for a club, and order
it to one address. The postage is a trifle?only half
a cent a number, six cents a year, paid in advance at
the offlce where the paper is received, fry All pay
ments must be in advance. Q. BAILEY.
P. S. Editors of newspa|>ers favorable to the fore
going will entitle themselves to six copies of the
monthly, by publishing the Pros)iectns, and directing
attention to it.
PREMIUM OP TWENTY-POUR DOLLARS.
DKK NATIONAL DEMOKRAT
This newspaper hw now bsen in existence only
four month*, nnd haa already quite a considerable
circulation. We have spared no co*t to make it, aa
Ui fi*e, typography, and paper, the flrat German pa
per in the country. Aa to it* literary merit*, we have
received luhmiwliaJ proofa of approval, from Maine
to Tcxaa. We have no agent* for whoae acta we are
reaponaihle, but any peraon can act aa a voluntary
agent, and he will find that our terma are aufficiently
liberal to reward hia trouble.
We now offer the following additional inducement*:
1. Any peraon aending ua 10 anhsoribera and $15,
will receive aa a premium any one of the following
work*.
Kohlrauachi'a Hiatory of Germany;
Life and Writlnga of Caaaiua M. Clay;
McCartney'a United States, or
The National Era for one year.
2. Any person aending ua 25 aubacribera and $-17.50,
will receiva?
Gibbon's Rome, A volume*, price $3 ; or
Iluine'a Rngland. A volume*, price $.1.
S. Any peraon aending ua 59 aubecribara, and $75,
will receive?
Schiller> Works, (German,) price $7;
Preacott'a Ferdinand and Iaabella, prie* $7;
Preacott'a Conquest of Mexico, price $7; or
Joaephu*, (German or English,) price $7.
4. Any peraon aending ua 100 aubacribera and $150,
will receive?
Goethe's Worka, (German,) price $14;
Shakspeare's Worka, London edition, 6 volume*,
bound in red morocco, price $14 ;
Pictorial Hiatory of Rngland, 4 volumes, imperial,
price $14; or
Hildreth's Hiatory of the United States, A volumoa,
prico $14.
5. Any peraon aending ua 150 aubacribera and $225,
will receive?
Life and Writinga of Washington, by Sparks, 12
volumoa ootavo, half calf, price $24.
(17" The books can be *ent by Adams A Co 'a Rx
preaa, or, il preferred, the price of the books will be
transmitted 4n caah.
TKRMS.
One copy, one year ? $2 I Five copies, one year $8
Three copies, one year 5 | Ten copies, one year 15
CE7" Persona who procure a olub of three, five, or
ten aubacribera, at two dollara each, may remit to ua
at the above rates, retaining the balance as a remu
neration for their trouble.
All communications must be poet paid, and ad
dressed to BUKLL A BLANCHARD,
Washington, D. C.
ATTKimON t
SOLDIERS who served in the various wart, aad '
sailors, or their widow* or hairs, to whom ar
rears of nay, aitra pay, bountv land, pensions, Ao., I
may be due, may find it to their advantage to kavt
their claisa* investigated. Address
A. M. GANGRWRR,
Attorney and Agent, Washington, D. 0.
Bounty land warrant* bought and sold
LI8T OF MEMBERSOPTHEJID CONGRESS.
SENATE.
The Senate eonsists ot two Senators from each
Stato. There are thirty-one Status, represented by
sixty-two Senators.
Whig*, Tta/ir: Democrat*, in Koman. Those mark*
ed F. S., Pree-Soilers or Abolitionist*; U., thoHOelect
ed as Union uieu; S. R., those eleoted ns Southern
or State Rights men.
President - . David R. Atchison
Secretary - . Anbury Dickins.
Term expires. . Term expire*.
ALABAMA. MISSISSIPPI.
Benj. Pitipatrick- - 185? Stopheu Adams, (U.) 1857
0. C. Clay 1869 Vacancy 1859
ARKANSAS. MISSOURI.
R.W.Johnson# - - 1856 David R. Atchison - 1855
Win. K. Sebastian - 1858 Henry S. Geyer - - 1859
CONNECTICUT. NEW HAMPSHIRE.
Truman Smith ? - 1855 Moses Norris.jr - - 1855
Isaac Toucey ? ? - 1857 Jared W. Williams- 1859
CALIFORNIA. NEW YORK.
William M. Gwin - 1855 Wm. H. Seward - - 1855
John B Wolior - - 1857 Hamilton Fish - - 1857
DELAWARE. NKW JERSEY.
James A. Bayard - 1857 J. R. Thompson - - 1857
John. M. Clayton - 1859 William Wright - - 1859
_ , FLORIDA. NORTH CAROLINA.
Jackson Morton - - 1855 George E. Badger - 1855
Stephon R. Mallory 1857 Vacanoy 1859
GEORGIA. OHIO.
W. C. Dawson - - 1855 S. P. Chase (P.S.) - 1855
Robert Toombs (U.) 1859 Benjamin F. Wade. 1857
r . ? ,ND1ANA- PENNSYLVANIA*
John Petit 1855 James Coojur - - - 1855
Jesse D. Bright - - 1857 Rich'd Brodhead, jr. 1857
ILLINOIS. RHODE ISLAND.
James Shields - - - 1855 Charles T. James - 1857
Stephen A. Douglas 1859 Philip Allen .... 1859
IOWA. SOUTH CAROLINA.
Augustus C. Dodge - 1855 A. P. Butler (S. R.) - 1855
Georgo W. Jones - 1859 Josiah J. Evans - - 1859
KENTUCKY. TENNESSEE.
Archibald Dixon- . 1855 James C. Jones - - 1857
John B. Thompson 1859 John Bell 1859
LOUISIANA. TEXAS*.
John Slidell .... 1855 Thomas J. Rusk - - 1857
J. P. Benjamin - - 1859 Sam. Houston - - 1859
MAINE. . VERMONT.
Hannibal Hamlin - 1857 Vacancy 1855
Vacancy 1859 Solomon Foot - - - 1857
MASSACHUSETTS. VIRGINIA.
Chs. Sumner (F. S.) 1857 J. M. Maaon (S. R.) 1857
Edward Everett - - 1859 R. M. T. Hunter " 1859
MARYLAND. WISCONSIN.
James A. Pearce - - 1855 Isaac P. Walker - - 1855
Thomas G. Pratt - 1857 Henry Dodgo - - - 1857
MICHIGAN.
Lewis Cass 1857
Chas. E. Stuart ? - ? 1859
* By Governor's appointment. The Legislature
of Alabama will have two United States Senators to
elect during the coming session
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
Tho House consist.! of two hundred and
thirty-four Members and five Territorial Dele
tfiite*, one new Territory haviug lately been
formed. vi?: Washington. The Delegates,
however, have no vote.
ALABAMA.
Democrats.?Philip Philips, Sampson W.
Harris, Wm. R. Smith, George S Houghton,
W. R W. Cobb, James F. Dowdell.
Whig.?James Abererombie.
ARKANSAS.
Democrats.?A. B. Greenwood, E. A. W?t
ren.
CONNECTICUT.
Democrats.?James T. Pratt, Colin M. Inger
soll, Nathan Keloher, Origen S. Seymour.
CALIFORNIA.
Democrats.?J. A. MoDougall, Milton S. La
I tham.
DELAWARE.
Democrat.?Georgo R. Riddle.
FLORIDA.
Democrat.?Augustus K. Maxwell.
GEORGIA.
Democrats.?James L. Seward, Alfred H.
Colquit, David J. Bailey, Wm. B. W. Bent, E.
W. Chastain. Junius Hiliyer.
Whig*.?David A. Reese, Alex. H. Stephens
IOWA.
DemiKrat ?Bernhardt Henn.
Wkig.?John P. Cook.
INDIANA.
Democrats?Smith Miller, Wm. H. English,
Cyrus L. Dunham, James A. Line, Thomas A.
Henrioks, John G. Davis, Daniel Mace, Nor
man Eddy, E. M. Chamberlain, Andrew J.
Harlan. ? j
Whig.?Samuel VV. Parker.
ILLINOIS.
Democrats.?John Wentworth, W. A. Rich- 1
ard-on, James Allen, William H. Bus, II, Wi|.
lie Allen.
Whigs.?E. B. WasWrtirne, J. C. Norton,
James Knox, Richard Yatns.
KENTUCKY.
Democrats.?Linn Boyd, James S. Chrisman,
J. M. Elliott, J. C. Breckenridgn, K. H. Stan
ton
Whig$.? Bcnj. E. Gray, I'rewly Ewing.
Clement S. Hill, Wm. Preston, Leander M.
I'OX.
LOUISIANA.
DemocriU*?Win. Dunbar, John Perk inf. jr.
IVktgs. Hunt, John B. Smith.
MASSACHUSETTS.
Ik mm rat ?Nathahiel P. Bank*.
fVktgs.?Zeno Sctidder, Samuel L. Crocker,
J. Wiley Edmunds, Samuel H. Walley, Wil
liam Apple ton. Charles W. Upham, Tappan
Wentworth. Kdward Dickinson, John Z. Good
rich.
Independent Democrat.?Ale*. De Witt.
MICHIGAN.
Democrat*?David Stuart, David A. Noble,
Samuel Clark, Hector L Stephens
MAINE.
Democrats?Moses Mo Don ald5 Samuel May
all. T. J D. Fuller.
Wkig*.?R. Wilder Farley, Samuel P. Ben
son, Israel Washburn, jr.
MISSI8SIPPI
Democrat*.? Daniel B. Wright, Wm. 8. Bar
ry, O R Singleton, Wiley P. Harris, Wm.
Rarksdale.?
MARYLAND.
Democrats.?Jacob Shower, Joshua Variant,
Henry May. Wm. T. Hamilton.
Whig*.?John R. Franklin, A. R. Sellers
MISSOURI.
Democrat*.?Thomas H. Benton, Alfred W.
Lamb, John S. Phelps.
Whig*.?John O. Lindley, John O Miller,
Mordecai Oliver, Sam. Caruthers.
MINNESOTA.
Democrat.?Henry M. Rioe.
NKMfc YORK
Democrat*?Jam??s Maurioc, Thomas W.
Cumming, Hiram Walhridge, Mike Walsh,
William M. Tweed, John Wheeler, William A.
Walker, Francie R. Cutting, Jared V. Peck,
William Murray. T. R. Westbrook, Gilbert
Dean, Rnfns W. Peckham, Charles Hughes,
Bishop Perkins, Peter Rowe, Daniel T. Jones,
Andrew Oliver. John J. Taylor, George Hast
ing*. Reuben K Kenton.
Wktgt.?Rust-el Sage, George A Simmons,
George W. Chase, O. B. Matteeon, Henry Ren
n?:tt, Kdwin R. Morgan, David Carpenter,
Thomas H. Flagler, Solomon G. Haven.
Independent Democrats.?Gnrrit Smith, Ca
leb Lyon, Benj. Pringlo.
NEW JERSEY.
Democrat*.?Nathan T. Stratton, Charloe
Skelton, Samuel Lilly, Gsorge Vrail,
Whig.?A. C. M. Pennington.
NKW HAMPSHIRE. '
Democrats.?George W. Kittredge, George
W. Morrison, Hurry Hibbard.
NORTH CAROLINA.
Democratn.?H. H. Shaw, Thomas Ruffin,
Wm. S A-he, Burton S. Creig, Thomas L.
Ciiju'tnan
Whigs?Siou H. Rogers, John Kerr, Rich
ard C. Puryear.
NEW MEXICO.
Democrat.?Jose Manuel Gallegos.
OHIO
Democrats.?David T. Disney, Matthias H.
Nichuls, Alfred P. Edgerton, Andrew F.lliwm,
Frederick W. Green, Thomas L. Ritchie. Ed
son B. Old^s Wm, D. Liud*ey, Harvey H.John
son, VVil?on Shannon. George Bliss, Andrew
Stuart.
Whig*.-} >???? tfXfliti Hkrrirton, Aaron Har
lan, Mooes B. Corwin, John L. Taylor, W. R.
Sapp, Edward Bull.
Independent Democrats.?-L. D. Campbell,
Edward Wade, J. R. Giddingn.
ORIGON.
Democrat.?Joseph Lane.
PENN8TLVANIA.
Democrats ?Thorn an B. Florence, John Rob
ins, jr., Wm. H. Wituj, John M<;N:iir, Samuel
A. Bridges, Henry A. Muhlenberg, Christian
W. Straub, H. B. WVight, Asa Packer, Ga
lusha A Grow, James Gamble, Wm. H. Kurtz,
Augubtns Drum, John L. Dawson, Miohael C.
Troutr Carlton B Curtis.
Whigs.?Joseph R. Chandler, William Ever
hart, Isaac E. Heintor, Ner MiddleBwarth,
Samuel L. Russel, John McCollooh, David
Ritchie, Thomas M. Howe, John Dick.
RHODE ISLAND.
Democrats.?Thomas Davis, Benjamin B.
Thurston.
SOUTH CAROLINA.
State Rights Democrats.?John McQueen,
William Aiken, L. M. Keitt, P. S. Brooks, Jas.
L. Orr, W. W. Boyce.
TENNESSEE.
Democrats.?Brookins Campbell,* Wm. M.
Churchwell, Samuel A. Smith, Geo. W. Jones,
Frederick P. Stan ion.
Whigs.?William Cullom, Charles Roady,
R. M. B.igg, Felix K. Zollikoii'er, Emerson
Etheridge.
TEXAS.
Democrats.?Geo. Y. Smyth, Peter H. Bell.
UTAH.
Democrat.?John M. Bernhisel.
VIRGINIA.
Democrats.?Thomas H. Bayly, J. M. Mill
son. John 3. Caskie, William O. Goodo, Thoe
S. Bocock, Paulas Powell, William Smith,
Charles J. Faulkner, H. A. Edmondson, John
Letcher, Z. Kidwell, J. F. Snodgrass, Fayette
McMullen.
VERMONT.
Whigs.?James Meaoham, Andrew Tracy,
Alvah Sabin.
WISCONSIN.
Democrats.?Daniel Wells, jr., B. C. East
man, John B. Maey.
?Deeewed.
ANTI-SLAV bit) WilltkK FOK SALK AT Tills (IF
PICK, Bt LKKI8 CLKPHANK.
Life of Iiuc T. Hopper?price $115, postage 21
ecnts. "
Unci* Tom'* Cabin?price 37} cents, pu stage 12 cent*;
five copies for $1, postage paid.
Uncle Tom's Cabin in German?price 50 cents, post
age IS cants.i
Key to Uncle Tom'a Cabin?price 50 cents, postage 11
cents.
White Slavery in the Barbary States, by lion. ChirJei
Sumner?price 60 cents, postage 12 cents.
Giddiness Speeches, one volume 12ms?price $1, post
age 25 oenta.
Goodell's American Slave Code?price 76 cents, post
age 18 cents.
Manuel Pereira?price in cloth 76 cent*, postage 12
cants; in paper 60 cents, postage 10 cents
Address LEWIS CLEPHANR,
National Era Office.
THE GREAT BRITISH QUARTERLIES
AND BLACKWOODS MAGAZINE.
Important Reduction tn tkr Ratts of Postage
Leonard scott * oo., n?. 54 cm etreet
New York, continue to publish the following
British Periodicals, vii:
The London Quarterly Review (Conservative.
The Edinburgh Reriew (Whig.)
The North British Review (Free Church.)
The Westminster Review (Liberal.)
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine (Tory.)
These Reprints have now been in successtal opera
Uon in this country for frrnty yrar*, and iheir circo
latioa is constantly on the increase, notwithstanding
the competition they encounter from American pen
odicals of a similar class, and of numerous RrJeetit
and Magazines made up of aelections from foreign pe
riodicals. This fact shown clearly the high estimatioi
in which they are held by the intelligent reading
public, and affords a guarantee that they are eetab
lished on a Arm basis, and will be continued withou
interruption.
Although these worka are distinguished by the po
litical shadow above indicated, yet Hut a * mall portiot
of thoir contents is devoted to political subjoets It
is their literary character which give* them their chie
value, and in that they stand confessedly far abort
all other journals of their olass. BlarkiruvJ, still un
der the masterly guidance of Christopher North, main
tains ita ancient celebrity, and ia at this time nnnsn
ally attractive, from the serial works of Bulwer anc
other literary notables, written for that Magaiine, anc
first appearing in its columns both in Groat Britair
and in the United States. Such works as " The Cat
ons" hnd "My New Novel," both by Rulwer; "M}
Peninsular Modal,'1 "The Green Hand," and othr'r
serials, of which numerous rival editions are issued bj
the leading publishers in this country, have to he re
printed hy those publishers from the pages of Black
wood, after it kn* been ittiird by Meter*. SetMt \ Co.
so that snbscribers to the Reprint of that Magaiint
may always rely upon having the earliest reading of
these fascinating tales.
TERMS Per an
For any one of the three Reviews - %)
For any two I
For any three )
For all four of the Reviews ? f
For Blackwood'a Magaiine f
For Blackwood and three Reviews I
For Blackwood and the foor Reviews - . 1<
For Farmer s Guide, complete, 22 numbers ? I
Clubdom}. ? A discount of 25 per cent, from th?
above prioes will be allowed lo clubs ordering four :
or more copies of any one or more of the abovs works
Thus: four copies of Blackwood or ons Review wil
be sent to one address for $V. foar copies of the foo- !
Reviews and Blackwood for |30, and so on.
POSTAOK
To any part of the United States op Blackwood,
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Remittances and communications should be alway
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LEONARD SCOTT A CO., 79 Fulton St., N. Y.. j
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N. B.?L. 8. A Co. have recently published, and hav*
now for sale, the Farmer'I Gaul-, hy Henry Stephens
of Edinburgh, and Professor Norton, of Yale College
New Haven, complete in two volumes, royal octavo j
containing 1,<100 pages, 14 steel and 600 wood engra i
vings. Price, in muslin binding. ; in paper coven
for the mail. |l, _ Sep. 2V.
TH K LITTI.K riMKIM.
A Monthly Journal for Girl? an t Hoy*
KniTKO BT OR ACR ORKEW WOOD.
A PAPER, under the above title, will he published
at Philadelphia on the flrst day of October next
In sise and general character, this publication will
resemble Mrs MargaretL. Bailey's lately discontinued
PrienA nf Youth, the place of whloh it ia designed U
take.
Term* ? Fifty cents a year, for single copies; o? '
ten copies for four dollars. Payment invariably It j
advance
All subscriptions and communications to be ad
dressed to L K LIPPINCOTT. Philadelphia.
CALENDAR FOB 1854
Jan
5? 0? ? H ??
B <h ri aa
? J I I -
cfc S H (fc H
12 3 4 6
8 It 10 I I 12
16 16 17 18 19
22 28 24 25 26
20 30 31
. . Sf
?? 13
I i
Pk t*j
6 7
IS 14
20 21
27 28
Feb. - . -
5 6 7
12 13 14
19 20 21
26 27 28
Mar. - - -
6 6 7
12 13 14
19 20 21
26 27 28
Apr. - - -
2 3 4
9 10 11
16 17 18
23 24 25
30
May - 1 2
7 8 9
14 15 16
21 22 2.1
28 29 :'.0
?Tune ? - -
4 5 6
11 12 13
18 J9 20
25 26 27
12 3 4
8 9 1ft 11
16 16 17 18
22 23 24 25
12 3 4
8 9 10 11
15 16 17 18
22 23 24 25
29 30 31
- - - 1
5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29
3 4 5 6
10 11 12 13
17 18 19 20,
24 25 26 27
31
- 1 2 3
7 8 9 10
14 15 16 17
21 22 2.5 24
28 29 30
?s ?
J 8
July
SJ "S 7
5 ~
"SJ 2 2
Si >, H ? H ? UU
1
5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29
Aug.
2 3 4
9 10 11
Itt 17 18
23 24 25
30 31
- - 1
6 7 8
13 14 15
20 21 22
27 28 29
Sept. - - -
3 4 5
10 11 12
17 18 19
24 25 26
1 2 3
8 9 10
15 16 17
22 23 24
29 30 31
Oct.
2 3 4 6
9 10 11 12
1(1 17 18 19
23 24 25 26
30 31
? ?12
6 7 8 9
13 14 J5 16
20 21 22 23
27 28 29 30
4 6 6 7
11 12 13 14
18 19 20 21
25 2? 27 28
Nov. - -
Deo.
12 3 4
6 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 26
26 27 28 29 30
12
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 16 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31
TUB (ittKAT iMKRIl'ftm I'ALE.
MRS. BEN DABBY;
OR,
[THE WEAL AND WOE OP SOCIAL LIFE.
One Volume 12mo, SI.
THE objeet of this tale is to exhibit in different
phases, in high life and low life, the accursed
effects of intemperate drinking, the bane of social
life, the ourse of civilized man. The characters are
well and Bharply drawn, and the various scene* are
doscribod with much spirit and graphic effect. * *
* Wo are disposed to regard the book as the best
of its kind that has yet appeared.?Boston Traveller.
It is not often that wo read a story of any kind,
but wo have broken our practice, and have road this
book not only with pleasure, but with a gratification
which but very few novels have ever afforded us. It
is a quiot and simple, but still striking and offoctivo
picture of American social lifo.?Chicago Tribune.
Written with markod ability.?Zatusvilh Courier?
A thrilling picture of the effects of that infernal
bano of social lifo, intemperance.?Richmond Pal
ladium.
The style is attractive and fascinating ; there is a
freshness and originality about it, that is very pleas
ing. * * * One of its chief merits is the excel
lence of its conversations.?Enquirer.
Has so many thrilling passages and well-drawn
characters, that yoa read it with absorbed attention.
It cannot fail to achieve for Mrs. Collins an enviable
popularity. She takes un with her to the drunkard's
home, and tells of tho hunger and the fear, thp toil
and the suffering, that arc there. Sho paints, with
a woman's dolicate skill, tho inoek patience, the
long-abused, but unchanging love of the drunkard s
wife, touches tho dotpeet chords of the heart, and
makes them vibrate with pity and with indignation.
Ckri*tian Herald.
Though Mn Collins has already hosts of adrni
rers of her literary productions, this work, we pre
dict, will increase that number ten fold, and give
her a reputation worthy of her high talents.?Ntte
Albany Trtbunt.
The stylo is easy, natural, beautiful, chaste, and
at times vory eloquent. We would commend it es
pecially to young, ladies, that they may see to what
dangers they are exposed, in forming alliances with
the fashionable in high life.?Ohio Organ.
A deeply interesting and powerful work. It vivid
ly portrays some of the terrific exploits of strong
drink in both high and low life. Nor are such scene*
as it depicts either imaginary or few. Let this book
circulate. It has a beneficent aim, and is the vehicle
of admirably old and most solidary lemons ?Prrt
byterian.
? ? ? lias sketohed it In Its daintiest form of
fascination, as well as in its giim and dismal a?|>ect
of open degradation. Rarelybas a woman ventured
to hold tho torch to such a dark recess of human
wo(.?lMy Time*.
We know of no passage, anywhere, more uniqnely
beautiful, more intensely absorbing, more ovorpow
ering in the pathetic, than the thirty-fourth chapter.
It is indeed a gem Wo doubt whether the celt bra
ted chapter devoted to the death of Kva, in Unnle
Tom's <!ahin, is superior. * ? * It is certainly
the most powerful temperaneo tale that we have evi r
perused.?Journal ami Me?arngtr.
It nan ti fully written. * * * A work of great
strength and power?GotjtrJ lb ml,I.
? ? ? The incidents dramatic, nn.l the inter
Mt interne to the end(M?? Siu4i fmtin.
Wield* an easy pea, and skotches men and man- |
nan to the life.? rrt^nttrrian Hrrnhi.
. Graphic, truthful, chaste, and deeply affecting, the
story wind* itaelf into our feeling*. and we become
absorbed in the plot, a* if we beheldA^'fore our own
?yet the realities of the author * delineation*.? M<i
/' S"" RECENTLY PUBLISHED:
POETRY OF THK VEGETABLE WORLD: A
Popular Exposition of the Science of Botany, in
it* Relation* to Man. By M J. Schlcden. M I).,
Professor of Botany in the University of Jena
First American, from the London edition of llcn
frey. Kdited by Alpbimso Wood, M A nuthor of
the "Class Honk of Botany." One vol. 12mo. II.
lustratod. Second edition $126
It is as interesting as the most attractive romance, !
aa beautiful an nature, and a* pleasing as the finest
poem ? Boston At/at.
LIFE OF THOMAS CHALMERS, D. D? LL D By
Rev. James C Moffat, D. I).. Professor of Latin
and Lecturer on History in New Jersey College,
Princeton One vol. l2mo; pp 435. With a fine
Portrait on steel. Third edition. $1 25.
A* an orator, a philosopher, a professor, a philan >
thropist, a successful par<sh minister, and a learnej
divino, Dr. Chalmers stood foremost not only among
the great men of Scotland, hat of Christendom.? '
Commercial.
THE THREE GREAT TEMPTATIONS OF
Y0IJNO MEN With several l?ectures addressed
to Business and Professional Men. By Samuel W. I
Fisher. D. D One vol. 12tno; pp. SM. Third
thousand. $1.
We shall put the hook by upon one of the choice
shelves of our private library.? Itonfon Con^rrpn.
ttonohtl.
HART S VALLEY OF THE MISSISSIPPI. One
vol 12mo; cloth; 8K cents.
A raeeinct compilation, from anthent c documents, ;
of fccts in the history of the Mississippi Valley to the
latest dates. The work boars the marks of industry
and discrimination.? N. V. Trihun*.
SCENIC AND LEGENDS OF THE NORTH OF
SCOTLAND. By Hugh Miller, author of " Foot- j
print* of the Creator.' Ac . A?. Fourth thousand
One vol. IVmo ; pp 43ft. $1.'
Home stories and legend* in their native costume
and in full life ? Th*
THE COURSE OF CREATION. By John Ander
son, D. D. With a Glossary of Scientific Terms,
added to the American edition. With numerous
Illustrations. A popular work on Geology Third
thousand. One vol. 12ino; pp. 3S4. $125.
A troatise of sterling merit?N. Y. Trtbnn*.
The simplest, most Incid, and satisfactory exposi
tion of geological phenomena we have had the good
fortune to meet with.? I'hthuMphtn Chromr/t.
JITST HEADY:
EARLY ENGAGEMENTS. By Mary Frasor. On*
neat vol. 12mo.
THE LIFE OF BLEN.NERHASSETT Comprising
an authentic Narrative of the celebrated Expedi
tion of Aaron Burr, and containing many addi
tional fiacts not heretofore published. By William
H Saffpfd One vol. ltmo; cloth.
MOORE, ANDERSON, A CO.,
Publishers, Cincinnati
HP* For sale by Rookseller* in Philadelphia, New
York, and Boston, and throughout the country.
Dee. 15?3teow
PROSPE?T?lN PUR 18M.
THE SATURDAY EVENING POST.
UNRIVALLED ARRAY OP TALENT.
THK Proprietom of the POST, in again cowing be
fore the publio, would return thanks for the gen
eorua patronage which has placed tlieui fur in ad
vance of every other literary weekly in America; and
as the only suitable return for such tree and heart y 1
support, their arrangement* for 1854 have been inudo
with a degree of liberality probably unequalled in
the history of American newx|>aj>cr literature. They
have engaged, as contributors for the ensuing year,
the following brilliant array of talent and genius:
Mrs. Soiitkwortk, Emerson Bennett, Mm. Dent
son, Grace Greenwood, and Fanny Fern.
In the first papAr of January noxt, we design com
mencing an Original Novulet, written expressly for
our column*, eitt-tied
THE BRIDE OF THE WILDERNESS,
By EMERSON BENNETT, author of "Viola,"
" Clara Moreland," " The Forged Will," etc.
? This Novelet, by the popular author of " Clara
Moreland," we design following by another, called
THE STEP-MOTHER,
By Mrs. MARY A. DENISON, author of "Home Pic
lures," " Gertrude Russell," etc.
We have also the promise of u number of
SKETCHES BY GRACE GREENWOOD,
Whose briliiarit and versatile pen will he almost ex
clusively employed upon the Post and her own " Lit
tie Pilgrim."
Mrs. Southworth- whose fascinating work* are now
being rapidly republished in Eugland ? also, will
maintain her old aud pleasant connection with the
Post. The next story from her gifted pen will be en
titled
Miriam, The Avenger; or, The Fatal Vow.
By EMMA D.E.N. SOUTHWORTH, author of "The
Curne of Clifton," " The Lost Heiress," " The Desert
ed Wife," etc.
And last?not least?we are authorised to announce
a soricsrf articles from one who has rapidly rison
very high in popular favor. They will be entitled
A NEW SERIES OF SKETCHES,
By FANNY FERN, author of" Fern Leaves,'' etc.
We expect to bo able to commence the Sketches by
Fanny Fern, as well as the series by Grace Green
wood, in the early numbers of the coming year.
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Little ferns for fanny 8 lit rue
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Ht.BI.IHH tits' ANMODNC'BVIKNT :
ELEVENTH VOLUME OF
THE AMERICAN AGRICULTURIST,
TilK LBAD1NU
Weekly Agricultural Paper of the Country.
rpHE AMERICAN AGRICULTURIST, a weekly
X Feriodieal of *ixtcon large quarto pugus, makii e
an anuual volume of 832 pugus of nearly double the
size of those in tho first ten volume* of the Agricul
It is beautifully printed with typecast expn^ly
tor it, and on tho best of clear white paper, with wide
margin, so that the number* can be easily ititohed
or bound together.
A copious Index is woekly added, which will be
fully amplified at the end of the year, for the bound
work.
Comprehensive in its Character,
Each volume will contain all matter worth record
IBg, which transpires cither at home or abroad and
?ii0Hn H0^v,, 10 iu*trilot UT interest the Farmer
the Planter, the Fruit-Grower, tho Gardener, atid
the Stock Breeder; thus making it tbo most cm
pleto and uscfel Agricultural Publication of the day.
Correct and valuable Market Reports.
The Markets will be carefully reported, giviug the
actual transactions which take place from week to
week, in Grain, Provisions, Cattle, Ac.; thus keep
ing our readers constantly and reliably advised as to
their interests. During the peat yoar, tho knowledge
obtained from thesu Market Reports alone has saved
? our readers thousands of dollars, by informing them
of tho best time to sell or purchase.
Such a Paper is demanded by the Farming
Com munity.
The publishers confidently believe that the agri- -
cnlturists of this country are becoming too much
awake to the demands of their own calling to be
longer satisfied with the slow monthly issue* of a pa
per professedly devoted to their intorcst*, or to trust
alone to the irresponsible extracts in a"farmers
column," so populnr just now in papers chiefly devo
ted to business, politics, or literature; and they look
for the united support of all the intelligent farmers
of this country in their continued effort to furnish a
weekly paper of a high and reliable character, which
shall be progressive, and at the same time cautious
and conservative in all its teachings.
Essentially an Agricultural Paper.
The Agmultturin will not depart from its legiti.
mate sphere to catch popular favor by lumbering up
it* pages, with the silly, fictitious literaturo, and
light, miscellaneous matter of the dav; it has a high
er aim ; and a small part only of its space will ce
devoted to matters not immediately pertaining to the
great business of Agriculture. The household as
woll a* the out-door work of the farm will rccehe u
due share of attention. The humbugs and nostrums
afloat in the community will be tried by reliable sci
entific rules, and their worthleasness exposed. I* is
.the aim of the publishers to keep this paper under
the guidance of those who will make it a standard
work, which shall communicate to its reudera ouly
that which is safe and reliable.
An Independent Journal.
The Amerirutt Agrmitturist stands upon its own
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which it brings to the *np|>ort of tbe interests of the
termer. It is aafratumaled by any collateral bust
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cliqne, or the puffing machine of any man or thing.
Thoroughly independent in all points, its ample jta
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provement of tbe great agricultural class
Editorial Department.
The Amrriftm Agrir*tiH>i*t is under the editorial
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for the past ten years, and Mr. Orange Jud<L A M .
a thoroughly practical farmrr and agricultural
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They will be aaai*t?d by Prof Nash, who has been
for a long time one of the Most toiive?-ful farmers of
New England, and i* now Agricultural l'rofettor of
Amh?r?t College; Rev Win. Clift widely known ?, n
pleasing and instructive writer on gardening and
other departments of prect.cal agriculture, ami. in
addition to these, a number of oiher eminent agri
cultural writers.
All tbe editor* are men practically experienced in
their profession, each of whom can handle the Plow
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The Cheapest Paper in th' country. <yf its eh . r
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The American Agriculturist is supplied to regular
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XUK ARHI MKXT.
Introduction TflTllory of Uk U?ri,?ry Mate*. la*
Subject and Source* of Information
I. OngtHotSt-ifti Slavery in the t,ferbarT StM<<*
II. Histvry of H'An( Stoir ? m Htn? Karlj
Kffort* again* it?by Herdinrvnd tht- Calholir bj
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doni hy K*<ltmptto t ?rd?uji by CVw j*rtun , Kr??
dom by Emr/? . Whit* American Victiia* to lint i ?
ry ; Parallel betw??en Whit* And IMack Sluvrry; Tri
umphant Abolition til Whitr Slattry.
III. Trtt* <7I'irartrr Oj Wh ? Slavery tn liiirhtu if ,
Ajwdogie* for White Slavery Happy Condition of tht
Whiteslave*; Better off in Barhary than at Home
Belter off ihaa the Free Chrirtiana in ilarbary . Ne*
wttelw, ByHlmMi Knormity of Whit# Slavery
in Barbery. Cnncl?*ion J'rtoe M ct*.; pmtiiige 12cm
F.rwlehy I.FWU CLKPHANE,
March <i M.r.e. NatMllrft
TMfc iMMiai *UTIC n>l?K. n THKIIHT
amii ftAcricr.
ITS THutinrtir* Feature* *bown by it? fstatntw. Jn
1 dioial IVciaiftiu, and lllnctr&tire Fact* Ry Wil
liam (lamMl, author of the " l?cmocracy of Obrwtian
ity," "Slarery and ABU-Slarery," m. The work
contain* page* neatly bonnd in clotb Prie#
75 cent* per copy. t-mtnR If dit* For *ale by
June Sft L. CLRPHA XK. Off.ce Nat lira
The following is an ertrnot of a letter from lloa.
William Jay to the author
" Yoar analynin of tlie ?la*? law ?* very able and
NWtiklVMiM of their practical afrpitoatii.n hv the
Sonthern coart# eirinoe* great and oarelul reeejirch
Yrmr book l? a* impregnable n?eiti*t the obarg" '<f
exaggeration a* Ruolid'* t>eoM*>try, riftee, like Uu?t,
j it connifte of proposition* and Jcto??*rtr*iiof.*. The
book i* not only true. bat it i* ?r?<iMwH'O ?*/tr *r?e.M

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