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Daily national Republican. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1862-1866, September 09, 1864, Second Edition, Image 1

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THE DAILY HATlOSAt. nKPOBUOAH
Is published ertrj afternoon (Sundays except
ni) by -W. J. Uuniaa Co., and It furnished
to onr subscribers (by carriers) at W, cent, per
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Mall subscribers, 16.00 per asnnm f 8.C0
for ill month!, and $3.00 for three monlhSpln
Tsrlsbly In adrance.
Single copies, Tain Curs.
One square, six days ...,..i,S.6Q
Every other day advertisements, GO percent,
additional.
Twice m week, 73 per cent additional.
Eight lines or less constitute a square.
AdvertlsemenU should bs handed tn bv it
VOL. IV.
WASHINGTON, D. C.. FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 9, 1864.
NO. 244,
o'clock, m.
Unite
Wfttottrtl
'TO''s '' ''(m li
mtmmi
n?noi At.
HIW ENROLLMENT ACT.
Was nfviiranr.
CUT,
"wvia( uiHML'ivrrn.i
WAiniKOTOir, July s, .sea,
u neirat uraers, no, sat.
Th following act of Congress Is published for
th information tad roveroment ol ill concerned:
Public-No. 1M.1
An tot further to regulat and provld for the en
rolling and calling ont tha national forces, and
for other purpose.
Be it enacted fry the Senate and Hot of Bepreeents
tivei of the United Stotet of America in Ctngrtee o
tembUd, That the President of tha United states
may, at hit discretion, at any Mm here i Iter, eall
for any number of men at volunteers, for the re-
srecuv terms of on, two and thr years lor mili
tary service aad aoyeuch volunteer, or, Ineaaa
of draft, ai hereinafter provided, any substitute,
aball be eredlted to the toirn, township, ward of a
city, precinct, of election district, or of a county
not so subdivided, toward th quote of which ha
mav hav volunteered or engaged aa a substitute!
and every rolantear who la accepted and muttered
Into the t er lee for a term of nyer, unless
aoonar discharged, ihall reeelra, and b paid by
the United States, a bounty ofl00 and If (or a
tana of two years, unless looner discharged, a
bountyof $3O0aad Ifor a term of three yetrr,
unless eooner discharged, a bounty of $100 one
third of which bounty shall be paid to the aoldler
at the time of hie being muttered Into tha eervlee,
ona third at tha expiration of one half of hie term
of service, and one third at the eiplratlon of hie
term of service. And In eaae of hie death while In
service, the ree'due of hie bounty uapald aball be
paid to hie widow, If ha ihall hare left a widow,
If not, to hie ohlldreo, or If there be none, to hla
mother, If the be a widow.
See. 9, And be it further enacted, Thalia eaie the
quota, or any part thereof, of any town, township,
ward of a city, preetnot, or eleetlon dletriet, or of
any county not eo subdivided, thall not be Oiled
within the epaee of fifty diyi after such eall, then
the President aball immediately order a draft for
one year to Dltaueh quota, or any part thereof,
whloh maybe unfilled) and la eaae of any such
draft, no payment of mosey shall beaeeeptedor
received by the Government aseommutatica to
release any enrolled or drafted man from personal
oMifatloa to ptrfora military service.
See. 1. And be it further enacted. That It shall be
lawful forth Executive of anv of the States to
lead recruiting Agents Into any of the State d-
clared to be in rebellion, except the states of At
ansts, Tenneuee, and Louisiana, so recruit volun
teers under aoy call under tne provision or tnis
act, who shall be eredlted to the Stat, and to the
respective subdivisions thereof, whlah may pro
cure the enlistment.
Sec. And be ti further enacted, That drafted men,
substitutes, and volunteers, whan mustered lo.
shall be organized Into or assigned to regiments,
batteries, or other organliatlona of their own
States, and, as far aa practicable, shall, when as
signed, be permitted toeclaat their own regiments,
bait lee. or other organliatlona from among those
of their respective States which at the time of as
signment may not be tilled to their maximum num
ber. Sec. 6 And be U further enacted, That the twen
tleth seetton ol the act entitled " An act to amend
aaact entitled Au aat for enrolling and calling
ont the nttlnnal forces, and for other purpose,1 M
approved February M, 184, ihall b construed to
mean that the Secretary of War shall discharge
minors under the age of eighteen years under the
circumstances and on the conditions prescribed In
satdseotloni and herearter, If any offlcef of the
United States shall kaowlogly enlist or master
Into the military service any person under the age
of sixteen years, with or without tha consent of
hie parent or guardian, aueh person eo enlisted or
recruited shall be Immediately discharged upon
repayment of all bounties received) and eush re
cruiting or mustering offletr who shall knowlogly
enlist any person under sixteen years of ae shall
be dismissed the service, with forfeiture of all pay
and allowances, and shall be subject to such fur
ther punishment as a court martial may direct.
Sac. 6. And be it further enacted. That section
three of an act entitled " An act to amend an act
entitled An act for ea ling out th national forces,
and for other purposes; approved February 14,
1641, be, and th eame nereby, amended so as to
authorise and direct district provost marshals,
Under the direction ot the Provost Marshal Gen
eral, to make a draft for one hundred per sent. In
addition to tha number required to fill the quota
of anr district a provided by said section.
See 7, And be it further enacted, That Instead of
traveling nay. all drafted persons reporting at the
place of rendezvous shall be allowed transporta
tion from their plaeea or ret aencet ana persons
discharged at the plase of rendezvous shall be al
lowed transportation to their plaeee of restdenee.
See, 8. And be it further enactea, Tnat an persons
In the naval service of the United States who hare
entetcd said service during the present rebellion,
who have not been eredlted to the quota of aoy
town, district, ward, or state, by reason of their
being In said service and not enrolled prior to
February 31, ISM, shall be enrolled and credited to
the quotas of the town, ward, district, or Slate In
which they respectively reelde, upon satisfactory
proof of their residence made to th Secretary of
War.
Sec. ft. And be it further enacted, That If any per
son duly drafted shall, be absent from home in
prosecution of his utual Miriness, the provost
marahbl of the district shall cause him lo be duly
notified as soon ae may be, and he shall not be
deemed a deserter, nor liable as such, until notice
has been riven to him and reasonable time al
lowed for him to return and report to the provost
marshal of his district! but such absence shall not
otherwise iret his liability under this act.
See 10. And be it further enacted. That nothing
contained In this act shall be coat trued to alter or
lo any way affect the provisions of the seven
teenth section of an act, approved February 34,
164, entitled "An act to amend an act entitled
An act foe enrolling and calling out the national
forces, and for other purposes, " approved March
1.1863.
Sea 11. And be it further enacted That nothing
contained in this act shall be com trued to alter or
change the provisions of cxlstlnc laws relative to
Kim It ting persons liable to military servlse to
rnlsh substitutes.
Approved July 4, 1801.
JJy order of the Secretary of Wan
H JJ. TOWNSEND,
aull Assistant Adjutant General,
JAY COOKE k CO., BANKERS,
FIFTEENTH BTREKT,
0? ronia United Stitcs TucasuaT,
Receive subscripts as for the
NEW U. S. 8EVKN-TUIRTY LOAN,
Authorlted by the act of June 10, iBet. The notes
will be Issued under date of August 19, In denomi
nations of
150, tlOO, $500, f 1000 AMD $5000,
Payable to bearer or order, bearing lntereat at
It-it) per cent, per annum, payable ssml-annually,
and will be convertible at the option of the holder
at maturity into six per cent. Five-Twenty Bonds.
We buy and sell
GOVERNMENT BONDS OF ALL ISSDKS,
TBKA8URT NOTE,
CEivnricATKs or indidtedssss,
AND COIN l
And par the highest prise for
QUARTEnUABTEK'S CERTIFICATE CHICK B,
JtTTdtf JAV COOKE fc CO.
V
pilK BUPREME COURT OP THE
DHTRCT OF COLUMBIA, HOLU1MJ A
DlilHILT CQUHT OF THE UNITED
BlATt-S FOR THE SAID IMSlRltT.
7t? 047 whvm it may concent, Um-ETINO l
Notice is hcrcuy given, that on th Id day of
Auf ust, 1U84, th longboat J. H. D. Smoot, Cargo,
lackle, ko , wet seized for breach o(th revenue
law by the United states mortar schooner Adolph
Hugte, acd bt ought the sam Into this District
for adjudication, and th sam are libelled and
pioseouiedintbls Court In thnameof th United
states furcoudcmnationi and have been arrested by
the Marshal (or th reasons In the lluel stated! and
that said cause will stand for trial at tha City Kail,
la th city oi Weabmgtm,oa th Third MONDAY
nf santambcr neat, when and where all persons
are warned to eppr to show cause why condem
nation should not be decreed, and to Intervene for
their Interests. Augus , w MniIn ,
eu2o-2wtseplt Jl J. UEI08, Clerk,
1HEPRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN
- WEIKLT NATIONAL. nBrUDLICAM."
From this time until the Presidential elee
tlon, erery loyal rnan who farors the re-election
of Mr. Lincoln will went newspsper
published t the sett or OoTernmeut, edroctt
lng the Union nomlnetlone for President and
VIceFraldeaU
To all such, who desire a paper which will
keep them promptly adtlsed of all political
moTementa. and their probable consequences,
we tender the Nimoiui Bitcbuom, with
conOdence that It will fulfil their deelrea In
thlirapect.
The NtTiosiL Riruiucia will continne to
(ornUh In adrance of all competitor, thelatcat
and moat reliable newt from onr different
armlet, and especially from the Army of the
Potomac
Ita literary and miscellaneous departments
will recite ipeclal attention, and efforts are
eontlanally being made to eotabllth the charac
ter of tht WtaxLT lUnout. RtroiuoM as a
fsmlly psper.
Six months ago the weekly paper was en.
Urged to Its present site and greatly Improved
In Its typographical appearance. Onr lilt has
increased largely since that time, for which we
thank onr ntmerons rolnntary agents through,
ont the loyal States. During that time, how
erer, the prices of labor and of malerlsl here
Increased npwtrds of fifty per cent. In ylew
of thst fsct we do not propose to lncreate the
price of the paper, bnt to urge npon onr friends,
and the friends of the Union, who faror the re
election of ourpresent worthy end patriotic Chief
Magistrate, to nte their utmost endearorato
Increase our clrculstlon. This Is the only way
by which we can be able to keep the Wmklt
KiTioifiL RircBLici up to the high standard
It has occupied during the last six months.
We desire a large number of subscribers for
the political campaign, which has oponed by
the nominations msde at the Baltimore Con
Ten tlon.
We propose to send ourweeUypsper for the
period ofslxBTOths, from the first of June to
the first ofDecembcr, which will corcr the
cempalgn, snd full returns of the Presidential
election, at the low rates st which It Is now
furnished to subscribers.
There Is so city, town, or Tillage In the loyal
States which cannot furnish ns some subscri
bers. Let the work of msking up clnbs com
mence at once. We hare printed a large edi
tion of the numbers for the present month, and
can famish bsck numbers to all who may de
sire them. Specimen copies will be sent,when
requested.
Tne terms for the campaign are as follows i
One copy, six months, tit tbrco copies, six
months, f 2.50 ten copies, six months, $7.50.
pnOPOBALS FOIt LOAN.
Ti-nriT Depatmt. JoW fid. 1844.
Notice Is hereby liven that subscriptions will be
received by the treasurer of the United Mate, the
several Assistant Treasurers and Desljroa'ed De
positories), and by the National Banks designated
ana qua idwim vpuiiwiieiuuriBsuiw arbdui
far Tfiuutv Notea Devable three veers from Au
gust 10, 184, bearing Interest at the rate ot asven
and three tenths per cent, per annum, with semi
annual coupons iicaeu, pmjioiv iu iawiui
These notes will be convertible, at the option of
the holder, at maturity, Into elx per cent, aold-
DCariOC DOOUI. reumUi ir uri iau pajav.a
iwtnir Tear irau auuii ae, t.
Th notes will befit med tn tne denominations rf
Ofty, OLe nunurea, nrv auDurwi wa tuuuiauu,
nndbve thousand dollars, and will be issued in
blank, or payable to order, ae may be direeed by
the subscribers. -...,,
AH subscriptions must be for fifty dellars, or
nina mnttlnU of flftv dollars.
Duplicate certificates will be Issued for all de
posits. inpary ueposuuoa; must cduutp upuu
ortMnml urtlflcat th denomination of notce re
quired, and whether they are to be issued tn blank
or pa j able to order. When eo endorsed It must be
llliwim lam uiuvvr ivviviua uv unjyvin, mi v
forwarded to this Department.
The notes will be transmitted to the owners,
free of transportation charges, as soon after th
receiptor the original Certiorates of Deposit aa
lhav mji ha nranaratL
Interest wlUb allowed to August 15 on allde
notrtu mad Drlor to that date, and will be paid bv
the Department upon th receipt of the original
certificates.
As the note draw Interest from August 15, per
sons making deposits subsequent to that dat must
pay the Interest accrued from date of note to date
of deposit.
Parties depositing twenty-flv thousand dollars
and upwards for tt.es notes at any on tlm will
be aiuwed a commission otooeniuarier of on per
cent , which will be paid by this Department upon
the receipt or a bill for th amount, certified to by
the officer with whom th deposit was made. No
deductions for commissions must b mad from
th deposits.
Officer receiving deposits will see that th
proper endorsements are mad upon th original
certificate.
All officer authorlted to reeelv deposits are
requested to give to applicants all desired Infor
mation, and afford every facility for making sub
scriptions W. P. FKMKNDEN,
Jy36-tf Secretary of tha Treasury.
D.
E. 80 21 KB k CO.,
BouciTona of patents.
COLLECTORS OF CLAIMS
AGAINST THE UUVEKNMKNT,
AND NEGOTIATORS OF CONTKACTB,
2fO. 476 8SVJCSTU STJiSKT,
Opposite the Post Office,
WASHINGTON CITY, D. C
wk ncrcn ar rcniiOH to
Hon. Hannibal Hamlin, Mce President, He,
jonn uuouwiD,
Edward H Rollins,
Alsx. II. Alee,
" John B. Alley,
u Alfred A. Burnham,
" Dwlght Loomls,
James M. Ashley,
JohnCovode,
" Robert MeKolgbt,
Justin S. Mjrrlli,
11 John E. Potter,
" Z. Chandler,
" James H. Lane,
" Cyrus Aldrlch,
" John T. Nlxoo,
F.P.Blair, Jr.,
KltiHrtrfa Cl HnaiitMinsr.
M. C, Me.
N.H.
11 Mass.
" Conn.
Ohio.
" Pa.
( 4
" vt.
Wis.
U.S. 8, Mich.
" Kansas.
M. C, Minn.
N.J.
MO.
n. y.
uessrs. hj uook sl to , uaaxers, wasninRion, v,
C, and Philadelphia, Pa. JySO-tf
TAY COOKE k CO., BANKERS,
HAVE THIS DAY MMOVED
TO TUKIH
NEW OFFICE,
FIFTEENTH STREET, NEAR 0 STREET,
orrosiTB
UNITED STATES TREASURY.
AtrevsT 1. IB. ul
TRAB3 BTENOnALPHAIJETB.
M. J. WETcTlF k SON.
lot UoIod street, Boston, Mass.,
The only manufacturers in the United States of
Brass Alphabets and Figures, to any great extent,
or in any variety.
Sold at wholesale at the Lowest Cash Prices.
Also, the best of Indelible Stencil Ink, very cheap.
Stencil Dies, and all kinds of Stencil block. Inqui
ries or orders promptly attended to. Jy33-em
rilHB FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
I WASHINGTON has removed ta Its New
Euarble Building on Fifteenth street, between F
and O, opposite in unite eiatcc ireaaury.
eellS CXtnange, loeoc muuwjr, rccsivaa uepoaUUs
put chases Government cheeks and vouchers, and
transacts a gensral banking business.
Careful attention given to Government and otty
collections, n. """p-fcKBSBSit
WM. i. HUNTINGTON, Caahler, aalO-tf
For th Republican.
JOTHAH BUOWN'S IDEA OP WOMEN,
Old Jotham Brown1! a smart old chip,
So folks all eat him dowat
'Twere hard te catch him In a trap
Ai any one In town.
And yet old Jetham used to say
No man was easier cengM,
lie had been trapped In every way
Nor could be wisdom tught.
The fast was this: Jo loved hts glass,
Whloh made htm sometimes mellowi.
And then he loved a bright eyed lass,
And so does every fellow.
That Is, whoi made of flub and blood,
And baa a human heart)
The wlscet men known sines the flaod
Have bled from Cupid's dart.
Well, oooe or twice old Jo had been
Entrapped In Hymen's chains,
And by experience oft bad seen
With pleasure there are pains.
On day ! saw blm rather sad.
With vlsag grim and rue.
I said to hla, Why, Jotham, lad,
What makes you look so blue 1"
' Ah, boy," says he, " take my advise,
Before It Is too la tei
Beware the matrimonial splice-
Retain your blessed state.
" Don't let no woman take you lnj
Beware her ttleks and wiles
It ain't no use she's sure to win
If she leads off with smiles.
Ml now 'em well I've many sees i
There ain't a pin to choose.
Ah, If ! hadn't been so green,
I shouldn't have the blues.
" Some seemed as though they owned no tongue
Who've turned out quite a scold
Women are aagele, boy, when young.
But devils when they're old "
Geo. O. W. Moaoaa.
WasitmoTON, Sept. 8, 18M.
THE ADMINISTIUTIO;. VINDICATED
Speech of Hon. William II. Seward, Sec
retary of Stat, Dllrred at
Auburn, If. Y., Saturday
KYenlng. Septeni
ber 30, 1804.
On Saturday evening, at the cloao of a day
devoted to rejoicing over the capture of Atlanta,
the lojat citizens cf Auburn proceeded to the
residence of Gov. Seward, and honored him
with a serenade. Mr. Seward la response to
the call of his ftllow-clUieos, came out Into the
Park, and satdi
Mr Dsab Friindbi It Is so that I like to see
you come, ma renin to the time of national
airs, under the folds of the old national flap.
I thank you lor this hospitable and patriotic
welcome. It prove that though yon deal rig
orously with your public servants, exacting
reasons lor incir poucy, energy iu mcir con
duct of affairs, and explanations for failures,
and disappointments In their administration,
yet you are nevertheless Just, because yon wlll
lnirlv allow them to rejoice with von. and when
yon have sneceasoe, victories, and triumphs, to
celebrate. The news that brlntts ns together Is
authentic. (A voice "Do yon think it relia
ble 7" Tea. Here is a telegram which I re
ceived this mernlDE from the secretary or art
''Van Dozer reports that Sherman's advance
entered Atlanta about noon to-daj particular
not vet received. Edwin M. Stanton."
Three cheers were glrcn for Atlanta. Now
this news comes In a good shape. It Is pleat
ant to have a (J rand result at the first, and It
protracts the interest or toe imog to nave par
ticular coming In afterwards. Tc, yes
we can watt ror tne parucuiars.-j
1hlsvlctorvcon.es In tho right connection
It falls in with the echoes of the capture of
Forts ualnes and Morgan, which I understand
to be the jxirtlcttl an of Farragni'a glorious naval
battle In the Bay of Mobile a battle equalled by
no other In American history, bnt the naval
achievements of the same veteran Admiral at
New Orleans and Port Hudson and alt these
have no parallel In naval warfare, bat the bat
tles of tho Nile and Trafalgar. A voice "I
wIshwewereallFarragnU." Well, my friend,
I know tho Admiral well, and I confess that we
all can't be Farraeuts. Indeed, very few of us
can. But we may take this comfort onrselvee
that, as a whole people, we can appreciate
inevcioraua. TogauaiBuaa uwiatouuviuiau.
who haa performed the most successful ana
splendid march through a mountainous and
hostile country recorded In modern history, and
In doing this we show onrselvee Inferior in vir
tue to no other nation. By (be way. everybody
admired Farragut's heroism In climbing to
the malo-top to direct a battle. But there
was another "particular" of that contest that
no less forcibly Illustrates bis heroic character.
"Admiral," said one of his officers the night
before the battle, "won't yon consent to give
Jack a glass of grog In the morning not
enough to mako him drunk, but Just enough
to make him fight cheerfully." "Well re-
nlled the Admiral. "I have been to sea coosld
erable. and have seen a battle or two. but I
never found that I wanted rum to enable me to
da mv dutv. I will order two caps of cood
coffee to each man at two o'clock, and at eight
o'clock I will pipe all hands to breakfast In
Mobile Bay." ''Hurrah for Farragut." And
be did gl?e Jack the coffee, and then he went
up to the main-top and did it.
The victory at Atlanta comes at the right
place. The rebellious district Is In the shape
of an egg. It preeenta equal resistance on Ita
whole surfaeff bnt If you could break the shell
at either of the two ends Richmond and At
lantathe whole muet crumble to pieces.
While Sherman, under Oram, has been striking
the big end, Meade, under Grant, has been
striking Just a hard blown upon the leaser end.
The whole shell will now be easily crushed, for
It has grown brittle with the exhaustion of vi
tality within.
This glorious victory comes In good time for
another reason. Juat now we are calling upon
yon for three hundred thousand more volun
teers, 1( you will drafted men if we must, to
end the war. You were getting a little tired of
long delays and disappointed expectations.
In Indiana a portion of the people, instigated
py rebel plotters, at the Clifton House, In
uanaaa, were importing uruisu revolver iu
boxet which passed the custom-house as sta
tionery, under pretense of arming to defend
themselves, but really to resist the draft and
bring the Government down to ruin, through
a subordinate and auxiliary civil wt.r. True,
no arms have been Imported here, fet dele
gates went out from among yon, and sat down
in council at Chicago with these Indiana con
spirators, and agreed with them not only that
Importation of arms should be defended In
the election canvass, but also to demand the
cessation of the war upon the ground that suc
cess In restoring the Union is unattainable.
Already under the lnllaencoof the cheering
news from Atlanta, all this discontent and this
despondency have disappeared. We shall have
no draft because the army Is being re enforced
at the rate of Ave to ten thousand men per dav
by volunteers. llama for the volunteers.
May I not add that th Irtory at Atlanta com ea
ita irood time aa the victor in Mobile bay. does
to vindicate the wisdom and the energy of the
war administration. Farragut's fleet did not
make Itself nor did he make it. It was pre
pared by the Secretary of tho Navy, and he
that shall record the history of this war truth
fully and Impartially will wrlto that, since tho
days of Cbarnot, no man has organized war
with ability equal to that of Stanton. Cheers
for Stantonj cheers for the Bccretay of the
ravy.j
But ausDlclout as the occasion is. It has nev
ertheless failed to bring out some whom we
might bsve expected here. Why are they not
here, to rejoice In the victories that will thrill
the heart of the lovers of freedom throughout
the world) Alas, that It must be confessed It
Is party spirit that holds them aloof. All of
them sre partisans. Borne are Republicans,
who cannot rejoice tn the nstlonal victories,
bee a ns s this war, for the Ufa of the nation. Is
not in ail res pec U cod ducted according to their
own peculiar radical Ideas and theories. They
want guaranties for swift, and universal, and
complete emancipation, or they do not want
the nation saved. Others stay away, because
they want to be assured that In coming out of
the revolutionary ttorm, the ship of State will
be found exactly In tho same position as when
the tempest assailed It, or they do not want the
ship saved at all, as If anybody could give such
guaranties In the name of a people of thirty
millions. Others are Democrats. They re
ceived from their Fathers the axiom that only
Democrats could save the country, and they
must save It by Democratic formulas and com
binations which the progress of the age has
forever exploded. Thoy cannot come up to
celebrate achievements which condemn their
narrow and hereditary bigotry.
Others, of both the Republican and Demo
cratic parties, are willing that the nation shall
be ssved, provided it Is done by some one of
their chosen snd idolized chiefs, which chief
mev muiuauv denounce- ana revue, i ncv can
not nonor urant, and unerman, ana rarragui,
and Porter, because by such homage they fear
that Fremont and McClellsn's fame may be
eclipsed.
Nevertheless, there are enough here of the
right sort, L" Yes, that's true,"! enough of men
who tnce were Republicans, but who, taking
that word In a partisan sense, are Republicans
no longert and men who once were Democrats,
but who, taking that word In Its narrow appli
cation, are Democrats no longer all of whom
are now Union men, because they found out at
the beginning of this tremendous civil war, or
at some period In Its progress, that no man
no party no formula no creed could save the
Union, but that only the people could save It,
come partisans, and becoming patriots and
Union men. Cheers for the union.
Yes, my friends, when this war shall be
ended in tho restoration of the Union, no man
then living will exult iu the recollection that
darlng Its continuance he was either a Radical
or Conservative, Republican or a Democrat,
but CTery man will claim to have been an uure-
served and nncondllloual Union man through-
out.
But why should party spirit, especially at this
Juncture, divide the American people? and
why should I, a member nf the fcxccullvo Ad-
ministration, allude to It on such an occasion
mm Ittl. f Tk. anaaiA. la at hatifl. Th. sennit 1..
SB SUI1 , Auwauvvs si.uitl auw wuv..-
tutlon of our country commands that Admin-
islrstton to surrender Its powers lo the people,
and the people to designate agents to assume
ana exercise mem jour years, ion receive me
Executive Government in a condition very dlf-
ferent and highly Improved. Wefoundttprao
tlcally expelled from the whote country south
Vi mo icianiio, tuo uuiv, auu suu iiiieauuii,
with the most of the army and navy betrayed
oriauen into tno nauasoi insurgents, ana a
new and trwasonable Confederacy, wlih the
Indirect but effective co-operation of foreign
Powers, establishing itself on the Gulf of Mex-
lco. We cheerfully clve the Government back
to you, with large and conquering armies, and
a triumphant navy, with the hateful Con fed-
cracy falling Into jtcccs, and tho rebellious
States, one after another, returning to their
allegiance.
Regarding myself now, therefore, not as a
Secretarv. but siintly aa one of tha people. I.
like you, am called by my vote, lo determine
Into whose hands the precious trust shall now
be confided. We might wish to avoid, or at
least to nostDone that dutv. until tho present
fearful crisis Is passed. But It c in not and It
ought not to bo avoided or adjourned. It Is a
Constitutional trial and the nation mutt go
through It, deliberately and bravely.
I shall therefore cheerfully submit, for your
consideration, the course which I have con-
eluded to adopt, and the reasons for It.
rirai, i veg you 10 remciuucr, mat ino pre
sent Is no common or customary Presidential
election. It occurs In the midst of civil war,
arising out of a disputed succession to the Ex-
ecuuve power, uispuicu uecreBiutja ro mo jvcn auopica icai poucy in concert wun ine
most frequent causes of civil wars, not only In other. You know when the Chicago Conven
RcpuMlcs, but even In Monarchies. A dispute tlon was approaching In July last, George 8an
about the succession of the President, period!- dcrs, Clement C. Clay and J. P. Holcomb ap
cally begetsan abortlveor arealrovolutlon,ln peered at the Clifton Home on the Canada
each one of the Spanish and American repub- bank of the Niagara river, folly Invested with
lies. So the disputed succession of the Span- the confidence and acquainted with the par
ish throne begot that memorable thirty years poses of Jefferson Davis and his confederates
years war. which convulsed all Europe. A die- at Richmond. You know, also, that Chicago
Euto whether Juarei was the lawful President Democrat) resorted there In considerable nom-
rought on the present civil war, with the con- bers to confer with these emissaries of Jefferson
sequence of French Intervention In Mexico. Davis. Here Is thefruttof that conference,
A dispute whether the present King of Den- and no ona can deny the authenticity of my
mark, who succeeded to the throue list winter, evidence. It Is extracted from the London
Is lawful heir to the Duchies of Scbleswlg and Time, the common organ of all the enemies of
11 ol stein, brought about the civil war In that the united States. The New York correa-
country, which through German Intervention, pondent of the London Tirnte, writing from
has Just now ended with the dismemberment Niagara Falls under dste of August 8tb, says i
of tha Danish klnedom. It la reuiarkablo also "Clifton House has become a centre of ne-
tbat civil wars produced by disputed succes-
slonsinvanaoiy Degm wuuresisiauce,Dy some
one or more of the States or provinces, which
constitute the Kinirdom. Eraulre. or Republic,
which Is disturbed. It was so with the United
States and Mexico, it was so in tne uniiea
States ot Columbia, and the case was the same
In the United States of Venezuela. Now it Is
certain that In 1800 we elected Abraham Lin-
coin, lawfully and constitutionally to be Prcsi-
dent of tho whole United States of America.
SftTtn ol the States lmraedlalelv thereon rushed
Into disunion, and summoning elgqt more to
their alliance, they set up a .(evolutionary
Government. They levied war against ns, to
effect a separation, and establish a dlatluet sov-
erelgnty and Independence.
Wo accepted the wartndefenceof the Union,
The only grievance of the Insurgents was that
their choice of John C. Breckinridge for Presl-
dent was constitutionally overruled In tha
election of Lincoln. They rejected Lincoln,
and set up a usurper. The Executive power of
the United States Is now, therefore, by forco
practically suspended between that usurper,
Jefferson Davie, and that constitutional Presl- aQ(i therefore they Justly excuse many extra va
dent, Araham Lincoln. The war Is wagtd by gancies. Wo have now seou what the agents
the usurper to expel that constitutional Presl ' 0f pooipe) and Caesar agreed at Niagara that
aeni irom toe capiiai, wuicu in soma sort is jorope snouia ao ai unicago. uore is wnai
constantly held In siego, and to conquer the DB actually did.
Btalca which loyally adhere to him. 'Iho war "fowJwtJ, Ibat this Convention docs ex
la maintained on our aide to suppress the nllcttlv declare, as tho sense of the American
usurper and to bring tbe Insurgent Btatea back people, that, alter four years of falluro to ro
under the authority of the constitutional Presl- Btore the Union by thuexperlmenl of war, during
dent. The war is ai us crisis, it ia cic.tr,
therefore, that wo are lighting to make Abra
ham Lincoln President of the whole United
States, under the election of 1800, to continue I every part, aud public liberty and private right
until the 4th of March. 1SC5. Iu voting for a alike trodden down, and tho material prosper
President of the United States, can we wisely ' ,iy 0f the country essentially Impaired, Justice,
or safely voto out the Identical person whom, jhuuiau.ty, liberty, and the public wc.fare de-
with force arms, o ere fighting into tho Presl
aency (
No. No. You Justly say nol It would be
nothing less than to give up tho very object of
the war at the ballot-box. The moral strength
which makes our loyal position Impregnable
would pass from us, and when that moral
strength has passed away, material forces are
no longer effective, or even available. By such
a proceeding we shall havo agreed with the
enemy, and shall havo gi en him the victory.
But In that agreement the Constitution and tho
Union will havo perished, because uhen It
shall have once been proved that a minority
can, by force or circumvention, defeat tbe full
accession of a constitutional!) chosen Presi
dent, no Presldeut thereafter, though eleetcd
by ever so large a majority, can hone to exer
cise tho executive powers uuoppo6.d through
out the whole country. One of two things
must follow that fatal error. Hither a contest
between your newly elected compromise Presi
dent, and the same usurper, In which tho
usurper must prevail, or else a combination
between tbem through which the usurper or
his successor, subverting jour Constitution
and Buuuftluliog his own, will become Presl
dent. King, or Emperor ofibo United States
ithnnt foreltrn aid. If he can with f or el it u lu
torvenlion If neceaaary, LTbat's so, lobe
sure it is soj nothing Is more certain thau tha
either the United States and their constitutional
President, or the so-called Confederate States,
and their usurping President, must rule within
the limits of this Republic. I therefore regard
the pending Presidential election as involving
the question whether hereafter we shall have
a Constitution and a conntry left ns. How
eball we vote, then, to rave our country from
this fearful danger! Vote Lincoln In again.)
Ton have hit It exactly, my friend. We must
vote Lincoln In again, and fight him la at the
same time. If we do this the rebellion will
perish, and leave no root. If we do otherwise,
we have only the alternative of acquiescence
In a perpetual usurpation, or of entering an
endless succession of clttl and social wars.
Upon iheee grounds, entirely irrespective of
platform and candidate, I consider the rec
ommendations of the Constitutional Chlcsgo
as tending to subvert the Republic. It's so
that's a fact. ,
It will seem a hard thing when I Imply thst
a psrty, like the Democratic party, can either
mediate or blindly adopt measures to over
throw the Republic. All experience, however,
shows thst It Is by the malice or the madness
of great parties thst free Stales have been
brought down to destruction. Yon often hear
alarms, that a party In power Is sub verting the
State, and It sometimes happens so. Bat nine
times ont of ten, It Is a party out of power, thai
In Its Impatience or Its ambition overthrows a
Republic.
The Democratic psrty, of course leaving otT
mo ijurai union Lcmocrau, oppneen me elec
tion of Abraham Lincoln, In 1800. In doing
so they divided and organized In three columns.
One a treasonable column, of State Rights, dis
union Democrats, under Breckinridge. A sec
ond, a loyal Northern column, nndcr Douglss.
The third, a conciliatory flying column, nnder
John Bell, who has since Joined the Insurgents.
We thereupon Invited the two loyal columns to
combine with the Republican party to oppose
the disunion Democratic column. They de
clined. On the eve of the election In 1800. 1 told tha
followers of Douglas and of Bell that when the
I election should have closed, they would find
1 they had Inadvertently favored disunion and
rebellion. They persisted, and the attempted
revolution came. Disunion then presented
ltseir.In the practical form of preventing Abra-
ham Lincoln from assuming the Executive an-
thorlly. Thus the Democratic party produced
that calamity, the Southern Democrat acting
from design, the Northern Democrats passive
through Inadvertence. The disputed succes-
slon still remains unadjusted. A new election
has come on. For a time, the Northern Dcm-
ocrats, with notable exceptions, gave a more
or less liberal support to the Government,
strr1nsil ttisa DasTirfiai.lA lnansfaM. m At .Va Q.Hih
.a,.u.i .uv svuiuvi.liw aajvuiavUHlla: IUO ajutllU. i
Bat Iho same Democratic forces which figured
In the election of I860, now appear In the pc-'
Ullcal fltld, with positions and policy un-J
cuangea since maiume, as i minx, except ror
worse. The Southern Democracy la still In
arms under the usurper at Richmond. The
Douglas and Bell columns consolidated, are
iuuuu n, uitu, iuv au luica ji tun parties
are compassing the rejection of tbeConstlta-
iionat rresiuent ot me uniiea mates, iney
njjrto not only In this attempt, hut they assign
tho same reasons for it namely, that Abra-
hsm Lincoln Is a tyrant.
Thcv agree, also, that the real usurper at
Richmond Is blameless, and pure, at least the
Richmond Democracy affirm It, and the Chi-
cago Democracy do not gainsay It. To me,
therefore, the Democracy at Richmond and the
Democracy at Chicago. like Cotsar and Pompey,
seem to retain all their original family rcaem-
bianco They are very much alike especially
Pompey. But it Is not In mere externals that
their similarity lies. They talk very much
allko, as I havo already shown yon. When you
couslder that amontr the Democrats at Cblcatro
the Indiana Democrats were present, who havo
imported arms to resist the national authority,
and defeat the national laws, and that all the
Democrats there assembled agreed to Justify
that proceeding, I think you will agree with me
that the Richmond Democrats and the Chicago
Democrats have lately come to act very much
aine.
I shall now go further and prove to yon that
they not only have a common policy and a
common way of defending It, bnt they have
gotlattons between tho Northern friends of
peace ana oouiuern agents, woicn propose a
withdrawal of differences from the arbitrament
of the sword. The correspondent then goes on
toexplslntbataneffortUtobemadetonomlnate
acanaiaate iur tne rrrsiaency on tnepiauorm
of an armistice and a convention of the States,
and to thwart by all possible means the efforts
of Mr. Ltucoln for ru-elcctinn."
Mark now, that on the 6th of August, 1804,
Northern Democrats and Richmond agents
acree UDon three thlotrs to be done at Chlcaco.
Namely: 1st. A withdrawal of the differences
between tno uovernmeui aua me insurgents.
from the arbitrament of the sword. 2i. A
nomination, for President of the United States,
ona platform of an armistice, and ultimately
a convention of tho States. 3 J. To thwart by
all possible means the re-election of Abraham
Lincoln.
Such a conference, held In a neutral country
between professedly loyal citizens of the United
states and the agents of tho Richmond traitors
Iu arms, has a very suspicious look. But let
that pass. Political elections muet be free,
which, under tne pretence oi a military necea
aity of war power higher than the Constitution,
thu Constitution llsilf has bev'n disregarded In
mand that Immediate efforts bu made for aces
Ballon of hostilities, with a view to an ultimate
convention of sll the States, or other peaceable
means, to the end that at the earliest practical
moment peace may be restored on tho basis of
the Federal union oi tno otaiea."
Tho Democracy at Chicago did there Just
what had been agreed upon with tho Richmond
agents at Niagara, namelyi They pronounced
for an abandonment of the military defence of
tue UDluu oiiue wo 4uuiuir. nnu u view
to an ultimate National Convention, and the
dciu.t or the election oi Aoranam Lincoln,
1 hat U to say, they propose to elect Abraham
Lincoln from the Presidential (Jualr at
I Wash
lngtouon the 4th of March next, and at the
eame timo kyovub uouipor, iavis, nnaesauea,
secure and unmolested In bis scat at Richmond,
with a view lo an ultimate Convention ot
Stales, wblcn that usurper's Constitution will
allow uo one- of the insurgent States to enter,
hat uow, If there be no Convention at all, or
If tho Convention fall to agree on a submission
to Federal authority I Jefferson Davis then
remains iu authority, his Confederacy eetab
llshed aud the Union with all Its glories lsgouo
forev r.
Nay more, if such a thing could haupcu aa
that tbe Chicago candidate, nominated upon
such an agreement could be elected on the 1st
1 1 uusday of November next, who can Touch fur
tha safety of the conntry against the rebels
during the interval which must elapse before
the new Administration can constitutionally
come Into power? It seems to me that such an
eleetlon would tend equally to demoralize the
Union and to Invite the Insurgents to renew
their efforts for Its destruction.
It remains for me now only to glfe you the
prooi, tnaiaunougn tne wayjn which tne i;m
cago Democracy did what had been aereed noon
In their behalf at Niagara, was not altogether
aauaiactory, yet wnat they actually did, was
accepted as a lull execution of the previous
com pact i
..o- , r, wV7 5Ai"'e, C W Sept. I.
"To thn D. Wir, Uallfdxi
"Platform and Presidential nominee nnsst
U factory. Vice President and speeches satis
factory. Tell Phllmore not to oppose.
'(Signed) Geo. M. Samoibs."
D. Wler Is a Richmond accomplice at Hall
fax, and Phllmore Is understood to be tbe con
doctor of the Insurgent organ In London.
Here, then, we hsvo a nomination and a
platform which were made by treaty formally
contracted between the Democratic LralLora at
Richmond and the Democratic opposition at
Chlcsgo, signed, seated, attuted, and deliv
ered In the presence of tho London Tlmtt, and
already ratified at Richmond. "By Heaven,
we're got 'em."1 Got them, to be sure you've
got them, my friends. They say I am always
too sanguine of tbe success of national candi
dates and of tho national arms. But it seems
to mo that the veriest croaker in all our loyal
camp will take new courage and become he
roic when he seoa that the latt hope of the re-
Deiuon naoga upon tno ratification or inl
abominable and detestable compact by tbe
amcricau poopie.
Yea, you have got them) but how did you get
theml Not by aoy sUU or art of the Adminis
tration, or even through the sagacity or activity
of tho loyal people, but through the cunning of
the conspirator overreaching Itself, and thus
working out their own defeat and confusion
They do say that tho father of evil always In
dolges his chosen disciples with such sn excess
of subtlety as to render their ultimate ruin and
punishment Inevitable.
And what a timo Is this to proclaim such a
Jiollcy, cotreetred In treachery and brought
orth with shameless effronterv. A coseatlon
of hostllltlea on tho heel of decisive nav-1
and land battle-, at tbe very moment that tbe
rebellion, without a single fort lo Its posses
ston, on the ocean or on cither of tho great
rivers or lakes, la crumbllog to the earth, and
at the same time a dozen new ships of war are
going to complete tbe Investment bv sea. and
three hundred thousand volunteers are ruihlng
in tne nnc, in complete toe work or restore
tlon and pacification.
There la a maxim which thoughtful teachers
always careiuuy inculcate, it la that Incon
stancy Is Imbecility, and that prcsevcranco la
necessary to insure success. This maxim was
set forth In the form of a copy, In tbe writing
book, when I was youug. ' Perseverance
always conquers," Even Infantile beginners
encountered the Instruction in the form of a
fable In Webster's spell let book. The e tor v
was, that after using soft words and tufts of
grass tho farmer tried what virtue there was In
atones, and by persistence In that application,
bo brought the rude boy, who was stealing ap
ples, down from the tree, and made him ark
the farmer's pardon. (Jur Chlcairo teachers
tell us that Just as tho rude boy In coming
down wo must lay uown the stones and resort
again to the use of grass, with the consequence,
of course, that tho farmer must bete pardon of
tue trespasser, uut wnai mattes tuia unicago
policy more contemptible and even ridiculous.
is that, it Is nothlog different from the policy
witn wnica tue same parties now contracting
ushered In disunion In lSCl, In the closing
nnurs ot tue Aumimsirauon or James liu
chanan. Yes, my dear friend', when we of this Ad
ministration carue into our places, In March,
1801, wo found there existing Just the system
which is now recommended ct Chicago, name
lyi 1st. A treasonable confedera:y In arms
against the Federal authority. 2d. A truce
between the Government of the Uiilted States
and the rebels, a veritable armistice which
was so construed that while tbe national ports
and forts were thoroushlr Invested alone the
ea -coast ana rivers oy too insurgents, msy
could be neither reinforced nor supplied oven
wnu ioou ot tno uovernment. m. a Jantrniii
debate, with a view to an ultimate National
Convention, which tbe rebels bauirhtilr do-
splsed and contemptuously rej-cted. What
were tue aiternauvis ten usi tuner to sur
render ourselves and the Government at dis
cretion, or to summon the peopleuo arras, ter
minate the armistice, adjourn the demoralizing
debate, and "repossess" ourselves of the
national torts ana posts. Ana now, Das amine
treasure, that has been spent, and all the pre
cious blood that has been poured forth, gone
for nothlog else but to secure an Ignominious
retrwat, and return at tha end of four years to
the hopeless Imbecility and rapid process of
national dissolution, which existed when Abra
ham Lincoln took Into his hands the reins of
Government!
Every one of you know that but Tor that ac
cession of Abraham Llucolu Just at that time
the Union would In less than three months have
fallwu Into absolute and Irretrievable ruin.
I will notdwell longonlhecomplalnts which
misguided but nol Intentionally perverse men
brlnz eg a In t tho Administration of Abraham
Lincoln. They complain of military nrre6te of
spies and lurking traitors in tue loyal mates, as
if the Government could Justify Ilsvlf for wait
ing, without preventive measures, for more
Stales to be Invaded or to be carried off Into
secession.
They complain that when wo call for volun
teers we present the alternative of a draft, aa
if when the ship baa been scuttled the captain
ought to leave tbe sleeping passenger to go to
tbe bottom without calling upon ibera. to take
their turn at the pump.
They are not content with plotting sedition
In secret places, but they go up and down the
public street uttering treason, vainly seeking
to provoke arrest In order that ibev may com
plain of a denial of tbe liberty of speech. The
impunity ihey everywhere enjoy under thu pro
tection of constitutional debate, shows at one
and the same time that their complaints are
groundless), and that the Union in the element
OI moral sianinty is stronger man iney know.
1 he chief complaint against the President la
that he will not accept peace on the baala o
the Integrity of tho Union, without having also
the abandonment of slavery. When and where
have the Insurgents offered him peace on the
oasis ot tue integrity oi tne umon r nobody
has offered It. Ibe rebels never will otkr it.
Nobody on their behalf can otler It. Thty are
aeterminea ana pieagea to rulo this Uepjbik
or rain it. I told you here a) car ago that
practically slavery was no louger Iu question
that It was perishtng, under ibe ulceration of
tne war. mat assertion lias dolu couurmea.
The Union men tn all tho slave Stales that
we have delivered are even more anxious thau
wears to abolish slavery. Witness Wwttru
Virginia, Maryland, Missouri, LouUlaua, leu
nosaeo aud Arkansas. Jkllirsou Davis tells
yon In effect, the same thing. Ho says that It
Is not slavery, but Independence and ttoverclgu
ty for which he Is contending. Ihure Is good
reason for this. A hundred dollar In gold Is
only a year's purchase of tho labor of a work
log man In every part of the Culled States. At
less than half that price you could buy all the
slaves In tha couutrv. Nev ertheless our opuo.
noots want a distinct exposition of thu Presi
dent's views on the ultimate solution of the
slavery que tlon
YVhv do thcv want It f For the same reaaun
that the, Pharisees aud Sadducees wanted an
authoritative resolution of the questions of casu
Istry which arose in their day. One or those
sects believed In the Kingdom to come, and the
other altogether denied the rwurrectlou of the
dead. Nevertheless, they walked together iu
lovlug accord tn eeatrh of Instruction couccru
Ing the spirit world. "Master." said thcv.
" there was a man of Our n jilou w ho married
a wife and died, leaving six lr others. These
hrnlh-Ta incfMaalwatlv tuarrlMil tlia uIiIiiiihiI
I woman, snd afterwards died. And last of all
the woman died also. In the reaurrectloo,
which of the seven shall have this woman for
htawtrol"
Now what waa It tn lhm whlhr nna et all
should have the woman to wife In Heaven? It
coma oe nothing to tbe Seddacees In any cas.
What waa It to any human being this side the
sravel What was It to any bo man being la
Heaven, except tho woman In Heaven and her
seven hns.andsl Absolutely nothing. Tet
they would have an answer. And they received
one. The answer wss, that while Id this mor
tal stats men and women should nerer tea to
marry and to dlej there will be In the resorree.
tlon neither death nor marrying, or giving la
marriage,
Aithwugh altogether unsuthortzel to speak
for tbe President upon hypothetical questions,
I think I can give an answer nnon tha mM-wi
of slavery at the present day an answer which
will be explicit, and I hope not altogether un
satisfactory. While the rebols continue to
wsg war against tno Uovernment of the Unl
ted States, the military measure affecting sla
very, which have been adopted from necessity,
to bring the war to a speedy and successful
end, will be continued, except so far aa prac
tical experience shall show thst tbeyeanbo
modified advantageously with m view to the
same end. When the Insurgents shall have
dlabanded their armies, and laid down their
arms, tbe war will Instantly cease and all the
war measures then existing. Including thoss
which affect slavery, will cease also, and all
tbe moral, economical and political question,
as well qa cations affecting slavery aa others
which shall be then existing, between Individ
uals, and States, and the Federal Government,
whether they arose before the Civil War be
gun, or whether they grew ont of It, will, by
force of tbe Constitution, pass over to tb ar
bitrament of the courts of law, and to th
councils of legislation.
I am not unsophisticated enough to expect
that consplratora while yet unsubdued, and
exercising an nnrealstod desj itm In the in
surrectionary State, will eltbt tu-t for or even
accept an amnesty Dssea on irf 'Trrenaer ot
the power they have so recKotsty usurped.
Nevertheless, I know that If ahyfiCh conspire-
or should tender his 'unralsslc ( ip-n each
Urms, that he w'll at once receive a candid
bearing, and an answer prom tew inrely by a
desire tor peace, with the ros.ntenaace of the
Union. On the other hsnd, I do expect prop
'Ulons of peace with a rcstcratlon oi the
Union, to come Lot from the in federate In
authority, nor through them, but fr 'tn citizen
and States under and behind tb l. And 1 ex
p xt such propositions from citizens and States
tocmnoover the con fed era tea In power, Just
so fait as tho-te citizens and Sfate eh ill be de
livered by the Federal arms, fn mthensurpatlon
by which they are now oppr eed.
All the world knows, thst sn far as I am
concerned, and. I believe, eo fa- as the Presi
dent Is concerned, all. such ym Ilcatlona will
receive Just such an answer as it become a
great, magnanimous, and humaoe peopl to
grant to brethren who hare corns back from
their wanderings, to seek a shelter in tho com
mon ark or onr national security aua nappi
ness. The sun Is setttnir. So surely as It shall rise
again, so purely do leblnk that the great evenU
we hive now celebrated prelude the end of our
nation's troubles, and tbe restoration of the
uatloual authority, with peace, prosperity, and
freedom throughout the whole land, from the
lakes to the gulf, and from ocean to ocean.
And so l ota you gooamgnt; anamiy uoa
have you, with our whole country, alway La
His holy and paternal keeping.
Enthusiastic cheers were given at ths eoa
cluMon of the speech.
r Flrl. o i a l.
NEWLY COM Ml. IUED OFFICER.
Circular, No. St.
Waa DapanrMBrr, 1
AdjcTaht OtvFuatt.'a Urrica, I
WASlIINQTOt., AUJUlt 2, 14. )
It ta announced forthainfornaUonandfUtdane
of all concerned, that aa officer of a this ytara'
volunteer organltaUoa,who Mcclvesanev com
mission at a ale subsequent to that ot hts orlilnal
eotrmoe Into service, U held ta eervtce for three
yrate from the date of his latt majtTHn, and nol for
three yers frm th dat of original musUr-ln.
No mustera-ia ar authorised or race-fitted by
th War Departmnt,trfA unexpired term of an
orgaoliatlon. Musters so madahav uniformly
tMta revoked, so soon as brought to nolle.
Uher musters hav been mad by Commls
sarlea of Muster, or thaJr Asslstaata,er IA wn
pired portion of a term, and tbers-'la doubt as lo th
position or anoOleer, lb Involved should b
forwarded thro (h th proper Gum miliary of
Musters to in Adjutant General oi in Army, tot
he decision of th war Pep art men
Wgulatlons similar to th foregoing apply ta
cr sanitation muttered into ttrvl'e for a period tete
than three yrari, th general rule being that a com-
ml ii toned otneer snail, la all cases, d mustered ta
igr the period forwbtehhls rcglmeat or company
was originally ao mustered.
If umetre of veteran organisations do not destr
o if cur tbe advantages of their format commit
Hone and rank as contemplated by Section S, of
laragtapb 1, Circular No. SS, current aeries, from
thsotllce, thrycan declln to b remastered a
therein directed, and ontgeerpe out the umpired
term of the mwter under whUhth y mag be acting
thettne. k. U. TOWN4KND,
Assistant Adjutant General.
(WriOI A L
War DcrABTktcjrr, 1
CUT, 1
ADJPTAItTOBHlMAl.'a UrrlLE,
WitHiNdTON. Seutemljer fi. 184
Tiie folio in uiftJera. havloc heea reported at
th he til garters uf the army for th offeaeaa
ticrelatfor specified, are hereby notified that they
will stand dlamUeed tn aervloe of tb Ualtad
Slates, unless, wttbla fifteen dajs from this date,
tlieyapinar be I ra tn Military Com ulsstou, la
enloa In this city, of which ttrlgadier Geucr!
John C, Caldwell, United States volunteer. 1
president, and malt eatliieebirr deiene to in
chargea agtlait them
rurauemfiHng to ot'iif a cotorei oty ei a iuiui u r,
and,failtnj fifAif arrrt'inj him ui a del rter (he
knowing at the Hnv he uui not,) iru a view to is
curing money thereby
Ueutea-.nl N. B. Uoutwell, llth h.w lainpshlr
volunteers.
Vuobedience of order t and abttiw u ''K' leave
First Licuteuant J More Wit .ad.MloMgaa
.valry.
49l'r Wi M icaiT
Surgeon David (i. Haiti, iJUt rui ) Iraila vol
unieera. ., , .
HntUejtenant Hiram Set 1 .1 Main heavy
.muerj .
Astli ant Surgron AUon 1 Cuert,
. 7th Illinois
0V-..MaFraiuiiE Hale, 1st M thty an light ar.
'llmi'laln Asa 5, Flake, 4'h MlonoU volun
teers t- " 10 U'SUND,
ta Aialstaut Arjut-tnt Qeneral.
N
O T I 0 E
UNITED STATES 7 3-10 LOAN.
Tilt HUSr NATIONAL DANK OF WASH
INGTON HAS HOW ON IIANP,
HEADY FOH IMMEDIAIL t LIVERT,
a lull supply of these new Hoods.
Sultcriberi are requetted to pment t-letr certfical,e
at once and receive Ihrir VonJt
Those having money to Invest should not los
sUhtof the fact that, by investing lathis Los,
ihey not onlr receive interest at in high rat of
1 S10 per cent , tut secure to tbemaelf e the very
Important adtentsg of obtaining, at in end of
fire) years,
SIX I'KH eKNT. 6-20 YEAH DONDS AT PAH,
w hi on a now worth over 14 pr cent, premium,
and which aittr th war must necessarily advine
to a much higner rat ant? tf
lUtOWN'b UAUy-TKM)J-it
A vertical and nolaslcss SPRING CRADL,
emily converted into a Uaby-Jurou-, Ubj-Hoise,
1H!, -Walker, Iliga-Lh4.lr, UttjJiaa or H3by
tinsel th who I designed to roller Mth-ri,
oujafort and amus children, obvHt tb evils of
rooking tbem, and me the ei-pette of a hutee. lis
miiliou is perieghy Itelibv ud ciiuilug. rue
, .0 ass. S.OJ U ui...i.jl. .""U,. co
tSI Broad r, N. V.
Ad rtrii HU, aial waatJ lor Wamlof lou.
ss-.iJtm -mj

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