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National Republican. (Washington City (D.C.)) 1872-1888, March 14, 1881, Image 2

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THE ATIOKAL BEPUBMCAST, MONDAY MOBSTESTG, MARCH 14, 1881.
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NATIONAL REPUBLICAN
foe isai.
- j -Prospectus.
-The National Republican begins the
new year under new management and with
new material.
Jt will be a stalwart Republican journal.
-' .ft will be tlic best newspaper in the J)islrict
of Columbia.
. JlwUl furnish during the sessions of Con
gress a satisfactory rqiorl of tlie proceedings,
and will at all limes give complete information
of the official doings in all Departments of the
Government.
Jt will give all interesting information that
can be legitimately obtained concerning the
intentions and policies of the ruling poiccr.
In District affairs it will bww only the best
interests of Hie people upon wlwse favor it re
lies, and will at all limes co-operate with pro
gressive citizens, without regard to their polit
ical predilections, who have measures to pro
pose and advance for tlie improiement of the
National Capital.
Jt wiR furnish a daily record of all the in
teresting social events of the city, making Us
toddy department a special feature.
Jt wuT, give telegraphic news from all parts
of the world readied by tlie wires, and in its
editorials and foreign, domestic, and city news
will keep pace witli tlie times.
THE IV ATKXNAIi REPUBLICAN
Is published dally (Sundays excepted) by
The Rational Rrpnbllcaa Printing Company
Ax 130S Pennsylvania Avenue.
TERMS:
One copy one year-
$6 00
50
One copy one month
jSddreu National Republican.
WasMngton, D. C
Entered at the postrofllce at Washington, D. C, as
tecond-class matter.
AMUSEMENTS.
National Theatbk " Tlie Tourists."
Ford's Opera-house" The Phoenix.'
Pud-Fellows IIall Blind Tom,
Theatre Comque " The Skeleton Iland."
Talxjj adck Hall Professor Carpenter.
Ccecoban Aet Gallery Masterpieces of Art Ad
mission free, except on Mondays, Wednesdays
and Fridays
WASHINGTON, D. C, MARCH 14, 1SSL
Ponnlafion of the National Capital 180,000.
Tlie Assassination of the Czar.
The whole civilized world will feel a
shock of horror at reading the account of
the assassination of the Czar of Russia,
which is contained in the dispatches to
day. It was one of those possible events
which have long been contemplated, but
the previous failures to consummate it has
lulled the sense of expectation, and now
the tragedy comes in an unsuspected mo
ment to horrify mankind, Atany will
look upon it as the legitimate outcome of
a vicious system of government, where
oppression and wrong find vent in deadly
rivalry and implacable revenge. It will
be difficult to trace its source. It may
have been the result of the blind mad
ness of Nihilism, or it may have been
the finale of a plot of other enemies. In
any aspect it is a horrible event for this
civilized age to contemplate, and will
have its effect in influencing the opinions
".n wiir thp hopft of hotter thines ladsis.
The madness of office-seeking has its
plainest exposition in the matter of the
solicitations for appointment to the
smaller missions abroad. There are a
myriad of these applications, and they
are coming in at the rate of hundreds
each day. For the most part the salaries
attached to these places are small, and the
duties are really contemptible. Why in
telligent gentlemen, who ought to earn
twice the pay in any honorable business
or profession at home, should want to
"banish themselves from America to
a place where everything is strange
and not of interest, and spend the
best years of their lives in solacing
themselves with a sinecure in lieu of use
fulness, is something past understanding.
Ah! there is no place like home.
1
Is it not rather a contemptible thing
for the American people to attach a sal
ary to the office of President and then
turn about and abuse him for using it as
he pleases? Whose affair is it but his
own? Why should he be accountable
to Tom, Dick, and Harry for the proper
use of his money ? They would consider
it singular impertinence for any one to
pry into their u-.e of their private funds.
The fact is, ex-President Hayes is not
susceptible to the charge of penurious
ncss. He was economical and frugal,
good old-fashioned virtues that are worthy
of more emulation than they get. And
perhaps he had good reasons for saving
his money. Whether he did or not,
however, is nobody's business. It was
his own.
Five ye Irs ago to-day the last arrest
and imprisonment of a private citizen
without due process of law was made by
the Congress of the United States. This
closed the long story of the arbitrary ex
ercise of this power, and marked the ad
vent of a broader citizenship. The occa
sion was the arrest and confinement
in a common jail of Hallet Kilbourn
"because he-declined to submit his private
papers or answer impertinent questions
about his personal affairs, as demanded
by an inquisitorial committee of that
Tiody. It is but recently that the Su
preme Court of the United States ren
dered its unauimous decision against the
authority by Congress ever again thus to
invade the personal liberty of the citizen.
The Republican, which has been exceedingly
bright and newsy under its new management, is
acquiring further distinction by the vigor andabil
ity of its editorial writing. A splendid leading ar
ticle w as that last Friday on the banks and their
greenbacks. That Secretary Windom is of the
eame opinion with The Republican is shown by
the decision published yesterday that the banks
cannot play fist and looe with their circulation.
Sunday Herald.
We takeoff our hat to our Democratic
neighbor. It is one of the pleasant
amenities of journalism that a political
opponent recognizes the ability of The
Republican under its present manage
ment An Assistant Sect etary, who has been
in office three years, said on Saturday
that his patronage was so little that he
had three friends whom he wished to ac
commodate, and if he could do it by giv
ing his check for 1,000 in each case he
would gladly get out of it in that way.
Xo. doubt the President and others
having favors to bestow believe that they
have much to be.tr. But the man who
lias any soul in him, and for reasons
finds himself impelled to ask for an
office, is the true sufferer after all.
v3"" v - - "Sf
General'Malione's 'Vote To-Day?
Probablyho topic is being more widely
'tliscnssed to-day throughout the country
than the attitude of General Mahone,
Senator Jroui Virginia, toward the Re
publican party. This comes of the fact
that upon his vote depends the question,
likely to be decided to-tlay, of supremacy
in the United States Senate. The com
mittees and officers of that body are to be
appointed, nominally for the brief execu
tive session, but virtually and practically
for two years. The committees will either
be composed, each, of a majority of the
friends of the administration anxious for
its successor of a majority of its oppo
nents straining every energy to make it
a failure, on the ruins of which they hope
for a party triumph in 1834. To these
committees must be committed all legis
lation and executive nominations.
Hostile committees can delay action,
refuse to receive, and neglect to seek in
formation, and color with party bias their
consideration of and reports upon all mat
ters referred to them. Appropriations
for carrying on the Government, and for
maintaining its authority when resisted by
theBourbon .Democrai'yjas it has been in
the past two years, must depend on
whether General Mahone will aid the
Bourbons or the Government. The
power of the President to nominate faith
ful and patriotic district attorneys and
marchals, who can be confirmed without
the concurrence of the Bourbon Senators
from the States in which they are to
serve, must for two years depend on the
vote of General Mahone. The success or
failure of new measures that may be found
neces'sary for the further security of the
ballot-box and the protection of equal
political rights of the citizen will depend
on his vote.
How, then, will General 3Iahone vote?
He is the leader in Virginia of cer
tainly over thirtyHhousand independent
white voters of Democratic antecedents.
Besides these thirty thousand are many
others who voted for straight Republican
electors in November, but who did so
hoping thereby to defeat Barnum's ticket.
He is also the leader of the great body of
colored voters in Stale contests. These two
elements can control the election in Vir
ginia this year, and choose a United States
Senator. They can, in 1SS2, elect seven
out of nine Representatives in Con
gress. In 1884 they will have come
abreast with each other on na
tional interests, and the Solid South
will be broken. The thirty thousand are
not Republicans, but they are friends of
the Nation and its laws, and are willing
to support the new administration. They
are for an honest ballot and a fair count,
and have already compelled these in Vir
ginia. They are the blaek man's friends
and political associates. They are for
free schools, and against the whipping
post and the capitation tax, both of which
are political engines for disfranchising
colored voters. They are for our national
election laws, and all amendments calcu
lated to strengthen them. They are for
national force against the disobedient.
They are against the Democratic party
which is headed by William H. Barnum,
and led in the Senate by Bayard, Hamp
ton, Vance, and others like them. Yet
they are not Republicans.
Now, the question whether General
Mahone's friends are as goodcompany
for Republicans in Virginia as he would
be for Republicans in the Senate answers
itsolf. The lrave anil patriotic men who
have, under his lead, fought tlie Virginia
B ourbons are as worthy of the respect of
Republicans as he is. National suprem
acy, equal rights, and fair elections are
more desirable in Virginia than a party
name in a State campaign. General Ma
hone would be guilt' of a great crime
against tlie ideas on which the Repub
lican party is based if he should to-day
so act as to disband the thirty-two
thousand anti-Bourbon whites, without
whose continued aid all that lias been
gained in Virginia must be lost.
But how will General Mahone vote?
The estimate put upon his patriotism
and that of his followers by-the Republi
can Senators will settle that question.
They will, it is likeh', by some significant
action, give assurance to the anti-Bourbon
whites of Virginia that they are not out
laws in Republican estimation. Then
General Mahone can, without surrender
ing Virginia to the Bourbons, give his
vote against Bourbonism in the Senate as
he has done in the contests in his own
State. That he will so act there is no
reason to doubt. If Republican Senators
were to draw lines between Virginia loy
alists of to-day to the disparagement of
the thirty-two thousand white independ
ents, the Virginia Senator could not fol
low them, because to do so would be to
disband his party. His main desire is to
maintain the anti-Bourbon majority in
Virginia. This he can do if isely aided
by Republicans. This he could not do if
they failed to see the value of seeking his
advice on the subject.
If twenty independents held the bal
ance of power in the Senate, the twenty
would be consulted as to the organization.
We doubt not that the Republican Sena
tors will so-eonsult with General Mahone.
And so believing-, we feel sure that the
Republicans will vote with General Ma
hone, and that he will, with the hearty
concurrence and approval of his party in
Virginia, vote with the Republicans on
matters pertaining to the organization.
The Republican party, founded inlS56,
did not lower its standard when, in order
to save the Nation in 1S61, it struck hands
with patriotic Democrats who were will
ing to support the administration in coun
sel and fight the Nation's battles in the
field.
The Republican party of 1SS0, saved
alive by a scant majority in New York
and a political miracle in Indiana, and
now having but 148 Representatives
against 145 of all others in the House,
and 37 against 39 of all others in the
Senate, will not lower its standard if
it strikes" hands for the execution of
the laws with the Virginia Independ
ent Senator and his two collcauges in
the lower House, as well as with the In
dependents from Missouri and Pennsyl-1
vania in the latter body. As in 1S61, the
welfare of the Nation is now at stake, and
the party can only succeed as the leader
of all loyal men on a broad platform. The
thirty-eight administration members in
the Senate and a Republican Vice-President
will not fail to control the organiza
tion of that body.
a
Human Nature The man looking for
an office is the one from whom office
seekers may expect the most bitter con
demnation. Xuucs to a 3Iartyr.
Put aside your little grievance,
Modify your senseless whine.
Hancock's done-the manly business ;
Can't you, too, fall into line?
-. ' V jm & $- -
AttoriicjTT inJtlieDepartracnts:
A1 question'has Tjeeh.jai.sed in a suit by
Gilmore & Co against ex-Secretary of the
Interior Schurz which promises, if
brought to trial, to throw light upon a
question which has long needed exact
definition. It is as to the status of claim
agents or attorneys before the Depart
ments. As far as our information goes,
there is no decision on record going to
the merits of this case. But the practice
of attorneys or agents before the Depart
ments is already a great matter, and is
increasing in extent daily. There is little
or no provision made by the rules of the
Departments for such practice, but it has
passed along so far as a matter of cour
tesy, and of the rights of clients to be
heard. But the question now arises, how
far shall the Departments go in giving
their time to the agents, and what rules
may a Secretary make as to debarring
an agent from practice? If it were
an exact case, the Department a
court, with the Secretary as judge,
he would undoubtedly have the right to
debar an attorney for cause ; but in this
and like instances, neither is the Secre
tary clothed with the functions of a judge
nor the agent with those of an attorney.
The' are judge and client by generally
accepted courtesy ; that is all." The Secre
tary, however, being intrusted with the
care and responsibility of affairs in bis
Department, has certainly the right,
without precise definition, to protect him
self and his Department from encroach
ments or from sinister designs, or from
the use of bad men. But this is a hard
matter to prove, and is subject to abuse
even by so high an officer of the Govern
ment as a Secretary. If the matter is left
to his decision he may use his power au
tocratically, and debar without sufficient
cause or without sufficient investigation.
He may in fact injure or ruin the reputa
tion of an agent or attorney at
will, and do great injustice to
a claimant simply because of his
(the claimant's) connection with an
objectionable attorney. But from the
Department's side of the question there
are further considerations. A large share
of the claims brought before them are for
reconsideration of cases passed upon. It
is presumed that they are settled, though
in many cases they are not. But an at
tornej' comes for a Te-onsideration fre
quently without further evidence, and
not only consumes time and study on the
part of officials, but consumes the time
and labor which is not contemplated in
the provision made for carrying on the
business of the Departments. Most De
partments have too little skilled clerical
force, and what they have are given upon
the basis of doing current workx To de
mand, therefore, that much of their time
should be yielded to back work is to ask
that the Secretary waive the interests
with which he is especially charged in
favor of those which Congress has not
provided for or has detailed no clerks to
do. Now, how far does the judgment
of the Secretary in such instances as
these find the support of law? The
fact is, the whole of this subject
needs and deserves the serious considera
tion of Congress. It would be of un
doubted advantage, for instance, if the
undecided work of each Department were
made a special business, with an assign
ment of clerks for carrying it on. - Time
and labor would be saved in this way
and much dissatisfaction he avoided.
But these thoughts are only partial in the
consideration of this subject. It is one
that must be brought to the attention
of Congress sooner or later, and have defi
nite boundaries fixed as to the rights of
both parties in the issue. In the mean
time, it is a matter of such interest to
attorneys that we open our columns to
its discussion, with a view to getting
light.
e
The next most disagreeable thing to
having an office to ask for is to have one
to give.
PERSONALITIES.
Mr. Pierke L. Jocy has started for
Yokohama to join the Palos expedition.
i Jay Gould and party returned to New
York from their Southwestern trip Saturday.
Mrs. A. G.Wilkerson and her children
and Miss Maud Rollins have sailed for Bermuda.
Samuel L. Gales, secretary and su
perintendent of the Memphis Cotton Exchange,
died Saturday.
Governor Pillsbury, it is expected, will
announce Secretary Windom's successor in the
Senate to-day.
Hon. L. C. Coulson is warmly urged
for a foreign mission by Alabama Republicans,
who say he is a true and earnest man.
- Senator Sherman has presented each
member of the Ohio Legislature with a cabinet
photograph of himself bearing his signature.
David Davis says the fence is not so
agreeable a position as it might be. That is why
he gets down on the Democratic side to rest so
often, probably.
President Garfield dined with the
members of the Cabinet, cx-Secrctary Ramsey,
and Senators Anthony and Allison, at Wclckcr's
Saturday evening.
Str.uvbep.uies" in the cup are as plenti
ful as three dollars ; but the trouble is that one
cannot find sugar dear enough to put on them.
Xciv York Herald.
It is reported that Count Hubert, son of
Prince Bismarck, has eloped with a German
Princes?, the wife of a high court dignitary, of Ger
many, and that the couple arc in Italy.
Attorney-General MacVeagh is soon
to be entertained at two public dinners in Phila
delphia. One is to be given by the Union League
and the other by his personal and political friends.
It is reported that Hon. Joe R. Rich
ards, former clerk of the loner house of the
Arkansas Legislature, will be a prominent candi
date for Clerk of the next House of Rcprcscnla
th es.
TnERE are 9G4 noblemen and gentle
men now being educated at Eaton College. The
list includes an Indian prince, a duke, twenty-one
lords, three counts, five baronets, and forty-two
honorable?.
The late Senator Carpenter's hand
writing was to the school teachers not very hand
some, but it told that the man was informal, reso
lute, sure, slightly impatient, and, to the last,
somewhat boyish.
"Half-baked evangelists" is what a
religious paper calls some of the peripatetics who
go from church to church with Turkey-morocco,
limp-backed Bibles under their arms, putting on
airs as if they were Moody nnd Sankey.
Mr, Paul H. Hayne, the Southern poet,
lives in a rough hut of pine boards on the Georgia
Railroad, about tw enty miles from Augusta, where,
completely isolated from the social and artistic
world, he devotes his life to literary work.
Six members of the Senate are foreign
born-: Messrs. Farley, of California; Fair, of Ne
vada; Jones, of Florida, and Sewell, of New Jer
sey, arc Irishmen. Senator Jones, of Nevada, was
born in England, and Senator Beck, of Kentucky,
in Scotland.
The Dowager Lady Raglan, widow of
Lord Raglan, who for sometime commanded the
British forces in the Crimea, aud died there on June
28,18-o, is dead. She was the second daughter of
the third Earl of Mornington, brother of the Iron
Duke, and was born on the IJJth of March, 1811.
Ex-Secretary of State William M. Ev
arts, of New York; Senator Allen G. Thurman, of
Ohio, and Timothy O. Howe, of Wisconsin,-the
United States Commissioners to the International
Monetary Conference shortly to be held in Paris,
will sail for Europe on Aprils in the Imnan steam-.
ship City of Richmond.
AN EXTRA SESSION.
Tlie VIcirs of a Republican GoQffi'CSH
man.. To the Editor of Tlic llepiiblican :
An extra session of Congress seems to
me to be a matter of very great importance to the
country, and necessarily so to the Republican party.
It is well known that a funding bill could have
been passed through the last Congress at the extra
ordinary low rate of three per it nt. Interest but for
the stupid, if not malignant, stipulation contained
in that "fifth section." But, as usual, the Demo
cratic party could not resist their irrcpret-sible pen
chant for asinine blundering,' aud the bill ery
properly failed. The money markets of the world
were never in so favorable a condition as now to
furnish the Government with immense sums
at merely nominal rates. It is not at
all likely "that" this anomalous financial
condition will continue for any very
great length of time, and if our party, with the
Sower now to fund this seven hundred millions of
ebt at three per cent., should loiter along until
the exigencies and demands of an active and
speculative trade shall double tlie present current
rates for money, the country will not fail to hold
the Republican party to strict accountability for
the consequences of failure. A second reason,
which might properly come first, is in the impor
tance to the Nation of having the Election Commit
tees immediately organized and bent South to
thoroughly investigate the many contested cases
for seats which will arise in the Forty-seventh
Congress. The Republican majority will be un
comfortably small in the next Congress, if the ten
to twenty fairlv-electcd Republican members from
the hull-dozed districts are denied their seats. I
cannot believe that a Republican Congress will fail
or refuse to furni.h its own true and faithful friends
in said districts with all reasonable and proper
lawful help, and that, too. at the beginning rather
than at the end of the sessiou. Let us have the
investigations all made and ready to be reported
immediately upon, the convening of the regular
session of Congress, aud then, we will have the
benefits of all the votes -and assistance of all our
members. A third reason is to be found in the
necessity for a deliberate and searching discussion
of " the apportionment bill " There are very grave
and vital questions connected with that subject
which, should be slowly, cautiously, and
thoroughly discu-sed, and It wera wise if an
unusual deliberation and investigation be given
to that very wide and all.pervadiug question.
A fourth reason ot generally understood by onr
friends in the North is to be found in the condi
tion of things South, notably in Mississippi. There.
isTiot a Jair-minded, unprejudiced, well-informed
man in the United States but knows that.givena
free, fair, and untra'innieled ballot, Mississippi is a
Republican State. The colored people are in a
large majority, and, not bull-dozed, are all Repub
licans. There is also a large and growing white
Republican vote in that State, which, coupled
with the colored, makes a fair, honest, and un
questioned majority. But the w hole country knows
what has been accomplished by the "Mississippi
plan." An investigation now will send some
of the bull-dozing Congressmen of that laith
to the rear, aud give many of our friends
In that State fresh heart and hope, and infuse into
many faithful men whorare beginning to grow
despondent at the long, dark Democratic night
which has enshrouded them in silent gloom. Be
sides, there is to be a State election held there next
autumn for Governor, judges, minor offices, &e.,
and these investigations now will almost certainly
enable our party, aided by the Independents of
that State who are tired of Democracy, to carry
Governor Alcorn into power, and with linn
a Legislature and other officers, who will
send to Washington, alter a while, a- United
States Senator in place of Senator I.amar.
These reasons alone, to hay nothing ol having
the organization of both Houses in our possession,
are suitieicnt, in my judgment, to warrant aye, to
demand the convening of an extra session at the
earliest povsible period after all our present va
cancies shall havp been tilled. VerJ- respectfully,
WILLIAM It. MOORE, M. C,
Tenth Congressional District of Tennessee.
Nnrj-oi--General Brewster Set Right.
To the Editor of The EepuWican:
Your New "Orleans correspondent, in
giving a sketch of the Federal office-holders of
Louisiana was sadly mistaken in regard to the
character of Surveyor-General Brewster. The
term carpet-bagger cannot be justly applied to Mr.
Brewster, who has resided with his family in Lou
isiana for sixteen years, haiing selected that Statt
for a home soon after being disabled by wounds
received in battle while a soldier in the Federal
army. In 166S he w as elected to tlic house of rep
resentatives of his State, his name having been
placed on the ticket without his knowledge orcon
sent. At the expiration of his term he was re
elected, and in 1S72 he was called to the speaker's
chair without an hour's notice of his election. The
following year hejvas elected to the State senate,
and in 1876 he wus chosen presidential elector. Mr.
Brewster is now holding the position of surveyor
general, receiving his first appointment from Gen
eral Grant, and during the last session of Congress
he was reappointed without solicitation on his
part, but, like many others, he went, over with
out action having been taken npon his nomina
tion. Z.
,
Broira Tiot 'Expelled.
To the Editor of The Republican :
Your article- on "Historic Halls" in
last Saturday's Republican has the following
paragraph:
It was here when, in later days, William J.
Brown, a Representative from Indiana, sought to
obtain the coveted prize of the speakership by
bribing his brother members; and, amid a scene
of the wildest excitement, was indignantly ex
pelled from the House.
This is a mistake. The Abolitionists held the
balance of rower between the Whigs and Demo
crats, and it was charged that Mr. Brown had
promised them prominent places on rommittees
should he be elected. This aroused the Democracy
and they abused him, but he was not expelled.
J. D. D.
Senator Rni Is' JLosIe.
To the Editor oftheBepubUcan:
The speech of Senator David Davis,-of
Illinois, in the Senate Saturday, Is such a fine
specimen of senatorial logic and political wisdom
and profundity as to deserve special attention.
The Senator first explained that he was elected
to tlie Senate free from politics, committals, and
personal obligations, and is therefore entitled to
occupy an independent position between the two
parties, and consequently feels compelled to vote
to maintain tlie present Democratic partisan or
ganization, though the same is not agreeable to
his taste or judgment. Y.
B?ccJ.cr on Hie Kabbntli.
Mr.Beecher, in a sermon on the text
" The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the
Sabbath," said : " Every father is best qualified to
tell how Sunday should be kept. It ought to be
the pleasantcst day to your children. It was not
to me w hen I was a child. I was a mirthful boy,
"but I was carried to church after hainghad my
face washed and it needed it laughter and I
was walked down the street and not allowed to
play with any stray dog I met. Laughter. In
church, if I went to sleep, I was snapped on the
head, while the deacon near me was allowed to
slumber. Then I was taken home and allowed the
privilege of learning my catechism. Laughter.
If I did not know it I could not have my dinner,
and you all know what a Sunday dinner is. Loud
laughter. I have given a good many hard knocks
at Calvanism, and the origin was the deprivation
of the Sunday dinners of my boyhood. Charles
and I used to stand in the window and watch,
and the moment that the rim of the sun went
under we cried 'Good, good, good.' Here Mr.
Becclier clapped his hands like a boy. Make
Sunday sweet aud lovely in the family. Some
novels might be read on Sunday. It is the con
tents of a book that makes its value. This institu
tion of Sunday is moving silently down the ages
a guide to life and immortality."
A Tet of Fraternal Loir.
Among the prisoners arraigned in the
Jeflerson Marke? Police Court yesterday was an old
man whose red nose, watery, eyes, and general
broken-down appearance denoted the habitual
drunkard.
"My first offense," said he cheerfully to Judge
Patterson. "I hope you'll take it into considera
tion." " Probably your first this week."
" I hope you'll discharge me, judge. I have a
brother who adores me. Last night we had some
hard words, and I drowned my grief in beer My
brother w ill go wild if yon commit me. He would
lay down his life for me."
" Here, then, is an excellent opportunity for a
display of this -affection. I will fine you 310, and
your brothcrcan obtain your release by p.ij ihg that
amount." Acip York Sun.
Bob Lincoln at College.
Harvard traditions state that Robert T.
Lincoln was very popular with his classmates, a
good scholar, a pleasant companion, and a sensi
ble young man. Boston Tmi illcr.
That confirms the statement iu The Republican
one w eek ago ; for the writer of the sketch of the
new Secretary of War was a classmate of Mr. Lin
coln at Harvard.
Ex-Srcrelnrj- Selim-z Still Creatine; Di.
enlion.
The Republicans of Massachusetts are
dividing into Schurz and anti-Schurz factions. If
this newspaper ever indulged in slang it would be
temptod to observe to them that the Poncd. ques
tion is too small a one to rend their shirts about.
JVcic Yoik Ttibvne.
.
Who Wns SheT
The wife of a certain H. G. wore a
dress to the inauguration ball which cost 1,500.
Its front, a breadth of satin, w as a garden of roses
violets, pansiei.and pinks, while not to set aside
fashion's stern decrees, sunflowers turned their
constant faces io the light
Clerical Jlodcsty.
In a recent sermon Talmage modestly
remarked: "If, when I get to Ileaven, I find that
less than one hundred thousand have been saved
through my instrumentality, I'll ask to be excused,
and to be allow cd to come back, and atone for the
dead failure."
&
-XTTvR ACTIVE i '
ARTICLES AND
ATTRACTIVE
XDargains IN
Bleached Sheetings, 25c.
Bed Spreads, $1.
Blankets, $1.75.
Cheap towels, 23c.
Curtain Laces, 25c.
Choice Tidies, 50c.
Cream Damasks, 87 1-2C.
Comforts, $1.25.
Boston
Dry Goods
House,
921 Pennsylvania Avenue.
WOODWARD,
IOTHROP &
COCHRANE.
M. W. Gait, Bro.
& Co.
Diamonds.
Watches.
Jewelry.
Silver Ware..
Plated Ware.
Fancy Goods.
1107 Penna. Ave.
Extraordinary Inducements.
M. GOLDSMITH,
917 PENNA. ATENTJE.
Diamond Earrings, $20 to $450.
Diamond Iace Pins, $25 to $300.
Diamond Solitaire Uing-s from $15
to $325.
Gents' Solid Gold Stem-winding-
Watches, $35 to $200.
Ladies' Gold Stem-winders, $25
to $175.
Opera Glasses, Silver "Ware, all at
the Lowest Prices.
TnMm
WALTHAM WATCHES.
We confidently recommend the
Watches manufactured by the
American Wateh Co., Walthani,
Mass., as the most reliable time
keepers that can he obtained for
the price. A large assortment of
all grades andjstylcs always in
stock at the lowest prices.
M. W. GALT, BRO. & CO.,
1107 Penna. Ave.
felS-tf
thtcaftonal.
National Academy of Fine Arts,
FOR JjADEES AND GESTLiEJIEX.
The most thorough Instruction in every department
of Art, from the Preparatory Course to Portrait and
Historical PalnUng. The Science of Art will be made
so clear and simple that years of study will be saved
the student.
CORCORAN BUILDING. FIFTEENTH STREET.
se30-tf
Spencerian Business College,
COR. OF SEVENTH AND L STS. N. W.
This institution has a progressive and succcsstul ex
perience of sixteen years. It educates young men
nnd women for usefulness and self-support. Its grad-
ship; Bookkeeping by single and double entry, adapted
to everv vnnetv of business: I!nIno.s Practice, re-
I quiring the making out and exchanging of all kinds
01 uusuiess patera, paving uiiu receiving ouja unu
keeping the accounts; Elocution and Lectures. Day
and Evening Sessions begin MONDAY, AUGUST 30,
ISsO. For Information and terms call at the College,
or address HENRY C. SPKNCEK. Principal. au!7
T ESSONS IN ELOCUTION BY
EDWARD C.TOWNSEND,
AT NO. 1113 NINTH ST. N. W.
Mr. Townsend can be engaged for Headings at a
moderate charge. o3-tf
5$firrancitt(.
i New York Stock Market.
nnxie
-Orders in Stocks and In
vestment Securities executed
with dispatch.
BTJT .2iTID SjBXjXj
Government Bonds,
Foreign Exchange,
Coin, &c, &c.
H. D. Cooke. Jr., & Co.,
BANKERS,
1429 IF Street.
ma2-tf
ozEssais'Z'ar.A.-Nr & co.,
Jfo. 513 Seventh Street,
BEAL ESTATE BROKERS.
MONEY TO LOAN IN SUMS PROM $100 TO tiO.OOO.
Qtcli
etvest3ie:nt securities.
If you w ant to bny or sell call on
II. JE. OFPIiEY,
JaC-tf Cor. Fifteenth and O streets, upstairs.
XXTAT T C"P rOllTUNES MADE IN
VV ALsLs O 1 . STOCKS. flO TO Si0,tt
cipal guaranteed. Address WARD & CO., Bankers
& Brokprs. Si Exchange Place. New York. oclSMWF
MONEY LOANED
At 6, 7, and 8 Per Cent.,
ON SATISFACTORY SECURITY,
apl-tf JOIIN SHERMAN & CO.
invested, .fronts ana prin
JOHN H. MITCHELL,
VETEBINARY HORSESHOER,
No. 210 Second street northwest, Washington, D. C
S7AI1 shoes used In the shop of my own make.
All diseases of the feet promptly attended to. sel-iy
f
5$?irrttTTcia.
HATCH & FOOTE,
- BANKERS,
No. 12 WALL STREET,
NEW YORK.
WE EUY AND SELL UNITED STATES
BONDS, EXECUTE ORDERS IN bTOCKS,
BONDs, AND MISCELLANEOUS SECURITIES.
AND TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING
BUSINESS.
INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS. maM-3m
H. E. DILLIKGHAH&ICO.,
Bankers etsid. jBrolsexs,
No. 13 NEW STREET, NEW YORK,
Buy and sell, either upon margin or for investment.
Railroad Stocks, Bonds, and other Securities usually
dealt in In the New York Stock Exchange.
H. E. Dillingham.! C. . White,
R. H. Parks. Member of the N.Y. xcbange.
M. S. Nichols,
(Of M. S. Nichols & Co., Chicago)-, Special.
maH Cm
First Mortgage
TWENTY-YEAR
Six Per Cent Gold Bonds
OE THE
Washington City
AND
Point Lookout
KAILR0AD COMPANY.
ISSUE LIMITED TO $1,000,000, OR
LESS THM $14,000
PER MILE.
Wc invite subscriptions at 92J
and accrued interest for a limited
amount of the above-named
bonds.
The road a now inprocessorconstructlon, overfour
hundred men being actively employed hi the work,
and will be in complete running order to Point Look
out within six months.
The bonds on the completed portion, now leased by
the Baltimore and Ohio, Issued at over $43,000 per
mile, and originally placed at 3 per cent., are now
selling at 110.
This road will furnish the most direct outlet to the
sea for the grain, coal, c-, of the Baltimore and Ohio,
Pennsylvania Central, and other important lines.
It will furnish an important linlc hi the chain of
communication between the North and Sooth, short
ening the time on through travel about six hours. The
company will establish a line of steamers to run be
tween Point Lookont and Norfolk In connection with
the road. It will hold tlie key to the oyster trade of
the Chesapeake, and fiirnlsb it only available outlet
during the winter season.
The company has over balfa million dollars in cash
and good assets. Its real estate on the line of the road
and Its rights of. way paid for and on record. It is ab
solutely free from debt, excepting tlie bonds now of
fered, the entire Issoo of which has been placed in onr
hands in trust in such form that we are enabled to
guarantee, as we do. that for every f 14,000 of bonds
issued there shall be completed and equipped at least
one mile of road.
All the bonds which we were authorized to offer at
00 having been subscribed for, we have advanced the
price toffJJj. The right to advance the price without
notice is reserved.
A recent advertisement Justifies the publication of
the following letter from the president of the road:
A. W. I3IOCK & CO.,
7 EXCHANGE COURT, NEW YORK.
Office op the
Washington City and Point Lookoct R. R.,
Washington, February 25, 1SSU
Messrs. A. W. DIMOCK & CO.:
GnNTLKitEN This company holds a judgment
against the Southern Maryland Railroad of oer ?0,
000, which, of course, underlies any mortgage that can
be now created. It also holds its obligations in the form
of notes for a large amount.
Its other debts, many being in the form of jiids
nients, areesthnated to amount to considerably OVER
A QUARTER OF A MILLION Or DOLLARS.
Not a day's work has been done on the road for
many years: even its rights of way. If It has any, are
not of record ; Its partial gradiux of many years ago
has become comparatively worthless through lape
of time, and there is small indication of Us present
object extending beyond the negotiation of its bond.
mal-tf fe. T. SUIT. President.
725aTifei---Sbelp.
TANTED-AOfTl.ETRNTH EJFAVELRY
W trade. Address JEWELER, with re'erences.
Republican o flier. maH-St
-T7"ANTED-AT T1 G STREET NORTHWEST.
V a girl to do general housework ; mnt be n jrood
ccok, w asher, and lroner; must stay at night. 1 l-at
-TTTANTED-IMMEOIATELY, A WHITE WO
V man to cook, wash, and Iron, at 7J9 Thirteenth
street northwest. maH-3i
XVTAXTEDA WIIITE BOY, 10 TO U VEARS
V V old, to wait on door and make himself Kcnerally
useful. Apply at 729 Thirteenth street uorlhu est.
mal4-3t
-fTTANTED-A WOMAN TO DO THE GENERAL
VV hooseworkof a small family; miit be a good
cook, washer. and lroner; references required. Ap
ply at 2H Eleventh street southw est. inalj-.'fc
-CTTANTED-A COLORED GIRL TO COOK.
VV wa?h, and iron; references required; muststav
nlghlf. Apply at 5M Fifth street northwest. 11-Jt "
w
ANTED-A GERMAN GIRL FOR NURt-E,
'USSanicb iiuaiians.
AEDApTACETC)KrWASirrAND
Iron in a small family. Address -Ul I
street, betw een Twenty first and Twenty-second.
mal3-3t
TTrANTED A MLDDLE-AGED WOMAN
VV w!hes actuation In a lira-class family to care
for children, sew. teach, and make herself useful.
Address NURSE. Republican olhcf. mal'.; St
TTrANTED-BY A COLORED GIRL. A SITUA
VV tion as chambermaid and to do ceneral house
work in a small family. Apply at 1434 N street north
west; niall-a
"YirAN'TED-A LADY WISHES TO TRAVEL
VV with a family: will make !ier?eir useful. Ad
dres Miss GRIMEs?. Republican ollice. ruall-at
WANTED - SITUATION - FRED. DANNE
mann. of Easton, Pa., first-class fiorUt, well
knowii among leading Hortits In tins country, wants
to take charge of a good gentleman's place; trust
worthy and sober: known by Congressman Harrbon
atBeUIdere: Professor Dannemaun has been gradu
ated from Quedlinbure. Prussia, uud lias visited the
large cities of France, England, and the United States.
Address F. DANNEMANN, Florist. Easton, Pa.
malO-Ct
-TTTANTED-A SITUATION BY A RESPECTA
VV ble widow woman a? child nurse: i willing and
obhgin:, and has no objection to assist in light house
work. If required: rccomnn-ndation from last place.
Please call or address HOPEFUL, Republican ofHcc.
m9-6t
QS5aivfeD---5boiroes;.
-TTT-ANTED-TO PURCHASE A NICE HOUSE
VV modern Improvements between Fifth and
Sixteenth streets and Pennsylvania avenue and L
street northwcl: will pay &.j0O cash and f50 monthly
with six per cent. Interest. Address BUSINESS. Re
publican oftice. mall-6f
TTr-ANTED-A HOUSE AT ANY TIME WITH-
V In six months, within live squares ofthtsoflice.
at not more than 30 per month: mat have nine
rooms, including bath-room. Address si. Rep Jbllcan
office. Ja3-tf
-TTTANTED i--TO RENTSMALlTHOuiE"oR
V part or a House, or Rooms for housekeeping,
In the northwest part or the city. Address V. M. B.,
LM Massachusetts avenue northw est. mali-Jt
W ANTED-APRIL l.THREE UNFURNISHED
t V rooms (two larire and oile ball room) bv gentle
man and wife (no children): will be permanent; must
be nearcornerThirteenth and Fslreets: terms not to
exceed $lj per month. Address PETER, Box 50. Re
pnbllean office. nia3-tf
-TTANTED-BY A VERY QUIET LADY AND
VV little boy, two -unfurnished rooms for light
housekeeping in a very quiet family: a widow lady
preferred; will be permanent if salted: terms must
be moderate; please state location and terms. Ad
dress Mrs. VIRGINIA SOUTHERN, City Post-Oftlce.
maS-Ct
E'
VERY DESCRIPTION OF PRINTING
AT ItKAfcO-NAHLfc KATEM,
AT THE REPUBLICAN OFFICS
Srtor J2flcnf-3RooTn0.
Vr ANTED BY A FAMILY OF TII"M
V aditlts.three unfurnl-hed rooms forh-'it i.o r
keeping; must be in a scood locality and notaHj,e n
ond floor. Address ST ALKY, Republican oiL f
maU-3t
FOR RENT-A SMALL RED-ROOM, W r' .
cellent board, in a private fiumiv; all ( . r
conveniences. 1413 Fourteenth street nortLwi
ma!4--tt
FOR RENT TWO ROOMS, ONE WEI f - ,.
nished; cozy, for lijslit housekeeping r
wise; new house, good location. in fci 4 t
northwest. f a ,
FOR RENT A VERY DESIRABLE I' d
suite of rooms, furnished; also firs, c . r" '
board, at G21 E street northwest. iu. "u
ITtOR RENT-TWO FRONT ROOMS ON HIST
: floor for light housekeeping, unturnud .r
municating; gas, water, and storage for fuel .t 0I.
furnished front attic room, rent onlv4jpf mo.itl
references required. Apply at 1102 "Fourtt-n i.kt4
northwest. nw; -a
ITIOK RENT BEAUTIFULLY Fl'I'Ms-Jr
front room, heated, best location, wit) , X
board: suitable for married couple or two g m ,
3Irs.feOWERBUTTS. 110S H street northw st
mall-3t
FOR RENT-ONE NEATLY KricT-jinj
room; terms moderate, at K7 1 street northwe-.-maU-3f
FOR RENT -FURNISHED ROOM V.llir
board, en suite or single; handsome lir w 1WxI;
ern Improvements, large reception parlor i t-vt fac
tion in the city. 1J25 K street, oppoite Krarfe: i
Square. icall-a
55tor R.cnf---bouscx5.
FOR RENT A SEVEN-ROOM HOlM.. l- t
Twentieth street: rent, Sll; key at i..i r,
teentb etreet. S.S.DAISF. irajj-tf
17IOR RENT AN ELEGANTLY FCIftlsilEfi
J lS-room House, with modern iiupcuvfn.euts
stable, carriage-house, and large garden altachp
JAMI-S a SPltlGU. 14J) New York avenue. uoaLI-c.
FOR RENT-A 9-ROOM HOUSE, WITH MQD
ern improvements;. central location; the f .r-j.
ture In it can be bought at a low figure. JAM1S L.
SPRIGGHaNpw York avenmv mare-jr
FOR RENT-A -NEW BAY-WINDOW JlOUbb.
pressed-bnek front; all modern impr. .!, enti
13 rooms; location central. JAMES. C.sPIt:i:l Its
New York aremie. n aU-Jt
FOR RENT SUITE OF ROOM.T IX NEW
house, 1322 G street northwest; elegantly fur
nished; all modern improvements; square IXbitt,
V Hlard's, and Riggs Hotels mal t-3t
I7IOR RENT-FURNISHED HOUSE. ELEVEN
? rooms; good neighborhood; pleasant locality,
especially for summer; price moderate. Inq.iireat
lAORIggs btreet northwest. inal-3t
FOR RENT-ROOMS. WITH OR WITHOl V
board, In private Cuully; location very best.
Herdlcs pass the door; references exchanged, can
at 3)18 G street northwest. mall
I7-iOR RENT-AT . NEW SIX-ROOM HOVSE
; with water in kitchen and benelit of sweraj-,
1125 Park place northeast, one block north o Luieuln
Park and two blocks from East Cupitul street car.
J. W. STARJC, 1429 New York avenue. inawt
T7IOR RENT BY B. H. WARNER,
816 F btreet northwest.
bI417thstnw
4100 00
. 8333
. S500
. 60 (M
. SOU)
. 42 00
2500
. 2500
2300
25 01)
3)00
18 00
15 00
. 15 00
lJOO
12 50
12 00
12 m
12 00
003F3tsw.
26Bst ne
121)0
13li!) I stn e
SiTGstse
915 G st s e
2108Mstn w"
2110Mstiiw
2116 10th st nw
GMDst sw
1129 Park Place
1125 Park Place
423 6"f st sw
2067 7th st n w .
20537th stnw
S23 13th st n e
2UB1 7th st n v.
2JPstne
1140 Del ave. .
1323 1 st n e
639ECanltolst
7305th n w.
11437th n w
411 Maole ave
1701 Csi n w..
1125 13th st uw-
12452)th st n w
400 II n e
SOSUstne
7229th stue
I') OI
lOH)
10 V)
toon
1 ')
10 0)
io a
900
son
9 0)
SOT
SCO
sw
iOl
7(rt
7M
caj
cm
iii
i
702 (i st n w.
S02dstG't'n
1821 13th stnw
3166th n w.
2215 12th st n w
lUOIstnt;
1210Ustnw
IS03 Connecticut av e
9501'rantave -
ll020thstn w
2t53dst n e..
1 Wllion st.
12 0!)
12 03
12 00
12 00
2 Wilson st
3 Wilson st
3 Lighters Row.
STORES.
1031 4th stn w
11437th stnw..
601 Cst sw
603Cstn w
33 00 15181st uw
12 )
I. I
I 'J
15 )
3UU)
3)00
15 00
20457th stlin..
200S7th!t
200t7th st
302 eth stn w..
15 00
OFFICE ROOMS In No. 323 and 319 Four-and a Ua'f
street n. w; also In 4-53 Louisiana avenue n. w.
Call for w eekly Rent-List.
FOR RENT-CALL AND SEE OLR LIS1 OF
property for rent. JOHN SHERMAN & C O.,
fe3-tf St. Cloud Bullil.ng.
55f or'7lerit-2T!is ceUa ncous
or Trf3ct-11ayThaing no usr Fni:
her pieio i.a very hanlsome one. tine toned a. 1
nearly new), would rent it to a careftil party at a ir
moderate rental per quarter. Address u W . l.e
publlcan ollice. malt t
5$Tor -Sale -Sbcmses.
FOR RENT HOUSE OF TEN ROOMS, IN FIMJ
condition; born with three stalls: very desirable
In all respects. 142S Sixth street northwest. Inline
dlate possession. mal Kit-
f) HOUSES, 2409-2107 H STREET NORTHWEST.
i hve rooms each, $12 month. Apply at 2139 R
street northwest; mall-St
FOR SALE A BARGAIN A WELL-BUILT
three-story basement and back-building brick
residence containing 9 rooms and hath; all modern
improvements; location within half square of the
Avenue cars and Herdlcs: pnee only fJ.500; easy
terms. J. V.N. HUYCK.No-1505 Pennsylvania ave.,
opposite north entrance U.S. Treasury. mal
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE A FINE CITY
residence. Will sell cheap or exchange for West
ern property; house is a very hue one: containsabuut
18 rooms: heated bv steam; lot TO by a;; location cci
traL J. V.N.HCYCK.Iteal Estate Broker. No. l '
Pennsylvania ave.. opposite U. S. Trea-nry. mal
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE HOUSES AND
lots in the northwest section of the city for real
estate in Northern arid Western citie1. Parties desir
ous of exchanging property in part or whole payment
for Washington city propertv can be acccmmodatnl
by applying to J. V. N- HUYCK. No. 1505 PennsyUa
nia ave., opposite north entrance IT. S. Treasury, mal
37OR SALE-CALL AND SEE OUR LLVT OP
? property for sale. JOHN SHERMAN & CO. St.
Cloud Building. Real estate and loans 1
SSror -Sale 7lTli0ccl(ancoii0
F"rALETWeTve1iVd'oF FINE,LAK(.n
driving and coupe horses; alm one line familv
horse, ettension top carriage, and hame, at
HCGUELY fc BOWKN"S stable, 645 New York avt
aae. maI4-2t
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE GARDEN FARM
of JO aa-es; also Ifio acrs adjoining. lour nulti
rroni city. Inquire of HUGUELY fc BOW EN. 64,
New York aveune. ma!4 12:
FOR SALE VIVOPATHY POWDER MAKKS
tlieblood pure; also cur-? every klml of deai-e.
at DREW'S, Muth and Pennsylvania, avenue.
maKMt
P
OR SALE OR EXCnAXGE-OLcOTTS sT
bles, between Thirteenth and Fourteenth tre if.
ou II and I. one of the handsomest gentleman's driv
ing horse in the city; fast and bigh-hfed; hisevrt
is afraid of him. mat I
ITtOR SALE-FREEDMAN'S OR GERMAN
, bank indebtedness wilt be taken in part imy.i.i ; I
for the pretfest. healthiest, and cheapest building Ic,
Tirst and C streets northeast, nearly opposite IV
tol; please examine. mall-."!.
FOR SALE-GOOD FARM OF 25S ACRES FO':
alc or exchange, fourteen mile- from Was! ! i
ton : two miles to station. T. W. COMsTOCK. Burt."
StationFairfax, County, Virginia. iua3-2i-
TTIOR SALE-CHEAP. A BEAUTIFUL C0K -
i lot, 100 by 100, to 15-foot alley, outheast ec"
Eleventh and C streets uortlnast, near East l".pi .
street cars and one block north of Lincoln Park, a
similar sized lot adjoining can be purchased, cjj .
bought on terms to salt, or will be exchanged. J w
STARR. 1423 New York avenue. maS-lu
FOR SALEA BEAUTIFUL HOME IN Till
conntry.on the IS-andO.R. IL. about 1 m s
from the city.a beautiful place of about 13 airccf
land, improved by a neat and nearly new sevn -
house and all necessary outbuildings. The'oca: ju
one of the finest in the District, cuninandiii as
of the Capitol, eastern section of the city, and -s
exjianse of surrounding country. There are over i .
fine Fruit Trees. Only half hour walk to tin. i '
tw enty minutes' drive, and ten trains a day W " ' i
wild ciieap and on easy term-. Apply to J
HUYCK, No. 1505 Pennsj Ivaniu. ave., opposite I
Treasury. J'Jt
FOR SALE-A NUMBER Or SEtOND-IIAD
LAN DAL Lid's.
COUPELETS. COUPES. AND COUPE R 'C Iv V
WAS. at low price-.
ROUT. H. ORAHA'I, .
Repository and Factory, 419-116 Eghth street N '
I-fOR SALE-A LARGE NUMBER OF M'V
? and Seond-Haiia
LIGHT AND HEAVY CARRIAGFs
REASONABLE PRICES.
All work warranted to he as represented.
ROBT. If. GRAHA'f
410-116 Eighth street norti v--
Repairing promptly attended to. fei J
"XTEW" SAFE. MADE RY THE f ELEBK-Vtf 0
iN manufacturers, Messrs. Mosier. Bahm-ji ii -
Cincinnati. Ohio. Can be een at this ofllce.
3oartinct.
a"HIETREM0NTHOUEOFl"EItsG00D Ku'iM
. with first-class hotel-board, for i 25 end ' "" rv
month: house Is well furnished, heated wIlUs..ari,
and pvery wav desirable. - -
'Business (Shauces.
ONEY -MALlT" AMOUNTS D IV' - "
on salaries: good indorser 4 per c.r.t. .'. -
SQUARE, Republican onlce. n.aI2 .
rV-O LOAN ON REAL ESTATE -THE FOLLC-w-X
lug sums. iz: J5.400, $4,M. $!,. Sl,-; to v -rates
of interest and cornrnKskMi. JOHN IH 1 1-
Room 29, Corcoran Jlmldiug; ma -
Cilf AAA TO LOAN ON IMl'ltOMB
oOW.UUU real e-!ale in Washington sn -"J
of 10,000andovert6pereeiii: ateo several wai-!r
sums at moderate rates.
Property for sale in all parts Of the city.
Life'and Fire Insurance.
F. II. SMITH i cON.
mal-lm 3,2.?!i12i-l1"-
LIBERAlTRATE OF INTEREST ALLOW IV
on time deposits collections, made cvenwn'
by J. II. SQUIER Jt CO., Bankers. IU6 P-nnsi.. i
avenue. fell-Ci.
S
i nnn-i-:V-Mr:tJr,Z-y
rates: call now. VM. F. HOLZMAX, attorney -.
F street northwest. '-'- '
iJKKJ smaller suius-u" - .
7baniei -TUTfiscellancoH-
"ANTED-A f-TE.VMT.VBLr (.OPPFP. 1
itrrtd. Apply .U 311 E street northwi -',
m. 1-'11 "..
Tf;rAXTED-NICF-.ECONIHAND BA".'
V rlape. "state prke and wiieie to b. r '"-
address PURC UAsEK. Iteimblltitii oBU-e r -
Heal: oftice.
SLost an 6 5-?o;mt.
J"STOCKTlICONTirE RVESINj ' '
J March 13. on H street. Masciiue'ts aj '' ,
New York avenue, between First andFJShtus it
northwest, and Russia P-athcrpocketbotik.'-' i ,
mg money and a voucher for half monttisja
Census Office. Tho finder will be libendlv rJ"'
by lca nsg the same at 51i H street northwest.
mal4-3l
OOAA'AXTKU-$l FOR 2 M-N.
OOViU SKWfor 4 months im for 6 .
good seniritv; a bonus or J25 w ill oe gi en ji '
at 10 per ceut. per ear. Addro-s DARIt- '
in i
-fttU---'
...j-j-a -. .-'-.,
A4fc- - . 4 j.

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